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Prospect Hill Academy Charter School (Prospect Hill Academy Charter School Foundation Inc.)

 50 Essex Street
 Cambridge, MA 02139
[P] (617) 284-7800
[F] (617) 284-7980
http://www.phacs.org/
abresler@phacs.org
Anja Bresler
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INCORPORATED: 1996
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 01-0851252

LAST UPDATED: 04/01/2019
Organization DBA Prospect Hill Academy Charter School
Prospect Hill Academy
PHA
Former Names Somerville Charter School (2003)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Prospect Hill Academy Charter School will prepare each student for success in college, inspire a lifelong love of learning, and foster responsible citizenship.

Mission Statement

Prospect Hill Academy Charter School will prepare each student for success in college, inspire a lifelong love of learning, and foster responsible citizenship.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Income $22,471,000.00
Projected Expense $23,841,335.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Adventure and Exploration
  • College Access, Readiness and Persistence
  • K-College
  • STEAM Saturday and Other Expanded Learning Opportunities
  • THRIVE Food Security Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Prospect Hill Academy Charter School will prepare each student for success in college, inspire a lifelong love of learning, and foster responsible citizenship.

Background Statement

Prospect Hill Academy (PHA) is one of the oldest and largest Massachusetts charter schools located in Somerville and Cambridge and serves nearly 1,200 students in grades K to 12 from diverse racial, ethnic, and socio-economic backgrounds: 55% are black, 21% are Hispanic, 13% are white, 8% are Asian, and 3% are of mixed or other races. 64% are low-income, and 47% come from homes where English is not the primary language spoken.
 
PHA is unapologetically a college preparatory school and focuses on teaching students the academic knowledge and skills and the social and emotional competencies required to succeed in college and beyond. That means, in addition to engaging our students in a rigorous, culturally relevant, and differentiated curriculum, we ensure they develop effective college-going habits and participate in a strong and caring school community based on Restorative Justice practices. 

Impact Statement

Each year, over 95% of PHA graduates matriculate to college (most being the first in their families to do so); PHA has consistently placed in the top 4% of all U.S. high schools per U.S. News & World Report; and Boston Magazine placed PHA among the top ten charter schools in Massachusetts.

Needs Statement

PHA’s definition of student success has expanded from ensuring all our K-12 students matriculate to college to ensuring they graduate from college. Therefore, upon careful and continuous reflection on the academic knowledge and skills and the social and emotional competencies that PHA students need to succeed in college and beyond, PHA is focused on the following five core needs areas outlined below: 

• Meaningful Family and Community Engagement 
• Effective Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment 
• Positive School Culture 
• Outstanding Teachers and Staff 
• Expanded Learning Opportunities

CEO Statement

During the 2016 -2017 school year, we were renewed for our fifth charter term and culminated our Strategic Plan (2012 -2017). Subsequently, we launched a strategic planning process to build upon our long-standing track record of success over the past twenty-one years, to boldly address areas of challenge and to identify innovative opportunities that maximize the delivery of our mission—to prepare each student for success in college, inspire a lifelong love of learning, and foster responsible citizenship. 
 
Throughout the spring and summer of 2017, a myriad of constituents in our community, with the guidance of the Center for Collaborative Education, engaged in an inclusive process of strategic planning and review to develop Strategic Plan 2.0 (2017- 2022). The highlights of this process included, but were not limited to: gathering survey data, conducting interviews and varied cross-constituent focus groups, analyzing progress of goals and outcomes articulated in the previous Strategic Plan, drawing from research/literature on best practices and reviewing the Strategic Plan Summary and Recommendations document prepared by the Center for Collaborative Education. As a result, for Strategic Plan 2.0 (2017- 2022), we broadened and deepened the overarching goals and objectives and determined accompanying metrics of the existing four strategic areas as follows: Meaningful Family and Community Engagement, Effective Instruction, Assessment and Curriculum, Positive School Culture and Outstanding Teachers and Staff. Additionally, we’ve added Expanded Learning Opportunities as a fifth strategic area to fully actualize our vision of offering comprehensive experiential learning opportunities and explicitly teaching college and career readiness skills. Research shows that providing equitable access to a wide array of educational opportunities and resources further contributes to the narrowing of the opportunity gap. As such, we will be intentional with our efforts to afford our students expanded learning opportunities in the following four key areas: Leadership and Empowerment; STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics); Adventures/Explorations and College Access and Persistence.
 
