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Organization DBA IIJD
INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR JUSTICE AND DEVELOPMENT
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The IIJD's mission is to tackle the root causes of poverty in Africa by providing tools necessary to address systemic institutional weaknesses, reform institutions of governance, build capacity and empower communities.

At the IIJD, we conduct research, consult, educate, advocate, and mobilize major stakeholders to take action and build a stronger institutional foundation to free Africa from oppression and poverty.

Without an independent, strong, transparent and reliable justice system, it is impossible to provide a just and trusted environment for business, research, and human development.

Mission Statement

The IIJD's mission is to tackle the root causes of poverty in Africa by providing tools necessary to address systemic institutional weaknesses, reform institutions of governance, build capacity and empower communities.

At the IIJD, we conduct research, consult, educate, advocate, and mobilize major stakeholders to take action and build a stronger institutional foundation to free Africa from oppression and poverty.

Without an independent, strong, transparent and reliable justice system, it is impossible to provide a just and trusted environment for business, research, and human development.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Feb 01, 2012 to Jan 31, 2013
Projected Income $100,000.00
Projected Expense $90,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Africa Justice System Reform Initiative
  • African Spiders' Webs Initiative (ASWIN)

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The IIJD's mission is to tackle the root causes of poverty in Africa by providing tools necessary to address systemic institutional weaknesses, reform institutions of governance, build capacity and empower communities.

At the IIJD, we conduct research, consult, educate, advocate, and mobilize major stakeholders to take action and build a stronger institutional foundation to free Africa from oppression and poverty.

Without an independent, strong, transparent and reliable justice system, it is impossible to provide a just and trusted environment for business, research, and human development.


Background Statement

The early nineties was a time when a new wind of democracy reached Africa. Benjamin Ngachoko, then law student in Yaoundé University, took a leadership role in the Cameroonian students’ organization to protest government’s abuses of human rights and lack of democracy. These protests forced the government to allow a multiparty political system that led to the organization of legislative  and presidential elections. When the government ridged the presidential elections in October 1992, students protested again. Under intense persecution from the government, Benjamin had to live his native Cameroon in 1993.

While in Burkina Faso (West Africa), he was impressed by how much work and progress was done by the government of Thomas Sankara of Burkina Faso in only four years. He knew that if better managed, Cameroon and other developing countries with more resources could do better than a landlocked country with almost half of its land in the desert. In 1997 he came to the United States and it was at Boston University School of Law, while enrolled in the LL.M in American law that Benjamin was again impressed by the United States' checks and balance system and by how much the judicial system had shaped American life and history. Having been at the forefront of the fight for liberties and democracy and having learned from mistakes made by political leaders from both governments and oppositions, Benjamin came to the conclusion that a strong judiciary would be an indispensable element to help achieve effective democratic governance and sustainable development in Africa. Hence the idea of the IIJD.

The International Institute for Justice and Development (IIJD) was created in July 2001 and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) made the determination in September 2004 that it was exempt from federal income tax under section 501(c)(3).   In October 2004, the Massachusetts Department of Revenue issued IIJD’s certificate of Exemption. February 2005 marked the effective beginning of IIJD’s activities, with a fully equipped office space.  

The IIJD seeks to alleviate poverty in Africa by dismantling systemic barriers and addressing institutional weaknesses that create an environment of corruption, exclusion, repression and economic stagnation. Our approach to development is a top-down and bottom-up strategy. Our programs are designed to allow for institutional and systemic reforms from top to bottom, while building capacity and empowering people from the bottom-up.


Impact Statement

Last year the IIJD set a number of ambitious goals. Some of the successful accomplishments that we continue to leverage include the following:

 Management: We developed and established a policies and procedures system checklist for the IIJD and began drafting additional policies and procedures. We enhanced our toolkit and our guide fro effective institutional reform. We developed a marketing and public relations strategy, including a social media policy and strategy. We developed business requirements documents for technology support platforms for our two main initiatives:  the African Spiders’ Webs Initiative (ASWIN) and the Africa Justice Index (AJI). We designed the Africa Justice System Reform webpage and we researched and selected different technology tools for the IIJD programs.

Some of our management goals for 2012 include: Fully implementing the marketing strategy to raise the organization’s profile and help raise funds, including a 100% implementation of our social media strategy. We are building the Justice System Reform online platform and webpage needed for the publication of country profiles for both ASWIN and the justice program.

