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Community Harvest Project, Inc.

 37 Wheeler Road
 North Grafton, MA 01536
[P] (774) 551-6544
[F] --
www.community-harvest.org
jodi@community-harvest.org
Jodi Koeman
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INCORPORATED: 1998
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3424018

LAST UPDATED: 02/26/2016
Organization DBA --
Former Names Food For The Needy, Inc. (2001)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Community Harvest Project's mission is to build an engaged and healthier community by bringing volunteers together to grow fresh fruits and vegetables for hunger relief.

Mission Statement

Community Harvest Project's mission is to build an engaged and healthier community by bringing volunteers together to grow fresh fruits and vegetables for hunger relief.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2015 to Dec 31, 2015
Projected Income $705,050.00
Projected Expense $691,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Farm to Health Care Center Initiative
  • Nutrition Education
  • Volunteer Farming Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Community Harvest Project's mission is to build an engaged and healthier community by bringing volunteers together to grow fresh fruits and vegetables for hunger relief.

Background Statement

This organization started at the Elmwood Farm in Hopkinton in the 1970's and was incorporated as Food for the Needy in 1998.  In 2002, the organization became Community Harvest Project and moved to the Brigham Hill Community Farm in North Grafton, MA.  In 2010, we began operations at Cheney Orchards in Brimfield, and in 2011, we added White's Farm in North Grafton.  In 2015, we're operating 16.5 acres at two locations in Grafton, MA and 75 acres in Harvard, MA.  We have minimal staffing, and most of the work is done by the thousands of volunteers that will help out this growing season - individuals, families, schools, churches, corporations and businesses, and many other groups will become a part of the Community Harvest Project and make a difference in their community in a very tangible way.

Impact Statement

2014 Accomplishments
1.  270000 lbs. (1.2 M servings!) of produce donated to hunger relief efforts in Worcester County
2.  9,900 volunteer visits (individuals and families, school, church and corporate groups) serving 27,000 volunteer hours
3.  3,000 urban youth volunteer visits – many had never been to a farm before or knew where fruits and vegetables come from!
4.  Development of a Farm to Health Pilot Initiative with Worcester health center

Needs Statement

Volunteer Farming Program   This program increases awareness of the issue of hunger in Worcester County and gives people a chance to contribute to hunger relief. Volunteer leave the farm inspired to make a difference in the communities in which they live. Last year, over 9900 volunteers joined us in our efforts to harvest over 270,00 lbs of fresh produce. This year, we've set a goal of 400,00 lbs of fresh produce using 11,000 volunteers.

Nutrition Education Initiative Through the Nutrition Education Initiative, students will participate in educational programming and volunteer at the farm. By creating a positive culture around health and nutrition, we empower our student volunteers to learn how food impacts their health and the health of their communities.

Summer/Vacation on the Farm Programs Students will engage in unique hands-on learning experiences exploring nutrition, health, and agriculture. There will be creative opportunities for students ranging from farm-fresh veggie tastings to guided historical hikes.

Farm to Health Center Initiative:  We will work with UMass medical students to understand the impact of healthy produce on health. We will provide fresh produce weekly for 12 weeks to over 1,000 individuals and measure the impact and changes in health.

 


CEO Statement

Community Harvest Project is unique.  To our knowledge, we're the only organization in our area that: 1) Exists solely to grow produce for hunger relief; and 2) Does so with volunteer labor. Everything that we grow is donated to hunger relief efforts in Worcester County - over 1,200,000 servings of fresh fruits and vegetables this growing season!  This truly is a community effort, and we're so thankful for the volunteers who come from our local community and across the globe to be a part of the solution to hunger.We're excited in our growth and look forward to improving access of fresh produce for all.

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

CENTRAL REGION, MA

Our produce is currently distributed throughout Worcester County, Massachusetts, and we draw volunteer groups from Massachusetts and across the globe.

Organization Categories

  1. Food, Agriculture & Nutrition - Food, Agriculture & Nutrition NEC
  2. Education -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Farm to Health Care Center Initiative

The Farm to health Care Initiative is a collaboration between CHP, Family Health Center of Worcester and UMass Medical students. It is intended to provide an opportunity for patients to increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables through a program that increases awareness of food insecurity and resources for families amongst health care providers, promotes advocacy of healthy eating habtis as preventative measures by health care providers for their patients and increases access to and consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables amongst food insecure patients.  This is done through a farmers market style of food distribution, education about nutrition and healthy cooking and resources about local low cost sources of fresh food.
Budget  $49,740.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Nutrition
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families
Program Short-Term Success  Year one implementation of a screening process for food insecurity and distribution of local fresh produce to 1,000 family visits. Planning for year two to include cooking and nutrition classes and doctors participating in implementing the screening.
Program Long-Term Success  100% health care providers educated in measuring for food insecurity and this to be a regular part of health care for patients. Nutrition education and resources provided to all patients who are deemed food insecure. Replicate this model to other community-based health care systems.
Program Success Monitored By  Surveys to monitor food insecurity. Surveys to identify access to and consumption of fruits and vegetables and what would improve both access and consumption. Evaluation of the effectiveness and convenience of the program.
Examples of Program Success  1,000 family visitors participated in the program and 60% indicated increased consumption.