With an innovative spirit at the core of our identity, we continually seek new and enhanced ways to provide our uniquely diverse students with transformative experiences along their PHA K to College Journeys. We are confident that our Strategic Plan 2.0 will serve as a navigation map as we continue to strive towards greater achievements in this new era in the school’s history. This Plan will inform our decision-making around priorities and resource allocation and serve as the umbrella under which campus and department-specific action plans are developed. We will execute this Strategic Plan with our long-standing mission serving as the steady foundation for our efforts and inputs along our journey to greatness. 
 
Thank you for your invaluable participation in the strategic planning process. We look forward to your continued collaboration in ensuring the future success of Prospect Hill Academy.
 
All the best,
Angela F. Allen, Ph.D.

Board Chair Statement

Upon completing our twenty-third year as one of Massachusetts' oldest, largest and most successful public charter schools, we are proud of our many successes and more committed than ever to our pursuit of ongoing improvement in service of the nearly 1,200 students we engage in active and authentic learning each day.  Subsequently, we have successfully brought closure to an impactful school year.  In the fall of 2017, we launched Strategic Plan 2.0 (2017-2022) in which we continue to shine light on the existing four interconnected strategic focus areas as well as adding a new strategic focus area, Expanded Learning Opportunities, with the aspiration to maximize student outcomes beyond the school day and school walls.  We had impressive results in the first year of developing partnerships and sustainable programming for Expanded Learning Opportunities.  A snapshot of three notable partnerships and programs are as follows:
 
* Hills School Collaborative. We announced a partnership with the Shady Hill School (SHS) in Cambridge whereby we launched a two-week pilot Summer STEAM Program at the SHS FAB LAB where 10 PHA students (Grades 1-5) were enrolled and three PHA teachers co-taught side by side with SHS teachers.
* Junior Journey.  As we celebrate the 10th anniversary of Junior Journey to Guatemala, we were thrilled to provide for the first time, all 75 PHA juniors the opportunity to participate in a domestic and international service-learning trip as part of PHA's college preparation program.  Notably, we added trips to Costa Rica and New Orleans (9th Ward).
* STEAM Saturday.  STEAM Saturday was designed as an exciting opportunity for our students in grades K to 8 to explore, discover, and learn outside the traditional classroom and be inspired to uncover their passion, gain motivation, and become lifelong learners.  During three sessions in the fall, winter, and spring, each across four Saturdays for three hours, students engaged in hands-on, interactive, and fun learning activities in a diverse selection of topics in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math. 
 
In 2018 PHA marked several other notable triumphs for our richly diverse and unique community:
* For the ninth consecutive year, PHA earned a gold or silver medal designation in the annual "America's Best High Schools" publication in US News & World Report, placing our school among the top 15% and 4% of all high schools in Massachusetts and in the United States, respectively, for our college preparation and access work. 
* Members of the Class of 2018 earned the following increasingly highly-competitive and prestigious scholarships: Christian Herter Memorial Scholarships at Howard University and Bentley College; Rev. Henry Bean, S.J. Scholarship at Holy Cross, The City of Boston at Wentworth as well as a myriad of other local scholarships. In 2019, three members of our senior class were awarded four-year full-ride Posse scholarships and one student was awarded a four year full-ride QuestBridge scholarship.  
* PHA also continues to be an educational leader in the arena of Restorative Practices as a comprehensive framework for building positive school culture and reforming school-based discipline approaches. 
 
We remain committed to the work ahead in continuing to improve our efforts and performance in support of our diverse community.

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
The Prospect Hill Academy public charter school educates nearly 1,200 students across four campuses in Somerville and Cambridge, Early Childhood, grades K-3 and Upper Elementary, grades 4-6 both in Somerville and Middle School, grades 7-8; and High School, grades 9-12 which also houses the Collegiate Institute for grades 11-12, both in Cambridge.  

