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Animal Rescue League of Boston

 10 Chandler Street
 Boston, MA 02116
[P] (617) 426-9170
[F] (617) 426-3180
www.arlboston.org
[email protected]
Derek Stemmler
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1943
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2103714

LAST UPDATED: 11/30/2018
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The Animal Rescue League (ARL) is an unwavering champion for animals in need, committed to keeping them safe and healthy in habitats and homes.  

Mission Statement

The Animal Rescue League (ARL) is an unwavering champion for animals in need, committed to keeping them safe and healthy in habitats and homes.  


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
Projected Income $10,180,000.00
Projected Expense $10,165,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Animal Care and Adoption
  • Community & Shelter Medicine
  • Community Programs
  • Law Enforcement & Rescue Services

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Animal Rescue League (ARL) is an unwavering champion for animals in need, committed to keeping them safe and healthy in habitats and homes.  


Background Statement

 In 1899, Boston social worker Anna Harris Smith wrote that while getting dogs and cats off the street is work worth doing, the teaching of thoughtful kindness is the work that changes families, communities and a nation.

This philosophy launched the creation of an organization that has grown to respond to animals in need throughout Eastern Massachusetts and beyond. We are proud to be a respected resource for the local and national animal welfare community, and most importantly to improve the lives of the animals we rescue.


Impact Statement

In 2017, ARL served 18,018 animals through its programs and services to benefit animals in need and the people that care about them.

Needs Statement

The ARL does not receive any government grants or public funding and relies solely on kind supporters like you to provide outstanding veterinary care, adoption and rescue services, and special police investigation and advocacy aimed at preventing cruelty and strengthening the laws that protect animals.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
CAPE &ISLANDS REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
The Animal Rescue League of Boston has three animal care and adoption centers in the Great Boston area (Boston, Dedham and Brewster). The League also serves Massachusetts' South Shore and Cape Cod with a low cost spay/neuter vehicle.

Organization Categories

  1. Animal Related - Animal Protection & Welfare
  2. Animal Related - Veterinary Services
  3. Animal Related - Animal-Related NEC

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Animal Care and Adoption

Animal Care and Adoption services include intake and surrender, shelter and care, behavioral assessment, enrichment, and adoption. These services are offered at three centers located in Boston, Dedham, and Brewster. ARL’s three animal care and adoption centers served 5,515 domestic animals in 2017.

 

Every animal that comes to an ARL shelter receives a medical evaluation from a highly-qualified, caring Shelter Veterinarian. ARL team members continuously train and work to expand skills to meet the needs of a diverse range of the species including dogs, cats, rabbits, small animals, birds, and livestock, coming for a variety of living situations and conditions. In 2017, ARL redesigned its adoption practices and developed Adoption Forward; a new conversation-based, application-free process designed so that the needs of both the animal and the adopter are understood and compatible.

 

Each animal participates in ARL’s unique Shelter Behavior & Enrichment program to not only make them happy and comfortable while they are under shelter care, but also to prepare them for life in their future home.

 

Additionally, ARL offers pet behavioral resources to the public, including dog training and socialization courses, and a free pet behavior helpline to assist pet owners with common challenges, such as excessive barking, crate training, and house soiling. The Boston center offers public Dog Training courses.

 

A network of 179 foster homes provides ongoing care for newborn kittens requiring nursing assistance as well as additional nurturing for adult animals with special needs. A pool of over 568 volunteers provided 26,014 hours of animal enrichment and socialization to prepare shelter and foster animals for adoption by holding dog play groups, cat play groups, and by utilizing cat socialization, to name a few types of enrichment.

Budget  --
Category  Animal-Related, General/Other Animal Protection & Welfare
Population Served Adults Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

In 2017...

 

• 3,474 animals were adopted to permanent homes

• 5,069 animals received shelter veterinary exams

1,815 shelter pet surgeries were performed

• 306 animals were transported from Puerto Rico, Florida, North Carolina, and Mississippi

Program Long-Term Success  Our long term success will be to meet people and animals where they are, bringing veterinary and wellness services directly to those who need it most, so that animals are safe and healthy living in community and out of shelters.
Program Success Monitored By 
Our key performance indicators for our sheltering work include:
  • Tracking intake of animals 
  • Tracking number of veterinary exams, vaccinations and surgeries
  • Length of stay for shelter animals
  • Humane euthanasia rates 
Examples of Program Success 

ARL has adopted the ASPCA Live Release Rate as a mechanism to track and monitor overall success around lives saved. This rate is calculated by dividing live outcomes by total intake of animals. Using this methodology, ARL increased to a 94% Live Release Rate in 2017.



