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Project Bread - The Walk for Hunger Inc.

 145 Border Street
 East Boston, MA 02128
[P] (617) 723-5000
[F] (617) 248-8877
http://www.projectbread.org
[email protected]
Jennie Bass
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INCORPORATED: 1969
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2931195

LAST UPDATED: 02/12/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Project Bread is the only statewide anti-hunger organization committed to providing people of all ages, cultures, and walks of life with sustainable, reliable access to nutritious food – because we believe the opposite of hungry is not simply full, but healthy

           

From community-based meals programs, to early childhood and school nutrition initiatives, to improved access to farm-to-table and local food resources, we approach hunger as a complex problem with multiple solutions that often work best in combination, and through cooperation and collaboration between communities and organizations.

 

With deep local engagement and support, we pioneer and facilitate innovative initiatives, fund and promote effective programs, advocate for research-driven change in government policy, and educate the public to increase our impact – all to eradicate hunger in our state and give everyone in need the dignity and voice they deserve.  

Mission Statement

Project Bread is the only statewide anti-hunger organization committed to providing people of all ages, cultures, and walks of life with sustainable, reliable access to nutritious food – because we believe the opposite of hungry is not simply full, but healthy

           

From community-based meals programs, to early childhood and school nutrition initiatives, to improved access to farm-to-table and local food resources, we approach hunger as a complex problem with multiple solutions that often work best in combination, and through cooperation and collaboration between communities and organizations.

 

With deep local engagement and support, we pioneer and facilitate innovative initiatives, fund and promote effective programs, advocate for research-driven change in government policy, and educate the public to increase our impact – all to eradicate hunger in our state and give everyone in need the dignity and voice they deserve.  


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2014 to Sept 30, 2015
Projected Income $7,089,726.00
Projected Expense $7,112,981.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Building Sustainable Food Systems
  • Children & Schools
  • Community Solutions
  • Informing Public Policy

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Project Bread is the only statewide anti-hunger organization committed to providing people of all ages, cultures, and walks of life with sustainable, reliable access to nutritious food – because we believe the opposite of hungry is not simply full, but healthy

           

From community-based meals programs, to early childhood and school nutrition initiatives, to improved access to farm-to-table and local food resources, we approach hunger as a complex problem with multiple solutions that often work best in combination, and through cooperation and collaboration between communities and organizations.

 

With deep local engagement and support, we pioneer and facilitate innovative initiatives, fund and promote effective programs, advocate for research-driven change in government policy, and educate the public to increase our impact – all to eradicate hunger in our state and give everyone in need the dignity and voice they deserve.  


Background Statement

Project Bread was founded in 1969 when Paulist priest Patrick Hughes and a group of activists from Boston’s Paulist Center organized the first Walk for Hunger. Approximately 2,000 people set out on a 29.6-mile trek through Quincy, raising $26,000 to fund two hunger projects. The Walk for Hunger is the oldest continual pledge walk in the country and the largest annual one-day fundraiser to alleviate local hunger.

Other highlights in Project Bread’s vibrant history include:

·         1982 – Project Bread started the FoodSource Hotline to provide free, comprehensive counseling on food resources.

·         1994 – Project Bread partnered with the MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to create the Child Nutrition Outreach Program, which works with low-income communities across the state to build participation in the School Breakfast and Summer Food Service Programs.

·         2000 – Project Bread sponsored a study conducted by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital that proves that kids who eat breakfast at school are more likely to do well in math and have fewer absences.

·         2001 – Project Bread developed the first online SNAP/food stamp eligibility application, now known as www.gettingsnap.org, which became a precursor for the state’s Virtual Gateway.

·         2003 – Project Bread began issuing the Status Report on Hunger in Massachusetts, which provides an annual report card on how the state is progressing in the fight against hunger.

·         2006 – Project Bread partners with Mayor Thomas M. Menino, the Boston Public Schools, and the Boston Public Health Commission to create the Chefs in Schools program, which provides healthy, affordable and appealing school meals for children in low-income communities.

·         2009 – The Harvard School of Public Health evaluates the Chefs in Schools program and demonstrates that low-income children will eat healthy food, including vegetables, whole-grain breads, and low-fat white milk, when it is prepared well and tastes good.

·         2009 – Project Bread and the MA Department of Transitional Assistance are awarded a competitive grant from the USDA to address food insecurity and increase SNAP (food stamps) participation in the Latino communities in Chelsea and Worcester. 

·         2011 – Project Bread is awarded a four-year, $1 million grant from the Arbella Insurance Group Charitable Foundation to expand the Chefs in Schools program to Boston, Chelsea, Lawrence and Salem.


