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Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

South Africa Partners (SA Partners) builds mutually beneficial partnerships between the United States and South Africa in the areas of health and education. Serving as a catalyst of innovative approaches, SA Partners links people, strengthens communities, promotes social justice and fosters leadership in both countries.

Mission Statement

South Africa Partners (SA Partners) builds mutually beneficial partnerships between the United States and South Africa in the areas of health and education. Serving as a catalyst of innovative approaches, SA Partners links people, strengthens communities, promotes social justice and fosters leadership in both countries.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $5,653,540.00
Projected Expense $5,678,903.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Early Childhood Development Program (ECD)
  • Educator Tours
  • Integrated Access to Care and Treatment (I ACT)
  • Strengthening Prevention in Male Correctional Facilities (STEPS)

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

South Africa Partners (SA Partners) builds mutually beneficial partnerships between the United States and South Africa in the areas of health and education. Serving as a catalyst of innovative approaches, SA Partners links people, strengthens communities, promotes social justice and fosters leadership in both countries.

Background Statement

  • South Africa Partners (SA Partners) was established in 1997 in Boston to maintain and deepen ties between the U.S. and South Africa and to support the development of post-apartheid South Africa. In 1998, the founders of SA Partners were instrumental in the signing of a cooperation agreement between the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province Department of Health.
  • SA Partners catalyzed and implemented an increasing number of health and education programs in South Africa and expanded from facilitating partnerships to direct program implementation in the Eastern Cape Province in the areas of education and public health. 
  • The SA Partners office in South Africa was opened in 2005. Located in East London, it has been managed by South African staff throughout. The capacity of this staff to manage programs led us to consider a South African entity to take over the direct management of program operations in South Africa.
  • In 2010, SA Partners worked with local partners to further support the development of local capacity for identifying and managing local programs in the areas of education and public health. This resulted in the creation of Masibumbane Development Organisation (Masibumbane), a non-profit in South Africa. 
  • Masibumbane serves as our primary partner in South Africa. The relationship developing between the two organizations will itself be a ‘best practice’, modeling how to manage a respectful, collegial and productive relationship between peer organizations. 

Impact Statement


Accomplishments & Goals:
  • Early Childhood Development (ECD):SA Partners and our community partner, Masibumbane Development Org, have joined South Africa's national effort to identify models for the scale up of high quality ECD.Focusing on low-resourced informal settlements in the Eastern Cape we bring together partners and resources to pilot & assess early literacy development strategies.During start-up year:preschools selected for ECD network=7; children served=374; teachers receiving professional development=35. Goals: develop, implement & test strategies to improve ECD so that underserved children have access to high quality ECD and develop the basic skills needed to succeed in school.
  • Integrated Access to Care and Treatment Program (I ACT):Offers support group meetings on HIV prevention, acceptance of status and treatment. I ACT now operates in all nine of South Africa's provinces and has been adopted as a national care and support strategy, with South Africa Partners serving as technical consultant.More than 200,000 people living with HIV/AIDS have participated in I ACT.Goals:Continue national scale up of I ACT including expansion to adolescent & pediatric programming.
  • Strengthening Prevention Services in Male Correctional Facilities (STEPS):An adaptation of I ACT, STEPS is a prevention strategy to stem the spread of HIV & TB in prisons. Since its launch in 2012, this pilot has expanded to 8 prisons.In 2014, STEPS was invited to join a national effort to support capacity development within the National Dept of Corrections. Number of screenings by STEPS=10,379.Goals: Expand to more correctional  facilities;  increase number of offenders and staff being educated and tested.
  • Albertina Sisulu Executive Leadership Program in Health (ASELPH): A partnership of Harvard School of Public Health, Univ of Pretoria, Univ of Fort Hare and SA Partners, ASELPH strengthens health transformation in South Africa through executive-level training. Current cohort=109 ASELPH Fellows.

Needs Statement

  • Expand funding and resources to support Early Childhood Development programming. 
  • Strengthen organizational messaging and communications.
  • Develop succession plan for organizational leadership.
  • Implement a monitoring and evaluation system for program and partnership activities.