Community & Shelter Medicine

Community Veterinary Services serves animals and people in the communities where they live.

 

ARL operates the following community and veterinary programs:

 

- Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) provides a full range of high-quality outpatient services to pet owners and serves over 3,000 pets in the Greater Boston community. Services include wellness examinations, surgery, dental care, senior pet care, advanced diagnostics, and imaging. All profits support the programs of ARL.

 

-The Spay Waggin’, a mobile veterinary surgical unit, provides low cost spay and neuter services for over 4,600 owned animals each year throughout Southeastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod, and the Islands.

 

-The Community Surgical Clinic provides both veterinary and surgical services twice weekly at our Dedham Campus, including the Community Cat Initiative.

 

-The Pet Wellness Clinic – Codman Square is a weekly clinic for local residents and their pets.

 

Shelter Veterinary Services provides comprehensive veterinary services for all Animal Care and Adoption Centers, and forensic assessments, related to law enforcement investigations.

Budget  --
Category  Animal-Related, General/Other Veterinary Services
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

In 2017...

 

4,761 spay/neuter surgeries were performed by Community Veterinary Services Department

• 5,069 shelter veterinary exams were performed

1,815 shelter pet surgeries were performed

3,345 animals were treated at BVC

Program Long-Term Success  Our long term success will be when we are bringing veterinary and wellness services directly to those animals who need it most in the communities where they live.
Program Success Monitored By 
Key performance indicators for our veterinary program include:
  • Number of community pet surgeries and vaccines administered
  • Number of shelter animal exams and surgeries performed
  • Number of animals treated at Boston Veterinary Care
Examples of Program Success 

ARL’s mobile surgical suite, the Spay Waggin', provides high-quality, affordable spay/neuter services to animals in need on Cape Cod and the South Shore. In 2017, the Spay Waggin’ surpassed 50,000 spays/neuters since program inception.


Community Programs

The Community Cat Initiative addresses the estimated 700,000 “community cats” (feral, semi-feral and outdoor cats) unowned and living in harsh weather conditions in Massachusetts. A dedicated rescue agent assesses a colony of cats and formulates Trap-Neuter-Return plans. Cats also receive veterinary treatment and are evaluation for sociability and adoption potential. With the hiring of the state’s only dedicated Community Cat Rescue agent in 2017, ARL assessed 102 community cat colonies involving 622 cats and 437 were medically treated. 78% of these cats were socialized and then adopted; while 22% were returned to their colonies after spay/neuter surgery.

 

 

The Healthy Animals-Healthy Communities Initiative in Codman Square of Dorchester, Massachusetts works to improve the welfare of animals and deepen the understanding of the human-animal bond and its connections with individual and community health. ARL’s goal is to collaborate and create a community health and wellness model, which includes pets, and has the ability to be sustained by the ongoing support and effort of the organizations and residents of the community. By partnering with local human service organizations in Dorchester, ARL believes this will create positive long lasting change for the people and pets in this community. This initiative includes the creation of pet-inclusive community programs, educational and informational events for families, as well as animal care services.

Budget  --
Category  Animal-Related, General/Other Pet-Related Financial & Commodities Assistance
Population Served Families Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

To date, ARL has:

  1. Formalized a partnership with the Codman Academy Charter Public School to offer an enrichment course on the human-animal bond that teaches students the importance of this link on our overall health and well-being.

  2. Offered Let's Talk Pets workshops open to the public, focused on basic animal care.

  3. Participated in a cooking course, FitKitchen: Pet Edition, where we showed families how to prepare healthy meals for themselves and their pets.

  4. Launched a weekly low-cost Pet Wellness Clinic at the YMCA in Codman Square, Dorchester.

Program Long-Term Success  Our long-term success will be when animals are safe and healthy in the communities where they live.
Program Success Monitored By  Our short term success will be measured by the number of partnerships we create with other community-based organizations to raise awareness about the link between the health of animals and that of people.
Examples of Program Success 
To date we have:
  1. Formalized a partnership with the Codman Academy Charter Public School to offer an enrichment course on the human-animal bond that teaches students the importance of this link on our overall health and well-being.
  2. Offered Let's Talk Pets workshops open to the public, focused on basic animal care.
  3. Participated in a cooking course, FitKitchen: Pet Edition, where we showed families how to prepare healthy meals for themselves and their pets.

Law Enforcement & Rescue Services

Since 1899, ARL has responded to an ever-changing world and the constantly-evolving challenges with respect to animal welfare and protection. ARL believes that animals are a fundamental part of our world and they deserve the highest level of care, protection, and kindness. As a leader in animal welfare, ARL is committed to investigating and preventing animal cruelty, abuse, and neglect in Massachusetts. ARL does this through three departments that focus primarily on animal protection; Advocacy, Law Enforcement and Rescue Services.

