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Girl’s LEAP (LEAP Self-Defense)

 197A Centre Street
 Dorchester, MA 02124
[P] (617) 514-4285
[F] (617) 415-4529
www.girlsleap.org
leapmail@girlsleap.org
Katjana Ballantyne
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INCORPORATED: 1997
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3454124

LAST UPDATED: 04/01/2016
Organization DBA Girls' LEAP Self-Defense, d/b/a Girls' LEAP
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Girls’ LEAP (Lifetime Empowerment and Awareness Program) interrupts the cycle of violence by teaching girls that they have a right to be safe and how to defend themselves if necessary. We believe all girls deserve to grow up safe and free from violence – and that empowerment is violence prevention.

Our mission is to empower girls and young women to value and champion their own safety and well-being. Our primary goal is to provide girls and young women with the tools and assessment skills to keep themselves safe, both emotionally and physically. 

 


Mission Statement

Girls’ LEAP (Lifetime Empowerment and Awareness Program) interrupts the cycle of violence by teaching girls that they have a right to be safe and how to defend themselves if necessary. We believe all girls deserve to grow up safe and free from violence – and that empowerment is violence prevention.

Our mission is to empower girls and young women to value and champion their own safety and well-being. Our primary goal is to provide girls and young women with the tools and assessment skills to keep themselves safe, both emotionally and physically. 

 



FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $368,784.00
Projected Expense $312,334.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Girls' LEAP Self-Defense Programs
  • Teaching Woman Program
  • Teen Mentor Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Girls’ LEAP (Lifetime Empowerment and Awareness Program) interrupts the cycle of violence by teaching girls that they have a right to be safe and how to defend themselves if necessary. We believe all girls deserve to grow up safe and free from violence – and that empowerment is violence prevention.

Our mission is to empower girls and young women to value and champion their own safety and well-being. Our primary goal is to provide girls and young women with the tools and assessment skills to keep themselves safe, both emotionally and physically. 

 



Background Statement

Girls’ LEAP began as a women’s community response to a wave of assaults against women and girls in Cambridge in 1995. Local women gathered and found that there were no resources available to protect girls. Using leading research on girls’ developmental needs, co-founders Deborah Weaver, an expert in physical movement and teaching, and Peggy Barrett, a licensed social worker, designed a 20-hour curriculum combining safety, conflict resolution and self-defense for girls. They designed the Girls’ LEAP program structure and teaching methods by researching the most effective practices in gender-specific learning.

Girls’ LEAP was founded in 1997 and incorporated as a 501(c)(3) non-profit in 2000. In 2008, we were the recipient of the Social Innovator award by Root Cause, which recognized the success of our innovative curriculum. In June 2011, we moved to the high-need community of Dorchester to be located where girls are most in need of our services.

Girls’ LEAP partners with local schools and community centers to deliver our innovative empowerment and self-defense programming to girls aged 8-18 in Greater Boston. Our programs teach a 20-hour curriculum that covers physical safety skills and socio-emotional, reflective skills to develop conflict resolution skills, violence de-escalation, self-esteem and courage.

Physical skills are based on the strengths of a girl’s body and taught to be used in only extreme, worst-case scenarios. Skills include escape skills, offensive counter attacks, fighting from the floor, and danger assessment. The socio-emotional component teaches self-awareness through self-portraits, journal writing, role-playing, and small group discussion to enhance girls’ ability to say “no”, know themselves, identify and trust their feelings, and build self-confidence, courage, and self-esteem. By integrating these two components, girls develop assessment skills, increase their self-awareness, and practice making decisions then to reflect on what happened.

Each program is hosted by a partner organization that provides facilities, recruits participants and covers a portion of program costs. Programs are taught by all-female, intergenerational teaching teams that include an adult lead teacher, college mentors, and teen mentors. This teaching model is designed to support near-age mentoring and provide a supportive learning environment for girls.