CEO Statement



Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
NATIONAL
STATEWIDE
INTERNATIONAL

Organization Categories

  1. International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security - International Academic Exchange
  2. Education - Preschools
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Management & Technical Assistance

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Early Childhood Development Program (ECD)

  • South Africa has prioritized the need for early childhood development in its National Development Plan, mandating that all children ages 2-5 be enrolled in preschool by 2030. For South African children to access quality early education, experts estimate that more than 20,000 teachers will need to be trained within the next five years and sustainable systemic changes in pre-school education will need to be piloted and scaled-up.
  • To help reach these goals, SA Partners is working with in-country partners to identify and test models in early childhood developement that can be successfully contextualized to South Africa in low income urban and periurban environments.
  • In partnership with our in-country sister organization, Masibumbane, and our academic partners Wheelock College (U.S.) and University of Fort Hare (South Africa) we have completed a needs assessment of seven under-resourced preschools serving very low income children.
  • We have catalyzed the creation of a Community ECD Network - a support program for high-need, community-based ECD centers. The program will both directly engage government and other non-profit organizations in the continuing improvement of ECD services and work in tandem with the local and international ECD academic communities. 

  • By creating a community of practice among local practitioners and drawing together sectoral partners, we seek to position the Eastern Cape to lead in the development of cost-effective and impactful interventions that successfully achieve national ECD policy objectives by piloting new approaches to literacy development, initial practitioner training, continuing professional development and infrastructure improvement in a resource-limited urban environment. 

  • Among the goals for our Community ECD Network centers will be to improve their quality of education and services and to qualify for the Department of Social Development subsidy, thus ensuring their sustainability and expanding the footprint of quality centers serving vulnerable children.

 
Budget  $250,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Population Served Africa Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

 

We expect that when completed or ongoing these activities will lead to the following changes in 3 years:

·         All network centers registered or conditionally registered

·         Network centers accessing all available subsidies

·         Increase in enrollment capacity in some network centers

·         Increase in program quality in network centers

·         Increase in school readiness of learners

·         Enrollment more accessible for highest-need children

·         Centers self-supporting and financially stable

·         Centers part of a mutually supportive network of ECD practitioners, managers, academics

·         Linkage of ECD network centers to local high-functioning primary schools

·         Linkage of ECD centers to academic institutions for purposes of evaluation and enhanced professional development

·         Increased access to quality ECD for most vulnerable and high need children in catchment area

·         Development of a locally appropriate and effective early literacy and language approach for ECD

 

Program Long-Term Success 

We expect that when completed these activities will lead to the following changes in 7-10 years:

·         Improved developmental outcomes for children enrolled in network centers

·         Improved academic performance in primary school by children enrolled in network centers

·         Increase in status and professionalization of ECD as a field for practitioners

·         Higher ECD enrollment rates in registered centers delivering quality services for most vulnerable and high need children in catchment area

·         Economic empowerment of ECD center managers and practitioners

Program Success Monitored By 

 

·         Center-wide outcomes will be measured using the scales applied in the baseline assessment (ECERS-R and ITERS).

·         Child outcomes will be measured by academic partners Wheelock College and University of Fort Hare using the best available tools, such as the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test IV.

 

Examples of Program Success 
Examples of program successes:
  • We completed a needs assessment of the ECD centers who will participate in the network, to identify baselines for defining needs and measuring progress.
  • We convened a Seminar on ECD and literacy development to engage  and strengthen the ties of cross-sectoral partners whose partnership is essential for program success. Attendance exceeded 150.
  • We have initiated professional development opportunities for the teachers and principals at the seven network ECD centers, to foster a mutually supportive network of professional relationships. Opportunities have included participation in the Seminar on Literacy Development, and travel/attendance at the Puku Trust Storytelling Festival. 

Educator Tours

 
  • Since 2006, more than 80 educators have participated in SA Partners’ Educator Tour.

Each summer SA Partners leads an Educator Tour to South Africa. During this two-week trip, United States educators learn about South Africa and engage with their South African counterparts through visits to schools, libraries and other social service initiatives and teaching in classrooms.  Because of the tour’s intimate size, the conversations that ensue during these visits result in meaningful exchanges of ideas and best practices. Participating U.S. educators include elementary and secondary school teachers from public and independent schools and professors of education.