Finances: We developed a funds development strategy for the IIJD, which included raising the organization profile and conducting individual prospects research.

For 2012: We continue to implement our fund development strategy to raise funds needed to cover all our expenses and  implement our initiatives.

Programs: We completed 35 African country profiles following a redesigned template. We also completed all ASWIN country profiles for 2011, for 54 countries.  

We issued several calls for action, including one on Ivory Coast, which was published and sent to decision makers around the world. We published 23 newsletters articles and updates.

Some of our program goals for 2012: Complete all 55 African country justice profiles and begin the review process to get at least 15 profiles published on the IIJD website.  We also plan to publish ASWIN profiles and launch our new blog.


Needs Statement

For years, the IIJD has advocated for change in the way development efforts have traditionally been conducted in Africa.  Currently, we are working on two initiatives:  The African Justice Index will be the first objective “scorecard” of how well each African nation performs in their fundamental responsibility of protecting their people with an independent, objective and transparent justice system.  This scorecard will be a highly visible tool for decision-makers around the world as they consider how to direct development efforts and business expansion to drive economic growth on the continent. The second initiative (ASWIN) is designed to encourage Africans in the Diaspora, and the friends of Africa, to participate in a more effective and organized way in the development of their homelands.  It provides an innovative development platform for participation and collaboration for sustainable projects with high impact. We need your support to drive each project to completion and to permanently resolve the African development crisis.


CEO Statement

Today, we are more dependent on each other at a global level; we all face the same threats, whether it's communal security threats or global warming. Living in the United States, in Europe or elsewhere, we are individually and collectively dependent on people who live in other countries. Where there is injustice and poverty, hopelessness and despair breed easily. It is well known that millions of people in Africa are living in extreme poverty today. Although the political, social and economic crisis in Africa can be attributed in part to past mistakes of the international community for their role in funding non sustainable development programs and supporting corrupt and illegitimate regimes; currently, African leadership must take responsibility for the lack of development in their countries as a result of bad leadership, authoritarian regimes, senseless wars, capital flight, mismanagement of countries resources, lack of accountability and transparency, and rampant corruption. These factors have led to squandering, misuse and more often misappropriation of development funds and national resources.

Democracy is more than a multiparty system where people have no right to assembly and media are controlled by the government or the ruling party. We believe at the IIJD, that Democracy is more about individual and collective freedom, justice and equity for all, transparency and accountability in the management of the affairs of the country.

Until more effective people-centered policies are implemented, it seems likely that the majority of innocent people will continue to live in poverty and desperation with no hope for a better future. While most development organizations emphasize the need to remedy the symptoms of poverty, IIJD works to confront its underlying causes by insisting on institutions reforms, infrastructure and capacity building. The promotion of an independent judiciary and of a fair and accessible justice system that fosters the principles of democratic governance and rule of law will help advance democracy, protect human rights abuses, bring accountability, and secure private and foreign investments.  

I know that this is an ambitious and challenging proposition, but it’s one that would begin to change dramatically the way international development works have been conducted for decades in and for Africa. If you share our vision, please join us in this exciting journey. Your support and contributions are always needed. Do not hesitate to contact the IIJD with any questions you might have. Together, we shall make it happen!


Board Chair Statement

For decades, the international community and the developed world as a collective whole have injected money into Africa. However, after years of the same African aid policy, the developed world continues to pump money into the continent, but continues to see little concrete and long-lasting results. The effectiveness of the aid programs already in place suffers tremendously from the embezzlement of funds and the general apathy of African leadership to the welfare of their respective populations.

As important as aid is to the well-being of Africa, the assumption that money alone will cure what ails the nations of Africa is inherently wrong; that assumption has undoubtedly been tested over the past 50 years only to see the average standard of living decrease in many places in Africa. The real issue at the core of Africa's development crisis is that of weak and dysfunctional institutions. In order to address the underlying causes of Africa persistent poverty, it’s crucial to reform institutions of governance, strengthen people's ability to hold leaders accountable for their actions, and maintain the basic conditions necessary for a functioning democracy that promotes the ingenuity of its people and attracts investments. It is only through the reform of the institutions of the system of governance and the establishment of independent justice systems that Africa will finally come to realize the incredible potential it possesses.   That’s what Africans in the Diaspora and within the continent are calling for, and it is what we at the IIJD have been advocating for years now.

