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Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Families First’s mission is to promote the secure, nurturing parent-child relationships that are the foundation of every child’s well-being and future success.


 

Mission Statement

Families First’s mission is to promote the secure, nurturing parent-child relationships that are the foundation of every child’s well-being and future success.


 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $1,130,173.00
Projected Expense $1,108,768.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Parenting in Public
  • Parents Are First Teachers
  • School Success

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Families First’s mission is to promote the secure, nurturing parent-child relationships that are the foundation of every child’s well-being and future success.


 

Background Statement


As a provider of parenting education in eastern Massachusetts for more than 28 years, Families First is a prominent part of the local network of family support. Founded by Wheelock College and the Boston Children’s Museum in 1988, we began with the goal of helping parents navigate the diverse challenges of raising children, by providing parenting education services. We were incorporated as an independent 501c3 organization in 1998, and now we serve more than 1,000 low-income and housing-insecure parents—benefiting more than 2,000 children—each year.


Families First provides original, research-based parenting education workshop series for families in under-resourced communities. We do all of our work in partnership with schools, early education programs, community organizations, and shelters to reach parents while they are receiving other supportive services.


Strong parenting increases the likelihood of lasting school and life success for children. Because we know all parents need help with this profoundly challenging work, we guide parents and caregivers to engage with their children in a new way, transforming uncertainty into knowledge, confidence, and resilience. Our workshops help parents: 


  • Understand each child’s temperament and learning style;
  • Use current techniques for effective communication and positive discipline;
  • Play an active role in each child’s learning from the start;
  • Build support networks within their communities; and
  • Manage stress, and practice self-care. 

Workshops are led by our expert trained Parenting Educators, and are free for parents. Many Parenting Educators have deep roots in under-resourced communities where Spanish and Haitian Creole are spoken. In addition to the ability to facilitate workshops in these languages, Parenting Educators also understand specific cultural factors related to parenting that can affect how participants understand the content. This type of cultural connection between Parenting Educators and parent participants results in a more comfortable environment that encourages open communication, and enables Families First staff to expand our scope, reaching more parents in more neighborhoods .


Impact Statement

Families First builds on parents’ strengths to cultivate positive parent-child relationships and encourage children’s resilience to stressful factors. These consistent, protective relationships help to provide children with the opportunity to succeed in school and life.

 

The following are some of our most significant achievements during FY16 (July 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016):

  • Worked with volunteer consultants from Social Venture Partners Boston to refine our theory of change and research/plan for a comprehensive program model that will lead to growth;

  • Continued to strengthen partnerships in the high-need neighborhoods of East Boston and Roxbury;

  • Developed, piloted, and evaluated the new Play as Learning Series, through which parents and children (ages 3 to 6) can interact and practice strategies;

  • Developed new curriculum that addresses the impact of technology on children’s development, called Parenting in the Digital Age; and

  • Improved our evaluation infrastructure by piloting new strategies and tools.


Needs Statement

Parenting Education and Support Programs: We provide parenting education and support throughout each child’s development. With each stage comes new challenges, and families benefit from long-term education. With this in mind, we are building partner networks in the region’s highest-need communities to provide longer-term support for families.

Curriculum Development and Translation: Our workshop series are unique because of our original content and research-based approach, and we are dedicated to consistently renewing our curricula to keep our workshops up to date and informed by current parenting research. Regularly revising and updating our curricula requires regular translation, as we provide workshop series in both Spanish and Haitian Creole.

Building Evaluation Capacity: Currently, we are improving our evaluation infrastructure to include collecting and analyzing data that effectively provides evidence of long-term program impact.

Parenting Educator Training: We are continuously working to improve training opportunities for our corps of expert Parenting Educators. This year, training opportunities will include a full-day training retreat and quarterly group meetings and training sessions.  


CEO Statement

Parenting is challenging for all families. We still believe, as our founders did, that all parents need help with the important work of raising children. Today there is a great deal of information and support available, yet some parents don’t have access to these resources. Many parents are also facing other challenges, including community violence and limited access to nutrition, education, and medical care.

Our programs are targeted to parents facing these challenges. Our collaborative model removes all the roadblocks parents face, so they can learn critical information about positive discipline, more effective family communication, and building self-esteem in their children.

Parents are the most important influence on their children. When parents understand how children develop—when they are engaged and nurturing—they can raise resilient children in healthy families and communities. We believe that all parents want to do what’s best for their children, but they don’t always know how. Our programs give parents tools to build on their strengths and encourage each child’s healthy development while also building positive support systems for themselves.

