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Medford-Brooks Estate Land Trust, Inc. (M-BELT)

 27 Gleason Street
 Medford, MA 02155
[P] (781) 396-3001
[F] --
www.brooksestate.org
[email protected]
Tom Lincoln
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1999
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3448138

LAST UPDATED: 04/13/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of the Medford-Brooks Estate Land Trust (M-BELT) is to protect and restore the historic Brooks Estate in Medford, Massachusetts, for public benefit. Our main vision is to ensure the future of the Brooks Estate (a permanently protected 50-acre open space and historic property) as a community and environmental asset for the people of Medford and the general public.
 
M-BELT’s main goals are to:
 
1) Completely restore two buildings, the Shepherd Brooks Manor and Carriage House (1880), for public benefit and use;
 
2) Restore the historic landscape, open space and natural habitat to: capture the historic “look and feel” of the property; promote biodiversity; and improve habitat values.
 
3) Create the necessary economic engine to ensure the long-term self-sufficiency of the property.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Medford-Brooks Estate Land Trust (M-BELT) is to protect and restore the historic Brooks Estate in Medford, Massachusetts, for public benefit. Our main vision is to ensure the future of the Brooks Estate (a permanently protected 50-acre open space and historic property) as a community and environmental asset for the people of Medford and the general public.
 
M-BELT’s main goals are to:
 
1) Completely restore two buildings, the Shepherd Brooks Manor and Carriage House (1880), for public benefit and use;
 
2) Restore the historic landscape, open space and natural habitat to: capture the historic “look and feel” of the property; promote biodiversity; and improve habitat values.
 
3) Create the necessary economic engine to ensure the long-term self-sufficiency of the property.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $8,000.00
Projected Expense $15,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Historic Restoration
  • Management
  • Planning
  • Public Outreach / Events

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of the Medford-Brooks Estate Land Trust (M-BELT) is to protect and restore the historic Brooks Estate in Medford, Massachusetts, for public benefit. Our main vision is to ensure the future of the Brooks Estate (a permanently protected 50-acre open space and historic property) as a community and environmental asset for the people of Medford and the general public.
 
M-BELT’s main goals are to:
 
1) Completely restore two buildings, the Shepherd Brooks Manor and Carriage House (1880), for public benefit and use;
 
2) Restore the historic landscape, open space and natural habitat to: capture the historic “look and feel” of the property; promote biodiversity; and improve habitat values.
 
3) Create the necessary economic engine to ensure the long-term self-sufficiency of the property.

Background Statement

The Medford-Brooks Estate Land Trust, Inc. (M-BELT) was formed in 1999 as the successor organization to the Brooks Estate Preservation Association (BEPA), which led the advocacy effort to permanently protect the property.

M-BELT is a community-based, volunteer, membership nonprofit whose sole mission is to protect and restore the 50-acre Brooks Estate in Medford,Massachusetts. The Brooks Estate is opened by the City of Medford(since 1942) and M-BELT Serves as the “Manager” and chief advocate for this unique historic and open space property. 

We work on these aspects of this very large undertaking:

- Protection, education, outreach, and advocacy

- Planning and physical restoration

- Cleanups and spruce-ups

- Programs for adults and kids

We started with a Brooks Estate that had suffered decades of neglect. It is safe to say that M-BELT has rescued the Brooks Estate and we have made major strides on both the historic buildings and the landscape. Our major physical accomplishments include: large-scale work on the Shepherd Brooks Manor; removal of ca. 100 tons of debris from the site; stabilization of the Carriage House; and comprehensive construction, business and ecological planning. We have raised and spent about $265,000 of our own funds, and leveraged more than $1 million of other funding secured by us and flowing through the City of Medford. Our Board and volunteers have contributed thousands of hours of general labor, high-level expertise and professional in-kind services. We partner with Medford residents, the City of Medford, state agencies, a variety of experts, schools, youth programs, and community groups. We also work with the Grantees of the Conservation and Preservation Restriction: The Trustees of Reservations and the Massachusetts Historical Commission.