Girls’ LEAP also houses two in-demand leadership development programs for teenage girls and college women. Our Teen Mentor Program is a year-round, paid leadership and empowerment program that trains young women, aged 14-18 as mentors to girls in our self-defense programs. The program is designed to address both youth violence and the need for employment and leadership skills training among underserved Boston teen girls.

Our Teaching Woman Program is a personal and professional development opportunity for college undergraduate women, aged 18-21, to volunteer as mentors to girls in our programs. The program is designed to build their leadership skills and give them experience serving in communities that have limited resources. We have chapters at Northeastern University, Simmons College, and Lesley University.

Impact Statement

The girls we reach through our programs live in a world that is characterized by persistent poverty and exclusion from opportunity. They live among and with violence on a daily basis; violence is normal. Girls suffer many consequences of this cycle of violence, including low self-esteem, limited access to healthy exercise, early sexual activity and teen pregnancy, and poor performance in school.

We intend to interrupt this cycle of violence and teach girls that there are safer and more productive ways to manage themselves and the world around them. Our commitment is to helping girls understand that they have a right to be safe, teaching them how to resolve conflict without violence—and how to defend themselves if necessary. We do this by wrapping the girls in a world of supportive women: teen mentors, college women and adult women provide role models and teach the girls that they have options to grow up differently.

Recent Accomplishments
  1. As of December 2013, we have reached a milestone achievement of serving over 10,000 girls since our inception in 1997.
  2. In addition, in FY2014 we exceeded our goal of 1,000 girls served by reaching 1,300 girls and young women in the community.
  3. We launched a new cross-sector collaboration with BPHC: the Chlamydia Prevention and Empowerment Program (C-PEP) in response to the high rates of chlamydia among teenage girls in Dorchester (28 times higher than the state’s rate). C-PEP will deliver our empowerment curriculum along with the BPHC sexual health education curriculum to teenage girls aged 15-18 in Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan.
  4. In FY2014, we raised more grant revenue than any past year in the organization’s history, increasing grant revenue by 46% over the prior year.
  5. In June 2014, we received a $100K for 100 Cummings Foundation grant ($100,000 over two years) to implement C-PEP programming. This allowed us to expand upon the initial phase of planning, funded with seed money from the Eastern Bank Foundation ($10,000).
Current Goals
  1. Increase size and impact of Board of Directors
  2. Implement a strategic Resource Development Plan
  3. Deepen and enhance relationship with Boston Public Health Commission
  4. Continue to strengthen program analytic
  5. Research program expansion opportunities

Needs Statement

Girls’ LEAP has identified the following organizational needs: 

  1. Board Members: We are seeking new board members, specifically those with expertise in at least one of the following areas - development and fundraising, strategic planning, public relations and/or marketing, accounting and finance, and the personal capacity or network to contribute or raise substantial annual funds ($10,000 or more) to Girls’ LEAP.
  2. Program Funding: Girls’ LEAP runs 25-30 self-defense programs each year. Each program costs Girls’ LEAP approximately $3,500. Partner sites are only asked provide a nominal fee. The low fee was instituted to ensure program accessibility for girls living in underserved Boston communities. 
  3. Program Partners: Girls’ LEAP partners with community organizations to deliver our programs.   
  4. Technology Funding: Our office operations are being conducted with outdated technology (hardware and software).

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
Girls' LEAP, located in Dorchester, serves every neighborhood in Boston, as well as the Greater Boston area and surrounding region. Over 60% of our programs are delivered in Dorchester and Roxbury, two high-risk neighborhoods in Boston.

Organization Categories

  1. Crime & Legal - Related - Youth Violence Prevention
  2. Crime & Legal - Related - Sexual Abuse Prevention
  3. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Girls' LEAP Self-Defense Programs

Girls’ LEAP’s innovative 20-hour empowerment and self-defense program includes:

  • Body awareness, verbal assertiveness and situational assessment training;
  • Escaping from attackers without inflicting harm to those requiring use of bodily force;
  • How to resolve and deescalate conflict instead of reacting out of anger or fear;
  • How to assess risk and say no in difficult situations, particularly situations involving peer pressure; and,
  • How to identify characteristics of healthy and unhealthy relationships.

