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Save the Harbor Save the Bay

 212 Northern Avenue, Suite 304 W, Boston Fish Pier
 Boston, MA 02210
[P] (617) 451-2860
[F] (617) 451-0496
www.savetheharbor.org
[email protected]
Patricia Foley
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1986
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2908768

LAST UPDATED: 02/26/2018
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay is a non-profit, public interest Boston Harbor advocacy organization made up of thousands of citizens as well as civic, corporate, cultural and community leaders and scientists.

As the region’s leading voice for clean water and continued public investment in Boston Harbor, the region's public beaches, and the Boston Harbor Islands, our mission is to restore and protect Boston Harbor, Massachusetts Bay and the marine environment and share them with the public for everyone to enjoy.

Mission Statement

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay is a non-profit, public interest Boston Harbor advocacy organization made up of thousands of citizens as well as civic, corporate, cultural and community leaders and scientists.

As the region’s leading voice for clean water and continued public investment in Boston Harbor, the region's public beaches, and the Boston Harbor Islands, our mission is to restore and protect Boston Harbor, Massachusetts Bay and the marine environment and share them with the public for everyone to enjoy.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $1,340,002.00
Projected Expense $1,319,534.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Development: Better Beaches Program
  • Environmental Advocacy: Beaches Science Advisory Committee
  • Public Policy: Metropolitan Beaches Commission
  • Youth Environmental Education Programs

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay is a non-profit, public interest Boston Harbor advocacy organization made up of thousands of citizens as well as civic, corporate, cultural and community leaders and scientists.

As the region’s leading voice for clean water and continued public investment in Boston Harbor, the region's public beaches, and the Boston Harbor Islands, our mission is to restore and protect Boston Harbor, Massachusetts Bay and the marine environment and share them with the public for everyone to enjoy.


Background Statement

For over 30 years, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay has been the driving force behind the transformation of Boston Harbor from one of the dirtiest urban harbors in America to one of the cleanest in the world.

Since our founding in 1986, we have successfully advocated for the completion of the state of the art Deer Island sewage treatment plant and the Mass Bay outfall pipe, led the effort to create the Boston Harbor Islands National Park, and transformed the South Boston beaches into the cleanest urban beaches in America. Over this period we have helped make Boston Harbor, the waterfront, the region’s public beaches and the Boston Harbor Islands a destination for companies, residents, and visitors.

We work with civic, corporate, cultural, scientific, philanthropic and community leaders, with government at all levels and with more than 120 youth and community groups from all of Boston's neighborhoods and the region's beachfront communities to strengthen the connections between local communities and the harbor and increase the recreational and economic value of Boston Harbor to the region's residents and businesses.

Since 1986, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay has:

 

  • Successfully advocated for the completion of the Boston Harbor cleanup, transforming Boston Harbor from a national disgrace into a source of recreational, educational and economic opportunity and civic pride.
  • Led the effort to create the Boston Harbor Islands National Park, transforming 34 abandoned islands into a remarkable destination for the region’s residents and visitors alike.
  • Led the effort to virtually eliminate both combined sewer overflows and storm water discharges into North Dorchester Bay, transforming the South Boston beaches into the cleanest urban beaches in America.
  • Leads critical efforts to increase our understanding of our marine environment and continue to improve and monitor water quality in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts Bay, and on our public beaches.

 

 


Impact Statement

 In 1986 Boston Harbor was a national disgrace as our waste washed up on the beach and shore from Cape Cod to Cape Ann. Today all that has changed, thanks to the extraordinarily effective advocacy of Save the Harbor/Save the Bay and the hard work of thousands of people who all believe in the power of Boston Harbor to strengthen our community and improve people’s lives.

In one generation we have transformed Boston Harbor from a liability into a civic, recreational, and educational asset for Bostonians and the region’s residents. Today the harbor has moved to the center of civic life and emerged as an engine of economic growth for Boston’s waterfront neighborhoods and the region’s beachfront communities.

The beaches of South Boston are now the cleanest urban beaches in America, and new private development and public spaces have transformed the Boston Harbor waterfront into a desirable space for the regions businesses and residents.

Boston is now also home to the Boston Harbor Islands National Park, but it is seriously underutilized and too expensive for many of the region’s residents to enjoy.

Our region’s public beaches, which serve as the primary recreational resource for many of the region’s residents, are on the rebound, though there is still work to be done on beaches in Lynn, Swampscott, and Dorchester, which still remain closed to the public as many as one out of every five days during the summer.

We are proud of what we have accomplished in the span of a generation, but are cognizant of the fact that it will take another generation -or more - to finish the job.

