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Organization DBA --
Former Names Judge Baker Guidance Center (1933)
Judge Baker Foundation (1917)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Judge Baker Children’s Center is to promote the best possible mental health of children through the integration of research, intervention, training and advocacy.

 The Baker carries out its mission through:

(1)  Research that identifies best practices;
 
(2) Intervention that brings those practices to children and families of diverse communities;
 
(3) Training that disseminates skills in research and quality care; and
 
(4) Advocacy using scientific knowledge to expand public awareness and inform public policy.

Mission Statement

The mission of Judge Baker Children’s Center is to promote the best possible mental health of children through the integration of research, intervention, training and advocacy.

 The Baker carries out its mission through:

(1)  Research that identifies best practices;
 
(2) Intervention that brings those practices to children and families of diverse communities;
 
(3) Training that disseminates skills in research and quality care; and
 
(4) Advocacy using scientific knowledge to expand public awareness and inform public policy.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $14,004,901.00
Projected Expense $14,235,885.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Clinical Care
  • Manville School
  • Summer Treatment Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of Judge Baker Children’s Center is to promote the best possible mental health of children through the integration of research, intervention, training and advocacy.

 The Baker carries out its mission through:

(1)  Research that identifies best practices;
 
(2) Intervention that brings those practices to children and families of diverse communities;
 
(3) Training that disseminates skills in research and quality care; and
 
(4) Advocacy using scientific knowledge to expand public awareness and inform public policy.

Background Statement

Founded in 1917, Judge Baker Children’s Center is dedicated to improving the lives of children and adolescents whose mental health problems threaten to limit their potential. The Baker was named in honor of the Boston Juvenile Court's first judge, Harvey Humphrey Baker, a visionary in child welfare. Judge Harvey Baker was among the first to advocate a system based on understanding and treatment to help troubled youth, rather than one using punishment or incarceration.

Today, integrating education, service, research, and training, Judge Baker Children's Center has become a national leader in the field of children’s mental health. As one of the oldest children’s mental health organizations in New England, the Baker offers a range of programs providing special education, counseling and family resources for children in Eastern Massachusetts who live with mental health issues and emotional and behavioral disabilities. The Center also partners with local providers of behavioral health care, education, public health, law, child protection, and mental health advocates to promote its mission. The Baker is a known leader in scientific research and professional training and is at the forefront of policy discussions and debates in its field.


Impact Statement

Judge Baker Children's Center is a known leader in the field of children’s mental health. The evidence-based treatments used at JBCC, those treatments which have been scientifically proven to work, are cutting edge. 

 Organization Accomplishments from FY’12:

(1)  Significantly improved the financial processes and internal controls and strengthened the IT infrastructure.

(2)  Grew existing and new programs to help address the needs of youth with mental, emotional and behavioral challenges, specifically expanding our work with youth with Asperger’s Spectrum Disorder in JBCC’s clinical and educational programs.

(3)  In support of a key priority of our new strategic plan, secured funding for dissemination and training of best practices for the treatment of youth with complex mental health issues for three public mental health clinics in Massachusetts.

 Organization Goals over Next 5 Years:
 
(1)  Pursue an integrated research, development and dissemination effort to increase the availability of effective mental health care for youth and families.

(2)  Broaden and deepen research efforts, especially to diversify JBCC’s portfolio of evidence-based interventions

(3)  Position direct services to be more integrated with research, development and dissemination

(4)  Develop JBCC’s organizational capability to disseminate effective interventions into broad-scale use by public systems with accountability for outcomes

(5)  Establish durable funding mechanisms to support growth


Needs Statement

JBCC’s Financial Needs:

(1)  Support for scholarships and/or financial aid for specialized programs ($100K).

(2)  General support for the sustainability and development of all JBCC programs ($100K).

(3)  Support research needs for ground breaking epigenetic research on malnutrition and its consequences, e.g., attention deficits, obesity. ($250k+)

(4)  Start up funding for College Prep program for with Asperger’s Spectrum Disorder ($25K)

(5)  Endowed Research Scientist position to advance psychosocial treatment for children ($1M)


CEO Statement



Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

STATEWIDE
NATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL
The programs and services of Judge Baker Children's Center (JBCC) are available for children and families throughout Massachusetts and the surrounding areas.  Research studies at JBCC take place on a national and global scale.

Organization Categories

  1. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Mental Health Treatment
  2. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  3. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Hot Lines & Crisis Intervention

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Clinical Care

Clinical Care at Judge Baker Children's Center provides mental health assessments and focused short-term treatments for children dealing with specific disorders (e.g. anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress, and/or disruptive conduct).

