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North American Family Institute

 90 Maple St, Unit 2
 Stoneham, MA 02180
[P] (617) 480-8238 x 4808238
[F] (617) 531-9313
www.nafi.com
[email protected]
Jay Paris
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1986
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2921507

LAST UPDATED: 08/22/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

Creating Diverse and Innovative Services for People

Mission Statement

Creating Diverse and Innovative Services for People

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $106,698,368.00
Projected Expense $106,149,228.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Youth Link Franklin Field

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Creating Diverse and Innovative Services for People

Background Statement

NAFI/NFI was founded by Dr. Yitzhak Bakal, who continues to serve as its president and chief executive officer. Dr. Bakal was inspired to launch the nonprofit after serving as Assistant Commissioner in charge of institutions for delinquent youth for the Massachusetts Department of Youth Services in the early 1970’s. In that role he became one of the architects of the reform that created the closing of the state’s juvenile correctional facilities in favor of privatizing community-based alternatives. As a result, Massachusetts became the first state to embrace deinstitutionalizing care for children and youth that eventually spread across the nation. After leaving the Department of Youth Services, in 1974 Dr. Bakal launched NAFI/NFI (then called Northeastern Family Institute, Inc.), joining a small group of burgeoning non-profits serving youth in the juvenile justice and mental health systems. He began with one contract, the Outreach and Tracking program in Malden, MA, which he operated out of his home. After its initial success, NFI continued to help meet the needs of this formerly institutionalized population by developing a foster care component. As the effort to privatize services for adjudicated delinquents grew, NAFI expanded its services to Vermont, followed by New Hampshire and several other states. Today, NAFI/NFI operates numerous residential and community-based programs across nine states and the District of Columbia, continuing its mission ofCreating Diverse and Innovative Services for Consumers in Behavioral Health. The organization is comprised of five corporations; the parent corporation, North American Family Institute, Inc. (NAFI), NFI Massachusetts, Inc., NFI North, Inc., NFI Vermont, Inc. and NAFI Connecticut, Inc. Within the parent corporation (NAFI), there are three regions: NAFI New York, NAFI Rhode Island Network and the NAFI Southeast region, made up of our programming in Florida and Virginia. NAFI continues to grow and expand, developing continuums of care and services for youth, adolescents, families and adults at-risk. Under Dr. Bakal’s leadership, NAFI/NFI is also pioneering prevention and early intervention initiatives to help at-risk communities strengthen and thrive in struggling public housing developments and high crime neighborhoods.

Impact Statement

Top Three Accomplishments
 
1) Bringing our Youth and Police Initiative training that builds trust between teenagers in challenged neighborhoods and the officers that patrol them  to now 25 cities, including Indianapolis, Philadelphia, Yonkers, NY, Providence, Boston and also Bermuda.  
2) Partnering with the Boston Housing Authority, business leaders and the Boston Police Dept. to oversee the operation of two youth and family centers in two of Boston's neediest housing developments. These include Franklin Field in Dorchester and Lenox in Roxbury. 
3)  Partnering with Dr. Bruce Perry, renowned child psychiatrist and author to develop a series of seminars and workshops for social service nonprofit workers that explores trauma-- its effects and cures.
 
Current top three goals;
1) Advance community building strategies in Boston by expanding business partnerships.
Build a consortium of grass roots organizations whose membership receives support in grant writing, maintaining standards and data collection.  
3) Expand youth and police training by 20%. 
 