Today Save the Harbor/Save the Bay:

 

  • Convenes and leads our Beaches Science Advisory Committee, which led the effort to transform the South Boston beaches into the cleanest urban beaches in America and is working to improve water quality at King’s Beach in Lynn and Swampscott and Tenean Beach in Dorchester.
  • Leads and manages the Metropolitan Beaches Commission for the Massachusetts Legislature, which is charged with improving the Boston Harbor Region’s public beaches from Nahant on the North Shore to Nantasket on the South Shore.
  • Uses our Beach Water Quality Report Card to focus attention and additional resources to address water quality concerns in communities that still face frequent beach closures.
  • Strengthens Boston’s waterfront neighborhoods and the region’s beachfront communities by hosting and sponsoring scores of free Better Beaches Program events and programs on the region’s public beaches from Nahant to Nantasket.
  • Helps shape the future of the waterfront by actively participating in state and local planning efforts including the City of Boston’s Municipal Harbor Plan Advisory Committee and Imagine Boston 2030.
  • Leads the City of Boston’s efforts to complete the South Bay Harbor Trail, a 3.5-mile long pedestrian friendly bicycle trail that will reduce automobile traffic in the Seaport District by connecting Roxbury, the South End, and Chinatown to the Fort Point Channel and the Seaport.
  • Is the Boston Harbor Connection for the region’s underserved and low-income youth and their families, with free STEAM-Based Youth Environmental Education Programs that have introduced almost 200,000 underserved and low-income young people to the spectacular harbor we have worked so hard to restore and protect since we began them in 2002.

 

 


Needs Statement

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay is clear on our mission, goals and objectives. We have a sound strategy, strong partnerships, first-rate programs and a proven track record of success.

To accomplish our mission we need to address the remaining water quality challenges that still effect beaches in Lynn, East Boston, Dorchester and Quincy. We need to maintain the broad consensus we have created on the value of continued investment in Boston Harbor and the urban environment to the city and the region’s residents and businesses.

We also need to reconnect Boston’s neighborhoods and the region’s residents with the harbor we have worked so hard to restore and protect, to create a new generation of Boston Harbor stewards who understand that Boston Harbor, the region’s beaches, and Harbor Islands belong to each of them and strengthen their communities. The thousands of low-income youth we serve each year do not have the opportunity or the means for coastal getaways to places such as Cape Cod or Cape Ann. Our programs offer an opportunity for free and accessible youth education and enrichment programs that take advantage of the spectacular urban natural resources that are just a short drive or ride for nearly 2 million regional residents.

We have a pressing need for additional funds for new staff to accelerate the pace of our advocacy, which is at the core of our mission. We also have a pressing need to secure new resources to grow our youth and beach programs to reach more of the region’s underserved youth and their families, and increase our internal capacity to handle the day to day needs of a growing and innovative non-profit with a proven track record of success.


CEO Statement

From 1986 to 1999 Save the Harbor/Save the Bay focused on creating and maintaining the broad public consensus it took to complete the Deer Island sewage treatment plant and the Mass Bay Outfall pipe.

I became President and CEO of Save the Harbor Save the Bay in 2000, as the success of the first phase of the project became apparent and Boston Harbor and Mass Bay began to recover from generations of neglect. At that time we turned our attention to solving the remaining water quality problems that still continued to close many of our region’s public beaches as often as one out of every five days, preventing the public from enjoying the benefits of our enormous public investment in clean water.

As the success of the cleanup became increasingly apparent, we pioneered a new strategy based on our simple but powerful theory of change: The best way to “Save the Harbor” was to “Share the Harbor” with the public through free events and programs that would connect our communities and residents to the Harbor, the waterfront, public beaches and the harbor islands.

This strategy has enabled us to create a new generation of Boston Harbor stewards in every neighborhood in the City of Boston and in the region’s beachfront communities from Nahant on the North Shore to Nantasket on the South Shore.

Working with the region’s civic, corporate, cultural and community leaders, state and local elected officials, other advocates, regulators, experts and scientists - and with thousands of citizens from more than 120 youth and community organizations we have built a remarkable regional network to support our work.

These diverse individuals, institutions and organizations share a common commitment to clean water, better beaches and improved public access to the waterfront and the Boston Harbor Islands. Together we have begun to integrate the harbor into the life of our city and our citizens, and transformed Boston Harbor from a “harbor of shame” into an extraordinary civic, recreational, and educational asset that has become an engine for economic growth in the City of Boston and the region’s coastal communities.


Board Chair Statement

All of us have opportunities to serve our community. I chose Save the Harbor/Save the Bay because it pairs my love for the city and my passion for the ocean and is committed to ensuring that our natural resources will be protected and available to the next generation of kids and families who may not have the opportunities that I was lucky enough to have.

As Board Chair, I believe that it is our responsibility to make sure that we accomplish our mission and that the organization continues as an asset. To succeed, Save the Harbor has to be strong financially and continue to be a “thought leader” that understands the value of the harbor to our city and the region’s residents.

An organization can have all the money in the world, but if it doesn’t improve people’s lives and is not a useful asset from a policy perspective, it is a waste of resources. Similarly, without the money and other resources required to make a difference, it is a futile exercise and a wasted effort. We are striving to do both, so that we can build on our current strengths and sustain them into the future.

I want to share a visceral moment with you. This summer I was on the beach in South Boston with about 550 kids at our annual Youth Beach Bash & Splash.

As I watched kids of all colors, shapes and sizes swim, splash, and explore together on a beach that Save the Harbor had transformed into one of the cleanest urban beaches in America, I was struck by the extraordinary legacy that we were leaving to the next generation.