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Charter Schools
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Leadership Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Adventure and Exploration

Comprehensive college preparation includes much more than strong academic readiness. It also requires students to have had exposure to a variety of extracurricular and experiential learning and travel that are common place in more affluent communities but rare for urban, low income students. In addition to annual signature field trips, we ensure that our students are exposed to gradually increasing overnight learning experiences throughout their K to College Journey. New trips included:


  • 50 6th graders participated in the Museum of Science’s Overnight Adventure, exploring the Museum and spending the night in the exhibition halls.

  • ALL 7th grade students participated in either a weeklong, overnight Farm trip or Ecology trip in Northern New England to learn about agriculture and the environment.

  • ALL 11th graders went on the Junior Journey. Each junior selected one of four service learning trips to either Guatemala (14 nights), Costa Rica (7 nights), New Orleans (6 nights), or Vermont (5 nights). In years past, only a select group of students went to Guatemala.

Budget  $135,000
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  Students gain independence and broaden their world-views as they improve their Language proficiency and appreciate different cultures and participate in service-learning.  
Program Long-Term Success  The achievement gap closes and students are inspired to change the world.  
Program Success Monitored By  Following the paths of our students and sharing their success stories.  
Examples of Program Success  Student matriculation to college, persistence in college, the work they do after college and the service and giving back to their communities that they are involved in.  

College Access, Readiness and Persistence

PHA’s college matriculation rate remains high at a persistent average of around 95%. PHA alumni’s college graduation rate is also comparatively strong at 59% in six years. This is higher than the 55% national average, and significantly higher than the rates for Hispanic and black students (46% and 38%, respectively), the majority demographic groups that PHA serves. However, it is our goal to increase our alumni’s college graduation rate to 75%.

 
The program employs three highly qualified and skilled staff members who guide and instruct our juniors and seniors on their journeys to and through college. The program also benefits from the assistance of two interns from the Harvard Graduate School of Education who come to the school twice per week to assist the college counselors during the college prep seminar, coach students, and help review college applications and forms.

Our low student: counselor ratio means that our counselors truly get to know each and every one of the students they serve, are readily available to meet with students and families, and act as the students’ advocate throughout the college admissions process. This wrap-around, differentiated guidance and support ensures that our graduates are as well-positioned for success in college as students from more affluent, privileged backgrounds.

Budget  $270,000
Category  Education, General/Other Guidance & Counseling
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Advanced Placement Participation

There is an increasing body of research indicating that students who participate in Advanced Placement (AP) courses in high school have higher college persistence and graduation rates. At PHA, 40% of all high school students participated in AP courses which is double the rate of PHA’s two host city high schools. More significantly, at PHA 32% of black students (compared to between 8% and 13% in our host cities) and 48% of Latino students (compared to between 12% and 16% in our host cities) completed one or more AP course(s).


Selection as Official Pre-AP School

This year’s focus was on developing strategies to increase student performance on AP exams. We are therefore excited to announce that PHA has been selected, by the College Board, as one among only approximately 100 national and international schools to be designated an official Pre-AP school. PHA will offer Pre-AP World History, Pre-AP Algebra 1, and Pre-AP Biology to all 9th graders beginning in September 2018. PHA’s partnership with the College Board provides access to high quality professional development, research-based instructional resources and classroom assessments designed to heighten standards and increase the rigor in subject classes preceding AP courses, better positioning all students to participate in and perform well on AP courses.


Program Long-Term Success 
It is our goal to increase our alumni’s college graduation rate to 75% and increase the number of alumni who succeed in college and continue on to successful careers. We do this in the following ways:
 
 A critical success factor for our program is the fact that our highly qualified college counselors possess significant institutional knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of each college’s climate, culture, and support structures in place to accommodate students of our at-risk demographics. They have formed strong relationships with college representatives and administrators and work closely with them to match students with schools that are the best fit academically, socially, culturally, and financially. Furthermore, these close relationships often allow for negotiation of more favorable aid packages for our students after they are admitted.
Program Success Monitored By 
Colleges that students are accepted into and graduate from.  Number of Scholarships received, alumni returning to PHA to support our K-12 community.  
 