With a corps of 15 expert Parenting Educators, equipped with our original, research-based curriculum, Families First is uniquely qualified to work with parents who are facing the toughest situations when bringing up their kids: poverty, homelessness, violence, substance abuse, and even raising their children in the unfamiliar environment of a new country.

We reach parents like Celeste, who was left to raise her two younger brothers and her own infant in a shelter when she was just 19 years old. Our Parenting Educator worked with Celeste and helped her learn new ways to protect her infant from the stress of shelter life, strategies for responding to the behaviors of her brothers as they navigated adolescence, and the importance of support systems and self-care. Now Celeste and her family are thriving, and she still keeps Families First’s handouts on her refrigerator for those moments when she needs guidance. Our ultimate goal is to help vulnerable families like Celeste’s reach their full potential and find success in life. 


Board Chair Statement

I have been involved with Families First since 2009, when I joined the Friends Council. I joined the Board in 2011 and have served as Chair since 2013.

The mission of Families First resonated with me right from the start. I am fortunate to be raising my three children with an abundance of resources, in a stable family and a safe community. All the same, the kind of parent I strive to be requires hard work, diligence, consistency, and patience.

In the communities we serve, parents are dealing with toxic stress caused by violence, poverty, crime, and addiction and have few resources on which to draw. Our parenting workshops are delivered in small groups so that parents have a chance to discuss, practice, and internalize new skills and approaches to parenting. These workshops allow parents to access the expertise of our Parenting Educators as well as to build a support network with other parents. These are things that can be easy to take for granted but are essential in giving parents the confidence to be the best parents for their children.

In my professional career I have spent the last five years overseeing Learning and Development at a consulting firm, first as Director of Talent Development and now as Vice President of Human Capital. We know that adults learn best when they have training that is delivered over time, that is highly interactive, and that allows them to practice new skills in between more formal sessions. We also know that new skills “stick” better when the environment is supportive of those new skills. Families First's model of parenting support and education is at the leading edge of adult learning theory, and ensures that we are truly driving improved outcomes in how parents interact with and relate to their children.

Families First has a strong, active, and committed Board of Directors, a dedicated donor base, and a vision of how our work promotes the secure and nurturing relationships that are the foundation of every child's well-being and future success. It's an exciting time to be a part of Families First and I am honored to be serving the organization.

-Jen Kordell, Board Chair 


Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (please select all areas as well)
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA

Families First’s Parenting Educators facilitate our workshops at partner sites throughout eastern Massachusetts, with a focus on high-need neighborhoods such as Roxbury and East Boston. We work with school districts in Boston, Lynn, and Brockton to ensure that our programs align with their district-level priorities.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Services
  2. Education - Management & Technical Assistance
  3. Youth Development - Management & Technical Assistance

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Parenting in Public

For homeless parents in eastern Massachusetts, Families First’s Parenting in Public initiative is crucial. Through this program, we help parents build a positive family climate while enduring the pressures of life in a shelter environment. In partnership with family and domestic violence shelters, and transitional housing programs, we provide parents with our PEACE (Parenting Essentials in a Challenging Environment) core workshop series. The PEACE series is strengths-based and includes topics such as positive discipline, improving self-esteem to increase resilience, using the power of play to fortify parent-child relationships, and managing extreme stress.

Budget  $180,156.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Parenting Education
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families Homeless
Program Short-Term Success  Families First serves parents with workshop series that consist of three to eight 90-minute sessions. Through our parenting education, we seek to build the Six Protective Factors endorsed by the Department of Health and Human Services as crucial for improving outcomes for families under stress. The Six Protective Factors are: 1) Parental Resilience, 2) Social Connections, 3) Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development, 4) Concrete Support in Times of Need, 5) Social and Emotional Competence, and 6) Healthy Parent-Child Relationships. These protective factors act as buffers against the chronic stress present in the lives of low-income families, especially those that are homeless or housing insecure. By the end of a workshop series, in answer to questions that relate to the Six Protective Factors, parents will self-report that they have high levels (between 4 and 5 on a scale of 1 – 5) of knowledge and confidence about parenting.
Program Long-Term Success  Families First promotes family well-being by guiding parents to support their children’s healthy development. While homelessness can have devastating impacts on a child’s overall development, Ann Masten of the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota identifies two interrelated factors that build resilience in children growing up in shelters: good parenting skills (warmth, involvement, structure) and good executive function (self-control). Other research done by the Harvard Family Research Project shows that parenting education, even without other interventions, has a positive impact on a child’s development. Their work links parenting behavioral changes arising from parent education directly to increases in pro-social behaviors and decreases in conduct problems. Our Parenting in Public initiative empowers parents to be supportive and nurturing, to foster resilience, and to promote healthy development to improve their children’s long-term outcomes.
Program Success Monitored By 