Girls’ LEAP’s' 5 or 10-week program structure and teaching methods include:

  • Small group discussions, role playing and writing;
  • All-female, inter-generational teachings teams of adult teacher, college mentors, and teen mentors;
  • Staff-to-participant ratios of 1:4, ensuring individual attention and strong staff-participant relationships;
  • Ease of access by hosting programs at local schools and centers in partnership with site staff; and,
  • Participant-led program graduations to increase awareness of the issue to community members.
Budget  $229,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Females At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

  • Provide girls with the tools and assessment skills to protect themselves and advocate for their own safety.
  • Empower girls to use their voices to build their self-esteem and confidence.
  • Develop mentoring relationships between girls and women to show girls that there are women and female peers who care about them and are invested in their success.
  • Teach girls that their safety is important and worth caring about.
  • Teach girls that their choices and actions make a difference in their safety.
  • Teach girls how communicate with friends, family, and peers about safety issues, difficult situations, and personal boundaries more effectively.
  • Develop girls’ leadership skills and responsibility so they are empowered to identify their feelings, communicate them effectively, and advocate for themselves and others.

Program Long-Term Success 

Safety

  • Girls will believe that their safety is important.
  • Girls will believe that their own choices and actions make a difference in their safety.
  • Girls will learn to assess risks and to use a variety of skills to stay safe.

Conflicts and Fighting

  • Girls will show an increased preference for resolving conflicts without physical fighting.
  • Girls will learn how to use their preferred conflict resolution style and also new responses to de-escalate conflicts.

Mentorship/Relationships

  • Girls will be able to identify and express their ideas and feelings.
  • Girls will learn that there are women and female peers who care about them and are invested in their success.
Program Success Monitored By 

Girls’ LEAP is firmly committed to the evaluation of its programs, and uses an assets-based approach in curriculum and evaluation. We use pre- and post- surveys that measure girls’ and teens’ improvements and self-perceived changes in a range of socio-emotional and behavioral outcomes.

In 2010, Girls’ LEAP worked with the Technical Development Corporation to create formal evaluation tools for our services. In addition, since 2012, we have been working with a volunteer data analysis consultant from the Center of Education and Policy Research at Harvard University, to edit our evaluations to better measure and track behavioral outcomes.
Examples of Program Success 

The positive results and feedback from our program graduates shows the impact of our programming.

  • 90% of graduates care about their safety and well-being.
  • 95% of graduates know how to use their voices and bodies to stay safe. 
  • 90% of graduates can trust the Girls’ LEAP teachers and feel like both the teachers and the other girls in their group really listed to them.
  • "Girls' LEAP has helped me understand how much power, strength, & courage I have."
  • "The most important thing I have learned because of Girls' LEAP is that girls are not defenseless, we are strong."
  • "One thing I've learned about myself is that I can be confident and that I don't have to feel bad about myself. Girls' LEAP helped me on that" 

Teaching Woman Program

Girls’ LEAP recruits and trains undergraduate women (Teaching Women, TW) as mentors and assistant teachers in Girls’ LEAP programs and provides them with a valuable personal and professional development experience. We have three official Teaching Woman chapters at Simmons College, Lesley University, and Northeastern University. Overall, we work with over 70 undergraduate women from 10 different universities and colleges per year.

TW are integral in the Girls’ LEAP program structure and pedagogy. In addition to leading small group discussions and activities on key curriculum topics, TW are role models for program participants and Girls’ LEAP Teen Mentors. In particular, Girls’ LEAP’s teens benefit from these relationships due to the increased support, guidance and access to the college experience they receive through their ongoing teamwork with TW throughout the year.