On the programmatic side, we have provided a variety of informal and formal events and programs, including: guided walks, open houses, work days, Scout projects, school visits, arts projects, and our popular annual picnic.

M-BELT is an all-volunteer organization, driven by a passion for the beautiful Brooks Estate. The phrase “A gift from the Past, a Legacy for the Future” summarizes our view of this unique and treasured jewel.


Impact Statement

Our main accomplishment in 2012 was the completion and presentation of the Brooks Estate Master Plan (available at www.brooksestate.org). This comprehensive document provides a detailed roadmap on how we intend to complete the basic restoration of the property to: maximize community potential; ensure financial self-sufficiency; maintain the property’s natural and historic values; and provide funds for other improvements. The Plan also shows how the re-use of the historic buildings as function facilities and new community space will pay off the capital investment for restoration. 

 

Three other important accomplishments in 2012 were the complete re-build of the handicapped accessible boardwalk to Brooks Pond, energy efficiency updates, and additional restoration work on the Shepherd Brooks Manor exterior. In addition, we presented a variety of guided walks, open houses, and our famous (and free) annual picnic.

For 2013, our main goal is to secure major funding for the restoration of the Carriage House, the access drive, and related infrastructure. Funding proposals are currently in front of the City of Medford for these key goals. A closely related goal is to complete the restoration of the Manor south yard, Parlor and Verandah to further sustained public programming and general use of the Manor. A third goal is to install a handicapped lift to the second floor of the Manor. Finally, on the programmatic side, we hope to present one or more arts events at the Brooks Estate with local performing and visual artists.


Needs Statement

  1. Capital Funding (pursuant to the Brooks Estate Master Plan) for restoration of the Carriage House, access drive and related infrastructure, and key parts of the Shepherd Brooks Manor. Total estimated cost: $3.5 million. Note: the goal is to put the Brooks Estate on the road to self-sufficiency.
  2. Management: Detailed long-term facility management plan to dovetail with (funding-dependent) completion of restoration work. Estimated cost unknown, but will involve consulting fee(s).
  3. Landscape and Ecology needs:  Re-stocking of Brooks Pond (minimal expense); selected vista and invasives clearing (mostly volunteer labor, some disposal costs).
  4. Program need: Development of more formal environmental and history education programs with Medford Public Schools and other partners. Will need part-time, educator staff or contractor - cost unknown.
  5.  Management need: Additional Board member with landscape architecture expertise (no direct cost).

CEO Statement

The Medford-Brooks Estate Land Trust (M-BELT) is truly a community-driven organization. We focus on a unique and multi-faceted local resource, the Brooks Estate, that has been part and parcel of Medford (MA) for over three hundred years. The land, the people and the stories of this place are all tied to the proud history and community of Medford, from our Colonial ancestors to immigration in the nineteenth century, from Native American hunting grounds to veterans’ housing, all the way to those who today enjoy the quiet open space, natural landscape, Brooks Pond, and the historic buildings.
 
The Brooks Estate is not the Grand Canyon or the Rockies, but it is ours and it is unique, familiar but ever-changing. To use a familiar phrase, it’s part of home. As importantly, it belongs to everyone and to every creature who finds a home in the pond or woods.
 
Unlike many historic places, the Brooks Estate contains both the built environment with a rich contextual and natural landscape. Some visitors never venture beyond the fish in Brooks Pond, some are interested only in Victorian architecture, and some value everything on offer. It’s all good and it’s why we’re here and why the Brooks Estate is so important.
 
And, of course, M-BELT is only distinctive because the Brooks Estate is distinctive. We think of this as a strength that fuels our endeavors as the stewards and champions of a small piece of New England just six miles from Boston.
 
Tom Lincoln - M-BELT President

Board Chair Statement

I have been involved with the Brooks Estate since a winter walk in the Medford cemetery in 1994. I ended up in the woods behind the Shepherd Brooks Manor. The landscape was stunning and my day was crowned when a beautiful red fox crossed my path. I thought “this must be a special place if a fox lives here.” So I asked a few questions at Medford City Hall and learned that I had been in the Brooks Estate, land owned by the City of Medford since 1942 and “managed” by the Cemetery Board.
 