To me that beach was a blank canvass that we had transformed into something beautiful. Imagine what the world would be like if everyone had the same opportunity and access to something as beautiful as our harbor and wonderful as that beach.

That’s what Save the Harbor/Save the Bay means to me – creating a generation of opportunities. I am proud to be a part of it and committed to carrying it forward for the next generation.


Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- Harbor Islands
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay serves the more than one million people annually who live in the 43 cities and towns served by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority.

We partner with community organizations and local friends groups from Boston's waterfront neighborhoods and beachfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket, including Lynn and Nahant, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy and Hull.

We work in close partnership with more than 120 youth organizations and community groups including local YMCAs, Boys and Girls Clubs and the Boston Centers for Youth and Families from all of Boston's neighborhoods and the greater Boston area.

Organization Categories

  1. Environment - Alliances & Advocacy
  2. Environment - Environmental Education
  3. Environment - Natural Resources Conservation & Protection

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Community Development: Better Beaches Program

Our Better Beaches Program works to strengthen communities and improve the quality of life for Bostonians and the region's residents by reconnecting them to Boston Harbor and the region’s public beaches through free events and programs. 

Since it began in 2008, Save the Harbor has raised and invested $683,858 in small grants to our “Friends Groups” and beachfront community partners in Nahant, Lynn, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy, and Hull. They in turn, have leveraged that investment with $2,352,557 in cash and in-kind contributions to fund 484 free concerts, beach festivals, soccer tournaments, sand raking and sand sculpting competitions on our region’s public beaches from Nahant to Nantasket.

Budget  $429,368.00
Category  Public, Society Benefit, General/Other Public, Society Benefit, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

There will be more free Better Beaches events and programs for all the region’s residents, especially underserved youth and families.

Program Long-Term Success 

Strengthen Boston’s waterfront neighborhoods and the region’s beachfront communities by hosting more than 70 free events on the region’s public beaches annually.

 

Program Success Monitored By 

 The number of people who participate in our pledge fundraiser, The Harpoon Shamrock Splash, and the amount of money they raise to support our Better Beaches programs and events.

The number of events and participants, as well as the cash and in-kind contributions our Better Beaches program partners invest in these free programs as well.

Examples of Program Success 

Previously, the funds to support this program came solely from our annual cold water swim and pledge fundraiser, which raised $40,000 from 500 participants and sponsors to support 30 free events in 2014. In 2015, based on the success of our program, Save the Harbor secured an initial appropriation of $190,000 from the Legislature to supplement the funds we raised at the Harpoon Shamrock Splash, enabling us to support and dramatically expand the reach and impact of our Better Beaches Program

With a reduction in FY2017 state funding, we raised record breaking $55,000 from nearly 1,000 small donors at our Harpoon Shamrock Splash plunge and pledge fundraiser which we awarded to 27 organizations in 9 waterfront neighborhood neighborhoods and beachfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket to support 94 free beach events and programs.

At the same time Save the Harbor implemented an effective advocacy campaign that resulted in our annual appropriation of $190,000 being restored for FY2018.


Environmental Advocacy: Beaches Science Advisory Committee

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay convenes and leads our Beaches Science Advisory Committee (BSAC), made up of independent scientists, engineers and technical experts who help us make site specific recommendations to improve water quality and protect the public’s health on public beaches that are still unsafe for swimming more than one out of every five days in a typical year.

Our BSAC led the effort to transform the South Boston beaches into the cleanest urban beaches in America and is now focused on ways to improve water quality at King’s Beach in Lynn and Swampscott and Tenean Beach in Dorchester, which continue to lag behind other area beaches.

Budget  $125,000.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Environment, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Sustained and focused attention on water quality and beach flagging accuracy, which prevent the public from enjoying the benefits of the Boston Harbor cleanup.

Program Long-Term Success 

Continued commitment from government at all levels to address outstanding water quality challenges on underperforming beaches from Nahant to Nantasket, including improvements at King’s Beach in Lynn and Swampscott, at Tenean Beach in Dorchester, and at other area beaches that lag behind.

Program Success Monitored By 

Measurable and noticeable improvements in water quality and flagging accuracy in communities where the beaches are still closed more than 10% of the time. 

Examples of Program Success 

Our BSAC led the effort to transform the South Boston beaches into the cleanest urban beaches in America and is now focused on ways to improve water quality at King’s Beach in Lynn and Swampscott and Tenean Beach in Dorchester, which continue to lag behind other area beaches.

In the spring, summer and fall of 2017, with the support of Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs Matthew Beaton and in partnership with USEPA, MADEP, the MWRA and local officials from Lynn and Swampscott, Save the Harbor installed flow meters and rain gauges at King’s Beach. At BSAC’s request, we also conducted additional water quality testing and analysis to help us understand the persistent pollution problems that still plague those beaches.