  

 

Budget  $60,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served Adults College Aged (18-26 years) US
Program Short-Term Success 
Educators from the U.S. link to teachers in South Africa, allowing for the exchange of ideas and practices and professional development.
Program Long-Term Success 
SA Partners' educational tours provide educators with opportunities to meet their counterparts in South Africa, share practices and observe first-hand the challenges and opportunities of education in South Africa. By linking educators in both countries, innovative partnerships are developed that result in skills and knowledge transfer that enrich educational programming in both countries. Some of these partnerships have evolved into long-term mutually beneficial relationships.
Program Success Monitored By 
The teacher tours are overseen by SA Partners and results are reviewed by our board Program Committee.
Examples of Program Success 
  • A teacher from Massachusetts developed a partnership with two schools. She returns annually to provide skills training to teachers to enhance their ability to teach reading to young children. She also raises funds to provide for libraries in two schools with high-quality children's literature.
  • Two teachers from New Hampshire who are occupational therapists are providing training to elementary school teachers to enhance their skills to work with children requiring services.
"The trip with SA Partners changed me, my outlook, my teaching and my life in so many ways. We continue to use many of the resources developed on that journey when teaching about this great country."
Fourth Grade Teacher, Tour Participant

Integrated Access to Care and Treatment (I ACT)

  
  • Since 2009 I ACT has supported more than 200,000 people living with HIV and trained hundreds of individuals to be I ACT group facilitators and trainers.
  • I ACT has expanded to all of South Africa’s nine provinces, with SA Partners providing technical assistance for the national scale-up.
I ACT grew out of a partnership that SA Partners facilitated during 2000-2008 between the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and South Africa’s Province of the Eastern Cape Department of Health. The program was officially launched there by SA Partners in 2009.

 I ACT’s goal is to promote the early recruitment, referral and retention of people living with HIV (PLHIV) into care and support programs. This process will ultimately reduce the high loss to follow-up from the time of HIV diagnosis until the successful commencement of treatment.

 I ACT support groups empower and engage. Through a structured curriculum-based series of six sessions, PLHIV are provided with the education, network and social support they need to begin accepting their status, stay healthy and continue accessing care. I ACT receives funding support from the President’s Emergency Plan for Aids Relief (PEPFAR) through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and USAID.

Budget  $1,400,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Public Health
Population Served Africa People/Families of People with HIV/AIDS Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
I ACT includes six educational sessions delivered in a group setting. By the completion of the program, participants are enabled to take responsibility for managing their illness, giving them the opportunity to lead healthy, high-quality lives.
Program Long-Term Success 
Participants in I ACT learn: how to accept their diagnosis; medical information about HIV; how to protect themselves and others: how and when to access medical treatment. I ACT was first piloted one province in South Africa; based on its success, it is now being implemented by public health services in all nine provinces of the country.
Program Success Monitored By 
I ACT is monitored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Examples of Program Success 
South Africa encourages its citizens to be tested for HIV. Based on I ACT's success in educating people who are HIV-positive to manage their illness and lead healthy and productive lives, the public health system has expanded I ACT from the Eastern Cape Province to all nine Provinces in South Africa.

 “The moment you step through that door your life changes forever. There is no going back.” I ACT support group participant


Strengthening Prevention in Male Correctional Facilities (STEPS)

  • STEPS is a pilot program to prevent the transmission of HIV among the most at-risk populations.
  • Since 2012, more than 10,379 offenders and staff have been tested for HIV and TB.
  • Since 2012, SA Partners has extended STEPS to eight correctional facilities.
 In 2012, SA Partners launched STEPS, a pilot prison-based HIV prevention program in Port Elizabeth, South Africa that addresses high-risk behavior in the male prison population.  An expansion of SA Partners’ I ACT Program, STEPS provides offenders and staff in 8 prisons with a facilitated 6-week curriculum for group meetings and supplementary activities that include Ubuntu Community Theater, educational sessions and referrals for testing. Through these activities, offenders and staff learn, engage and advocate for health. STEPS promotes the knowledge needed by the prison population to reduce the incidence of HIV exposure and to live positively with HIV. STEPS is funded by President’s Emergency Plan for Aids Relief (PEPFAR) through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
 

Budget  $700,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served Africa Offenders/Ex-Offenders At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
STEPS intervention has used several training approaches, including peer prevention support groups and educational theatre performances (Ubuntu Community Theatre). It has also increased HIV testing among the prison population.
Program Long-Term Success 
STEPS educates the male prison population about the risks of contracting HIV while in prison. HIV prevalence in correctional centers in South Africa is estimated to be as high as 41%
Program Success Monitored By 
STEPS is monitored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Examples of Program Success 
The promising early results of the STEPS pilot program has resulted in the expansion of the STEPS pilot program by the CDC to two additional correctional facilities.
 