Others felt the same way and we organized the Brooks Estate Preservation Association (BEPA), spurred on by a municipal proposal to install cell phone towers next to the Shepherd Brooks Manor. Together with the efforts of hundreds of Medfordites, BEPA secured the permanent protection of this invaluable piece of open space in perpetuity in 1998. No mean accomplishment, to be sure, for unprotected land worth millions of dollars.
 
Since 1999 I have worked as a planner, writer, fundraiser, negotiator and cheerleader on behalf of the Brooks Estate. It has been a truly collaborative effort among the M-BELT Board, members, and volunteers, aided by a variety of in-kind donors, planning professionals and others.
 
I chose to be involved because I believe that every community deserves a Brooks Estate, and we are lucky enough to have one. I believe in the common good embodied by common open space, especially space that echoes centuries of local history. I believe we are stewards of the environment and owe a debt to our children, the planet and nature itself. I believe that the residents of Medford deserve quality meeting, event and programmatic space, in a city lacking both.
 
But these are not just my beliefs. Every person who has contributed, volunteered or rallied for the Brooks Estate shares some or all of them.
 
These shared beliefs have powered our many successes. We have cleaned up decades of litter, rescued the Shepherd Brooks Manor from a long slide to destruction and stabilized the Carriage House. On the landscape side, we built a handicap boardwalk to Brooks Pond, cleared overgrown trials, removed invasives and more. We have secured and managed over $1 million in restoration funding for the Manor, with monies directed to the City of Medford. We have spent over $265,000 of our own funds on a huge variety of physical improvements, repairs, planning documents and programs. Finally, we manage volunteers of all sorts.
 
We have brought the Brooks Estate back to life and poised for final restoration and re-use. Today, major pieces need to be put in place; only then will self-sufficiency be possible. Our Brooks Estate Master Plan (see brooksestate.org) is the blueprint. We lack only the requisite capital funding. This is by far our biggest challenge.
 
We are tackling this challenge. First, we are working to secure bond funding from the property’s owner, the City of Medford, for the largest pieces. Second, we are seeking grant funding to make the Manor more useful for programs, education, meetings, etc. Third, we are working on making the project even “greener,” by exploring opportunities for energy efficiency and renewables.
 
M-BELT is community-based and community-driven. We have a glorious vision for the Brooks Estate and are determined to make it a reality.

Geographic Area Served

NORTHEAST REGION, MA
The Brooks Estate is located in Medford, Massachusetts (02155) and serves that community, as well as neighboring cities and towns (Winchester, Somerville, Arlington, Malden, Melrose, and Cambridge). Of course, as public open space, the property may be enjoyed by visitors from any location!

Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Historical Societies & Historic Preservation
  2. Environment - Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
  3. Education - Elementary & Secondary Schools

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Historic Restoration

Includes restoration of the Shepherd Brooks Manor and Carriage House (1880) for adaptive re-use as community meeting space, program space, and function facilities. The Shepherd Brooks Manor offers five historic rooms (Parlor, Library, Dining Room, Office and Hall), a Verandah, and a beautiful two-story Victorian West Porch (fully restored), as well as archival and management space. The Carriage House will be the main economic engine for the project and will offer a large, flexible, meeting and function space within a “cathedral-like” space. The two buildings will be served by a proximate parking area (sub-grade), the large manor Yard, and a forecourt, all within the naturalistic historic core landscape. The goal is to provide modern, flexible, and accessible facilities for public benefit, all within the beautiful historic landscape and open space of the Brooks Estate. This will also require rebuilding the historic access drive, and providing upgraded utilities.
Budget  $3,300,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Historic Preservation & Conservation
Population Served Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success 
Short-term success will occur with the availability of more of the historic buildings' rooms for public use, as the restoration proceeds.
 
