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Organization DBA The City School
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The City School develops and strengthens youth to become effective leaders for social justice.
 
We work with young people ages 14-19 living in Boston and its surrounding suburbs who are emerging leaders and have a passion for social justice. Our community intentionally crosses lines of race, class, gender, and neighborhood. 

Mission Statement

The City School develops and strengthens youth to become effective leaders for social justice.
 
We work with young people ages 14-19 living in Boston and its surrounding suburbs who are emerging leaders and have a passion for social justice. Our community intentionally crosses lines of race, class, gender, and neighborhood. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income $588,390.00
Projected Expense $581,889.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Pathways of Change
  • Social Justice Education Institute
  • Summer Leadership Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The City School develops and strengthens youth to become effective leaders for social justice.
 
We work with young people ages 14-19 living in Boston and its surrounding suburbs who are emerging leaders and have a passion for social justice. Our community intentionally crosses lines of race, class, gender, and neighborhood. 

Background Statement

The City School was born over twenty-five years ago in 1987 when a group of students from Milton Academy asked to learn about issues of race, poverty and inequality that they felt were missing from the school’s curriculum.  In response, a teacher (Todd Fry, our founder) began offering weekend service learning trips into Boston for his students. He called these trips Youth Outreach Weekends.  From 1987 to 1994 these trips happened monthly. 

In 1995, a partnership between Milton Academy, Boston Latin School and Cathedral High School (a private, public and religious school) launched The City School and housed it in the South End at Cathedral High School.  The name comes from the idea that the City of Boston is our classroom.  This was the first year of our flagship Summer Leadership Program.  Starting in 1995 and the eighteen summers since then, we bring together 60 high school age youth from across Greater Boston to build community, learn, and take action for change. 

As our Youth Outreach Weekend and Summer Leadership Program alumni grew, we began offering other programs including:

1.     The Graduate Program (1998) offers year round education and action opportunities for social change.
2.     Prison Empowerment Project (2001) brings high school youth into local prisons to dialogue with people in prison about the criminal justice system.
 3.    Rose From Concrete (2004) works to strengthen young women’s leadership who are both in and out of the court system.  
4.     Social Justice Education Institute (2006) offers training and technical assistance to individual and groups looking to incorporate social justice into their practice.

As our programs grew, we needed a larger space.  In 2000-2001, we raised $1.4 million through a successful capital campaign.  In 2002, we moved into a newly built office and program space in Dorchester that we continue to call home today.

In 2010, The City School completed a five year strategic plan in which we are currently in our second year.  This plan focused our programs into what we now call Pathways of Change, which more closely connects our summer and year round programming, strengthens our impact and connect young people to social change careers.  The above programs continue to take place, and are now led by youth program graduates who have become leaders in one of three pathways: Education, Organizing and Advocacy, or Organizational Leadership. 


Impact Statement

The past year, The City School accomplished the following:
 
1.Worked with over 1,000 youth from across Greater Boston including core youth leaders from Boston neighborhoods such as Dorchester, Jamaica Plain, and Roxbury as well as towns such as Newton, Winchester, Brookline and Brockton;
 
2. Contributed nearly 7,000 hours of community service at nonprofit organizations throughout Greater Boston that address issues such as hunger, health care, violence and education.
 
3. Developed 60 core youth to be effective leaders for social justice as educators, organizers and organizational leaders;
 
4. Received recognition for our work in the community including staff members Royal Nunes and Beatriz Rivera both being honored with The Philanthropic Initiative’s Boston Neighborhood Fellowship in April 2011 and April 2012 respectively. (the youngest people to ever receive the award)
 
In the next three, The City School's three strategic priorities are: 
 
1: Grow and Strengthen Our Program Model to Expand or Replicate our Summer Leadership Program; Adopt our Summer Leadership Program model to our academic year programming; Double the number of youth who become effective leaders for social justice, reaching 120 each year by 2014.
 
2: Strengthen Our Performance Management Systems to Fully implement our performance management plan by: Capturing additional data using our existing evaluation tools; Adopting proven measurement tools in the area of positive youth development; Continuing to assess staff, programs and our organization to ensure achievement of intended impact.
 
3: Strengthen Our Financial Sustainability to Increase our annual revenue by: Strengthening our donor development work; Seeking out new foundation funding; Growing our fee for service programming; This will enable us to: Increase our development capacity; Increase our cash reserves; Pay off the last $150,000 of our mortgage; Maintain our diverse funding streams.

Needs Statement

The needs listed here directly align with The City School's three strategic priorities listed above. 
 