 
 
 

Needs Statement

Top 5 Needs
 
1) More funding for operational infrastructure--$250,000
2)  Develop new marketing materials using social media and video
3)  Find five new business partners that support our goals 
 4) Expand our advisory board by 5 people
5) Partner with five new cities to do the Youth and Police training 
 

CEO Statement

NAFI/NFI is an organization built upon a belief in the power of community to unite, grow and transform individuals into their best selves. We value diversity, training, self-care, personal growth and work satisfaction for staff because our staff are the character of the organization, which must be strong in order for our services to achieve results. We are committed to quality improvement and accountability so we have invested in systems and training to support first class data collection and transparency linked closely to program development. Our broad staff group includes many clinical and therapeutically trained professionals alongside many grass roots advocates for youth and families. The cross fertilization of skills has led to an organizational culture that is client friendly and practical. Our goal is to empower clients to maximize their independence and harness past experiences as strengths and wisdom to help them succeed in the future. The NAFI/NAFI philosophy centers around the Normative Community Approach (NCA), a framework developed by our founder, Dr. Yitzhak Bakal, that promotes a safe, caring, and deeply respectful environment that nurtures growth. The NCA establishes an ongoing process for evaluation and feedback that allows everyone to have a voice, including an opportunity to advocate for their point of view. If fully heard, it has been NAFI’s experience that participants become investedstakeholders in the program and in their own treatment. The NCA creates a working alliance between staff and clients and among groups of clients. It aims to empower all clients - youth and their families - and engages them as partners in their treatment and recovery. NAFI/NFI’s unique Normative Community Approach emphasizes: Identifying and building upon client strengthsMaintaining physical and emotional safetyIndividualized and family-centered treatmentRole-modeling, community, teamwork, respect and trust

Board Chair Statement

To be added

Geographic Area Served

NATIONAL
Although national in scope, Boston is our hub and where we incubate, pilot and develop many of our community-based programs. Our focus has been public housing development neighborhoods, specifically in the Franklin Field area of Dorchester.  

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  2. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Mental Health Treatment
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community & Neighbourhood Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Youth Link Franklin Field

In 2007, NAFI Youth Link began working at the Franklin Field Housing Development in Dorchester. Numerous other services were developed and a Youth Link team began supporting kids and families on a daily basis. A culinary arts program taught more than 150 young Franklin Field residents new social skills and vocational skills. Youth formed a catering company with the skills they gained. More than 30 Youth Link grads from Franklin Field have moved on to college with the support of staff who helped with school searches and financial aid resources. According to police partners, crime dropped there by approximately 60% and drug arrests by 80% I
Budget  $150,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Adults Families
Program Short-Term Success  89% of youth stay in program one year or longer; average grade improvement =7 points. Completion of at least one program tack--95%. 
Program Long-Term Success  More than 200 youth and 150 police officers participated in the YPI trust building training, transforming the sense of safety and community at the development. Numerous other services were developed and a Youth Link team began supporting kids and families on a daily basis. A culinary arts program taught more than 150 young Franklin Field residents new social skills and vocational skills. Youth formed a catering company with the skills they gained. More than 30 Youth Link grads from Franklin Field have moved on to college with the support of staff who helped with school searches and financial aid resources. According to police partners, crime dropped there by approximately 60% and drug arrests by 80%
Program Success Monitored By  Staff through surveys that are logged onto NAFI's database
Examples of Program Success  Numerous other services were developed and a Youth Link team began supporting kids and families on a daily basis. A culinary arts program taught more than 150 young Franklin Field residents new social skills and vocational skills. Youth formed a catering company with the skills they gained. More than 30 Youth Link grads from Franklin Field have moved on to college with the support of staff who helped with school searches and financial aid resources. According to police partners, crime dropped there by approximately 60% and drug arrests by 80%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As mentioned previously, our goal is to assist the neighborhood of Franklin Field become a thriving locale that develops leadership and resources to sustain its wellbeing for all who reside and work there. As a prevention initiative now entering its tenth year, we are thrilled to see that crime has come way down, going from rating Franklin Field as the most violent neighborhood in the city to now being one of the safest housing developments in Boston.  

 

A main challenge that all stakeholders and especially the residents have raised is the need for mental health support. As a result, we have formed a partnership with the Boston College School of Social Work and have hired a supervisor (licensed clinician) who will work with two graduate students to offer outreach, advocacy and support three days a week at the center that we operate on the grounds of the housing development. This is a first for the city and the Housing Authority that we are hoping to make into a replicable model. The program launches in September of 2017.