Specifically, improvements to the first-floor rooms of the Manor, Verandah, and Yard will permit greatly enhanced use and public benefit,
Program Long-Term Success 
The complete restoration of the Brooks Estate for public benefit, including the restored Shepherd Brooks Manor and Carriage House as community and program space, and function facilities for the people of Medford and the general public.
 
Success defined as the availability of the historic buildings year-round for a wide variety of community meetings, programs, and events, as well as functions and events. The function facility aspects of the site will ensure its long-term sustainability, further improvements over time, and subsidize free or low-cost uses. Note: the landscape, Brooks Pond and open space are already available and accessible to the public.
 
Programmatic success will only be fully possible with concomitant facilities. We envision a variety of cultural and educational programs, generally with third party partners.
 
Finally, success is more qualitatively defined as community pride, historic and cultural awareness and environmental protection of a priceless and unique public asset.
Program Success Monitored By 
Success is monitored by tracking the number of visitors, attendees and casual users of the Brooks Estate, particularly persons coming for cultural, educational, or environmental reasons.
 
As with any public open space / historic site, users are a mixture of daily visitors, goal-specific visits (such as fishing in Brooks pond) and attendees on offered events, tours, talks, etc.
Examples of Program Success 
We have made substantial progress on the physical restoration of the Brooks Estate. When we got started, the property had suffered decades of neglect; we have played a certain amount of "catch-up ball," but have reached the stage where: both buildings are sound; the Manor is livable, generally presentable, and useful in warmer months; and where the natural landscape, trails, Brooks Pond are accessible and enjoyable year-round; and where the historic and natural environment is protected.
 
Each time a visitor takes a walk, studies birds, learns some history, or  enjoys a quiet interlude -- that's success! And, it is success because 15 years ago, it would not really have been possible.

Management

M-BELT serves as the “Manager” of the Brooks Estate for the City of Medford. We handle small repairs, alarm systems, landscaping, general sprucing of the trails and Boardwalk, and a host of related tasks. Most work is done by volunteers or in-kind donors; we cover supplies and other labor costs. The Shepherd Brooks Manor is occupied by Caretakers, used for some meetings, and the yard is used for our annual picnic and other events.
Budget  $3,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Historic Preservation & Conservation
Population Served Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success 
Short-term success will be to bring several longstanding issues to resolution, including:  water pressure, temporary road repairs, and invasive plant control.
 
We have general plans for each of these issues, several of which, of course, are inter-twined with larger restoration and infrastructure investment requirements.
Program Long-Term Success 
[Note: management cost estimate is only for current management costs.]
 
The ultimate change will be a completely restored Brooks Estate as a modern, efficient, accessible and self-sustaining public asset. Concomitantly, the ultimate goal is to manage the asset sustainably and efficiently for public benefit.
 
On a practical basis, the long-term goal is to achieve a complete program of preventative maintenance, reduce emergency costs, and integrate periodic management with longer-term improvements, particularly on landscape and habitat issues.
Program Success Monitored By  We know what is working by the level of one-time or emergency repairs required, the general appearance of the property and user feedback. We also conduct a minimum of two "spruce-up" events for volunteer work on the site. And, we have several very committed volunteers who regularly monitor trail conditions, Brooks Pond, and the woods.
Examples of Program Success  Success is receiving user feedback. Data also shows that we have taken care of major long-term conditions, such as in-Manor utilities. Finally, the property is now virtually litter-free, which is about as visible as one can get.

Planning

M-BELT undertakes or contracts for a wide range of restoration, landscape, and management planning for the Brooks Estate. This has included: a Landscape / Open Space Plan for the entire 50-acre site; a detailed “Historic Core” Landscape Plan for the 3 acres around the buildings; wetlands mapping; architectural and construction documents; adaptive re-use planning, drawings and professional estimates; ADA planning; a complete Business Plan for income/costs/amortization of the entire project and an energy efficiency study. Planning supports our ongoing restoration projects, as well as the long-term vision for the Brooks Estate. Planning is done by volunteer-experts, as well as paid consultants. All planning documents have been consolidated in the Brooks Estate Master Plan, available at www.brooksestate.org
Budget  $5,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Historic Preservation & Conservation
Population Served Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success 
Short-term success is derived tow-fold: the inclusion and integration of a huge amount of planning into the Brooks Estate Master Plan; and the use of some of the planning elements in near-term restoration (and other) projects, such as desired work on the Parlor, Verandah and Manor Yard.
 