Budget  $159,955.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Outpatient Mental Health Treatment
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
  • Double the number of assessments completed and number of patients seen per month.
  • Continue to demonstrate shortened treatment course and gains that are sustained longer post-treatment, previously proven with the evidence-based techniques used at Clinical Care. 
  • Continued growth of clinician training program (adding two new clinician trainings per year).
Program Long-Term Success 
  • Increase the number of children and families treated at Clinical Care for anxiety, depression, and disruptive behavior.
  •  Increase the number of community clinicians trained to use evidence-based therapeutic practices.
  •  Increase awareness community wide about the importance and effectiveness of evidence-based practices (largely cognitive and behavioral).
Program Success Monitored By 
  • Increased patient flow.
  •  Individual courses of therapy are monitored weekly for efficacy via TRAC (Treatment Response Assessment for Children).
  • Continued positive feedback on clinician trainings by community clinician participants.
Examples of Program Success 
  • Previous successful treatments for selective mutism (anxiety) have led to increase in referrals to Clinical Care for selective mutism.
  • Children with high functioning autism were effectively treated using evidence-based anxiety protocols.

Manville School

The Manville School at Judge Baker Children's Center is a therapeutic day school for children ages 5-16 with emotional, behavioral and learning disorders.  Manville opened its doors in 1957 and has continuously been recognized as a leader of special needs day schools in the greater Boston area.

Budget  $5,567,422.00
Category  Education, General/Other Special Education
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Indicator of the short term program success is that even in times of budget strains for cities and town, the Manville School census continues to grow because this is a better option for students versus what school districts are able to provide or compared to other out of placement opportunities. Manville is growing at a time when the push is not to send the student to an out of placement. Since the most troubled kids cannot be adequately served in public school systems, increasingly parents and school districts are choosing Manville School.

Program Long-Term Success 

In general, students make improvements in clinical educational and behavioral areas. They come to us at a time of crisis having been unsuccessful at any of their prior and frequently multiple educational placements. Over time at Manville School, they require less psychiatric hospital placements and many require less psychotropic medication to manage their psychiatric distress and acute behavioral response. In addition, they do well academically as evidenced in an increase in the acquisition of core academic skills. The educational success is evidenced in MCAS results.

Program Success Monitored By 

Continued strong MCAS results with a 100% pass rate for 10thgrade English/Language Arts and Math and an 86% pass rate for 10thgrade science.

All of students have Individual Educational Plans ( IEPs) that are developed and monitored by the educational team consisting of Manville staff, parents and the school district. The school district has the ultimate responsibility to see that child receives the educational services they will require in order for them to be successful. Manville School provides quarterly IEPs to school districts and parents.

Examples of Program Success 

One student who spent 8 years at JBCC’s Manville School graduated. After he left Manville, he stepped down to a less restrictive educational program, which he successfully completed. He was then accepted early decision and received an academic scholarship to the Rochester Institute of Technology. 

After a challenging childhood struggling to stay on track in public schools, a Quincy resident attended the Manville School at JBCC and learned the skills required to succeed in everyday life. He enrolled in Conductor School and is now a full-time Conductor with the MBTA.


Summer Treatment Program

The Summer Treatment Program (STP) at Judge Baker Children's Center is a therapeutic summer program for children with ADHD and other disruptive behavior disorders.
Budget  $67,565.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Childhood Mental Health Disorders
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
  • Help children develop more pro-social behaviors and decrease problematic behaviors
  • Help parents develop improved behavior management skills
  • Create a supportive community for children with ADHD and behavior problems and their parents
  • Collaborate with outside providers and school personnel to increase generalization of treatment
  • Train Ph.D. graduate and undergraduate students in providing treatment to children with ADHD and behavior problems
  • Conduct research to better understand children’s mental health problems
Program Long-Term Success 
  • Expand enrollment of children and parent in the program
  • Help many more children develop more pro-social behaviors and decrease problematic behaviors
  • Help many more parents develop improved behavior management skills
  • Create an expanded supportive community for children with ADHD and behavior problems and their parents
  • Collaborate with more outside providers and school personnel to increase generalization of treatment
  • Train Ph.D. many more graduate and undergraduate students in providing treatment to children with ADHD and behavior problems
  • Conduct research to better understand children’s mental health problems
Program Success Monitored By 
  • Extensive data collection on children’s behavior
  • Parent report of satisfaction and skill development and engagement in the program
  • Parent engagement in year round services and retention of families in the program
  • Outside providers and school personnel’s engagement with the STP and their reported satisfaction
  • Feedback from students on their training experiences
  • Completion of research projects
Examples of Program Success 
  • An 8 year old child learned to interact more positively with adults and inhibit swearing. He was able to extend these gains during the school year.
  • Grandmother of a 10 year old girl was able to practice attending and ignoring skills which helped deescalate her granddaughter’s tantrums at home.
  • Parents of a nine year old boy were able to understand their child’s mental health problems in a more complete way and seek increased services for him.
  • Program director collaborated with dozens of school personnel and outside providers to help increase continuity of care for children and families
  • Ph.D students were able to gain hundreds of hours of clinical experience working with children and reported the experience to be “amazing”
  • On going research is being conducted that may eventually be published