 

But the greatest challenge of prevention programs is funding because monies tend to follow crises and the most acute, pressing problems. NAFI has used its  limited surpluses to offset these costs, as well as fundraising from individuals, corporations and an occasional grants to keep the initiative going. We remain committed to this important work, which is both cost saving in the long run and eases the hardships that unaddressed issues cause.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. YITZHAK BAKAL
CEO Term Start Mar 1974
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Born in Iraq, Dr. Bakal’s early childhood experiences as a member of an oppressed Jewish minority sensitized him to understanding the difficulties and the stresses of dealing with discrimination and prejudice. Those early experiences and the struggles to adjust to new cultures in Israel and the U.S molded his resolve to dedicate his life’s work to create just and supportive environments for disadvantaged children and families. Another important experience that shaped his professional worldview occurred when he served in the army. During a training exercise he broke his ankle and had to stay in a camp while the rest of platoon went on a training mission. Dr. Bakal was assigned the responsibilities of guarding the camp and overseeing a particularly recalcitrant group of soldiers who had managed to avoid the rigorous training by pretending to be ill or have disturbed behaviors. In order to control the rebellious group, he intuitively realized the importance of using peer influence. His approach engaged his fellow soldiers in establishing mutually beneficial goals and ways to motivate, as opposed to using authority and punishment. He engaged them in discussions about their responsibilities through a group process, which created motivation, mutual accountability and respect. This early experience of turning unmanageable soldiers into a functioning community was the inspiration for the Normative Community Approach, which has become NAFI/NFI’s signature framework for using the power of community to help and heal. Dr. Bakal is a graduate of Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Columbia University in New York and the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. He is the co-author of three books about issues relating to juvenile justice reform. He also has published articles relating to residential care, corrections and youth in trouble.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms Kelly Madden Executive Dir. of Admin and Finance --
Ms Hildy Paris COO --
Ms. Pam Rocha CFO --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Council

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) - Long Term Care Accreditation 2007

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1,650
Number of Part Time Staff 240
Number of Volunteers 245
Number of Contract Staff 45
Staff Retention Rate % 80%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 740
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 57
Caucasian: 757
Hispanic/Latino: 61
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 1,092
Male: 508
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Howard Rich
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Board Chair Term Mar 2015 - Mar 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms Nancy Grossman Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. William Madaus retired Voting
Mr. Roger Marcorell retired Voting
Mr Howard Rich retired Voting
Ms. Jackie Stanton Rosario Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Matt Sagal Consultant Voting
Ms Barbara Vinick author Voting
Mr. Barnat Weinstein retired Voting
Mr. James Zafris retired NonVoting
Ms. Margaret Zusky Harvard University Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. John Boyle Cushman Wakefield NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 1 Arabic
Gender Female: 4
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 10
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 88%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 50%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Administration

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Diversity is a premier concern and interest as we bring and develop new leaders in our organization. We are also interested in prevention and early intervention, particularly through partnerships with foundations, city hall and businesses.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $106,698,368.00
Projected Expense $106,149,228.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audited Statements

2015 Audited Statements

2014 Audited Statements

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $21,620,363 $23,873,718 $21,631,187
Total Expenses $22,082,586 $22,547,825 $21,380,856

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- $0 $0
Individual Contributions $196,168 $331,907 $142,084
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $0
Earned Revenue $21,403,266 $23,484,186 $21,448,925
Investment Income, Net of Losses $17,204 $64,344 $44,856
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events -- $0 $-5,500
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $3,725 $-6,719 $822

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $16,918,537 $17,018,190 $16,144,016
Administration Expense $5,164,049 $5,529,635 $5,236,840
Fundraising Expense -- $0 $0
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.98 1.06 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 77% 75% 76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $9,033,148 $8,972,961 $8,456,253
Current Assets $5,434,997 $5,969,102 $4,500,361
Long-Term Liabilities $1,900,055 $1,730,623 $1,919,162
Current Liabilities $2,715,691 $2,372,133 $3,033,377
Total Net Assets $4,417,402 $4,870,205 $3,503,714