Investment Needed

Strategic Priority 1:  Grow and strengthen our program model

Year 1 Cost     $0                    Adopting summer program model to academic year

Year 2 Cost     $70,000           Additional program staff, participant stipends

Year 3 Cost     $70,000           Sustaining growth in staff and participants

 

Strategic Priority 2:  Strengthen performance management systems

Year 1 Cost     $10,000           Refining and improving upon evaluation tools and systems

Year 2 Cost     $10,000           Implementation of data driven recommendations

Year 3 Cost     $10,000           Implementation of data driven recommendations

 

Strategic Priority 3: Strengthen our financial sustainability

Year 1 Cost     $10,000           Re-craft our donor development plan   

Year 2 Cost     $20,000           Implement plan

Year 3 Cost     $20,000           Implement plan


CEO Statement

There are many unique aspects of our work, two of which stand out.  First, our community intentionally crosses lines of race, class, gender and neighborhood.  We do this because we believe youth who learn across difference become adults who lead across difference, and effective leaders for social justice create comprehensive solutions to complex problems.  Second, our “ladder of leadership” program model means 90% of our programming is youth led.  The depth of learning and impact for youth participants is significantly increased when youth are taught and led by their peers.  More importantly for The City School, the young people doing the leading gain experience and practice on a weekly basis increasing their effectiveness as leaders for social justice.   

Each summer we mentor, train and support at least 60 core youth participants in our flagship Summer Leadership Program.  They then spend the academic year educating and organizing over 1,000 of their peers, many of whom become the following summer’s participants.  Additionally they help run a number of organizations in the Greater Boston area, including our own in areas of fundraising, finance, administration, event planning and as board members.  Together, our year round programming combine to create our Career Pathways to Change – in the areas of Education, Organizing and Advocacy, and Organizational Leadership.  Many of our graduates go on to college studies and careers to become teachers, youth workers, lawyers, government officials, community organizers, and nonprofit leaders.

Currently, we hold ourselves accountable for ensuring that 60 youth become effective leaders for social justice each year.  We define and measure this with indicators and measurement tools in four key areas: understanding and critical thinking about social justice, proficiency in core leadership skills, capacity to build relationships across race, class and age, and internalization of positive youth development approach toward one’s life and future. Key Performance Indicators from the past year are as follows:

Social Justice Education: 91% scored proficient or higher on their understanding of and critical thinking about social justice issues;

Relationships Across Difference: 82% built two trusting relationships with youth of a different race or class AND two trusting relationships with adults;

Leadership Skills: 70% scored proficient or higher in all five of our core leadership skills;

Positive Youth Development: 91% have a plan for their future.


Board Chair Statement

The City School is a special place as it offers youth from Boston and its surrounding suburbs a unique opportunity and space to engage in deep dialogue about real problems and ways to create positive solutions. Through critical thinking and action oriented learning, youth take the necessary steps to become leaders in the areas of education, organizing and advocacy, and organizational leadership. What sets us apart from others is how youth learn and teach one another while using their differences as a source of strength and opportunity. The creative ways in which our highly dedicated staff works with our youth ensures that once a young person enters the doors of The City School, they will mature and come out with a new, and enriched perspective in life. 
 
On a more personal level, I would not be the same individual that I am today if it were not for my experiences as a youth participant through the Summer Leadership Program several years ago. I could have easily floated through my youth and early adult years inside a bubble without having to deal with or even having the urge to tackle pressing social justice issues affecting our communities. Fortunately, through my many interactions and discussions through the years with peers, teachers and mentors from The City School, I have learned how to harness my leadership skills and take action. I was not only made aware of the many social ills and injustices people from the Greater Boston area and beyond face every day, but I also developed a strong passion and the skill set needed to work with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures to find solutions to these problems. My experience as a youth participant at The City School gave me a foundation upon which I could continue to build. I ultimately pursued a legal career, so that I could better understand the legal structures and the ways that I could help provide creative solutions to systemic problems in my everyday life, whether it be in the private, public or non-profit sectors. The more support The City School receives, the larger the impact we can make in supporting the lives of young people - the next generation of social justice leadership.
 

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)

The City School works with young people ages 14-19 living in Boston and its surrounding suburbs who are emerging leaders and have a passion for social justice. Our community intentionally crosses lines of race, class, gender, and neighborhood.
In 2012, our participants came from over 40 high schools from across Greater Boston ranging from Lexington, Cambridge and Winchester in the north, to Newton and Brookline in the West, to Milton and Brockton to the south, and nearly every community and neighborhood within the city itself.  
 