Budget  $20,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Mentoring
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) Females
Program Short-Term Success 
  • College women will develop and improve professional and teamwork skills.
  • College women will develop and improve interpersonal skills to navigate and build healthy relationships.
  • College women will be engaged in a community of women who care about them and are invested in their success.
Program Long-Term Success 
  • College women will develop increased sense of self-confidence and self-efficacy.
  • College women will have increased awareness of issues of power, privilege, and oppression.
  • College women will value and champion their own safety and well-being.
  • College women will affect positive social change for and are engaged in communities of girls and women.
Program Success Monitored By 

 Girls’ LEAP measures outcomes in multiple ways:

  • Clear guidelines of professional performance in their teaching, mentoring of girls and in public presentations.
  • Weekly feedback and mentoring by the Lead Teachers in each program session in which TWs participate as assistant teachers.
  • Written and in-person performance reviews of each TW program cycle by the program’s Lead Teacher.
  • Issuing a participant program evaluation survey each semester, collecting, analyzing results and implementing changes for subsequent semester.
Examples of Program Success 

"Being a Teaching Woman with Girls' LEAP makes me part of a team that is responsible for one less victim and one more survivor."

"I was able to find a new sense of self-worth and confidence. I feel more truly myself." 
 
"I know those girls, I was those girls." 

Teen Mentor Program

The Girls’ LEAP Teen Mentor (TM) Program is our year-round, paid leadership and empowerment program for 20-25 teenage girls, aged 14-18, in Greater Boston. Teenage girls are trained to be mentors and assistant instructors in our empowerment and self-defense programs and also participate in leadership development and social justice activities.

Our program trains teenage girls to be mentors to peers and younger girls in our empowerment and self-defense programs on at least one 20-hour program per season, in addition to occasional workshops. Teens develop the leadership skills to mentor and teach younger girls, while also learning to be advocates for safety and empowerment in their community. In addition, they learn the professional skills necessary to be a successful part-time employee. Teen mentors teach in program once/week (academic session) or twice/week (summer session).
 
Our Teen Mentors also meet in small groups with a college mentor, who leads leadership and social justice activities to teach teens how to be advocates for girls’ safety and empowerment in their communities. These meetings strengthen teens’ communication and critical thinking skills, as they discuss topics such as dating violence, race and gender, and women in the media. The teens greatly benefit from relationships with the college mentors, who provide strength, competence, support and guidance as strong female role models to the teens. Teens meet in groups with a college mentor once/week (academic session) or three times a week (summer session).
Budget  $71,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Females
Program Short-Term Success 
  • Teens will master the Girls LEAP curriculum and build their knowledge of how to value and promote their own safety and that of others.
  • Teens will learn presentation skills and develop improved communication skills.
  • Teens will learn how to be role models/mentors for younger girls and girls their age.
  • Teens will communicate and teach violence prevention skills to younger girls and peers.
  • Teens will be able to put their violence prevention and safety knowledge into practice when warranted.
Program Long-Term Success 

 

  • Teens will have increased violence prevention skills, deploy these skills when needed, and share these skills with others in their lives.
  • Teens will have increased self confidence in their abilities.
  • Teens will have the skills and desire to serve as positive role models and leaders in their communities.
  • Teens will value and promote their own safety and advocate for community safety.
  • Teens will have the communication, professional skills and self confidence to help them envision and realize a positive future for themselves.

 

Program Success Monitored By 

 

Girls’ LEAP uses pre- and post- surveys that measure teens’ improvements and self-perceived changes in a range of socio-emotional and behavioral outcomes. We also have clear guidelines of professional performance in their teaching, mentoring of girls and in public presentations – particularly in attendance, participation, attitude and improvement.

 We also collect weekly feedback and mentoring by the Lead Teachers in each program session in which teen mentors participate, as well as a written and in-person performance reviews of each Teen Mentor by the Program Director at the end of the program.
Examples of Program Success 

  • 90% of teens have increased mentoring skills.
  • 90% of teens know how to use their bodies, their voices, and their choices to stay safe.
  • 100% of teens are confident in their ability to teach skills and values to others.
  • “Being part of Girls’ LEAP has been an amazing journey of self-discovery. I feel like LEAP has opened my eyes to what I couldn't see: a beautiful individual with so much to give, not only to others, but to myself.”
  • “The most meaningful part of Girls’ LEAP to me is getting to meet new girls and impacting their lives. It’s great being a positive role model, and guiding them towards a better path. For me Girls’ LEAP means making a big impact. It means being able to meet a lot of girls, make a lot of friends, share stories and really get involved in a worthy cause. Being able to impact their lives and help them is helping me because together, we’re changing the world.”