To further support the goal of making college financially accessible, the program provides critical one-on-one assistance to students as they navigate the complex college financial aid system. For low-income students like ours, the high costs of attending college represent a huge barrier to access and persistence, as such the program does everything it can to ensure students are able to access all the financial resources available to them. Throughout the senior year, as students begin applying for aid, the program provides individualized, step-by-step guidance to students and their families, including help filling out financial aid forms and scholarship applications, communicating and managing deadlines, and the hosting of family education events related to financial aid. The program also collaborates with our data department to collect and analyze our seniors’ financial award data for every college where they are accepted. The data is added to an internal college rating system that guides our students towards schools that have the appropriate policies and structures in place to support their unique needs, thus increasing their chances to succeed and graduate.
 
 Another unique and defining feature of the program is its explicit focus on teaching students critical college readiness skills, in the form of a weekly college preparation seminar that is mandatory for all juniors and seniors. The seminar incorporates a rigorous curriculum that covers professional skills, college search and selection, writing the college essay, preparing applications and supplements, applying for financial aid and scholarships, practicing interview skills, and the academic, social, and financial transitions to college. The seminar also includes 12 weeks of intensive in-class SAT test preparation and many in-school opportunities to take the PSAT, practice SAT, and official SAT test. This is a significant benefit to our students, many of whom are unable to pay for expensive external SAT prep classes and for whom travel to off-site SAT testing sites may represent a challenge.
 
 
Examples of Program Success 
Student SAT scores, the variety and numerous scholarships, like Posse and QuestBridge, that students receive, the list of colleges our students matriculate to and graduate from, the variety of careers that our alumni move onto, many moving into STEM and STEAM careers.  
 
New in 2018, PHA is piloting expanded alumni outreach programming and comprehensive data collection to track the paths of our graduates and ensure their persistence in college and attainment of their degree. The program supports our alumni’s success throughout their college years through regular communication (utilizing email, Signal Vine two-way texting platform, phone calls, and social media), hosting alumni events, visiting alumni at their colleges, and offering valuable guidance regarding financial aid deadlines, scholarships, on-campus support services and resources, transferring, summer job/internship opportunities and applications, and career readiness. Equally as importantly, data is collected along every stage of our alumni’s college journey, and findings will inform College Counseling and Success program improvement plans, as well as broader K-12 college and career readiness programming. Overall, support systems and data collection are facilitated by strong relationships formed between our college counselors and our alumni.

K-College

Prospect Hill Academy leads its students on an academically rigorous, culturally rich, and socially and emotionally engaging journey from kindergarten to college.  PHA is a college preparatory school and focuses on teaching students the academic knowledge and skills and the social and emotional competencies required to succeed in college and beyond. That means, in addition to engaging our students in a rigorous, culturally relevant, and differentiated curriculum, we ensure they develop effective college-going habits and participate in a strong and caring school community based on Restorative Justice practices.

 
Vision

Prospect Hill Academy Charter School aspires to be a culturally proficient community of learners where all members are engaged, feel inspired, and succeed. All PHA students, through developmentally-appropriate and research-based teaching and learning practices, will be equipped with knowledge, skills, and habits of mind necessary to succeed in college and at whichever career paths they choose to pursue.

Beliefs and Values
At Prospect Hill Academy, the prevailing belief is that with hard work, effective effort, perseverance through adversity, committed teachers, and invested families, all students are capable of academic, intellectual, social, and moral excellence. Fueling this conviction are eight core values that guide the daily life and culture of the school.
 
  1. High Expectations: Each student can do and be whatever s/he wants.

  2. Equity: Access and opportunity drive achievement.

  3. Personalization: One size does not fit all.

  4. Cultural Proficiency: We see, honor, and embrace differences.

  5. Collaboration: Many minds are better than one.

  6. Balance: Both-and, not either-or.

  7. Inquiry: Decisions are strategic and informed by data.

  8. Accountability: If students fail, we all fail.

 


Budget  $25,131,572
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Over 95% of PHA graduates matriculate to college (most being the first in their families to do so); PHA has consistently placed in the top 4% of all U.S. high schools per U.S. News & World Report; and Boston Magazine placed PHA among the top ten charter schools in Massachusetts.