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Youth Development-Citizenship
  2. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Civil Rights
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community Coalitions

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Pathways of Change

Pathways of Change offers three career pathways for youth to develop as educators, organizers and advocates, and organizational leaders. Each pathway is rooted in training and mentorship, and supports participants (first as youth and later as adults) to become effective leaders for social justice.

Community Educators learn skills such as facilitation, issue-based research, and curriculum development. Youth in this pathway lead community courses that focus on issues such as the criminal justice system or poverty and wealth inequality.
 
Youth Organizers learn basic community organizing skills such as campaign mapping, public speaking, and understanding the legislative process. Youth who choose this pathway lead city and statewide campaigns for change.
 
Organizational Leaders help run our organization. Youth learn and participate in financial management, fundraising, event planning, and serve on our Board. Through this pathway youth learn how to maintain a thriving organization.

 

 

Budget  $160,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Youth become skilled and knowledgeable about themselves and the world, and begin taking steps to change both for the better.  Additionally, youth are supported to be healthy individuals with a direction and plan for their future.
Program Long-Term Success  Youth become effective leaders for social justice who are leading in their communities.
Program Success Monitored By  The City School uses a number of evaluation tools developed in partnership with The Black Ministerial Alliance's Boston Capacity Tank.  These tools tools measuring skills, knowledge, relationships and positive youth development outcomes in first and second year participants.  Tools include surveys, interviews, observations and peer assessments.  To strengthen our positive youth development data, we are partnering with Boston After School and Beyond and piloting their ACT Framework evaluation process (Achieving, Connecting, Thriving) using the PEAR assessment tool. 
Examples of Program Success 
The City School's Key Performance Indicators 2012 
 
Relationships Across Difference           

•       82% built two trusting relationships with youth of a different race or class AND two trusting relationships with adults

Social Justice Education

•       91% scored proficient or higher on their understanding of and critical thinking about social justice issues

Leadership Skills

•       70% scored proficient or higher in all five of our core leadership skills

Positive Youth Development

•       91% have a plan for their future 


Social Justice Education Institute

The Social Justice Education Institute (SJEI) is a program for youth leaders, educators, civic leaders, youth workers, administrators and others who want to strengthen the power of youth and explore ways to get young people to challenge themselves to take ownership of their own education.

SJEI helps build transformative learning communities and teaches strategies to educators, youth workers, administrators and others to inspire young people to own their education, take leadership in the classroom, develop the skill to work across difference and focus on social justice in their communities.

In education systems where people are being pressured to create curricula that teach to standardized tests, we build community by asking critical questions, engaging in honest, meaningful discussion among youth and adults.

The Social Justice Education Institute is the culmination of over nineteen years of The City School's history -- building powerful learning communities where young people are engaged in experiential education.

Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success  Participants will gain concrete knowledge and pedagogical tools to use as educators and community workers.  Examples of this include increased skill in facilitation, curriculum design, conflict resolution, communication and group decision making.
Program Long-Term Success  The long-term success of SJEI is to support educators of all ages to implement a social justice framework and pedagogy in their classrooms, schools and programs.   This framework and pedagogy is designed to foster critical thinking and analysis in students about oneself and society.
Program Success Monitored By  Success is measured by a system of evaluation tools developed exclusively for The City School's program model.
Examples of Program Success 
We measure and track success for partner schools and individual leaders young and old. We have many testimonies of success.  Here is a recent quote from a teacher we worked with:
"You do important work at the City School, work that more educators need to be aware of. It is my hope that I will have more students like "Lisa" that are equipped to lead their peers, to assist their teachers, and to help us all reach a place of mutual respect, understanding and transformation. After teaching and learning with "Lisa", I am perhaps more hopeful now than I have ever been that we can, indeed, make the necessary change happen if young people such as her are leading the way. Thank you for giving "Lisa" the foundation to be a powerful change agent. I have been able to push conversations and ideas far past students’ original boundaries, and further than I ever would have been able to if it were only me." 
 
 

Summer Leadership Program

In 2014, The City School will run our 20th annual Summer Leadership Program ("SLP"). SLP is our flagship program and the one in which most young people first come to us. It brings together a diverse group of 75-125 high school age youth for community and classroom learning over six and half weeks. The program begins each summer with an overnight retreat where participants engage in discussions on race, class, gender, sexual orientation and age. This retreat is life changing. After the retreat, youth participate in a creative and exploratory research seminar, a related internship in a community based organization, a youth created project to make positive change in our community, as well as diversity and leadership training. Through SLP, youth gain a greater understanding of their relationship to one another and their broader community as well as a basic exploration of social justice education, organizing, advocacy and organizational leadership. 