Nutrition Education

CHP provides nutrition education through our Sprouting Minds programs and our Farm camps. The goal is to encourage students in healthy living. Students will understand how food choices affect overall health, build awareness of where food comes from and engage in a hands on farming experience. Educational program empower students with the knowledge and experience to build a healthier community.
Budget  $177,340.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  We will gauge our success by the number of students showing an increase in knowledge of healthy foods. We will also be measuring the number of students who choose a wider variety of vegetables at the completion of the program.
Program Long-Term Success 

Sprouting minds impact students as agents of change in their lives and their communities. It serves as a means of engaging youth in preventative measures to promote healthy eating. By building starting with younger students and continuing to work in with these schools in long-term relationships, we will get a greater idea of the impact these programs have over time.

Program Success Monitored By  We use a pre and post class survey to measure increased identification of fruits and vegetables and attitudes towards including them in the diet.
Examples of Program Success  Over 2,000 students have engaged in the program since 2013. Over 60% indicate they will eat more fruits and vegetables after participation in the class.

Volunteer Farming Program

All of our work is done through our Volunteer Farming Program.  Each year, thousands of volunteers come together to grow fresh fruits and vegetables which are all donated for hunger relief efforts in Worcester County. 
Budget  $450,000.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  In 2015 we hope to donate 400,000 lbs. of produce to hunger relief efforts in Worcester County.  This will provide over 1,400,000 servings of fresh produce for the 130,000 residents of Worcester County utilizing hunger relief services.
Program Long-Term Success  All community members will have access to fresh, high quality fruits and vegetables.
Program Success Monitored By 
We evaluate our Volunteer Farming Program by:
  • Pounds of produce donated to hunger relief efforts
  • Number of volunteers participating 
  • Impact of health
Examples of Program Success  Last growing season, we were able to donate 270,000 lbs. of produce with the help of 9,900 volunteers.  It's exciting to see the numbers, but it's heart-warming to hear stories of how our produce or the experience on the farm impacts people.  We've heard stories from the agencies distributing the produce about how excited people are and how much the high quality of the produce really matters.  We hear stories all the time from teachers and other group leaders about how much of an impact a day on the farm has on students and adults.  For many, this is their first experience on a farm, and they have the opportunity to get their hands dirty, learn where their food comes from, and become part of the solution to a significant need in the community.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The potential for operational growth is great, in terms of land made available, volunteers, and demand for fresh produce in the hunger relief system.  The challenge is how to grow strategically and in a way that will be sustainable over time.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Jodi Koeman
CEO Term Start Feb 2015
CEO Email jodi@community-harvest.org
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 10,000
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 88%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Scott Rossiter
Board Chair Company Affiliation Lampin Corporation
Board Chair Term Jan 2015 - Dec 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Robb Ahlquist Worcester Restaurant Group Voting
Mr. Kenneth Crater Control Technology Corporation Voting
Ms. Lisa Kirby Gibbs Highland-March Office Business Centers --
Rev. Laura Goodwin St. Andrew's Episcopal Church --
Mr. David Guarino Fletcher Tilton --
Ms. Pamela Kane Greater Worcester Community Foundation --
Mr. David Nicholson Endeavor Tool Company Voting
Dr. Katheryn Post-Brodowski UMass Voting
Mr. Scott Rossiter No Affiliation Voting
Mr. David Small Stop & Shop Supermarket, Retired --
Mr. Brian Sutherland No Affiliation Voting
Mr. David White R.H. White Companies Voting
Mr. John Wornham Greenberg, Rosenblatt, Kull & Bitsoli --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 10
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2015 to Dec 31, 2015
Projected Income $705,050.00
Projected Expense $691,000.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

Audit Documents

2014 Financial Audit

2013 Financial Review

2012 Financial Review

2011 Financial Review

2010 Financial Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $3,631,416 $396,086 $423,164
Total Expenses $498,401 $370,713 $321,561

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- $137,700
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $448,663 $195,824 $97,543
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $35,415 $13,037 --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $70 $61 $124
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $52,268 $187,164 $178,927
Revenue In-Kind $3,095,000 -- --
Other -- -- $8,870

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $372,716 $267,550 $182,327
Administration Expense $62,732 $60,597 $74,838
Fundraising Expense $62,953 $42,566 $64,396
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 7.29 1.07 1.32
Program Expense/Total Expenses 75% 72% 57%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 13% 11% 16%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $3,507,461 $357,048 $331,715
Current Assets $250,384 $247,897 $215,963
Long-Term Liabilities $6,000 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $14,496 $3,098 $3,138
Total Net Assets $3,486,965 $353,950 $328,577

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 4.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 17.27 80.02 68.82

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s for fiscal years 2014 and 2013 and per the Reviewed Financials for fiscal year 2012. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. Please note, In-Kind contributions for FY14 reflects donated land.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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