 


Program Long-Term Success  PHA alumni’s college graduation rate is also comparatively strong at 59% in six years. This is higher than the 55% national average, and significantly higher than the rates for Hispanic and black students (46% and 38%, respectively), the majority demographic groups that PHA serves. However, it is our goal to increase our alumni’s college graduation rate to 75%.
Program Success Monitored By 
Our mission is to provide a PHA K-12 education that will prepare our students for matriculating to and persisting through college.  In order to succeed at this we monitor K-12 student progress through test results, student and parent surveys, social and emotional and expanded learning success, restorative practices monitoring, student, teacher and staff recruitment, retention and attrition, program sustainability and college and career readiness.
Examples of Program Success 
Student demographics served, standardized tests and assessments, student and teacher attrition and retention rates, college applications submitted, scholarships received, list of colleges students are attending, college acceptances, persistence and graduation rate, alumni careers.  
 

STEAM Saturday and Other Expanded Learning Opportunities

STEAM Saturday is a tuition-free program designed to provide exciting opportunities for our students in grades K to 8 to explore, discover, and learn outside the traditional classroom and be inspired to uncover their passion, gain motivation, and become lifelong learners. During three sessions of four Saturdays each, on average just under 90 students engaged in hands-on, interactive, and fun learning activities on subjects that ranged from “Flowers, Worms, and Dirt”, Ocean Life (New England Aquarium), Robotics, Coding, and Chess to Haitian Dance and African Drumming, and many more. Courses were taught by a combination of qualified volunteers and proven course providers. Satisfaction survey results indicate that instructors, students, and their families found the program a great success in meeting its goal of exciting students about their learning. Over the course of the 2017-18 school year, 209 unique students, or 25% of the PHA K-8 student population participated in the program.


Budget  $35,000
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Satisfaction survey results indicate that instructors, students, and their families found the program a great success in meeting its goal of exciting students about their learning and requested that it be continued in the 2018-19 school year. Over the course of the 2017-18 school year, 209 unique students, or 25% of the PHA K-8 student population participated in the program.


Program Long-Term Success 

The success of our STEAM Saturday program is defined by the following three criteria:

 

1. Level of student engagement and increase in interest in STEAM career fields:

Our goal is to maintain at minimum 80% full student engagement throughout the program and demonstrate an 80% increase in interest in STEAM career fields over the course of the funding cycle. As indicated by a survey of our STEAM Saturday instructors in the Fall Session, nearly 80% of instructors reported that students in their classroom were engaged or very engaged in the course content. Relatedly, 88% of parents indicated that their child had a “good” or “amazing” experience in the program. For subsequent STEAM Saturday sessions, we are further developing our survey to include student ratings of their own levels of engagement and interest in pursuing STEAM careers.

 

2.   Level of student participation:

Our goal is to have 95% of courses filled at the time of registration and to maintain 90% attendance throughout all four weeks of the program. As mentioned above, while we reached full capacity with registration in the STEAM Saturday Fall Session, attendance fell below 90% by the fourth Saturday.


3.   Level of parental satisfaction:

Our goal is to maintain 90% parental satisfaction throughout our program. According to data from the STEAM Saturday Fall Session, 95% of parents indicated that they plan on signing their children up for another STEAM Saturday session.


Program Success Monitored By  Surveys and student and family engagement and excitement around learning outside the classroom.  
Examples of Program Success 

Families strongly indicated that the wide variety of course topics was important to them and contributed to their deep satisfaction with our overall program. Moving forward, we strive to maintain 90% student participation as a benchmark for attendance throughout our program.

 


THRIVE Food Security Program

PHA THRIVE is a grassroots volunteer effort by Prospect Hill Academy parents, staff and friends to provide 2 meals a day to students who do not have regular access to food during weekends and school breaks. 16.2 million children in America live in households that lack the means to get enough nutritious food on a regular basis, and therefore struggle with hunger at some time during the year. As a result, many children are coming to school too distracted by their empty stomachs to focus on doing well in school.  Although this national statistic may seem overwhelming, we believe small steps we take in our local community can make a difference.


