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NAMI Cape Ann

 43 Gloucester Avenue, Suites 2A & 2B
 Gloucester, MA 01930
[P] (978) 2811557
[F] (978) 2811550
www.namicapeann.org
[email protected]
George Howe
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 2006
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 01-0857047

LAST UPDATED: 09/15/2017
Organization DBA NAMI Cape Ann Inc.
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

NAMI Cape Ann (NAMICA)'s is a non-profit organization who mission is: a) to provide support, education, and advocacy throughout the Cape Ann area, on behalf of individuals and families dealing with serious mental illness, both diagnosed and undiagnosed, treated and untreated, with the goal of recovery; b) to promote better quality of life and care, rights and interests of people with serious mental illness, particularly of those who cannot speak for themselves, and to advocate policies at the local, state and national levels to accomplish these objectives; and c) to help families and friends of people with serious mentsal illness by providing emotional support, education, and information.
 
 

Mission Statement

NAMI Cape Ann (NAMICA)'s is a non-profit organization who mission is: a) to provide support, education, and advocacy throughout the Cape Ann area, on behalf of individuals and families dealing with serious mental illness, both diagnosed and undiagnosed, treated and untreated, with the goal of recovery; b) to promote better quality of life and care, rights and interests of people with serious mental illness, particularly of those who cannot speak for themselves, and to advocate policies at the local, state and national levels to accomplish these objectives; and c) to help families and friends of people with serious mentsal illness by providing emotional support, education, and information.
 
 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $55,000.00
Projected Expense $35,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Family-to-Family Course
  • Mental Health Recovery Peer Support Groups
  • NAMI Family Basics Course
  • Support groups for families affected by mental health issues

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

NAMI Cape Ann (NAMICA)'s is a non-profit organization who mission is: a) to provide support, education, and advocacy throughout the Cape Ann area, on behalf of individuals and families dealing with serious mental illness, both diagnosed and undiagnosed, treated and untreated, with the goal of recovery; b) to promote better quality of life and care, rights and interests of people with serious mental illness, particularly of those who cannot speak for themselves, and to advocate policies at the local, state and national levels to accomplish these objectives; and c) to help families and friends of people with serious mentsal illness by providing emotional support, education, and information.
 
 

Background Statement

Founded in 1979, NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) has become the "nation's voice on mental illness" in all fifty states, with local affiliates in over 1,100 communities. NAMI is the nation's leading grassroots advocacy organization solely dedicated to improving the lives of persons with severe brain disorders and their families. Its mission is to offer support, education, and advocacy through regularly scheduled meetings at which helpful suggestions about coping strategies, successful recovery models, and referrals to resources are made.
 
NAMI Cape Ann offers telephone and e-mail support on a daily basis through a dedicated voice mail number (978-281-1557) and e-mail address ([email protected]).Additional information is posted on our web site (namicapeann.org), which is updated regularly. NAMI Cape Ann relies entirely on volunteers and has no paid staff.NAMI Cape Ann, Inc. is a 501 © 3 corporation.
 
NAMI Cape Ann offers seven support groups per month, four for consumers and three for families. The groups are led by NAMI trained peers, i.e., persons in recovery, or family members of a person with a mental illness. Two facilitators are required for each group.We encourage volunteers to attend the next NAMI Massachusetts training for family and peer facilitators so that we may offer more groups. Anyone with a diagnosis of a brain disorder, such as depression, bi-polar illness, schizophrenia, anxiety disorder, or the like, and/or a family member or friend of such a person, is welcome to attend. Although we invite people to join NAMI, it is not a requirement to attend the groups. There is no charge or fees for support services. The support groups give hope, encouragement, a sense of belonging and being understood to a group of vulnerable individuals. Participants are encouraged to call for additional support at any time.
 
 
In 2010, NAMI Cape Ann was able to rent office space in Gloucester.This greatly enhanced its ability to offer a variety of meetings and programs.We have expanded our rental space so as to accommodate attendance of up to thirty for speaker programs and twenty plus instructors for our Family-to-Family and Basics classes.
 
In May, 2011, NAMI Cape Ann was honored with a Social Justice Recognition Award from Gloucester’s Unitarian Universalist Church.The award is given to individuals and groups that demonstrate consistent and selfless service to the people of Gloucester. Honorees are nominated by the general public.