The time-frame here, of course, is very dependent on available capital funding.
Program Long-Term Success 
Planning is undertaken entirely in support of the overall vision for the Brooks Estate -- to provide a completely restored asset for public benefit.
 
Logic says that long-term success will occur when all our planning comes to fruition in the physical and programmatic realms.
 
It is important to note, however, that this success is only achievable with our partnerships with the Medford public, friends and supporters, and the City of Medford,
Program Success Monitored By  Success is visible and tangible:  restored rooms and buildings; fewer invasives in the open space; and increased visitorship, particularly for educational, youth and related programs. Planning is designed to result in better conditions (etc)- better conditions result in better usage, accessibility, and outreach.
Examples of Program Success 
We have already use many elements of our planning documents to carry out construction, restoration or repair projects. Prime examples include:
 
- ADA accessibility for the first floor of the Shepherd Brooks Manor
- adding a handicapped lift to the second floor (in progress)
- reduction in the number of open trails on the property (reduces impact and fragmentation)
- our complete CAD drawings have made it possible to generate estimates and construction documents much more efficiently
- the wetlands mapping is critical to further plans for the re-build of the historic access drive
 
(These are just a few examples)
 
Most importantly, all these planning efforts have made it possible to create a  coherent, professional, and practical master planning document and vision: the Brooks Estate Master Plan. The Master Plan is the absolute foundation on which rests our forward efforts.

Public Outreach / Events

M-BELT offers an informal program of on-site nature and history walks, tours and open houses, all open to the public. We have held dozens of free events since we began. We have also held several art exhibits and hope to do a site-wide modern dance afternoon later in 2013. We have sponsored several Eagle Scout projects on the property. Tours are held for Girl Scouts, Roots and Shoots, Victorian enthusiasts, and other interest groups. We do public lectures and offer the Brooks Family Heritage Walk, both online and on the ground in Medford. Our annual Brooks Estate Picnic (in July) is a local institution, free to all, and very popular. It is also our modest annual fundraiser.
 
The biggest constraint on events is the lack of appropriately restored space in the Shepherd Brooks Manor, and the somewhat rough condition of the Manor Yard. This has made it impossible to easily hold classroom-type or lengthy indoor programs, particularly in the colder months.
Budget  $1,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Historic Preservation & Conservation
Population Served Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success 
 Near-term achievements will include:
 
- coordinating offerings with the Friends of the Middlesex Fells
- offering several more Bird Walks with the Menotomy Bird Club
- starting a test program of offering informal meeting space
Program Long-Term Success 
Long-term success will come when we have a completely restored Brooks Estate to accommodate a greater variety and intensity of community outreach, education (including environmental education), and events, as well a function space for the Medford public and others. (Medford has a marked shortage of accessible, amenable and flexible meeting and function space.)
 
This long-term success will make it possible to engage a variety of potential partners, such as after-school programs, Medford Family Network,  various environmental organizations, arts organizations, and the like.
Program Success Monitored By 
Program success is defined by the number of people attending on-site events, the number of hot dogs consumed at our Picnic, and the variety of people and groups we attract to the Brooks Estate.
 
Interestingly, it is also measured by what we are not seeing: littler, trail erosion, and similar mal-usage effects.
Examples of Program Success 
  We generally draw 120-160 people to our Annual Picnic. Open Houses (at the Manor) draw between 20-60 people. Our initial Brooks Family Heritage Walk got 36 people to walk three miles across Medford to the Brooks Estate. Attendance at our occasional slide shows runs from 30-100 people.
 
In sum, we have established a baseline of offerings that we can offer with existing resources and site conditions. As those elements increase, so will outreach and events.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Thomas W. Lincoln
CEO Term Start Jan 1999
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Board Chair - Thomas W. Lincoln - Experience
 
Extensive business experience as Director of Product Development in the professional publishing industry in Boston and New York, including planning, cost analysis, contracts, proposals, etc.
 