Budget  $30,000.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  Building Family and Community engagement and creating a sustainable food program that distributes backpacks full of nutritious food to students in need.  
Program Long-Term Success  Research shows that students perform better in school when they have 3 nutritious meals per day.  
Program Success Monitored By  Number of backpacks of food given out, student and family participation surveys, community members volunteering their support.
Examples of Program Success  We partner with Food for Free receiving cases of fresh produce every week for students to snack on throughout the day.  We have received two supportive grants from MIT’s Community Service Fund to help us increase our impact and establish sustainable practices.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Angela F. Allen Ph.D.
CEO Term Start July 2015
CEO Email aallen@phacs.org
CEO Experience Dr. Angela Allen became the Head of School at Prospect Hill Academy in 2015. Dr. Allen has 25 years of experience in education that spans from Kindergarten through college. She started her career as a math teacher in Atlanta, GA and has since worked at Shady Hill School, the Boston Public Schools, and most recently the Brookline Public Schools where she served the past ten years as the K-8 Math Curriculum Coordinator and then as Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources. Dr. Allen attended the University of Georgia (BBA) and Emory University (M.ED), and also holds a Doctorate of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction from Indiana University.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association MA

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 200
Number of Part Time Staff 29
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 31
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 10
Caucasian: 159
Hispanic/Latino: 25
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 4
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 173
Male: 56
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Jeffrey R. Kushner
Board Chair Company Affiliation Senior Advisor
Board Chair Term Dec 2016 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Haley Adams Financial Advisor, Edward Jones Investments Voting
Angela F. Allen Ph.D. Head of School/CEO, Prospect Hill Academy Exofficio
Karl Balan Director, Strategic Advisers, Inc. at Fidelity Investments Voting
Karolyn Belcher Independent Consultant Voting
Matt Brewster Director, Next Street Financial Voting
Karen Daniels Retired Education Professional Voting
Pam Dickinson Director of External Relations and Strategic Engagement at Shady Hill School Voting
Laurens Goff Co-Founder & General Partner, Stone-Goff Voting
Susan Goldstein Lawyer/Partner, Pressman & Kruskal Voting
Susan Istock Hanlon Senior Communications Strategist, Voya Financial Voting
Jeffrey Kushner Senior Advisor Voting
Jane Moncreiff Independent Consultant Voting
Trecia Reavis Co-Founder and Executive Director at Eartheaded Customer Solutions Voting
Michael Rubenstein Founder at PathAdvisor Voting
Madelin Santana Assistant Director Marketing and Global Programs, Executive Education and International Programs, Harvard University Graduate School of Design Voting
Marc Saunders Director of Operations at Cambridge Youth Programs, City of Cambridge Voting
Tom Waye Chief Administrative Officer/HR Director, Commonwealth of Massachusetts Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 10
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Income $22,471,000.00
Projected Expense $23,841,335.00
Form 990s

2017 Form 990

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

2008 Form 990

Audit Documents

2017 Combined Financial Statements

2016 Combined Financial Statements

2015 Combined Financial Statements

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $26,042,528 $23,780,241 $22,325,590
Total Expenses $25,408,089 $24,137,796 $21,991,004

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$371,452 $513,504 $436,812
Government Contributions $20,646,015 $19,889,844 $19,342,281
    Federal -- -- --
    State $19,926,624 $19,109,979 $18,638,279
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $719,391 $779,865 $704,002
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $983,314 $972,661 $1,017,851
Investment Income, Net of Losses $737,631 $-6,997 $30,378
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $3,304,116 $2,411,229 $1,498,268
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $23,449,592 $22,065,956 $20,021,294
Administration Expense $1,958,497 $2,071,840 $1,969,710
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.02 0.99 1.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses 92% 91% 91%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $26,203,644 $25,640,426 $26,525,148
Current Assets $6,874,579 $7,022,716 $6,746,801
Long-Term Liabilities $3,142,753 $3,627,719 $4,109,604
Current Liabilities $2,505,666 $2,091,921 $2,137,203
Total Net Assets $20,555,225 $19,920,786 $20,278,341

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
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2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
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3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.74 3.36 3.16

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 12% 14% 15%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's combined audited financials and reflect both the charter school and foundation. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

PHA Impact Report (2018)

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

  1. Prospect Hill Academy (PHA)’s overarching goals are to prepare each student for success in college, inspire a lifelong love of learning and foster responsible citizenship,  To accomplish these goals, in the fall of 2017, we expanded our original goal from ensuring students matriculate to college to ensuring students graduate from college.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

  1. PHA’s instructional program is foremost designed to prepare our students for enrollment in and graduation from college.  To accomplish this goal we have committed to the following five strategic areas:


  • Meaningful Family Engagement: PHA faculty and staff will engage families as a central component of its educational approach such that families from all cultural groups and socioeconomic statuses will be included as partners in advancing the achievement of and celebrating all students within the community.