Public Policy: Metropolitan Beaches Commission

In 2014, the MBC became a permanent Commission, made up of local elected officials and residents from Boston’s waterfront neighborhoods of East Boston, South Boston and Dorchester, and the regions beachfront communities of Lynn, Nahant, Revere, Winthrop, Quincy and Hull. At that time it issued a second report, “Waves of Change” which both celebrated the gains we have made and called out ongoing issues of critical concern about management, maintenance and free events and programs at DCR, whose budget and staff had decreased by nearly 30% statewide.

In 2015 and 2016 the MBC and Save the Harbor successfully advocated for a $1.19 million dollar line item in the budget to help DCR staff and maintain the Boston Harbor Region’s public beaches, which included funds for seasonal staff and free events and programs, which the Commission felt were critical to the region’s underserved and low income residents, many of whom cannot afford to get away to Cape Cod or Cape Ann.

In 2017, the MBC held public hearings at the State House and on the North Shore, and heard from local officials and the public about their concerns about the impacts of the cuts on their communities. We also reached out to the Baker/Polito Administration, and asked them to join the leadership of the House and The Senate and include the funds for FY2018.

In 2018, the MBC will hold additional hearings in Boston and on the South Shore, and focus attention on the value of these beaches to the regions; residents and the critical role they play as economic drivers in the region’s largely blue collar beachfront communities, and continue to advocate for the modest investments it takes to put these extraordinary environmental assets to work for our communities and residents.

Budget  $175,000.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Environment, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Continued support by both the Baker/Polito Administration and the Massachusetts Legislature for an annual investment of $1.19 million dollars in the Metropolitan Region’s Public Beaches, including funds for DCR staff, algae removal, and free beach events and youth programs.

Program Long-Term Success 

The metropolitan region’s 19 miles of public swimming beaches owned by the Commonwealth and managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation will be well maintained, well managed and well used by the nearly 2 million Bostonians and regional residents who live within a short ride or drive from the coast.

Program Success Monitored By 

Continued investment by the Massachusetts Legislature and increased educational recreational and civic use of the region’s public beaches.

Examples of Program Success 

Since 2007, Save the Harbor has led and managed the Metropolitan Beaches Commission (MBC) for the Massachusetts Legislature, charged with making specific recommendations on how to improve the Boston Harbor Region's public beaches from Nahant to Nantasket. The MBC’s initial report served as a road map for reform at the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) and a blueprint for investment in 15 public beaches in 9 communities.


Youth Environmental Education Programs

The overarching objective of all our Youth Environmental Education Programs is to create a new generation of Boston Harbor stewards who understand that Boston Harbor, the region’s beaches and islands belong to each of them and strengthens their communities.

In 2017, we experienced significant growth in all areas of our Youth Environmental Education Programs, which connected 31,451 youth and teens from 124 youth development and community groups from 43 communities to Boston Harbor and the Boston Harbor Islands National Park at 9 program sites and 28 free trips to the Boston Harbor Islands.

All Access Boston Harbor offers underserved youth and teens free day trips to Boston Harbor Islands National Park. This service is offered as a resource to over 120 Boston area youth and community organizations with the intent of expanding public access to our local hidden gems. In the spring, we offer Marine Mammal Safaris; in the fall, Treasures of Spectacle Island cruises enable families to experience what their children have seen in the summer.

Boston Harbor Explorers engages underserved youth and teens with experiential learning about their local marine environment. This program is run at 12 sites around Boston Harbor at the region's youth sailing centers, on the region's public beaches, at the Boston Children’s Museum, the City of Boston’s Camp Harbor View, and at DCR's Carson Beach.

Budget  $423,942.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Program Short Term Success: The short term goals of these programs is to see increased use of the extraordinary urban environmental assets that are within a short ride or drive of nearly 2 million residents.

 

Program Long-Term Success 

The long term goal of our Youth Environmental Education Programs is to create a new generation of Boston Harbor stewards who understand that Boston Harbor, the harbor islands, and our region’s public beaches belong to each of them.

 

Program Success Monitored By 

We conduct a rigorous evaluation of our Youth Environmental Education Programs, and issue annual Youth and Beach Program reports, which track the number of low-income, minority and immigrant youth and teens who take part in our free youth and beach programs, the number of program sites and free beach events we staff, the communities we serve, the groups who participate and the number of times they take part in our programs. We also ask our program partners to provide us with demographic data about their program participants and the communities they serve.

Examples of Program Success 

The success of free programs like these has made Save the Harbor/Save the Bay the Boston Harbor Connection for the region’s underserved and low-income youth and their families, with free Youth Environmental Education Programs that have, in the past 15 years, introduced almost 200,000 young people to the spectacular harbor we have worked so hard to restore and protect.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Save the Harbor/ Save the Bay is clear on our mission goals and objectives.

Both our organization and our programs have a proven track record of success.

Like many successful non-profits, the biggest challenges we face are capacity and revenue. It is a real challenge to secure the resources we need to sustain and expand our free programs to reach more of the region’s underserved youth and their families.

In response to this challenge we are constantly looking for new foundation funding partners, and have developed a Strategic Plan For Sustainability And Growth, which focuses on small donor events such as pledge fundraisers and increased support from the city’s business community and the region’s corporations – which now makes up more than 40% of our revenue.