Impact Statement

NAMI Cape Ann provides five support groups a month for persons with a psychiatric diagnosis and provided three support groups a month for family and friends of persons with a psychiatric diagnosis.
 
NAMI Cape Ann provides a free twelve-week educational course for families and care givers of persons with a psychiatric diagnosis.
 
NAMI Cape Ann provides a free six-week educational course for parents and caregivers of children with a psychiatric diagnosis.
 
NAMI Cape Ann provideds an art marketing program enabling consumer artists to produce, show,  and sell their art works.
 
NAMI Cape Ann manages the Cape Ann Social Club, a former Department of Mental Health Program which lost all of its state funding in 2008.
 
Goals for this year are: a)  to expand our support and educational programs; b) complete a three-year strategic plan; c) secure stable financing both for affiliate operations and for the Cape Ann Social Club, for which it serves as fidiciary agent; d) combat stigma of mental health issues in the workplace; e) fcommence a community dialog on suicide prevention; and e) add resources for dealing with the intersection of the mental health and criminal justice systems. 
 

Needs Statement

1) Purchase kits that have been professional designed for use in schools for SOS - the Signs of Suicide Prevention Program, an award-winning, nationally recognized program designed for middle and high school-age students. The program teaches students how to identify the symptoms of depression and suicidal thoughts in themselves or their friends, and encourages help-seeking through the use of the ACT(R) technique (Acknowledge, Care, Tell).Estimated cost $1,000
 
2) Increase community education programs to eight per year by providing stipends for speakers and related expenses, such as travel and publicity. Estimated cost $1,500/year
 
3) Train volunteers to facilitate support groups and teach educational courses, such as, Family to Family for care givers of adults with a mental illness and NAMI Basics for care givers of children with a mental illness. Estimated cost of training for 10 people: $3,000
 
4) Continue to provide oversight and financial support to the Cape Ann Social Club, a former program of the Department of Mental Health which lost its funding in 2008. The Club meets twice a month to provide social and recreational opportunities for older persons in recovery who are otherwise isolated and in need of companionship and understanding. The Club also provides a group membership to the "Y" and sponsors outings to cultural events and holiday celebrations.Estimated cost $12,000 - $15,000/year

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

NAMI-Cape Ann is an all-volunteer organization with lots of energy and passionate belief in its mission. All the members of its Board of Directors are either family care-givers of individuals with mental illness diagnoses, or are individuals with lived experience of mental illness and are in recovery.
 
NAMI-Cape Ann is the first affiliate in Massachusetts to complete its re-affiliation with NAMI (National) and one of the first seven affiliates nationally. Our governance is excellent. 
 
This year we are nearing completion of preparing a three-year strategic plan to help us focus our efforts, expand our programs, and secure long-term stable financing both for our affiliate's baseline education and support programs and for the Cape Ann Social Club, which provides sustasinable life skills training for some of the most fragile members of our community afflicted with mental illness who have no other opportunities for socialization.
 
 
 
 

Geographic Area Served

NORTHEAST REGION, MA

Cape Ann, including Gloucester, Rockport, Manchester-by the Sea, Essex, Ipswich; we offer our services to individuals in other area communities, e.g., Danvers, Peabody, Salem, and Beverly whenever an adjacent affiliate (NAMI - Greater North Shore) is not offering educational programs.

Organization Categories

  1. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Mental Health Associations - Multipurpose
  2. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Mental Health Associations - Multipurpose
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Family-to-Family Course

Twelve-week evidence-based course taught by volunteers each fall season
Budget  $2,000.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
Attendees are family care-givers of those suffering effects of mental illness. Program gives care-givers direction and skills to deal with their loved ones who are ill, and a sense they are not alone in dealing with the problems, and how/where they can get help.
 Short-term measures of success include students sharing their successes in dealing with social workers, mental health care workers, court officers because they have become better educated and better prepared with documentation and the right questions to ask, when dealing with hospitals, clinics and courts (as applicable) in which their family member has become involved
 