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.00 2.52 1.48

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 21% 19% 23%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As previously discussed, our greatest challenge is finding funding for our prevention initiatives and also to continue to diversify our income streams.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

A large body of research has emerged that proves early intervention and prevention programs and services can have game changing impact on school failure, juvenile crime, child abuse, neglect and poverty-driven dependence upon public welfare. Over a billion dollars is spent annually in Massachusetts alone on programs for the youth, adults and families who are already engaged in the court and family welfare systems, compared to the minuscule amount spent on preventing them from this costly involvement. For the past ten years, North American Family Institute’s Youth Linkdivision has pioneered and piloted a series of prevention initiatives in partnership with the Boston Housing Authority, the Boston Police Department and numerous local non-profits to counter this trend. These efforts have dramatically improved the quality of life and opportunity for Boston youth and communities negatively impacted by poverty and trauma that has translated into millions of dollars of savings to the Commonwealth. As we have merged and partnered with grassroots organizations, the clear strength and power of their efforts emanates from their local services led by passionate champions from within the communities served. Often those strengths are challenged by a lack of resources and experience related to program development, outcomes management, fundraising and nonprofit administration. Those circumstances undermine the success of many inspired solutions to practical problems that become far worse without preventive support. With the ongoing success of these efforts, NAFI has created a new initiative called Youth Link Community Network to develop, enhance and oversee critical prevention and early intervention programs that counter the enormous financial and emotional costs of dealing with social problems that occur as a result of young people and families languishing in crises.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

NAFI/Youth Link’s leadership team will operate the Youth Link Community Network  as a collective-impact model for prevention services and community-building projects. The goal is to demonstrate a model at Dorchester's Franklin Field Public Housing Development with the clarity and impact to be adopted by communities across the city and eventually, the country. The Youth Link Community Network team is providing coordination and leadership to: 1)create holistic approaches with innovative projects and programs that deliver practical solutions to those challenges faced by youth and families seeking to improve their lives and communities 2)Work with the grass roots providers to build the capacity needed to sustain quality services, efficient operations, measurable impact and accountability As the coordinating agency, NAFI will be charged with supporting providers with the standards and tools to refine services and maximize their impact.  The launch of this approach began with current partnerships and will gradually expand with new initiatives that have complimentary aims. Impact is measured on multiple dimensions including gains for involved youth, advancement of member service providers and sustained grassroots capacity to support health and progress in communities served. Current initiatives include the following: ·The Youth & Police Initiative that has united hundreds of officers from the Boston Police Department with youth from across the City over the past decade, enhancing trust and partnership while reducing tensions and misunderstandings. ·The Youth Link Program at the Franklin Field Housing Development that has been a daily presence in the lives of young residents for eight years and has worked with families and community partners to transform one of the City’s most violent environments. ·A Youth Development Partnership with the Somali Community and Cultural Association is engaging 75 to 100 youth from Somali refugee families - empowering them with the skills and supports to help their peers and families draw upon the strengths of their traditional culture and build positive futures as Americans. ·A partnership with the Spanish Immersion program of Jamaica Plain to advance understanding and share strengths among Latino people’s and the elders who carry on language and cultural traditions that can help younger generations form identity and make valuable contributions to our City’s diverse future. The Youth Link Community Network is seeking to create a bridge of direct collaboration between philanthropic innovation and grass roots prevention. NAFI is committed to supporting the most vulnerable people with a strengths based approach that advances sustainable opportunities, capacity and accountability.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