“The STEPS program has given opportunity for the prison community to discuss issues openly. Because of the impact the program has had, the number of offenders who test for HIV has gone from below 5 per month to above 100."
Manager of the Wellness Clinic, hub for STEPS

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Mary Tiseo
CEO Term Start Jan 1998
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Mary Tiseo is founding Executive Director of South Africa Partners, working since 1988 on issues related to South Africa's democratic development. She served as Deputy Director of Fund for a Free South Africa, and as U.S. Director of FREESA Development Fund for South Africa. In 1993 she served as Campaign Director for Fund for Democratic Elections in South Africa (FDESA), which helped raise campaign funds for the African National Congress leading up to South Africa's first democratic elections in 1994. Believing there was a need to establish an organization that would maintain and deepen the strong ties that had been established between the U.S. and South Africa during the apartheid years, in 1997 Mary joined with 3 other women to form South Africa Partners (SA Partners) and became its founding Executive Director. Mary has provided strategic leadership to SA Partners in the US and South Africa, forming mutually beneficial partnerships that share best practices on a broad spectrum of health and educational programming in both countries. SA Partners has grown to 3 offices in the U.S. and South Africa, and a total annual budget of $5,678,903 (FY15). 
Co-CEO Mary Tiseo
Co-CEO Term Start Jan 1998
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Martina Bouey Deputy Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 40
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 5
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 33
Other (if specified): South African
Gender Female: 35
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Joellen Lambiotte
Board Chair Company Affiliation Jhpiego, an affiliate of Johns Hopkins University
Board Chair Term Nov 2014 - Nov 2016
Board Co-Chair Ms. Ilana Hurwitz
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Boston University Law School
Board Co-Chair Term Nov 2014 - Nov 2016

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Andrew Ainslie Simon Business School, University of Rochester Voting
David Allen Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Voting
Penelope Andrews University of Cape Town Law School Voting
Judy Ann Bigby community volunteer Voting
David Dolbashian Eastern Bank Voting
Mitalene Fletcher Harvard Graduate School of Education Voting
Joanne Guzzi Brookline Public Schools Voting
Ilana Hurwitz Boston University Law School Voting
Jonathan Joffe QTec Analytics Voting
Joellen Lambiotte Jhpiego-an affiliate of Johns Hopkins University Voting
Trevor Larkan Bentley University Voting
Temba Maqubela Groton School Voting
Stephen Moody Boston Trust & Investment Management Company Voting
Bonisile Ntlemeza KIPP Houston Public School Voting
Mike Page Bentley University Voting
Karen Shmukler Brookline, MA Public Schools Voting
Ellen Sullivan Boston College Voting
Mary Tiseo South Africa Partners Exofficio

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Carmen Nana Ashhurst -- NonVoting
Janet Axelrod Community Volunteer NonVoting
Margaret Burnham Northeastern University Law School NonVoting
Susan Cook Merrill University of New Hampshire NonVoting
Jackie Jenkins-Scott Wheelock College NonVoting
Rachel Knight New York City Public Schools NonVoting
Jeanette Kruger Community Volunteer NonVoting
Senator Jason Lewis Legislator, Commonwealth of Massachusetts NonVoting
Phakamile Madikiza community volunteer NonVoting
Lynn Meltzer Research Institute for Learning and Development NonVoting
Colette Phillips Colette Phillips Communication NonVoting
Marita Rivero Rivero Partners NonVoting
Gail Willett Community Volunteer NonVoting
Marti Wilson-Taylor Wilson Taylor Associates NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 12
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $5,653,540.00
Projected Expense $5,678,903.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $4,990,257 $3,204,546 $2,380,427
Total Expenses $4,837,636 $2,535,076 $2,218,068

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- $730,622 --
Government Contributions $2,994,996 $1,905,305 $1,587,209
    Federal $2,994,996 $1,905,305 $1,587,209
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,661,682 $423,540 $730,675
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $71,412 $20,156 $43,915
Investment Income, Net of Losses $11,371 $4,603 $1,579
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $242,908 $136,792 --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $7,888 $-16,472 $17,049

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $4,354,290 $2,164,675 $1,831,374
Administration Expense $314,653 $231,511 $321,092
Fundraising Expense $168,693 $138,890 $65,602
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.03 1.26 1.07
Program Expense/Total Expenses 90% 85% 83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 3% 4% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $2,160,268 $1,205,504 $495,163
Current Assets $2,142,608 $1,181,632 $460,845
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $985,028 $182,885 $142,014
Total Net Assets $1,175,240 $1,022,619 $353,149

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.18 6.46 3.25

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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