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Katjana Ballantyne
CEO Term Start May 2012
CEO Email katjana@girlsleap.org
CEO Experience

Katjana Ballantyne is fully committed to the empowerment of girls and young women, brings a wealth of experience to the position, and possesses the know-how to lead the organization to the next level. Katjana has 25 years of professional experience in non-profit, start-up, and corporate organizations and is known for her inclusive leadership style as well as her strong strategic, operational, and financial management skills. She holds a B.A. from St. Michael’s College and an M.B.A. from Suffolk University.

Katjana has actively volunteered in her community for over twenty years, serving on the Board of Directors of Somerville Community Corporation for the past ten years and as a mentor and tutor in the Cambridge and Somerville public school systems since 1992. She is the Ward 7 Alderman for the city of Somerville. She is also the mother of two daughters.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Deborah Weaver Jan 1997 June 2012

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Kaitie Chakoian Program Director

Kaitie Chakoian, Program Director, has been with Girls’ LEAP for six years, beginning as a Teaching Woman and student intern.  After graduating summa cum laude from Simmons College in 2009, Kaitie served two years with Girls’ LEAP as a full-time AmeriCorps Massachusetts Promise Fellow, where she managed Girls’ LEAP’s college volunteers. During this time, Kaitie earned her master’s degree in Education from Northeastern University.  Following the end of her term as a MA Promise Fellow, Kaitie spent a year working in higher education as an undergraduate admissions counselor, but returned to Girls’ LEAP in the spring of 2012.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Massachusetts Nonprofit Network --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

 

Collaboration is at the center of our program delivery model, as it allows us to reach girls in their own neighborhoods where they live and go to school. Over the last 17 years we have collaborated with over 165 different agencies and schools to offer our empowerment programming to girls and young women they serve. A sampling of our partners include Boston Public Schools, Citizen Schools, Boston Centers for Youth and Families, the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston, and Goodwill Industries.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 28
Number of Volunteers 57
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 75%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 34
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 38
Hispanic/Latino: 5
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): 11
Gender Female: 82
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mrs. Cynthia Maltbie
Board Chair Company Affiliation Partners In Health
Board Chair Term July 2008 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Katjana Ballantyne Girls' LEAP NonVoting
Martine Beaumont Blue Cross Blue Shield Voting
Kristen Cuneo IBM Corporation Voting
Pamela DiBerardino Ernst & Young LLP Voting
Wendy Macias Konstantopoulos Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School Voting
Cynthia Maltbie Partners in Health Voting
Frances Sullivan WGBH Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $368,784.00
Projected Expense $312,334.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2014 Financial Review

2013 Financial Review

2012 Financial Review

2011 Financial Review

2010 Financial Review

2009 Financial Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $319,614 $253,811 $316,200
Total Expenses $209,812 $278,623 $275,359

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$236,706 $147,069 $127,521
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $23,640 $43,172 $43,953
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $15,446 $15,745 $28,403
Investment Income, Net of Losses $131 $137 $17
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $41,773 $47,688 $115,896
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $1,918 -- $410

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $120,641 $195,351 $178,039
Administration Expense $70,967 $79,594 $72,833
Fundraising Expense $18,204 $3,678 $24,487
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.52 0.91 1.15
Program Expense/Total Expenses 57% 70% 65%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 6% 2% 9%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $209,699 $98,351 $131,441
Current Assets $208,699 $98,351 $131,441
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $2,840 $1,294 $9,572
Total Net Assets $206,859 $97,057 $121,869

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 2.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 73.49 76.01 13.73

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations & corporations are per the organization's Financial Reviews.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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