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. John R. Weisz , Ph.D., ABPP, Former
CEO Term Start Mar 2004
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
John R. Weisz, Ph.D. joined Judge Baker Children's Center on September 1, 2004. Prior to joining the Center, he was a Professor in the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the University of California at Los Angeles, where he served for a term as Director of the Graduate Program in Clinical Psychology and Director of the Psychology Clinic. Dr. Weisz received his BA from Mississippi College. After serving as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in Kenya, he studied at Yale University, where he received a Ph.D. in clinical and developmental psychology. Before his appointment at UCLA, he was a faculty member at Cornell University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has served as President of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (the largest professional organization of researchers and practitioners in the field) and as President of the International Society for the Study of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (the primary scientific organization in the field). He is currently Director of the Network on Youth Mental Health, funded by the MacArthur Foundation. His written work includes books and articles focused primarily on youth problem behavior and disorders, cultural factors in development and dysfunction, and psychotherapy for children and adolescents.
 
After eight years as President & CEO of Judge Baker Children's Center, Dr. Weisz recently resigned in order to focus on his research and teaching.  Dr. Weisz will continue to collaborate with JBCC as a senior research scientist.  An interim President of JBCC will be named soon and a search for a new President & CEO will be conducted.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Michael Mastascusa Director of Finance --
Stephen Schaffer Chief Operating Officer --
Michele D. Urbancic Vice President of Advancement --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 149
Number of Part Time Staff 47
Number of Volunteers 16
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 30
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 6
Caucasian: 144
Hispanic/Latino: 16
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 145
Male: 51
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Edward E. Mullen
Board Chair Company Affiliation Beacon Equity Partners
Board Chair Term Jan 2012 - Jan 2014
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Deborah L. Anderson Nixon Peabody Voting
Julie M.B. Bradley Trip Advisor, Inc. Voting
Richard P. Breed , III Tarlow Breed Hart & Rodgers, P.C. Voting
Elizabeth Burrows Old Mutual Asset Management Voting
Kathryn E. Cade N/A Voting
Thomas W. Cornu Cornu Management Company Voting
Robert P. Gittens Northeastern University Voting
Robert G. Holdway Fiduciary Trust Company Voting
Andrew R. Knowland , Jr. Foster Dykema Cabot & Co Voting
George Macomber N/A Voting
Edward E. Mullen Beacon Equity Partners Voting
Katherine R. Nicholson Cirriculum Associates Voting
John R.A. Pears , RIBA Perkins Eastman Voting
Edmund Poli , III Poli Mortgage Group, Inc. Voting
Laura I. Ramanis Mercer Voting
Claire S. Stern St. Francis House Voting
Verne W. Vance Jr. N/A Voting
Jay L. Webber CBIZ Tofias Voting
Dorothy A. Weber , Ed.D. N/A Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 19
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 12
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 90%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $14,004,901.00
Projected Expense $14,235,885.00
Form 990s

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Revenue $12,903,985 $15,037,025 $10,502,634
Total Expenses $14,077,474 $14,982,092 $13,591,294

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,028,581 $3,236,136 $1,373,326
Government Contributions $2,155,974 $2,163,352 $933,848
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $2,155,974 $2,163,352 $933,848
Individual Contributions $183,915 $245,632 $364,304
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $8,991,441 $9,555,179 $9,298,336
Investment Income, Net of Losses $385,833 $-244,106 $-1,595,387
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $158,241 $80,832 $128,207
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Program Expense $11,922,784 $12,904,654 $11,841,862
Administration Expense $1,735,972 $1,650,954 $1,314,006
Fundraising Expense $418,718 $426,484 $435,426
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.92 1.00 0.77
Program Expense/Total Expenses 85% 86% 87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 7% 16%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Assets $32,947,034 $32,895,045 $35,796,031
Current Assets $4,876,550 $5,291,361 $5,140,728
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- --
Current Liabilities $1,322,633 $1,028,620 $5,081,023
Total Net Assets $31,624,401 $31,866,425 $30,715,008

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $6,841,023.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 4.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 3.69 5.14 1.01

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s. Specific details relating to foundation and corporation revenue was provided by the organization.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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