With additional resources we will be better able to:

Accelerate the pace and increase the impact of our advocacy for clean water, better beaches, and continued public investment in the urban environment.

Strengthen Boston’s waterfront neighborhoods and the region’s beachfront communities by growing our Better Beaches program, which hosted or sponsored more than 70 free events on the region’s public beaches in Lynn, Nahant, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy and Hull.

Improve access to Boston Harbor and the Boston Harbor Islands by expanding our free Youth Environmental Education programs, which are already the largest in the region, connecting over 130,000 underserved youth, teens and their families to Boston Harbor and the Harbor Islands since we began them in 2002. We will be able to expand our year-round programs to include more in and after school programs and additional programs during public school vacations. We will also be able to focus additional resources on strengthening the skills of the 21 urban teens we employ each summer.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Patricia A. Foley
CEO Term Start Jan 2000
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

 Patricia Foley began her career of public service as a juvenile probation officer in the Quincy District Court, where she helped pioneer alternative sentencing programs for youthful offenders. In 1979 she joined Boston Mayor Kevin White’s re-election campaign, and in 1980 served as a congressional district field organizer for United States Senator Edward M. Kennedy’s presidential campaign in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Ohio. Foley then returned to Massachusetts, and in January of 1981 signed on as legislative assistant to State Senator George Bachrach.

In 1983 Patty joined then Lieutenant Governor John Kerry’s staff, serving first as a policy analyst, then Finance Director for his senatorial campaign in 1984. Following his victory, she served as Deputy Chief of Staff in his Washington Office, then home to serve as Massachusetts Chief of Staff. In 1990, Foley served as Kerry’s Campaign Manager for his first reelection campaign, the first woman to successfully run a statewide campaign here in Massachusetts.

In 1991 Foley moved to New York City, where she served as Senior Vice President for External Affairs at LISC, the Local Initiatives Support Corp., the nation’s largest non-profit organization dedicated to assisting community development corporations (CDCs) in rebuilding their neighborhoods. At LISC, Foley developed and implemented a national communications strategy on behalf of the community development movement, ran a $200 million fundraising campaign, and worked directly with the Congress to advance policies that strengthened America’s cities, including the Federal Low Income Housing Tax Credit.

In 1999 Foley joined Save the Harbor/Save the Bay as a strategic planner and consultant. In 2000, she was appointed President, a position she has held since that time.

 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Bruce Berman Director of Strategy and Communications

 E. Bruce Berman, Jr. teaches marine science, management, public policy, and the history of the Boston Harbor Cleanup at Boston University.

Since 1992 Berman has served as spokesman and Director of Strategic Communication and Stewardship for the public interest environmental advocacy organization Save the Harbor/Save the Bay in Boston, and is the architect of the organization’s youth environmental education, recreation and stewardship programs.

He currently serves as lead consultant to the Metropolitan Beaches Commission and represents Save the Harbor / Save the Bay on the City of Boston’s Municipal Harbor Plan Advisory Committee, charged with planning the restoration and renewal of Boston’s waterfront.

Berman is the CEO of Catalyst New Media Group, an award winning Boston based communications consulting, advertising and public relations firm with clients in health care, new technologies, the boating industry and the environment.

Berman was founder and senior partner of Ways & Means, a Boston based political communications and campaign consulting firm whose clients included United States Senator John Kerry, Bay State Congressman Joe Kennedy, Ed Markey, Gerry Studds, and Barney Frank, and Governor Mike Dukakis, as well as initiative and referenda campaigns from Hawaii to Maine.

Berman is also the founder and senior partner of the web's oldest advertising agency, “The Internet Advertising Agency”, with clients from Culebra to Katmandu. He also served as Contributing Editor and author of a weekly syndicated column for the Boston Phoenix. 

Chris Mancini Vice President of Operations and Programs

Chris Mancini is a seasoned non-profit executive with extensive experience in curriculum development working for 6 years at Groundwork Somerville as Executive Director and 5 years at Sailors for the Sea in Newport, RI as Program Manager. He is also an accomplished sailor, singer, storyteller and program leader who appeared briefly in Pirates of the Caribbean II.

 

 

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

One reason that Save the Harbor/ Save the Bay’s programs and policy work have been so successful is that we are a truly collaborative organization, with a proven track record of success and a long standing commitment to the organizations with which we partner and the communities we serve. We regularly work with government at all levels, with decision makers, opinion leaders and the media, with the region’s civic, corporate, cultural and community leaders, and with thousands of citizens from around the region.

We work in close partnership with more than 120 youth and community organizations from 43 communities including all of Boston’s neighborhoods, the region’s beachfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket and other cities and towns across the region. These include beach friends groups, the region’s YMCAs and Boys and Girls Clubs, the Boston Centers for Youth and Families and many smaller youth development and community centers. We run our Boston Harbor Explorer Program in partnership with the staff and leadership of youth sailing centers at 8 sites around Boston Harbor including Courageous Sailing in Charlestown, Piers Park in East Boston, Blacks Creek in Quincy, Community Boating on the Charles River, the City of Boston’s Camp Harbor View on Long Island in the Boston Harbor Islands National Park, at The Boston Children's Museum and at DCR's Carson Beach in South Boston.