20 years experience in historic preservation and environmental advocacy:
     - historic preservation in Medford and elsewhere
    -  chair of several brownfield and park development commissions
    -  Chair - Medford Trash and Recycling Commission etc.
 
Editor and writer, including historic preservation and other grants
 
Other skills in negotiation and community organizing
 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

As noted in other parts of the Profile, we work closely with the City of Medford (various departments), Medford Office of Community Development, Massachusetts Historical Commission (MHC) and the Trustees of Reservations (TTOR).

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? N/A
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Thomas W. Lincoln
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Board Chair Term Dec 2012 - Dec 2013
Board Co-Chair Douglas P. Carr
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Board Co-Chair Term Dec 2012 - Dec 2013

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Douglas P. Carr Community Volunteer Voting
Thomas W. Lincoln Community Volunteer Voting
May Marquebreuck Community Volunteer Voting
Robert M. Penta Community Volunteer Voting
Audrey Stanwood Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Building
  • Community Outreach / Community Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

M-BELT is a community-driven, all-volunteer organization. Our Board is derived from the strengths of the Medford community and has been dedicated to this project for over a decade. As noted in other sections of this Profile, we do seek another Board member with landscape architecture experience.
 
 
Finally, I would note that the M-BELT Board, like all such institutions, draws upon a variety of volunteers and experts, ranging from a person who did measured drawings (into CAD) of the historic buildings, to birdwatching (birding) organizations, as well as painters, carpenters, and the like.
 
Like all nonprofits (well, all smaller nonprofits) Board service is a major commitment on the part of community  volunteers. We feel that the amount we have accomplished and the constancy of our mission and dedication reflects well on the M-BELT Board.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2013 to Dec 31, 2013
Projected Income $8,000.00
Projected Expense $15,000.00
Form 990s --
Audit Documents

2012 Funds Spent Including via City of Medford

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $40,990 $6,660 $8,365
Total Expenses $4,309 $7,625 $6,558

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$33,333 -- $535
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $200 $915 $280
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $6 $14 $9
Membership Dues $5,641 $3,981 $5,906
Special Events $1,810 $1,750 $1,635
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $3,508 $6,394 $5,603
Administration Expense $701 $1,071 $805
Fundraising Expense $100 $160 $150
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 9.51 0.87 1.28
Program Expense/Total Expenses 81% 84% 85%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 6% 6%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $72,211 $34,820 $35,600
Current Assets $72,211 $34,820 $35,600
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $72,211 $34,820 $35,600

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities -- -- --

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

M-BELT advances the restoration of the Brooks Estate in two ways: 1 - We raise and spend our own funds on a variety of physical / construction projects and planning. From 1999-2012 have spent approximately $221,000 of these funds directly on physical / construction projects and planning for the Brooks Estate. 2 - We seek, leverage and manage other funds from public and private granting agencies, as well as monies that are available to municipalities like Medford. From 1999 to 2012, this funding has totaled $1,051,500. All these funds flow directly through the City of Medford, the owner of the Brooks Estate. 3 - Therefore, through 2012, a total of $1,272,243 has been spent directly on restoration and planning at the Brooks Estate. For details, please see “M-BELT Brooks Estate Key Charts” (PDF) in the “Other Documents” section of this Giving Common listing. Please also see the Brooks Estate Master Plan “Introduction” and “Executive Summary” (separate PDFs) in the “Other Documents” section. The complete Brooks Estate Master Plan is available at www.brooksestate.org Please note that the Brooks Estate Master Plan was presented to the City of Medford in March, 2012, and minor additions were made in September, 2012. The Mayor of Medford proposed funding for the restoration of the Carriage House, the access drive, and related infrastructure in March, 2012. This funding proposal remains in front of the Medford City Council as of March, 2013.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's internal records, as this nonprofit files a 990-N (990 Postcard) which contains limited data.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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