Program Long-Term Success  Having our service area population having a better understanding of the issues of caring for mental health in a de-institutionalized context; fewer unnecessary criminal prosecutions when mental health treatment is more appropriate, through training of police employees in crisis intervention and diversion; having our service area local school administration better-equipped to deal with students suffering from mental illness  
Program Success Monitored By  Evaluations are prepared by students at course end. Additional measures: membership in NAMI and follow-up participation in support groups, training to become course teachers, etc.
Examples of Program Success  a) Large proportion of course attendees becoming on-going members of NAMI Cape Ann; b) "graduates" helping others navigate the mental health delivery system when their loved ones are in crisis; c) "graduates" becoming involved as certified facilitators or teachers and running other this or other NAMI signature programs

Mental Health Recovery Peer Support Groups

Meet four times a month
Budget  $2,000.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Peer Counseling
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
50% success
Program Long-Term Success 
Succesful mental health recovery is linked to stigma,and isolation. Persons involved with peer groups learn that the groups are a safe table and are willing to talk and return month after month
Program Success Monitored By 
Monthly reports by board members who are faciliating the support groups
Examples of Program Success 
Peers deliver public presentations to area community hospitals' staff and patients in a formal program " In Our Own Voice"

NAMI Family Basics Course

Eight-week course taught annually in the spring and/or fall, for parents of (primarily) pre-teens who suffer from apparent signs of mental illness
Budget  $1,500.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other
Population Served Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Having the parents of children with mental illness secure Individualized Educational Plans for their children; minimization of hospitalization via timely mental health clinical intervention prompted by greater awareness of mental illness symptoms; and better-directed,. more suitable treatment
Program Long-Term Success 
Help area parents enhance their awareness of the signs of mental illness in their children, and gain greater skill in dealing with their ill children, including advice on working with school administrative staff and hospital staff, as applicable.
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is monitored by : a) evaluations prepared by the students at course end; b) anecdotal reporting by "graduates" of how they have coped with the challenges of parenting an ill child; c) reductions of inappropriate disciplinary action/isolation of MI students who may be acting up
Examples of Program Success  a) Adoption by schools of more suitable policies for dealing with MI students, through effective advocacy by the parents themselves; b) MI children getting timely clinical attention and suitable treatment, advocated by their parents, having been trained in this course; lower incidences of MI child violence and/or self-injury, through timely intervention

Support groups for families affected by mental health issues

Meet three times a month
Budget  $2,000.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Peer Counseling
Population Served Families Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
60% report back as receiving services
Program Long-Term Success 
Successfuly counseled over 250 families in applying for mental health services, from department of mental health and private organizations
Program Success Monitored By 
All feedback is self-reported and discussed at monthly directors' meetings.
Examples of Program Success 
Individual acknowledgment of their illness, that they have recieved and complied with treatment and are now active advocates in NAMI Cape Ann

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The major challenges we confront are: a)  mental and behavioral health stigma; b) community funding for police and teacher training to recognize mental illness and how to carry out effective crisis intervention and secure appropriate treatment; and c) getting additional affiliate members certified to serve as teachers and/or facilitators for NAMI education and support programs, so we can expland these offerings.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. George Howe
CEO Term Start Apr 2016
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
George Howe is a retired town manager, having served in that capacity for 32 years, 27 of which in Ipswich, MA. He is a past president of the board, and has a son who is in recovery from mental illness.
He co-teaches Family-to-Family, and has handled governance and re-affiliation ("re-chartering") issues for the affiliate; and affiliate strategic planning.  
 
 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Linda Lewis Apr 2014 July 2011
George Howe Aug 2013 July 2009

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) 2006
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

We collaborate with NAMI-Massachusetts and with the Northeast MassachusettsRecovery Learning Center, located in Lawrence, MA

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

This is an all volunteer organization.  There are no paid staff.  George Howe, listed above, is the board chair.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 30
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 0%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? N/A
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Yvonne Burke
Board Chair Company Affiliation peer; full-time student
Board Chair Term Apr 2017 - Apr 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Yvonne Burke board vice president; Peer Specialist; Director, Cape Ann Social Club Voting
Malva Crothers community volunteer Voting
George Howe Retired; Community Volunteer; son in recovery from MI Voting
Amy Hubbard Wediko Childrens' Services Voting
Holly Knapp physical therapist; son & daughter suffer MI Voting
Linda Lewis past president of board of directors Voting
Wendy Lindsay NE Board of Higher Education; board secretary; Community Volunteer; parent of MI son Voting
Debra Pacheco Community Volunteer; mental health advocate in schools Voting
Chris Sadkowski board treasurer; Community Volunteer; parent of MI son Voting
Sharon Zajac community volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 55%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Public Policy/Advocacy