We gauge our success by measuring the extent to which we build the Six Protective Factors, (as described above under Program Short-Term Success) through our recently redesigned, original, standardized evaluation questionnaire.

To get a better understanding of how parents experience our programs, we use focus groups at selected sites. Finally, client stories help put our survey numbers in context while they help us better understand clients’ needs and Families First’s impact.
Examples of Program Success 

Yaritza had resided in a family shelter for a year when she attended a Families First workshop series. An English language learner, she was grateful that the series was facilitated in Spanish and English as she had a burning question: Why was her son, Javier, acting out in the common areas of the shelter any time she corrected his behavior?

Yaritza learned that, like adults, children have unique personalities and that discipline needs to account for this. Javier experienced discipline in public as shaming and reacted against it. When she began to address issues in private, Javier accepted his mother’s corrections more readily and his conduct improved significantly.

For families in shelters issues of privacy and the need to respect children’s differences are crucial. Families First’s workshops help parents make adjustments like this one to make shelter life more tolerable for themselves and their children. These lessons will continue to serve them when they return to permanent housing.


Parents Are First Teachers

In early childhood, children require specific parental actions, including exposure to language, physical interaction, and an enriching play environment. These actions help children develop a secure attachment to their caregivers, and build a foundation for future learning, strong relationships, and social-emotional health. Through our Parents Are the First Teachers program, we guide parents to address their children’s needs during this period of rapid cognitive development.

Our Success from the Start core workshop series teaches parents of infants and toddlers how to encourage positive social-emotional growth and support their children’s unique needs. Our Kindergarten 1-2-3 series is dedicated to parents who are preparing their child for the transition to school. Sessions help parents understand the concept of school readiness and how they can help prepare their child for this important life change. 

Budget  $338,562.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families
Program Short-Term Success  Families First serves parents with workshop series that consist of three to eight 90-minute sessions. Through our parenting education, we seek to build the Six Protective Factors endorsed by the Department of Health and Human Services as crucial for improving outcomes for families under stress. The Six Protective Factors are: 1) Parental Resilience, 2) Social Connections, 3) Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development, 4) Concrete Support in Times of Need, 5) Social and Emotional Competence, and 6) Healthy Parent-Child Relationships. These protective factors act as buffers against the chronic stress present in the lives of low-income families, especially those that are homeless or housing insecure. By the end of a workshop series, in answer to questions that relate to the Six Protective Factors, parents will self-report that they have high levels (between 4 and 5 on a scale of 1 – 5) of knowledge and confidence about parenting.
Program Long-Term Success  Families First promotes family well-being by guiding parents to support their children’s healthy development. According to research presented by Paul Tough in his book How Children Succeed, parents play the crucial role in promoting their children’s academic success. He argues that “character,” the ability to persevere, is more important than cognitive skills. Parents who are supportive and responsive while encouraging their children to become independent can foster this trait. Other research by the Harvard Family Research Project shows that parenting education, even without other interventions, has a positive impact on a child’s development. Their work links parenting behavioral changes achieved through parent education directly to increases in pro-social behaviors and decreases in conduct problems. Using Families First’s informed, engaged parenting practices, parents can support their children effectively before and during their school years, increasing the likelihood of success.
Program Success Monitored By 

We gauge our success by measuring the extent to which we build the Six Protective Factors, (as described above under Program Short-Term Success) through our recently redesigned, original, standardized evaluation questionnaire. A more detailed description as well as a statistical summary of these survey results can be found above in the Program Overview. 

To get a better understanding of how parents experience our programs, we use focus groups at selected sites. Finally, client stories help put our survey numbers in context while they help us better understand clients’ needs and Families First’s impact.
Examples of Program Success 

One way that we have increased the effectiveness and consistency of our services is by identifying each site’s unique needs. One example is Horizons for Homeless Children, an organization that provides early care and education for homeless children while parents look for work or housing. Horizons knows that its clients need support beyond child care, and their staff understands the value of parenting education. Initially, they were interested in our PEACE series primarily. However, since their clients are parents of young children, ultimately they decided to add our Kindergarten 1-2-3 workshop series, which increased the dose of education for their clients and deepened our relationship as partners. Last July (2014), we provided these 3-session early education series at each of their sites in Roxbury (in both Spanish and English), Jamaica Plain, and Dorchester.