Impact Statement

Project Bread takes a fresh approach to ending hunger across Massachusetts.  We're committed to providing people of all ages, cultures, and walks of life with sustainable, reliable access to nutritious food. We focus on empowerment, innovation, health, and dignity, and we look beyond stopgaps and temporary help to evolve and maintain effective sustainable, long-term solutions.


Needs Statement

Project Bread relies on financial support to develop, fund, and facilitate a wide range of programs that interrupt the cycle of food insecurity in our communities. We also appreciate in-kind donations and volunteers for our annual Walk for Hunger.

CEO Statement

Project Bread is always evolving. Through research, listening, and creative thinking, we are discovering and developing new ways to address and prevent hunger in our state. Project Bread’s new tagline—”a fresh approach to ending hunger”–– speaks to the range of our innovative programs: from emergency meal solutions, to early childhood health initiatives, to local and sustainable food resources.
 
That sound when you bite into a really crisp, fresh carrot, straight from the garden? That’s what we want to bring to this work. Which is why…
 
We bring a fresh understanding to the problem of hunger. We view it as a complex problem, and recognize that one anti-hunger solution does not fit all.
 
We listen carefully to the voices and insights of people who have experienced food insecurity, and go on to create solutions that are responsive to their sense of personal dignity, and reflective of their concerns.
 
We take a fresh approach to partnerships. We’re passionate about including local producers and farmers in our initiatives because we understand that hunger is a problem that exists within the food system—not outside of it. We can support local business, reduce our environmental impact, promote sustainable activity, and give our families healthy food as a result of these partnerships.
 
We stand up for fresh food, good cooking, and community life. Good food connects us, gives us joy, and makes us healthy. We illustrate this in our partnerships with summer meal programs and the importance of relationship-building and mentoring. The motto of the Cops N Kids program in Southbridge is “you have the right to a healthy and active life.”
 
We couldn’t agree more.
 
And we’re taking a fresh approach to including you, our supporters, in our work and thinking. Many of you know the Walk, of course, but you may not know as much about our newer programs, or some of the great partners we’re working with now, or how you can become involved in our efforts, year-round. We want to make sure that you’re up to date on all of our fresh approaches. We can’t bring them to life without you!
 
Thank you for joining Project Bread in changing the lives of families and communities around the state.

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Berkshires Region
Cape and Islands Region
Central Massachusetts Region
Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
Greater Boston Region-Allston / Brighton Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Back Bay / Beacon Hill Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Charlestown Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Chinatown Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Dorchester Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Downtown Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-East Boston Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Fenway / Kenmore Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Hyde Park Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Jamaica Plain Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Mattapan Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Mission Hill Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Roslindale Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Roxbury Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-South Boston Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-South End Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-West Roxbury Neighborhood
Massachusetts-All Regions
Metrowest Region
Northeast Massachusetts Region
Pioneer Valley Region
Southeast Massachusetts Region
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (please select all areas as well)
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- Harbor Islands
City of Boston- West Roxbury
BERKSHIRE REGION, MA
CAPE &ISLANDS REGION, MA
CENTRAL REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
Project Bread serves citizens of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Organization Categories

  1. Food, Agriculture & Nutrition - Food, Agriculture & Nutrition NEC
  2. Food, Agriculture & Nutrition - Food Programs
  3. Food, Agriculture & Nutrition - Nutrition

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Building Sustainable Food Systems

Project Bread collaborates with others to build a robust regional food system. All aspects of food production and distribution exist within the food system, and all of us have a seat at the table. Projects like food rescue, double value coupons at farmers markets, subsidized CSA shares, farm to school and urban ag boost community food security and wellbeing. Project Bread is one of 30 food and health organizations in The Massachusetts Food Policy Alliance (MFPA) and an early advocate of the Massachusetts Food Policy Council. In addition, Project Bread’s Massachusetts Farm to School Project promotes the purchase of locally grown fruits and vegetables by linking local farmers directly to school districts, and introduces fresh local ingredients into school meal menus across the state.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Sustainable Agriculture
Population Served Adults Families Migrant Workers
Program Short-Term Success  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Program Long-Term Success 
To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Program Success Monitored By  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Examples of Program Success  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.

Children & Schools

Project Bread reaches out to one of our most vulnerable populations with thoughtfully researched and "kid-approved" programs that provide children with healthy food in the places they learn and grow. We help build good eating habits from the start, and help children to achieve their full potential through increasing access to school breakfast and summer meal programs, as well as placing a chef in low-income school districts and Head Start programs.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Program Long-Term Success  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Program Success Monitored By  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Examples of Program Success  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.