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $55,000.00
Projected Expense $35,000.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

Audit Documents

2016 Compilation Report 2014, 2015 and 2016

2013 Compilation Report

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $86,026 $22,315 $43,590
Total Expenses $40,348 $27,601 $22,394

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- $9,400
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $83,358 $20,555 $29,827
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $267 $99 $5
Membership Dues $507 $438 $446
Special Events $1,894 $1,223 $3,912
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $37,500 $26,500 $19,406
Administration Expense $2,848 $1,101 $2,556
Fundraising Expense -- -- $432
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 2.13 0.81 1.95
Program Expense/Total Expenses 93% 96% 87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $103,714 $58,036 $63,252
Current Assets $103,714 $58,036 $63,252
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $103,714 $58,036 $63,252

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 12.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We have been using reserves to cover increased operating expenses (rent and utilities). We have committed extensive volunteer time in seeking grants to cover our increased operating costs.

Foundation Comments

Summary financial data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990-EZs. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

NAMI-Cape Ann (NAMICA) has as its mission to bring about change in societal attitudes toward mental illness: a) by combatting stigma attached to those afflicted with mental illness; b) by improving intake and treatment in area hospital ER's; c)  by training educators and first responders to recognize the symptoms of mental illness and help those in crisis or at risk of crisis get referred to appropriate treatment; d) by educating family care-givers about the nature of mental illness, how to be more effective advocates and care-givers, and how to take care of themselves; and e) by providing support to care-givers and those with lived mental illness experience.

Our target population is the Cape Ann area of Massachusetts: Gloucester, Rockport, Manchester By-The-Sea, Essex, and Ipswich; some of those whom we serve come from Danvers, Beverly, Salem, Peabody, and elsewhere on the North Shore.

Our evidence-based signature programs target a) those in recovery from mental illness, providing them with peer support groups, and training opportunities to become certified peer mentors; and b) family care-givers of those who are suffering from mental illness, providing them with training, support groups, training opportunities for leadership, advocacy, and one-on-one advice and support when they find themselves in a crisis situation with their loved one(s). We advocate with local government leaders and police chiefs for crisis intervention training and diversion (CIT), whereby mentally ill individuals are referred to mental health treatment rather than entanglement with the criminal justice system. We advocate with local school systems to assure that children with special needs secure appropriate Individual Education Plans, and strive to train the educators to recognize the signs of mental illness and make accommodations in a timely, targeted, compassionate manner.

We define long-term success in our efforts by growth in our membership. We seek to achieve full parity in insurance coverages: mental health treatment must receive full parity with physical health treatment. Success also is measured by earlier detection of mental illness, the provision of an adequate number of inpatient beds, shorter wait-times for appointments with mental health professionals, fewer cases of mental health crises ending in violence, fewer cases of mental health crises ending in arrest and incarceration, and a reduction of cases of homelessnessof the mentally ill. 

We know we have been successful by getting more referrals for training, education and/or support. This can be measured by class sizes, support group attendance records, and contact logs. 

We will know we have been successful if area police records reflect referrals for our input. We will know we have been successful if police officers, firefighters and EMTs receive training in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness, and we receive positive information feedback these first responders.   

We will know we have been successful if our endeavors to fight stigma in the workplace foster a better understanding of mental health issues. This can be measured by workplace education and training, and by self-reporting of those in recovery who have secured employment.

We will know we have been successful when we are asked to return to provide training to new school classes on recognizing the signs of depression and suicidal ideation. 

We will know we have been successful when the signs of depression and other symptoms are recognized widely by educators in our target area. We will be successful when suicidality can be discussed and averted through recognition, timely intervention and understanding.

Success for NAMICA is when we secure regular newspaper coverage of our activities and when other mental health providers in the area send us new and continued referrals – so we can provide support for those who need it and engage the wider community in a discussion of mental health. .


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

NAMI-Cape Ann has recently implemented a three-year strategic plan which has helped us to prioritize our goals and annual objectives.

One of our first initiatives will be to reach out to the CEO's of ten large employers in the Cape Ann area, seeking to have them sign on to the CEO's Against Stigma campaign being coordinated by NAMI-Massachusetts. We will use NAMI-Mass.-prepared materials and a training vehicle "99 Faces" , the latter slated to be an exhibit at the Museum of Science in the fall of 2016. Because of the nature of this photo-documentary, we hope to reach a very large population, with a message delivered in terms that are easily understood.