The work we do at the IIJD requires creativity, commitment, time, energy and a lot of resources; and will yield strong results over time.  We’ve been very fortunate to receive countless hours of research work by our many unpaid college interns and volunteers from some of the great universities and colleges in the United States, but these contributions can only take the IIJD so far. Substantial financial support will provide the last piece of the puzzle that, once solved, will help the IIJD quickly implement its programs to make Africa better and the world a  more peaceful place for all. 


Geographic Area Served

INTERNATIONAL
NATIONAL
STATEWIDE
Africa, African Countries, Sub-Sahara Africa: Our current justice initiative, the Africa Justice Index, covers all African countries. Our development projects are geared mainly toward sub-Sahara Africa. We target the African Diaspora mainly in the United States and Europe. Our education  program currently focuses on MA and other US states, as we welcome students from Universities around the country. We conduct advocacy by targeting decision makers in the US, international organizations and more.

Organization Categories

  1. International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security - Democracy And Civil Society Development
  2. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Economic Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Africa Justice System Reform Initiative

The IIJD's Justice System Reform Initiative’s principal objective is to address the root causes of poverty in Africa by creating an institutional framework that can ensure the establishment of a justice system that is internationally recognized as effective, and that encourages the growth of democracy, reducing corruption, establishing transparency and accountability in the management of public services and natural resources, empowering the poor, and supporting sustainable development. A dysfunctional justice system undermines the rule of law and perpetuates poverty in Africa by allowing resources to be squandered through unchecked corruption. Only through the reform of these systems can we create an incentive for educated and capable citizens to stay and contribute to their countries' future. A well-functioning justice system is the cornerstone of sustainable economic development and growth.

 

Budget  $500,000.00
Category  International, Foreign Affairs & National Security, General/Other Democratic Values Promotion
Population Served Africa US& International
Program Short-Term Success 

The Africa Justice System Reform Initiative (AJSRI) is the first program developed to address the institutional weaknesses causing a crisis in development and persistent poverty in Africa. The AJSRI conceptual work began with the development of a justice system reform toolkit, a comprehensive approach, and an index. The IIJD developed 55 African countries justice profiles to give a better understanding of, and background information on, each country’s governance structure. A comprehensive assessment of the institutions within the justice systems allows us to gain a firm understanding of these institutions and their implications in daily life. With the Africa Justice Index (AJI), we examine hundreds of indicators, conduct opinion surveys to explore the perceptions and opinions of everyday citizens about the current state of their justice system. The AJI will be published once we have gathered all the necessary data.

Program Long-Term Success  The development of effective institutions and the creation of transparent, independent, reliable and accessible justice systems is the ultimate goal of the Africa Justice System Reform Initiative. The success of the IIJD reform process is achieved with (1) the establishment of strong, well-functioning and accessible justice systems, and (2) by addressing tensions between formal institutions and customary laws, which allows for reconciliation between Africans and their government institutions.
Program Success Monitored By  The success of this program is measured by the increased adhesion of decision makers to the theory that reforming institutions of governance in Africa make a significant difference in its quest to eradicate abject poverty. The justice system reform program offers a new standard for African justice system evaluation and, most importantly, institutional reform and good governance for sustainable development.
Examples of Program Success  The overall impact of the program is measured in the long term. Data collected through the Africa Justice Index will represent a valuable tool for decision makers to reshape policies on Africa's development. The Africa Justice Index provides data that clearly presents systemic barriers and institutional weaknesses of the system of governance and the justice system. It can be used as a decision-making tool by leaders in Africa and within the international development community, and by multinational commercial enterprises weighing important investment decision.

African Spiders' Webs Initiative (ASWIN)

ASWIN is designed to allow Africans and the friends of Africa to participate in a more effective and efficient way in developing African countries. Migrants’ remittances are recognized as one of the major sources of financial support to developing countries. Available data and analysis indicate that remittance inflows play an important role in reducing poverty and fostering entrepreneurship.

The ASWIN platform provides efficiencies in facilitating communication between project beneficiaries and funding sources, helping to identify and voice community needs as well as help in addressing those needs while supporting training and building the capacity of community groups and channeling resources to the most disadvantaged groups.  This platform is a powerful mobilization and development tool that will make a significant impact. As of 2010, there were about 1.6 million African-born in the United States alone, almost 42% with a Bachelor’s degree.