In addition, each year we work with 500 volunteers and our Better Beaches Program partners in the city’s waterfront neighborhoods and the region’s beachfront communities to host more than 70 free beach events in Lynn, Nahant, Revere, Winthrop, East Boston, South Boston, Dorchester, Quincy and Hull.

Through these active partnerships and collaborations we have built a network of 5,000 citizens, scientists, and civic, corporate and community leaders from 43 communities who share our goals and support our work.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay has a big mission but a fairly small full time staff.

As a small non-profit we simply can’t afford to pay the salaries that experienced non-profit executives typically command. As a result, we rely on a young staff and a coterie of committed of interns who do great work but often lack the expertise and specific skills that can only come with time and experience.

Moreover, during the recent recession we made a conscious decision to continue to invest in the free programs that are so important to our program partners and the region’s underserved youth and families.

As a result, our senior staff – which includes our President Patty Foley, Vice President of Programs and Operations Chris Mancini, and Director of Strategy and Communications Bruce Berman, has had to shoulder an increased burden.

Despite the challenges, we have had consistent success in all phases of our work.

In 2017, Save the Harbor held public hearings at the State House and on the North Shore, and heard from local officials and the public about their concerns about the impacts of the cuts on their communities. We also reached out to the Baker/Polito Administration, and asked them to join the leadership of the House and The Senate and include funds for free beach programs in the FY2018 budget, which they agreed to do, though the funds have not yet been released.

Our Beaches Science Advisory Committee issued the 8th annual Beaches Report Card, the region’s only comprehensive report card on water quality and flagging accuracy. We hosted or sponsored more than 90 free beach events and programs on the region’s public beaches. Our free youth environmental education programs employed a summer staff of 36 that includes 6 senior harbor educators, 5 college students, and 21 urban teens and connected over 30,000 youth and teens to Boston Harbor and the Boston Harbor Islands.

In addition to stewardship mailings, donor appeals and grant requests and reports, we also generated dozens of stories in community newspapers and the regional press. We also produced two newsletters, manage our own website, two Facebook pages with more than 7,000 followers, and a youth and beach program blog.

We also hosted an annual corporate fundraiser for more than 400 people that raised more than $400,000 and a low donor pledge fundraiser with more than 1000 participants. We also organized and hosted our annual Youth Beach Bash & Splash that brought nearly 550 youth and teens from across the city to Caron Beach in South Boston for a day of celebration on one of the cleanest urban beaches in America.

Frankly, to sustain our advocacy, accelerate our policy agenda and meet the increased demand for our free programs, we need additional experienced program and policy staff.

We also have a pressing need for a senior development staffer, to help us secure the funds we need for sustainability and growth.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 6
Number of Part Time Staff 35
Number of Volunteers 500
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 92%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 21
Hispanic/Latino: 8
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 23
Male: 17
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Medical Health Insurance
Special Event Liability
Disability Insurance

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Joseph P. Newman
Board Chair Company Affiliation National Grid
Board Chair Term Jan 2012 - Dec 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Laura A. Burke Capital Realty Voting
Christopher Byner Boston Centers for Youth and Families Voting
Mark Chrisos Con Edison Development Voting
Thomas Cox Bosport Docking/Constitution Marina Voting
Karen Fernandes Mellon Capitol Voting
Paul D. Foster Paul D. Foster & Associates Voting
Elisabeth Jackson Bridge Over Troubled Waters Voting
James Jensen Blue Hills Bank Pavilion/Live Nation Voting
Eugene Kennedy Lee Kennedy Co., Inc. Voting
Thomas A. Kershaw Hampshire House Corp. Voting
Martha Laposata Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Voting
David Lee Stull and Lee, Inc. Voting
Michael A. Leon Nutter McClennen & Fish Voting
Nicholas Martins Coca-Cola Refreshments Voting
Thomas N. O'Brien The HYM Investment Group, LLC Voting
Julie Pagano Bay State Cruises Voting
Judith Pederson MIT Sea Grant College Program Voting
Joseph R. Savage Charlestown Resident Voting
Christian R. Scorzoni Travaglini Eisenberg Kiley Voting
James Shine Harvard School of Public Health Voting
David Spillane Goody Clancy Voting
Elizabeth Toledo YMCA of Greater Boston --
Susan Tracy The Strategy Group Voting
Thomas G. Wolfe Jennison Associates Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 19
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 17
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 20%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Executive
  • Nominating
  • Youth

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay is fortunate to have an active and engaged Board of Directors, which meets four times a year. It provides overall guidance to management on all aspects of our work and has proven to be a remarkable asset to the organization.

The Board of Director has several standing committees that meet more frequently:

Our Executive Committee meets regularly and provides financial oversight and advice and counsel to management.

Our Audit Committee is charged with making sure that we follow best practices and have appropriate policies and procedures in place.