  • Effective Instruction, Assessment, and Curriculum: PHA will prepare all students for success in college and career by building strong foundations in critical thinking skills, social and emotional learning competencies, and content knowledge across a wide range of domains.

  • Positive School Culture: PHA will develop and embrace a Restorative Approach to positive school culture that is consistently practiced across the whole school community. PHA’s positive school culture creates the conditions for high academic achievement, development of strong social and emotional learning and college persistence skills. School policies, practices, student supports, and learning experiences in and out of the classroom align with that vision for school culture.

  • Outstanding Teachers and Staff: PHA will increase the recruitment and retention of high-quality teachers and administrators who are committed to the mission and vision of the school and effective in advancing the achievement of all students.

  • Expanded Learning Opportunities: To further decrease the access and opportunity gap, PHA will, at times in partnership with community organizations, expose students to engaging expanded learning opportunities within and outside the school day that will inspire curiosity, passion, and a drive to remain engaged in learning and school. Every year, students in grades K-12 will have the opportunity to experience expanded learning opportunities in at least two of four key areas: Leadership and Empowerment, STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics), Adventures/Explorations, and College Access, Readiness, and Persistence.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

PHA operates as a K-12 charter public school serving nearly 1,200 students across four campuses in Somerville and Cambridge (Early Childhood, grades K-3; Upper Elementary, grades 4-6; Middle School, grades 7-8; and High School, grades 9-12 which also houses the Collegiate Institute for grades 11-12). Planning backwards from graduation standards and requirements, the four PHA campus principals align their instructional practices under a shared mission, vision and strategic goals. The 2017-2022 Strategic Plan serves as a roadmap to set common goals and objectives that provide the foundation to develop specific action plans at each campus.  Under the premises of “defined autonomy”, our principals implement and oversee college preparatory instructional practices that meet the developmentally appropriate and rigorous needs of students. To further decrease the access and opportunity gap, with the goal of leveling the playing field for the majority underrepresented population we serve, PHA also offers a wide range of expanded learning opportunities, most of which are commonplace in more affluent communities, to ignite curiosity, inspire passion and initiate drive to remain engaged in learning and school.


PHA has the unique advantage of leading its students on an academically rigorous, culturally rich, and socially and emotionally engaging journey from kindergarten to college.  As such, we can plan backwards across 13 grades and align K-12 curricula and instructional practice, to meet graduation standards.  We also have the budgetary, staffing, and professional development flexibility to identify a problem, devise a solution and then quickly and nimbly adapt budgets and staffing structures to set up the condition for successful implementation.  For example, PHA assessed, piloted, and implemented iReady within a few months and at a cost of $25,500 and a Professional Development cost of $3,000.  Similarly, we piloted STEAM Saturday in the Spring of 2017 and fully launched the program in 2017-18 at an annual cost of $35,000.  Additionally, with PHA schools located in Cambridge and Somerville, we leverage the opportunity to develop key dynamic and direct partnerships with local organizations such as the Museum of Science, Novartis, MIT and Harvard, where students receive free programming providing our students access to innovative learning opportunities in a variety of settings.  



4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

We measure ourselves against all five of the above strategic goals.  We will have met our goals when:

  • „ 80% of families log into PowerSchool four times per year+ and complete the Family Survey

  • „ 90% of families attend at least one parent/teacher conference

  • „ 25% of families will attend school-wide or campus specific family education event

  • „ PHA’s college acceptance rate is 95%

  • „ The PHA alumni graduation rate from a 4-year college within 6 years of matriculation into college is 75%

  • „ Students achieve moderate (SGP of 40-60%) to high (SGP > 60%) growth as measured by Student Growth Percentiles on MCAS Math, ELA, and Science assessments

  • „ 75% of students who have attended PHA for at least 3 years meet the state’s rigorous academic standards as measured by meeting or exceeding expectations on the Math and ELA MCAS.