Budget  $200,000.00
Category  International, Foreign Affairs & National Security, General/Other International Development
Population Served Africa Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success  The ASWIN platform provides efficiencies in facilitating communication between project beneficiaries and funding sources, helping to identify and voice community needs as well as help in addressing those needs. The short-term is measured by the immediate impact of projects realized and how sustainable and replicable they are. By the end of the third year of execution we should have at least ten communities impacted by this initiative.
Program Long-Term Success  Migrants’ remittances are recognized as one of the major sources of financial support to developing countries. Available data and analysis indicate that remittance inflows play an important role in reducing poverty and fostering entrepreneurship. The World Bank estimates that remittance flows in Africa amounted to approximately $40 billion in 2010. The long-term success in this program is measured by the impact of projects realized and the number of communities affected by the realizations.
Program Success Monitored By  Projects will be monitored through communications with beneficiaries and the impact will be measured by observation, surveys, interviews and comparative assessments, depending on the nature of each project.
Examples of Program Success  People in impacted communities will be able to satisfy more of their basic needs than before the realization of the project.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The IIJD is a fairly young organization with an ambitious program that does not fit the mold assigned to Africa' development and emergency relief platform. The IIJD refuses to see the problems of Africa from a symptomatic angle, but look at the root causes that need to be addressed once and for all. As such, the IIJD does not present Africa with pictures of farmished children or wars, instead, the IIJD looks at the potential the African continent represents for the world economy and lays out a plan to help Africa achieve its full potential. The two main programs are developed to: on one level, help build the institutional foundation need to foster good governance, secure peace and sustain development; on the other level, the IIJD ensures that all stakeholders have a say in developing Africa, hence ASWIN, as a socio-economic and development mobilization platform. The main challenge the organization faces is raising enough funds to launch these robust platforms. However, through its educational program, the IIJD has attracted students interns who are eager to learn more about African political institutions here in Massachusetts, without having to travel to Washington DC. They assist with research. That's how we've been able to dress a politico-judicial profiles of all African countries. We have also welcomed assistance from volunteers with diverse backgrounds and because of our ability to manage this kind of assistance, we have maintained a decent website and we'll soon start to post country profiles for both the justice and development programs. Pro bono assistance can only take the IIJD so far, that is why we are currently working harder to raise the visibility of the organization and raise enough funds to execute projects and deliver more results.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Benjamin Ngachoko
CEO Term Start Feb 2002
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

·    Over 20 years of experience in providing technical assistance and advisory services to governments, NGOs and individuals in the areas of institutional reforms and judicial strengthening, capacity building, organizational development, management and rule of law in sub-Saharan Africa

·     Experienced in successfully developing, managing, directing, supervising, or overseeing complex projects in Francophone Africa (Guinea, Cameroon, Benin, Burkina Faso, etc.) 

·     Extensive experience in producing complex legal documents and reports or analysis in both English and French.

·     Excellent understanding of international development issues and advanced knowledge of the legal, political, cultural, and socio-economical environments of most sub-Saharan African countries. 

·     Created and successfully organized the first International Conference on the State of Affairs in Africa (ICSAA) in an effort to address Africa’s development crisis and its persistent poverty. 

·    Developed an innovative and comprehensive approach in tackling the roots causes of poverty in Africa by reforming the institutions of governance and establishing an independent, accessible and efficient Justice System.

·    Created the IIJD’s Justice System Reform Toolkit being used to assess the institutions of Justice System and to establish the justice index.  

·    Strong interpersonal skills along with the ability to work in a multicultural environment and to motivate and inspire others.

·   Excellent planning, drafting, reporting, and communication skills. 

·    Highly motivated professional who is passionately committed to democracy and institutional reforms in Africa

 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Paulette Meyitang Ngachoko Esq. Chief Strategy Officer --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Africa today, with its myriad of resources, represents the next frontier in terms of markets with incredible potential and opportunities. Building institutions that can protect investments and sustain development is of prime importance. Since the success of institutional reform can only be measured over time, it is essential to know the such work is complex, time intensive and requires very specialized skills. The IIJD has essentially functioned as a volunteer organization and has accomplished most of what could be accomplished with pro bono work. Hundreds of researchers and volunteers have so far contributed thousands of hours to these efforts. The IIJD provide tools to people and African governments so they can build the institutional foundation needed to foster democracy and sustain development. The tools the IIJD provides also help decision makers in developed countries and international organizations, including corporations, foundations and individual donors in making a better assessment of how to direct their support and invest to alleviate poverty in Africa. The organization is working to expand its board of directors, but most importantly to raise funds to take its work to the next level.