 

ARL seeks to make long-term gains for animals by advocating for humane laws, policies, and regulations. ARL engages dedicated staff and volunteers to draft and advocate for legislation and policy with local, state, and federal government.

 

ARL’s Law Enforcement Department investigates crimes against animal cruelty, abuse, and neglect. ARL employs Special State Police Officers, with the authority to enforce animal cruelty and neglect laws. These officers work closely with local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, and animal control officers through the Commonwealth. In 2017, ARL was involved in over 300 investigations of animal cruelty or neglect that involved 2,966 animals and resulted in 84 prosecutions and convictions.

 

ARL’s Rescue Services Department provides emergency assistance to injured wildlife, livestock, and domestic pets that have become trapped, displaced, or otherwise distressed. ARL is the only animal welfare agency in Massachusetts that has an entire department dedicated to animal rescue. Rescue agents are technically trained in a host of skills including tree climbing, swift water, and ice rescue. In 2017 the Rescue Services Department responded to over 2,000 calls to assist animals at risk or in need, and their families, in different cities and towns in Massachusetts.

Budget  --
Category  Animal-Related, General/Other Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Enforcement
Population Served Adults Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

In 2017...

 

-Investigated cruelty and neglect cases involving 2,966 animals resulting in 84 law enforcement prosecutions and convictions

-111 animals were rescued from 4 hoarding cases requiring intensive veterinary care and all survived

-316 animals were involved in animal neglect and cruelty situations and were either confiscated or surrendered to ARL.

Program Long-Term Success  Our long term success will be to prevent animal cruelty and neglect by strengthening public policy and increasing community awareness and action to report and combat abuse.
Program Success Monitored By 
Our key performance indicators include:
  • Number of laws, policies or system changes resulting in positive impact in the quality of life for animals in Massachusetts
  • Number of inspections of animal facilities
  • Number of animal cruelty/neglect investigations
  • Number of prosecutions in animal cruelty cases
  • Number of convictions
Examples of Program Success  The 1,400 animals that were rescued from Westport, MA represented the largest case of farm animal cruelty recorded in the Northeast. This case is notable for the sheer number of animals found in deplorable conditions. This animal rescue and the subsequent animal cruelty charges brought against those responsible were directly brought about by ARL's Law Enforcement team.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Mary Nee
CEO Term Start Dec 2012
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Mary Nee joined the ARL as President in December of 2012. A lifelong resident of the Boston area, Mary brought over thirty years of experience at non-profit and government organizations to the ARL, having had prior leadership positions at hopeFound Inc., Neighborhood House Charter School, The United Way of Massachusetts, and with the City of Boston. Her wealth of experience and achievement in strategic planning, finance, marketing, fundraising, and program development provided her with the perfect skill-set to lead the ARL into the next chapter of its history. 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Angelo Colace Director of IT --
Constance de Brun Chief Financial and Operating Officer --
Tony Giordano Director of Facilities --
Ann-Marie Joyce Human Resources Director --
Jean Morse Assistant to the President --
Mary Nee President --
Edward Schettino Vice President of Animal Welfare and Veterinary Services --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals --
Humane Society of the United States --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 91
Number of Part Time Staff 6
Number of Volunteers 552
Number of Contract Staff 4
Staff Retention Rate % 85%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 97
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 67
Male: 30
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Malcolm McDonald
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Board Chair Term Apr 2012 - May 2019
Board Co-Chair Lee A. Leahy
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation PWC
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
David Cawley -- --
Randi Cohen -- --
Richard A. Davey Treasurer --
Constance de Brun Assistant Treasurer --
Richard Kelly -- --
Walter Kenyon -- --
Neal Litvak -- --
Malcolm McDonald Chair --
Kelly McKernan -- --
Jean Morse Assistant Secretary --
Mary Nee Animal Rescue League of Boston, President --
Tara Oliver -- --
Alisa Plazonja -- --
Malisa Schuyler -- --
Tim Sullivan -- --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 15
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 87%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
Projected Income $10,180,000.00
Projected Expense $10,165,000.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audited Financials

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $6,241,523 $9,723,590 $6,801,744
Total Expenses $9,569,285 $9,203,392 $9,308,326