School Success


Families First’s School Success program provides parents of school-age children with the tools and information they need to build their parenting abilities, attitudes, and expectations in order to support their children’s achievement. We guide parents to be role models, focus on their children’s strengths, and teach their children the skills they need to become a confident, competent, and resilient adult.

Our Learning and Thriving core workshop series teaches parents how to understand their child’s unique learning style and methods for supporting their child as they encounter challenges in and out of school, as well as strategies for navigating technology and the unique stresses of parenting in the 21st century.

Workshop content varies to address specific challenges faced by parents during particular stages of child development. For example, in middle and high schools, we offer series that address the challenges of raising happy, healthy adolescents. 

Budget  $285,479.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Parenting Education
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Females
Program Short-Term Success 

Families First serves parents with workshop series that consist of three to eight 90-minute sessions. Through our parenting education, we seek to build the Six Protective Factors endorsed by the Department of Health and Human Services as crucial for improving outcomes for families under stress. The Six Protective Factors are: 1) Parental Resilience, 2) Social Connections, 3) Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development, 4) Concrete Support in Times of Need, 5) Social and Emotional Competence, and 6) Healthy Parent-Child Relationships. These protective factors act as buffers against the chronic stress present in the lives of low-income families, especially those that are homeless or housing insecure. By the end of a workshop series, in answer to questions that relate to the Six Protective Factors, parents will self-report that they have high levels (between 4 and 5 on a scale of 1 – 5) of knowledge and confidence about parenting.

Program Long-Term Success  Families First promotes family well-being by guiding parents to support their children’s healthy development. For older children, that means thinking about schools. It is increasingly clear that parents play a crucial role in children’s academic success. In his book How Children Succeed, Paul Tough showed that, rather than cognitive skills, the ability to face challenges without giving up is most critical to school success. Parents who are supportive and responsive while encouraging their children to become independent can foster this trait. The Harvard Family Research Project found that parenting education has a positive effect on a child’s development. Parenting behavioral changes achieved through parent education are linked directly to increases in pro-social behaviors and decreases in conduct problems. Using Families First’s informed, engaged parenting practices, parents can support their children effectively throughout the school years.
Program Success Monitored By 

We gauge our success by measuring the extent to which we build the Six Protective Factors, (as described above under Program Short-Term Success) through our recently redesigned, original, standardized evaluation questionnaire. A more detailed description as well as a statistical summary of these survey results can be found above in the Program Overview.

To get a better understanding of how parents experience our programs, we use focus groups at selected sites. Finally, client stories help put our survey numbers in context while they help us better understand clients’ needs and Families First’s impact.
Examples of Program Success 

For young children, transitions can be challenging. Jon was having trouble at kindergarten when it was time to leave the playground after recess. He was disruptive, acted out, and did not listen to his teachers. His mom, Sylvia, wasn’t sure what to do.

In a workshop series at Bridge Boston Charter School, Sylvia learned to communicate better with Jon by showing him empathy when being firm about rules. Sylvia saw a change when she shared with her son how frustrated she feels about having only 30 minutes to eat lunch at work. Modeling how even adults must obey rules they do not like, she helped Jon improve his behavior for a more positive school experience.
 
This series, part of Families First’s School Success initiative, empowers the parents of school-age children to support their academic success. To reach the most vulnerable families, we partner with districts and schools like Bridge Boston that serve significant populations of homeless and newcomer families.
 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Understanding Parent Transformations

Families First’s Identity Mapping evaluation activity helps us better understand the impact that our parenting programs have on parents and their children. This self-reflection exercise prompts parents to record a visual representation of their feelings and ideas about parental identity.

For example, one father at Meridian House drew the picture on the right and explained: “[I was] the blind father who couldn’t see the love from his children.”  After the series, he drew himself as a “happy dad” and said, “[Now, I am] the dad who will take his time to listen to his kids and see what it is they need. I can see now.”