Subject to the availability of funds, we shall offer "End the Silence" and/or "SOS - Signs of Suicide" in the area middle schools and high schools; and offer training for teachers in how to recognize signs of mental illness and how best to respond in a timely and compassionate manner. We will target Gloucester, Rockport, Manchester-Essex, and Ipswich schools.

We will encourage Cape Ann police chiefs to apply for funding for overtime pay for officers to receive training in Crisis Intervention (CIT)  and will lobby the legislature for increased funding for this program.

We will attend area mental health delivery consortium meetings, e.g., The System of Care, which meets monthly in Beverly; the High Risk Task Force, which meets bi-monthly at Addison Gilbert Hospital; and we will seek an opportunity to join a similar group at Beverly Hospital. Our expectation from this activity is that we will be able to educate, advocate, and support more individuals and families our the target area.

We will reach out to lapsed members and find other sources to meet community needs and in doing so will grow our membership. We will encourage more members to become NAMI-certified as facilitators and course teachers. This effort will enable us to expand our offerings of Family-to-Family and Basics classes, and support groups, the latter on weekends.

We will engage in advocacy for improvements in mental health funding at the state level, for statutory changes to improve parity in mental health care delivery and assure that insurance coverage for mental health care is in parity with coverage for physical disorders.



3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

NAMICA is an all-volunteer affiliate with sixty members. We are passionate about our mission and offer high energy toward its fulfillment, as all of our board members either are family care-giver or have lived MI experience and are in recovery.

Unlike many other NAMI affiliates in Massachusetts, we have an office for meetings, classes, support groups, and for governance records. Although our current operating expenses exceed our current revenues, we have a year's surplus to draw upon, as we engage in fund-raising and grant-seeking.

We regularly work with NAMI-Massachusetts on programs and rely upon them for teacher and facilitator training. Based on our participation in the NAMI-Massachusetts Walk, we derive about 15% of our annual operating revenue.

We use NAMI-National's course materials, which are evidence-based, and which are provided to us at no direct cost to our affiliate.

We currently collaborate with the Northeast Recovery Learning Center, based in Lawrence, for holistic health training for those in recovery, and for an on-going support group which meets in our office weekly on Friday afternoons.

We are uniquely situated to provide services to our target clientele in the Cape Ann area because we have personal experience in dealing with mental illness issues, either as a patient or as a care-giver. We are "battle-tested" and can offer insight, support, and comfort to those who are hurting. We have all walked in another’s shoes and gain strength from sharing our experiences.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

At present NAMICA has few, if any, benchmarks against which to measure its progress, as we have just begun using measurement techniques in the past few months. We ask the reader to refer to that portion of Impact Section 1, above, in which we state how we’ll know we are being successful. In future years, we should be able to adopt meaningful benchmarks and measure progress against them.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

In the past 18 months, NAMICA has grown its membership recognized by NAMI-National from seven (!) to over sixty. Our contacts group of caregivers and those in recovery has increased substantially as well. We have begun maintaining a contact log (phone, e-mail, word-of-mouth).

In the past 24 months, we have completed re-affiliation with NAMI (National), the first of Massachusetts affiliates and one of the first seven nationally to complete this "re-chartering" process. We have moved governance records from the personal of a long-standing board member

to the office, and have set up a filing system, computer and Internet connection, and AV capabilities for training and speaker programs.

We have expanded our board of directors from nine to eleven, and have enlarged our office space comfortably to hold thirty for speaker meetings and twenty for classroom activities.

We have not solved the structural deficit for our operating expenses, but are working on it aggressively, especially for support of the Cape Ann Social Club.

We are well on our way in implementing our strategic plan.

We have enhanced our marketing of our Family-to-Family and Basics courses, and expanded our support group meetings. Two board members received training this year as support group facilitators, and four affiliate members (two of whom sit on the Board) have received training and are now certified Peer-to-Peer group facilitators.

We haven't managed to get consistent coverage in local newspapers of our activities. We haven't successfully increased awareness of the value of our services by other mental health caregivers, particularly the staff of secure inpatient psych wards in area hospitals and how NAMICA can provide help conveniently and cost-effectively both for those emerging in recovery as well as their care-givers.