Our Youth Committee works directly with our program staff to strengthen our programs, and ensure that they meet the needs of our over 120 youth and community program partners.

Our Nominating Committee is charged with recruiting new corporate, community and non-profit directors and officers. As we write this, it has put together a great slate of new board candidates that includes both corporate and community leaders.

The board frequently creates special or select committees with a particular expertise such as marketing or event planning to help us accomplish a specific task.

The biggest challenges we face here are not unique to our organization: All our directors and officers are committed to our work, but like most successful people they lead very busy lives. It is sometimes a challenge for them to find sufficient time to help us secure the resources we need to accomplish our mission.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,395,686 $1,249,459 $1,079,764
Total Expenses $1,339,860 $1,200,712 $1,058,670

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$613,700 $535,381 $381,373
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- $61
Membership Dues $152,907 $175,201 $125,244
Special Events $456,549 $385,370 $327,000
Revenue In-Kind $172,530 $153,507 $158,663
Other -- -- $87,423

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,081,009 $978,771 $845,085
Administration Expense $102,458 $83,796 $87,766
Fundraising Expense $156,393 $138,145 $125,819
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.04 1.04 1.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses 81% 82% 80%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 15% 15% 18%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $414,369 $412,542 $323,657
Current Assets $414,369 $412,542 $323,657
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- $0
Current Liabilities $191,499 $245,498 $205,360
Total Net Assets $222,870 $167,044 $118,297

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.16 1.68 1.58

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

During the recent recession Save the Harbor/Save the Bay made a conscious decision to continue to invest in our programs, which are so important to our 110 program partners and the region’s underserved youth and families. 

Despite the tough economic climate we have been able retain the support of the our foundation funding partners, recruit hundreds of new small donors, and secured substantial new revenue from the region’s businesses and corporations, which now makes up more than 30% of our budget.

Over the past 15 years we are proud to say that we have raised more than $14 million dollars to support our mission. However, we still start from scratch each year with $100,000 in the bank.

This puts a significant strain on our senior staff and on our board. In response, we have developed a strategic plan for sustainability and growth.

As part of that plan we are seeking renewed support for our environmental advocacy and policy work from foundation funders and new support for our events and programs from the region’s corporations and the many new businesses which enjoy the benefits of our investment in Boston’s resurgent harbor and waterfront.

At a time when numbers of requests for funding from traditional environmental foundations and the region’s businesses is increasing we anticipate that this will continue to be a challenge for Save the Harbor/ Save the Bay and the region’s other non-profits as well.

To succeed we will need to continue to professionalize the organization’s fundraising, and continue to ask our board to increase their commitment and support. We have to continue to find new prospects, and continue to steward our existing donors to make them feel good about supporting our work.

The pace of our success will also depend in part on factors such as the economy, which are largely beyond our control. However, we have an extensive track record of accomplishments and have already created an enduring legacy: In just one generation, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay has driven the transformation of Boston Harbor from a “Harbor of Shame” into one of the cleanest urban harbors in the nation.  Our task going forward is to finish the job, put Boston Harbor to work for the city and to fully integrate this spectacular urban natural resource into the lives of all Bostonians and the region’s residents.

We are confident that we have a compelling case for support as we work with our civic, corporate and community partners and our allies in state and local government to advance our agenda for Boston Harbor and create the next generation of stewards to continue our work.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials. Contributions from individuals are listed under foundations and corporations when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay's ultimate goal is to transform Boston Harbor from a liability into an asset for all Bostonians and the region’s residents alike. To accomplish it we believe we need to do three things, which will take a generation to fully accomplish. 

  1. Restore and protect Boston Harbor, Massachusetts Bay, the waterfront, our region’s public beaches and the Boston Harbor Islands forever, and share them with the public for everyone to enjoy.
  2. Reweave Boston Harbor, the waterfront, beaches and islands into the fabric of the civic, cultural, community and economic life of the city and the region.
  3. Create a new generation of Boston Harbor stewards who understand that these spectacular urban natural resources belong to them and their community.
  4. Encourage continued public and private investment in Boston Harbor, the waterfront, our public beaches, and the Boston Harbor islands. (Please see Question 4 for indicators of our success.)


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

 

We make five strategic assumptions that form the basis of our success.

1. Sound science, good data, and good politics are the key to good public policy.

2. Sharing the Harbor creates new stewards, supporters and champions who are critical to achieving our short and longer-term goals.

3. If you can get people to understand and agree on the problem or question, you have a better chance of creating a consensus around the solution or answer.

4. Shaping public opinion using community newspapers, the regional press and new and social media is critical to our success.

5. We have a special responsibility to the less affluent and underserved residents of region - who share the costs of the cleanup though their water and sewer bills and deserve to share the benefits of their investment.
 