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $3,830,973 $4,817,456 $3,368,364
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $2,646,783 $2,270,908 $2,102,845
Investment Income, Net of Losses $-811,233 $2,625,866 $1,322,325
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- $9,360 $8,210
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $575,000 -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $6,696,553 $6,535,858 $6,714,869
Administration Expense $2,204,460 $2,195,669 $2,055,836
Fundraising Expense $668,272 $471,865 $537,621
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.65 1.06 0.73
Program Expense/Total Expenses 70% 71% 72%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 17% 10% 16%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $91,527,747 $93,058,819 $102,399,926
Current Assets $10,900,718 $9,119,795 $12,308,591
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $2,767,343 $2,485,244
Current Liabilities $762,875 $1,242,448 $759,703
Total Net Assets $90,764,872 $89,049,028 $99,154,979

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $77,464,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 4.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 14.29 7.34 16.20

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 3% 2%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The ARL has investments, both restricted and unrestricted, of which the board appropriates 4.75% on a trailing 12 quarter average to support annual operations. The 990s show the market activities rather than the appropriated operating revenue, so these financials may appear different than the audited financial statements. Bequest revenue, which is part of contribution and grant revenue on the 990, is appropriated in part, and primarily invested for future operations as funds functioning as endowment. In years when this revenue is significant, this can create a second divergence between the 990 revenue and operating revenue.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Our vision is that animals are safe and healthy in the communities where they live. We seek to confront animal cruelty and neglect at its root causes. Through programs, services, and facilities focused on accessible animal care, public advocacy and sustained anti-cruelty efforts, we will be a resource for people and an unwavering champion for animals most in need.
 
Our focus will be to meet people and animals where they are, bringing veterinary and wellness services directly to those who need it most, so that animals are safe and healthy living in communities and out of shelters. We will align our resources to support this vision through a coordination of existing programs and the development of new, community-based services. 
 
The impact of our work will be seen in the lives of animals most in need across Massachusetts, with the greatest effect in our primary service areas of Greater Boston, Eastern Massachusetts and the Cape Cod regions. 
 
We will be successful when animals are safe, healthy and well-supported by the communities in which they live.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

In order to make progress on achieving our vision, the ARL strategies and goals for the next five years include:
 
  • Preventing animal cruelty and neglect by strengthening law and public policy and increasing community awareness and action to report and combat abuse.
  • In the near term, ARL will continue to support legislation that enhances and improves protections for animals, and to oppose reforms that endanger the welfare of animals in Massachusetts. 
  • Growing and refocusing our programs to target animals in greatest need and to the people who care for them. In the last year we have identified Codman Square in Dorchester as a hot-spot community; a neighborhood where many of our animals in need originate from. This initiative seeks to create partnerships with community-based organizations to raise awareness about the link between the health of animals and that of people.
  • We will expand our efforts to address community cats living in our neighborhoods. ARL has hired a dedicated rescue staff member to respond to the needs of these animals through spay and neuter services as well as the development of a community cat volunteer squad.
  • In addition, we have expanded our surgical suite capacity to be able to accommodate services needed for community cats.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

The ARL team is comprised of professionals committed to delivering high-quality direct animal care which meets best practice standards in animal welfare. Our team consists of skilled shelter agents, veterinarians, law enforcement police officers, technical animal rescue technicians, community liaisons and dedicated volunteers -- all committed to carry out our mission every day. 

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Our progress toward our short and long term goals are tracked through various monitoring and evaluation techniques.
 
The five strategic goals as set forth by our strategic plan are buoyed by a specific set of objectives and action plans to ensure the goals, and ultimately, the plan are actualized. Quarterly updates on progress against these objectives are required and reported to the President and Board of Directors.
 
Additionally, our existing operations are monitored by specific sets of operational key performance indicators for each program and department. These KPIs are tracked annually and benchmarked against prior year's performance to highlight our progress.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Our vision for the future is to target more of ARL's services toward the animals and communities with the greatest need. We took a major step toward this goal with the award of the "$100K for 100" grant from The Cummings Foundations to support our Healthy Animals - Healthy Communities initative.
 
Focused in the Codman Square neighborhood of Dorchester, this initiative seeks to create partnerships with community-based organizations to raise awareness about the link between the health of animals and that of people. 
 
Moving forward, we will need ongoing support to continue to build upon our nascent successes in this community-based approach as we learn more about the types of animal care and support this community needs the most.
 
We are also taking steps to address community cats; those that live outdoors and are unowned, but are a part of our local communities. To best serve the cats in greatest need, we have hired a dedicated rescue staff member to respond to the needs of these animals through spay and neuter and wellness services. We have also opened a Community Surgical Clinic at our Dedham Animal Care and Adoption Center. To fully support these innovative programs and help more than 1,500 cats lead healthier lives, we need to raise $204,000 annually.