NAFI/NFI is an organization built upon a belief in the power of community to unite, grow and transform individuals into their best selves. We value diversity, training, self-care, personal growth and work satisfaction for staff because our staff are the character of the organization, which must be strong in order for our services to achieve results. We are committed to quality improvement and accountability so we have invested in systems and training to support first class data collection and transparency linked closely to program development. Our broad staff group includes many clinical and therapeutically trained professionals alongside many grass roots advocates for youth and families. The cross fertilization of skills has led to an organizational culture that is client friendly and practical. Our goal is to empower people to maximize their independence and harness past experiences as strengths and wisdom to help them succeed in the future. In Boston, NAFI/Youth Link's division has developed strong partnerships with Northeastern University, the Boston Housing Authority, the Boston Police Department, Wells Fargo Bank and numerous other businesses and non-profits whose missions are similar to ours. These cooperative efforts are essential to success.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

—All activities are designed to help youth and their families make gains that inoculate against the negative effects of poverty —Safety and afterschool/summer shelter from the crime related dangers of the neighborhood —Daily academic support and as needed school advocacy —Expanded access to resources and opportunities using a case management approach to trouble shoot problems, prevent crises and ensure that all participants are exposed to enrichment resources, fitness, nutrition and healthy norms —Teen employment to extend their involvement in the program and prevent them from turning to anti-social ways of earning money and seeking belonging —Parent outreach and support to promote employment, engagement in the lives of their children and skills for family management —Advocacy with policy makers and systems to gain access to resources and promote awareness of needs These efforts are measured through quarterly surveys conducted by staff of participants in our centers.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

In Boston, Youth Link is helping to build communities of hope and trust within public housing developments that have been plagued by violence and fear. Public housing is the perfect place to reach groups of people united by needs that drive a logical vision for moving forward together. With some YPI trust building and careful listening, Youth Link helps residents build a movement that advances their priorities. Residents are empowered to become leaders, steering their community toward shared goals. Partnerships and new services are aligned to support the needs of youth and the goals of residents. Individual support helps youth to navigate their way to college, career and a bright future. The Boston Police, the Boston Housing Authority, local community based organizations and staff who have lived and worked in the community all of their lives are essential to the plan. The Youth Link Boston community-building model allocates intensive prevention services to people with the greatest need. The goal is to gradually spread this unique model across the city and beyond as we have great confidence that the results demonstrate how targeted prevention saves resources and lives. YPI - The Youth and Police Initiative (Featured and boxed in big bold type) A unique training program that brings together up to fifteen youth with a similar number of police officers who patrol their neighborhoodsIn six afternoon sessions, youth find a confident voice for sharing their stories and their goalsOfficers see and hear the youth in new ways and share their own stories and hopesWith new trust, youth and police identify ways to help each other create a better communityRepeated rounds of YPI begin to form a new culture of problem-solving and mutual respect The Franklin Field Development – Out of the Shadow of Fear and Into College In 2007, when NAFI Youth Link began working at the Franklin Field Housing Development in Dorchester, it was the city’s leading hotspot for murder, violence and gang activity. The Franklin Field development is home to approximately 500 youth and children. Youth Link focused on creating a safer environment through the Youth and Police Initiative (YPI). More than 200 youth and 150 police officers participated in the YPI trust building training, transforming the sense of safety and community at the development. Numerous other services were developed and a Youth Link team began supporting kids and families on a daily basis. A culinary arts program taught more than 150 young Franklin Field residents new social skills and vocational skills. Youth formed a catering company with the skills they gained. More than 30 Youth Link grads from Franklin Field have moved on to college with the support of staff who helped with school searches and financial aid resources. According to police partners, crime dropped there by approximately 60% and drug arrests by 80% In 2015, the need for support remains great. Poverty and a legacy of crime in the neighborhood continue to put youth at risk. Youth Link worked with police and the Housing Authority to renovate a new larger youth and family center that supports expanded programming. The new center  includes space for training and several rooms where Youth Link and partners can deliver more daily services. Our goal is to now offer mental health support services having now developed a partnership with Boston College's School of Social Work. We intend to launch this important component in the fall of 2017.