Identity Mapping helps us see the important transformations that are happening as a result of our workshops. The activity is very meaningful for the parents, as it provides an opportunity for creative expression. Many parents even report that they keep the drawings as a reminder of their ability to overcome challenges. Because of the positive effect of this activity, it has become integral to our series at all shelter sites. 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Sue Covitz
CEO Term Start Apr 2016
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Families First was pleased to promote Sue Covitz to the Executive Director position in April of 2016. On staff since 2006, Sue has served as the Director of Strategic Partnerships, Director of Outreach & Education, and Deputy Director. Previously, she served as the Executive Director of Greater Options for Adolescent Lives and brings almost 20 years’ experience in non-profit management, coalition building, and community organizing to her work.


Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Elizabeth Cohen Jan 2012 Jan 2016
Ms. Crista Martinez Padua Dec 2003 June 2011

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Rebekah McKinney Director of Development & Communications

Rebekah has been with Families First since 2011. She has nearly 15 years’ experience in fundraising and communications for Boston non-profit organizations, with an emphasis on institutional grants strategy, writing, and stewardship. She has advanced the development programs of Greater Boston Legal Services and the City of Somerville Youth Program, and prior to joining Families First, she managed fundraising and communications for Hyde Square Task Force. As an independent fundraising consultant, Rebekah has served clients including Critical Explorers and Encuentro Diaspora Latina. She also taught at the elementary school level for several years in the Boston Public Schools. She holds a BA in Urban Studies from Brown University and an MEd from Lesley University.

Ms. Maureen O'Brien PhD Director of Curriculum and Evaluation --
Ms. Magda Rodriguez Director of Programming --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Three-year grant to develop comprehensive program model for increased impact planning Social Ventures Partners Boston 2015
Skills-Based Volunteer Program and Capacity Building Grant Blue Cross Blue Shield 2014
Community Impact Consultant Grant Highland Street Foundation 2012

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) --
Massachusetts Nonprofit Network --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Families First employs a partnership-based program model. Our Parenting Educators carry out workshop series at partner sites throughout the region. Partner staff is responsible for organizing the space for workshop sessions, arranging child care and food, and promoting the series in their community. Collaboration with partners helps us carry out our work as efficiently as possible while also enabling partners to extend their services with parenting education that they would otherwise lack the capacity and/or funding to offer to their clients.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 6
Number of Part Time Staff 6
Number of Volunteers 3
Number of Contract Staff 17
Staff Retention Rate % 72%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 11
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 16
Caucasian: 50
Hispanic/Latino: 8
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 32
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Jennifer Kordell
Board Chair Company Affiliation Charles River Associates
Board Chair Term July 2013 - June
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term July 2013 - June 2016

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Melissa Bradley Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Voting
Mr. Gary Creem Proskauer Rose LLP Voting
Dr. Osagie Ebekozien Boston Public Health Commission Voting
Ms. Wendy Friedman Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Melissa Grossman Hadassah Brandeis Institute Voting
Mr. Michael Kohn John Hancock Financial Network Voting
Ms. Jennifer Kordell Charles River Associates Voting
Mr. J.D. LaRock Northeastern University Voting
Mr. Sean Lynch Jones Lang Lasalle Voting
Mr. Jeff Murray NxStage Medical Voting
Ms. Susan O'Connor Honorary NonVoting
Mr. Russell Oken Irwin Realty Partners, LLC Voting
Ms. Michelle Padden-Dragone MA Department of Children and Families Voting
Ms. Etta Rosen Educational Consultant Voting
Ms. Molly Stearns The Neighborhood House Charter School Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 70%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Governance and Policy

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


 

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $1,087,486 $1,135,290 $1,083,425
Total Expenses $1,070,310 $1,029,376 $976,884

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$768,575 $664,877 $500,385
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $205,629 $228,864 $320,075
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $61,062 $73,577 $56,944
Investment Income, Net of Losses $45,920 $152,891 $101,271
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $6,300 $15,081 $105,450
Other -- -- $-700

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $632,415 $697,161 $711,938
Administration Expense $167,609 $145,040 $62,936
Fundraising Expense $270,286 $187,175 $202,010
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.02 1.10 1.11
Program Expense/Total Expenses 59% 68% 73%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 28% 21% 25%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $1,397,315 $1,371,562 $1,265,542
Current Assets $341,503 $301,115 $213,365
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $34,968 $26,391 $26,285
Total Net Assets $1,362,347 $1,345,171 $1,239,257

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $565,250.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 9.77 11.41 8.12

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financial statement.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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