Budget  $204,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Youth become skilled and knowledgeable about themselves and the world, and begin taking steps to change both for the better.  Additionally, youth are supported to be healthy individuals with a direction and plan for their future.
Program Long-Term Success  Youth become effective leaders for social justice who are actively leading in their communities.
Program Success Monitored By 
The City School uses a number of evaluation tools developed in partnership with The Black Ministerial Alliance's Boston Capacity Tank.  These tools tools measuring skills, knowledge, relationships and positive youth development outcomes in first and second year participants.  Tools include surveys, interviews, observations and peer assessments.  To strengthen our positive youth development data, we are partnering with Boston After School and Beyond and piloting their ACT Framework evaluation process (Achieving, Connecting, Thriving) using the PEAR assessment tool. 
Examples of Program Success 
The City School's Key Performance Indicators 2012 
 
Relationships Across Difference           

•       82% built two trusting relationships with youth of a different race or class AND two trusting relationships with adults

Social Justice Education

•       91% scored proficient or higher on their understanding of and critical thinking about social justice issues

Leadership Skills

•       70% scored proficient or higher in all five of our core leadership skills

Positive Youth Development

•       91% have a plan for their future 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Programs at The City School combine academic learning, work experience, leadership development and building communities across difference. Our model works to ensure that teenagers develop “21st Century” skills including leadership, communication, empathy, team work, emotional regulation and critical thinking skills. Our programs are primarily youth led, with adult staff serving in supportive mentoring roles. Youth leaders analyze the world around them, and develop the tools to take action and create change in themselves and our communities. Pathways to Change includes three career pathways of Education, Organizing and Advocacy, and Organizational Leadership. 

Most young people begin their journey with us through our flagship Summer Leadership Program which brings together a diverse group of 70 to 80 students for community and classroom learning over six and half weeks. Youth participate in a creative and exploratory academic seminar, a related internship in a community based organization, a youth led project and diversity and leadership training. Seminars include topics such as Economics, Environmental Justice, Immigration, Political Arts and Violence and Healing.

 During the school year, youth then move into a more intensive career pathway programming:

Community Education: Young people become community educators, learning group facilitation, research, and curriculum development. Students provide programming to schools and organizations such as running Prison Empowerment Projects-workshops that explore the criminal justice system followed by visits to a prison to talk directly with people in prison; and take part in Rose from Concrete, a young women’s leadership group.

Organizing and Advocacy: Youth learn organizing and advocacy skills such as campaign mapping, research, public speaking, member recruitment and academic study in areas such as the legislative process. They then design campaigns to create larger systemic changes within schools and our community.  Over the past three years youth in this pathway have led the Statewide Youth Jobs Coalition – which has successfully restored $12 million to the State budget in each of the past two years for youth jobs funding.

Organizational Leadership:  Youth support City School adult staff to learn and share in grant writing, event planning, administrative tasks, and run weekly after school programming as well as manage all youth and adult hiring for our Summer Leadership Program.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Ruby Reyes
CEO Term Start Sept 2009
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Ruby Reyes - Co-Executive Director since September 2009. Ruby started out as a Development Associate at The City School in 2005, and after much success in this role, was promoted by our Board to Co-Executive Director in 2009.  She holds a Bachelors of Science Degree in Communications from Emerson College. Previously she served as a College Counselor at Brighton High School and Cambridge Rindge and Latin School. 
Co-CEO Mr. Seth Kirshenbaum
Co-CEO Term Start Sept 2009
Co-CEO Email [email protected]
Co-CEO Experience

Seth Kirshenbaum, Co-Executive Director since September 2009 –  Seth joined the organization in 2003, serving in multiple roles including Bookkeeper, Operations Manager, Program Coordinator and Program Director. He holds a Masters of Education from Harvard University.  Previously, he served as Founding Director of Beantown Society, a youth development program in Jamaica Plain.  

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mrs. Miriam Messinger Jan 2001 June 2008
Mr. Todd Fry June 1995 Jan 2001

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Royal Nunes Program Director

Royal Nunes ’05,Program Director since February 2013 – Joined the organization as participant and then youth staff member in 2005, transitioned to youth worker in training in 2007, and program coordinator in 2008. Promoted in February 2013 to Program Director.  Royal grew up and continues to live down the street from our agency.