  • „ Students in 11th & 12th grade either perform within one grade level of their current grade or improve by at least 2 grade levels by graduation on a nationally-normed reading assessment that correlates with college readiness

  • „ 90% of 3rd -12th grade students participate yearly in at least one public authentic performance assessment that integrates academic content knowledge with college readiness/SEL skills

  • „ 100% of core academic courses are constructed around rigorous standards-based units consisting of well-structured lessons with measurable outcomes.

  • „ 100% of curriculum is well-documented and easy to access in the PHA curriculum library.

  • „ 100% of yearly campus PD plans include work on culturally relevant pedagogy and highly effective teaching practices.

  • „ All campuses regularly implement a data-driven system for monitoring and assessing positive school culture.

  • „ Expulsions, exclusions, and suspension rates for DESE determined subgroups meet or are lower than the state average.

  • „ 100% of classrooms across each campus are designated as having a safe and positive classroom climate

  • „ There is a correlation between the use of a variety of restorative tools and the decrease in Tier 3 interventions.

  • „ PHA presents its Restorative Practices at a minimum of two national conferences.

  • „ The annual faculty hiring profile meets the following targets: The % of hires who have completed appropriate credentials prior to date of hire will increase to 75%+. The % of hires who self-identify as reflecting the socio-economic background of our students will be 50%+. The % of hires who have 3+ years of experience in a comparable role will increase to 50%+.

  • „ 100% of employees participate in an annual evaluation process

  • „ All employees have access to receive differentiated annual pay increases relevant to annual performance

  • „ Every student is provided with the opportunity to participate in four overnight trips during their K-12 PHA journey.

  • „ Every student is exposed to Engineering and Computer Science skills across K-12 .

  • „ Every K-12 student is given the opportunity to participate in a leadership group at least once while matriculating at each campus.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

We are nearly half way towards achieving our 2017-2022 Strategic Plan goals by accomplishing the following key milestones:

  • We have created a process and guidelines for accessing translation and interpretation, enforced clear homeschool communication guidelines and offered at least four events within the Family Education series.  We have broadened access to schoolwide family communication and have expanded family-to-family communication.  

  • We have developed vertically aligned K-12 SEL standards and metrics and collected baseline data for PHA’s college persistence rates and 11th and 12th grade college reading readiness including a Common Core aligned diagnostic tool for 3-12 math and reading and created pathways for high school students not currently on track to meet college math entrance standards. We’ve developed common standards for 3rd-12th grade authentic performance assessments and implemented authentic performance assessments in grades 9-12.  50% of K-12 ELA, math and science course curricula are standards-aligned and documented.

  • We have collected K-12 baseline data on safe and positive classroom culture, on K-12 interventions and behavior indicators and developed a database for tracking Restorative Practices and interventions.   

  • We have established baseline hiring and retention data, developed a K-12 faculty professional development program, piloted an instructional coaching model at one campus and created staff evaluation practices and processes.

  • We have developed a multi-user partnership database, launched STEAM Saturday, expanded the Junior Journey to include a journey for all 11th graders.  


Between now and 2022, we will be tackling the second half of our Strategic Plan as follows:

  • We will consistently provide access to Family Education Series and other crucial family events via video.  

  • We will ensure that 50% of students who have attended PHA for at least 3 years meet or exceed Math and ELA MCAS standards.  Authentic performance assessments will be expanded to grades 3-8 and 100% of students will participate in data-informed tiered intervention or enrichment in math and reading.  100% of K-12 ELA, math and science course curricula are standards-aligned and documented. The long-term goal is for our students to achieve at least a 75% 4 year college persistence rate within 6 years of high school graduation and PHA will be nationally recognized for its culturally relevant pedagogy and curriculum that are key drivers for PHA students’ success in K-12, college and beyond.  

  • We will provide regular data reports on K-12 SEL competencies by student subgroups and improve positive classroom culture using baseline data from 2017-18 and 2018-19.  PHA will be nationally recognized as a model for Restorative Practices in K-12 urban education.

  • PHA will implement a strategic plan for diversity recruitment, create an internal leadership development program framework and create an annual training and calibration calendar for all evaluation practices.