Community Solutions

Project Bread anticipates and responds to immediate needs in our communities with emergency and short-term programs—provided with dignity and kindness. We also connect people to local food resources, and enable them to participate in their local food economies and the marketplace. These community solutions include investing in over 400 community food programs—soup kitchens, food pantries, food vouchers at health centers, summer meals, subsidized CSA shares, community gardens, double-value farmers market coupons, etc.—in over 120 communities across Massachusetts. Project Bread's FoodSource Hotline also connects food insecure people with public resources and local help, in order to help them find the right solutions for their needs. The Hotline answered over 46,000 callers from across Massachusetts each year, and is the only comprehensive statewide information and referral service in Massachusetts for people facing hunger.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other
Population Served Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Program Long-Term Success  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Program Success Monitored By  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Examples of Program Success  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.

Informing Public Policy

Working hand in hand with the legislature and executive branch, Project Bread champions legislation that makes a big impact on the lives of low-income children and families—locally, regionally, statewide, and nationally. We also partner with higher education the medical community, and those who drive public policy in our government, all toward the goal of developing solutions, connecting smart programs with the funds they need, and advocating for legislation—to make a difference in the lives of those who are hungry. For example, NERAHN is a coalition of agencies, administered by Project Bread, which takes a leadership role in federal policy discussions around SNAP and child nutrition.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other
Population Served Adults Families Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Program Long-Term Success  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Program Success Monitored By  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.
Examples of Program Success  To learn more about our programs, please contact us at [email protected] or call 617-723-5000.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Listening to the stories of the 46,000 people who call our FoodSource Hotline showed us that not every hungry person looks alike — and that our solutions must to be tailored to fit. For low-income children, we know that having two healthy meals a day at school is one of the best ways to prevent hunger; for the elderly woman who cannot walk to a soup kitchen or carry bags, we’ve partnered with home health care organizations so her caseworker can fill her pantry during a regular home visit; for hungry families, we have given pediatricians at neighborhood health centers the tools they need to help by providing them with food vouchers and SNAP/food stamp application assistance.

Project Bread is a small, creative, flexible organization that has had a big impact through this strategy of partnership. We do not invest in our own infrastructure — but in new solutions through demonstration projects that we evaluate and bring to scale.

During the worst of the economic downturn, Project Bread made the bold decision to put a chef in Boston schools to see if he could make healthy food that kids like to eat — on a budget. Then we evaluated the program through the Harvard School of Public Health, found it to be very successful, and are now working to bring it to school districts throughout the state.

Project Bread’s vision of how to end hunger in Massachusetts — by enlisting the help of partners who range from pediatricians to school cooks — derives from what we’ve learned about mobilizing 40,000 people for The Walk for Hunger: everyone has a place at the table.

Hard times don’t last forever, but our call to action must remain sharp and urgent. We must protect our neighbors from want and the corrosive worry that comes with it. Hard times become less difficult when we make the effort to listen to one another and work together.


 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Ellen Parker
CEO Term Start Mar 1996
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Ellen Parker has led the evolution of Project Bread from a traditional anti-hunger organization to a leading national model that responds to the individual crisis of food insecurity while investing in systemic changes to prevent hunger.
 
Parker was among the first, and strongest voices, to recognize hunger as a public health problem in low-income communities––and to call for leaders in behavioral economics and public health to initiate review and evaluation of the efficacy of food distribution as a dominant answer to this problem of economics and health.
 
For over a decade Parker has advocated for healthy school food and community-based programming that reflects local need. In accomplishing this, she’s brought vibrant new partnerships to the table: engaging community residents and leaders, research institutions, legislators, hospital networks, corporate partners, the media, as well as school districts in her work.
 
During her tenure, she has raised more than 100 million dollars to help children and families struggling with hunger and food insecurity.
 
Before assuming the leadership of Project Bread, Ms Parker was vice president for programs at Crittenton Hastings House, Boston; director of Catholic Charities for Metro-Boston, and the senior policy advisor for human services to the Mayor of Boston. She began her career as an advocate for children and families at Greater Boston Legal Services. She holds two master’s degrees from Boston University: one in social work and one in business administration and public management. She has lectured at Boston University, MIT and Dartmouth.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Darcy Pfeifer Director of Institutional Advancement --
Mr. Scott Richardson Interim Director of Development --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Community Leadership Award Massachusetts Public Health Association 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Project Bread collaborates with a diverse group of partners – emergency food programs, community health centers, schools, community leaders, academic researchers, physicians, public health officials, religious organizations, businesses, etc. – that allows it to leverage its work and have the greatest impact on the hungry person.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 40
Number of Part Time Staff 17
Number of Volunteers 2,000
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 47
Other (if specified): we don't used to EEOC form to collect data
Gender Female: 45
Male: 12
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Dr. Ronald E. Kleinman M.D.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Massachusetts General Hospital
Board Chair Term Sept 2012 - Sept 2015
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Jeffrey N. Carp State Street Corporation Voting
Ms. Julia Kehoe Consultant Voting
Mr. William F. Kennedy Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP Voting
Dr. Ronald E. Kleinman M.D. Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School Voting
Mr. Glynn Lloyd City Fresh Foods Inc. Voting
Ms. Lia Der Marderosian Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hall and Dorr LLP Voting
Ms. Catherine McCarron Jager Smith PC Voting
Ms. Jean G. McMurray Worcester County Food Bank Voting
Mr. Timothy J. O'Brien Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Voting
Ms. Ellen Parker Project Bread - The Walk for Hunger Exofficio
Dr. Eric B. Rimm Sc.D. Harvard Medical School Voting
Mr. Alberto Vasallo III El Mundo Newspaper Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Jean McMurray Worcester County Food Bank --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 5
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 57%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 86%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 20%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2014 to Sept 30, 2015
Projected Income $7,089,726.00
Projected Expense $7,112,981.00
Form 990s