Ms. Tara Venkatraman Program Director

Tara Venkatraman,Program Director since September 2011 – Participated in The City School’s programming while in high school at Milton Academy.  Graduated Harvard College in June 2011, joining our staff after that summer.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Boston Neighborhood Fellow - Beatriz Rivera (staff) The Philanthropic Initiative 2012
Boston Neighborhood Fellow - Royal Nunes (staff) The Philanthropic Initiative 2011
Special Recognition Award for Community Activism of Royal Nunes Massachusetts Office of Victim Assistance 2008
Innovative Youth Services Agency of the Year Boston Center for Youth and Families 2007
Youth Worker of the Year Award - Hector Negron Boston Center for Youth and Families 2007
Humanitarian Award Pine Street Inn 2004
Boston Neighborhood Fellow - Todd Fry (founder) The Philanthropic Initiative 1999
Volunteer Organization of the Year Shattuck Shelter 1996
Volunteer Appreciation Award Boston Family Shelter 1994
Tribute to Teens Award Teens as Community Resources 1989

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

A core strategy of The City School is our organizational collaborations.
We lead three coalitions:
1. The Unnamed Network - six youth social justice organizations including Beantown Society, Boston area Youth Organizing Project, Project HIP-HOP, Reflect & Strengthen, and Roxbury Environmental Empowerment Project finding innovative ways to create a youth leadership pipeline across organizations.
2. Youth Justice and Power Union - a coalition of youth organizations organizing for a multi-issue, youth justice platform with a primary focus on youth jobs.
3. GOTCHA - local Uphams Corner youth organizations focusing on youth employment. 
 
We also participate in numerous other collaborations with over 40 organizations and schools. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 10
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 8
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 8
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 6
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 10
Male: 11
Not Specified 1

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Quarterly

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Priyanka Sharma
Board Chair Company Affiliation World Education, Inc.
Board Chair Term July 2013 - June 2015
Board Co-Chair Ms. Titania Nguyen
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation high school student
Board Co-Chair Term Oct 2012 - June 2014

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Thomas Bonner State Street Bank Voting
Mr. Lewis Bryant Buckingham, Browne and Nichols Voting
Ms. Laura Diamond student Voting
Ms. Susan Eckstein Boston University Voting
Ms. Irvienne Goldstein ABCD Health Services Voting
Ms. Colleen Hovey Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. Voting
Ms. Pauline Nguyen Lawyer Voting
Ms. Titania Nguyen Student Voting
Ms. Oluwayemisi Olorunwunmi student Voting
Mr. Bhavin Patel technology consultant Voting
Ms. Cynthia Peters World Education, Inc. Voting
Mr. Juan Ramos Union of Concerned Scientists Voting
Ms. Priyanka Sharma World Education, Inc. Voting
Mr. Purcell Won State Street Corporation Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Laura Diamond student Voting
Titania Nguyen Milton Academy Voting
Ms. Oluwayemisi Olorunwunmi student Voting

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 5
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Youth Board Members are fully integrated into our Board Governance structure, including participation and leadership of committees and of the board as a whole. We have youth co-chair and co-vice chair positions.  

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $630,652 $546,869 $689,082
Total Expenses $567,331 $608,727 $600,887

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $18,600
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- $18,600
Individual Contributions $236,093 $257,708 $430,018
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $283,637 $140,413 $136,546
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- $20 $31
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $22,058 -- $4,955
Revenue In-Kind $83,540 $138,690 $88,707
Other $5,324 $10,038 $10,225

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $444,318 $491,028 $454,753
Administration Expense $84,674 $68,720 $71,205
Fundraising Expense $38,339 $48,979 $74,929
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.11 0.90 1.15
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 81% 76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 15% 19% 17%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $849,345 $826,948 $892,353
Current Assets $301,330 $261,691 $307,455
Long-Term Liabilities $44,891 $44,891 $69,536
Current Liabilities $37,395 $78,319 $57,221
Total Net Assets $767,059 $703,738 $765,596

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 8.06 3.34 5.37

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 5% 5% 8%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The City School's budget has stayed consistent for about four years at the $500,000 level. In 2013, we experienced about a 15% growth and by 2014-2015 should sustain our budget at the $600,000 level.  This increase is based on a recent business planning process we created in partnership with The Bridgespan Group, and which we are successfully meeting our benchmarks so far toward the $600,000 goal.
 
In 2010, our income is listed as $379,210. In 2009, we received two multi-year grants totaling with $160,000 time restricted for 2010. Our actual revenue for 2010 is $539,210, though $160,000 of it showed up on our 2009 books because of accrual based accounting.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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