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 10
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 2
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 12
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Benjamin Ngachoko
Board Chair Company Affiliation IIJD, Inc
Board Chair Term Feb 2012 - Jan 2015
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Jean Assobmo Massachusetts General Hospital Voting
Mr. Keith Boudreau The Growth Coach Voting
Mr. Jonathan Butler DiCicco, Gulman & Company LLP Voting
Mr. Justin Crawford Esq. GERAGHTY SUAREZ LLP Voting
Mrs. Paulette Meyitang Ngachoko Esq. International Institute for Justice and Development Voting
Ms. Carole Copeland Thomas C. Thomas & Associate Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Jean-Claude Etheart Haitian Embassy - Dominican Republic NonVoting
Mr. Kwame Frimpong Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA) NonVoting
Mr. Romero Hayman Stax, Inc. NonVoting
Mrs. Martha Hopewell Seven Centers Leadership Consulting NonVoting
Ms. Aparna Polavarapu University of South Carolina NonVoting
Mr. Francis Ssekandi Columbia Unicersity / World Bank NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 60%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 80%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Africa today, with its myriad of resources, represents the next frontier in terms of markets with incredible potential and opportunities. Building institutions that can protect investments and sustain development is of prime importance. Since the success of institutional reform can only be measured over time, it is essential to know the such work is complex, time intensive and requires very specialized skills. The IIJD has essentially functioned as a volunteer organization and has accomplished most of what could be accomplished with pro bono work. Hundreds of researchers and volunteers have so far contributed thousands of hours to the efforts. The IIJD provides tools to people and African governments so they can build the institutional foundation needed to foster democratic governance and sustain development. The tools the IIJD provides also help decision makers in developed countries and international organizations, including corporations, foundations and individual donors in making a better assessment of how to direct their support and invest to alleviate poverty in Africa.

So far, with the absolute minimum and from scratch, the IIJD has created a toolkit, developed a process and an approach for effective institution reform in Africa. The organization is working to expand its board of directors, but most importantly to raise funds to take its work to the next level.

 

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Fiscal Year Feb 01, 2012 to Jan 31, 2013
Projected Income $100,000.00
Projected Expense $90,000.00
Form 990s

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2010 IIJD 2009-2010 Audited Financial Statement

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Revenue $22,345 $7,003 $40,546
Total Expenses $32,479 $13,706 $23,286

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- $22,046
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $22,345 $7,003 $15,056
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- $3,440
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- $4
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Program Expense $21,239 $10,840 $15,015
Administration Expense $11,240 $2,794 $8,201
Fundraising Expense -- $72 $70
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.69 0.51 1.74
Program Expense/Total Expenses 65% 79% 64%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 1% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Assets $10,552 $16,577 $74,027
Current Assets $1,757 $1,686 $1,690
Long-Term Liabilities $15,925 $70,612 $28,800
Current Liabilities $58,796 $0 $13,691
Total Net Assets $-64,169 $-54,035 $31,536

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose Provide the organization with a building for its headquarter, its education (internship/leadership exchange) program, and for the organization financial sustainability.
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 0.03 -- 0.12

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 151% 426% 39%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Africa today, with its myriad of resources, represents the next frontier in terms of markets with incredible potential and opportunities. Building institutions that can protect investments and sustain development is of prime importance. Since the success of institutional reform can only be measured over time, it is essential to know the such work is complex, time intensive and requires very specialized skills. The IIJD has essentially functioned as a volunteer organization and has accomplished most of what could be accomplished with pro bono work. The IIJD receives thousands of pro bono hours or service worth more than $200,000 every year. They are the main source of support for our programs and have helped the organization accomplish a lot so far. These contributions made possible our research, writing fifty-five country profiles, issuing calls for action, advocacy work, technological support, and much more.
The IIJD provide tools to people and African governments so they can build the institutional foundation needed to foster democracy and sustain development. The tools the IIJD provides also help decision makers in developed countries and international organizations, including corporations, foundations and individual donors in making a better assessment of how to direct their support and invest to alleviate poverty in Africa. The organization has accomplished a great deal so far with the absolute minimum and is currently working to expand its board of directors, but most importantly to raise enough funds to take its work to the next level.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s with added information from the organization, included the breakout of expenses for FY 2010.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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