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

2007 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

2008 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $7,340,954 $7,630,542 $8,536,595
Total Expenses $8,134,034 $7,903,302 $7,771,007

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$679,022 $678,394 $1,628,467
Government Contributions $561,541 $547,702 $768,863
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $561,541 $547,702 $768,863
Individual Contributions $5,819,610 $6,358,552 $6,018,370
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $237 $1,198 $1,096
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $36,429 $44,696 $119,799
Other $244,115 -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $6,366,632 $6,327,210 $6,324,073
Administration Expense $550,754 $338,893 $310,466
Fundraising Expense $1,216,648 $1,237,199 $1,136,468
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.90 0.97 1.10
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 80% 81%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 17% 16% 14%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $5,711,258 $6,379,396 $6,662,214
Current Assets $3,255,940 $3,618,159 $3,531,525
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $1,412,578 $1,450,343
Current Liabilities $1,863,637 $326,117 $298,410
Total Net Assets $3,847,621 $4,640,701 $4,913,461

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.75 11.09 11.83

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 22% 22%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Typically, around 72 percent of Project Bread's revenue comes from individual donors. 17 percent are from foundations and corporate contributions and 11 percent from government sources.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials. 
 
In the FY2013 audit, there is a note on emphasis of matter regarding unrestricted operating deficits.  Per the Auditor's Report, these deficits were associated with a strategic spenddown of board designated reserves.  Further details are available in the Independent Auditor's Report letter and note 12 of the FY2013 audit. During FY2013, Massachusetts Farm to School Project, LLC was formed and is included in the financials in charts and graphs.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Founded in 1969 with the first Walk for Hunger, Project Bread is the only statewide organization committed to ending hunger in Massachusetts. We believe hunger is a complex problem that demands a diverse set of solutions—and that’s why we fund and facilitate a wide range of research-proven, effective programs that meet people where they are.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

We are public educators and thought leaders: We know that hunger exists all across our state, but because the food insecure population is near 0% in some communities and upwards of 35% in others, many of us do not recognize the need around us.
 
We are funders: We raise money for, and invest in, programs that make a difference.
 
We are conveners and connectors: We bring different people to the table to continually craft more effective solutions.
 
We are innovators and a catalyst for change: We inform our efforts with research conducted in collaboration with top academic institutions. 

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Because Project Bread intentionally does not rely on the financial support of multinational food companies, our work can be shaped and driven expressly by local needs and integrated with local businesses—a fact that sets us apart from every other statewide and national anti-hunger organization in America.
 
We also rely on staff expertise in nutrition, public policy, and social work to create the most effective solutions.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Project Bread releases an annual Status Report on Hunger in Massachusetts that informs our decisions and allows us to know what initiatives are havign the greatest impact. We also rigorously evaluate each of our programs through internal and independent research, such as our partnership with the Harvard School of Public Health on a plate waste study that revealed the success of our Chefs in Schools initiative. We are continuously looking at the impact of our work to determine how to best meet the needs of those in need, and engage those we serve in conversation about the policies and programs that can make a difference.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Project Bread has realized that the best help meets people where they are, and is close to being invisible. That's why Project Bread runs and supports programs that connect community farms to local food pantries; screen kids for hunger within pediatric health centers; make it possible for families to pick up discounted CSA boxes in health clinics; teach refugees to farm the foods they are used to; rescue outdated food to serve up in summer meals; and make free, "universal" breakfast available in 284 elementary schools.
 
In the future, we hope to build upon this base and engage more community leaders in the conversation about how to address hunger.  We will work to change the mental model that most people have toward hunger, away from the idea of a hand out and to the idea of a hand up.