In 2018, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay will:

  • Convenes and lead our Beaches Science Advisory Committee, which led the effort to transform the South Boston beaches into the cleanest urban beaches in America and is working to improve water quality at King’s Beach in Lynn and Swampscott and Tenean Beach in Dorchester.
  • Lead and manage the Metropolitan Beaches Commission for the Massachusetts Legislature, which is charged with improving the Boston Harbor Region’s public beaches from Nahant on the North Shore to Nantasket on the South Shore. 
  • Strengthen Boston’s waterfront neighborhoods and the region’s beachfront communities by hosting and sponsoring scores of free Better Beaches Program events and programs on the region’s public beaches from Nahant to Nantasket.
  • Help shape the future of the waterfront by actively participating in state and local planning efforts including the City of Boston’s Municipal Harbor Plan Advisory Committee and Imagine Boston 2030.
  • Lead the City of Boston’s efforts to complete the South Bay Harbor Trail, a 3.5-mile long pedestrian friendly bicycle trail that will reduce automobile traffic in the Seaport District by connecting Roxbury, the South End, and Chinatown to the Fort Point Channel and the Seaport.
  • Serve as the Boston Harbor Connection for the region’s underserved and low-income youth and their families, with free STEAM-Based Youth Environmental Education Programs that have introduced nearly 200,000 underserved and low-income young people to the spectacular harbor we have worked so hard to restore and protect since we began them in 2002. 

 


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

 

With 5,000 members and supporters from every neighborhood in the city of Boston and in the region’s beachfront communities from Nahant to Nantasket, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay is the region’s largest harbor focused environmental advocacy organization, with a proven track record of success.

Our core assets are stunning natural resources – Boston Harbor, our region’s public beaches and the Boston Harbor Islands. We come to the table with the following internal resources and external strengths.

We are effective advocates with a powerful theory of change, led by experienced non-profit professionals with experience in public policy and politics. We have the full support of an involved board of directors who take an active role in all aspects of our work.

We are a truly collaborative organization, with an annual budget of approximately $1 million and a proven track record of success. We have built strong relationships with policy makers in government at all levels, and with the region’s foundations, the corporate community, and the press.

Each year we work in close partnership with 120 youth development organizations and community groups from 40 communities in Greater Boston, which include beach friends groups and the region’s YMCAs and Boys and Girls Clubs, the Boston Centers for Youth and Families and many smaller youth development and community centers. We run our free youth environmental education programs at eight program sites on Boston Harbor, and host or sponsor scores of free beach events and programs in Boston’s waterfront neighborhoods and the region’s beachfront communities from Nahant on the North Shore to Nantasket on the South Shore.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

 

Save the Harbor/Save the Bay uses both quantitative and qualitative measures to evaluate the impact of our work.

We track the number of participants in the MBC hearings, our free youth and beach programs, and our low-donor events and pledge fundraisers like the Harpoon Shamrock Splash.

We track the amount of money the Commonwealth invests in the region’s public beaches, and use web-based surveys to measure “customer satisfaction” as well. We also closely monitor water quality and flagging accuracy on the urban beaches from Nahant to Nantasket in our annual Beaches Report Card.

We also track the amount of money we raise to support free beach events and programs, the number of events and participants, as well as the cash and in-kind contributions our Better Beaches program partners invest in these free programs as well.

We track the number of underserved youth and teens who take part in our free youth and beach programs, and the number of free island excursions we host each year. Last year our All Access Boston Harbor and our Boston Harbor Explorers programs connected 31,451 youth and teens to Boston Harbor and the Harbor Islands.

These metrics are not the only measures of our success. The late U.S. District Court Judge A. David Mazzone, who oversaw the Boston Harbor Case for nearly 20 years, once remarked that he measured the success of the Boston Harbor Clean-up not by the number of feet he could see into the water, but by the number of people's feet he saw on the beaches, waterfront, islands, and shore. We believe that that is also a true measure of our success.

 


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

In 1986 Boston Harbor was a national disgrace as our waste washed up on the beach and shore from Cape Cod to Cape Ann. Today all that has changed, thanks to the extraordinarily effective advocacy of Save the Harbor/Save the Bay and the hard work of thousands of people who all believe in the power of Boston Harbor to strengthen our community and improve people’s lives.

In one generation we have begun to transform Boston Harbor from a liability into a civic, recreational, and educational asset for Bostonians and the region’s residents. Today the harbor is beginning to move towards the center of civic life and is emerging as an engine of economic growth for Boston’s waterfront neighborhoods and the region’s beachfront communities.

Though the first chapters of the Boston Harbor Success story are a great read –the story is not finished yet.

The beaches of South Boston are now the cleanest urban beaches in America, but other beaches in Lynn and Swampscott, Dorchester and elsewhere continue to lag behind in water quality.

The Boston Harbor Islands are now a State and National Park, but it is seriously underfunded and underutilized, and water transportation is too expensive for many of the region’s residents to enjoy.

New private development and public spaces have transformed the built environment at the edge of Boston Harbor, but our resurgent waterfront still needs stronger physical and programmatic connections to the harbor and our neighborhoods.

Our region’s public beaches, which serve as the primary recreational resource for many of the region’s residents, are on the rebound, but budget cuts at the Department of Conservation and Recreation put the gains we have made in the past five years at risk.

While we are proud of what we have accomplished in the span of a generation, we are cognizant of the fact that it will take another generation -or more - to finish the job.