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Cambridge Family & Children's Service

 60 Gore Street
 Cambridge, MA 02141
[P] (617) 876-4210 x 4052
[F] (617) 661-9749
http://www.helpfamilies.org
[email protected]
Noreen Dolan
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INCORPORATED: 1873
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2104057

LAST UPDATED: 01/16/2018
Organization DBA CFCS
Former Names Family Counseling Service Of Cambridge (1968)
Family Welfare Society Of Cambridge (1930)
Cambridge Welfare Union (1920)
Associated Charities Of Cambridge (1883)
The Avon Home (1873)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

To provide  high quality support and advocacy for children, adults, and families to develop and nurture safe, permanent relationships and maximize individual growth.

Mission Statement

To provide  high quality support and advocacy for children, adults, and families to develop and nurture safe, permanent relationships and maximize individual growth.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $6,259,100.00
Projected Expense $6,215,400.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Adoption Services
  • Intensive Foster Care (IFC)

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

To provide  high quality support and advocacy for children, adults, and families to develop and nurture safe, permanent relationships and maximize individual growth.


Background Statement

Cambridge Family and Children’s Service was founded in 1873 as Avon House, an orphanage for local children. Since the agency’s inception, it has grown into a highly regarded non-profit, multi-service agency that provides intervention to at risk families; placement services for children and youth through its adoption, intensive foster care and residential programs; and services to children and adults with developmental disabilities and their families. In 2017, in line with our mission, and in partnership with the Department of Children & Families and community providers, CFCS set out to try new ways to expedite permanency for every child. The CFCS Permanency Priority enhances all agency programming through re-envisioning our focus on permanency to achieve outcomes that are even more positive for each individual that we serve.

This priority is expressed through the sentiment that: For every child, a caring adult, a loving family, a supportive community.

The Every Child focus is integrated throughout CFCS’s unique continuum of services that range from supporting and stabilizing families (through our Family Support & Stabilization (FSS) and Developmental Disabilities Programs (DDP)), strengthening relationships with family and lifelong connections or cultivating new relationships (within Intensive Foster Care (IFC,) Congregate Care Residential Programs, and Independent Living,) to facilitating full legal permanency through our Adoption Services contract.

Currently we employ over 100 dedicated and caring staff with extensive clinical knowledge and language expertise. We enjoy strong working relationships with state agencies, such as the Department of Children & Families, Department of Mental Health, Department of Developmental Services, and Department of Early Education & Care; strong partnerships with fellow service providers through the Providers Council, Children’s League and Cambridge Nonprofit Coalition. Our affiliations with graduate schools has expanded our capacity to provide individualized services to youth and families and to provide opportunities’ in the areas of research, expert consultation, staff development, internships, and employment. Through a number of public and private funding sources, CFCS is able to maintain a stable financial footing to support our staff and clients with quality programming and to pilot new and innovative approaches.


Impact Statement

Committed to improving permanency outcomes for our youth and families, we work with all programs to determine clearly defined measurable outcomes and  a multi-pronged quality assurance system. Based on a continuous learning approach, our Quality Assurance system includes: an updated data information system (Efforts to Outcomes) ETO, monthly Key performance indicators by program, Quarterly Management Outcome reports, as well as Board Dashboards.  Our inclusive review process includes the staff, clients, and community experts through the Human Rights Committee, and Program Committee of the Board. Other feedback mechanisms include client and staff satisfaction surveys and a full annual evaluation report of each program.  

  •  In FY17, CFCS and Walker Inc partnered to launch to the Permanency Collaboration Project to develop a replicable model to streamline the family find and adoption process for young foster children placed in residential settings; to provide extensive preparation, support and therapeutic services for the families and youth; and to implement creative approaches for the recruitment of pre-adoptive homes. To date, 37% of enrolled youth have a potential adoptive family identified for them and work is being made toward placement.
  • In FY17, CFCS served over 1600 children, teens and adults in programs ranging from support and stabilization with their birth or adoptive family, providing stable nurturing foster, group homes or individual supported apartments, to ensuring foster youth were legally adopted by new forever families.
  • In FY18, CFCS launched our Permanency Priority throughout all agency programs to enhance all programming through re-envisioning our focus on permanency to ensure all youth served have at least one caring supportive adult that can help ensure long term positive outcomes. 
 

 


Needs Statement

CFCS must raise more than $650,000 in private support, above and beyond revenue provided by government contracts and grants, in order to continue our legacy of providing all children and youth with stable homes and positive experiences in their community. Funding priorities include:

  • Funds for Permanency: building our capacity to help more individuals and  families make a lifelong commitment to deserving children through our adoption program’s recruitment, training and placement. Currently the focus is on young children with disabilities and teens;
  • Funds for Life Skills: providing pathways to success and independence for young people through a program that engages teens transitioning from the foster care system in setting long-term goals and developing a “tool kit” to launch into a healthy adulthood.
  • Funds for operations to close the budget gap that comes from chronic and systemic delays in reimbursements and contract fees

In addition, CFCS needs a broader and more strategic communications strategy to build awareness and to support these initiatives, as well as increasing the capacity of it's Development department.


CEO Statement

 


 


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
STATEWIDE

CFCS serves 1,600+ children and families annually in Cambridge, Boston, Somerville, Malden, Medford, and the surrounding communities.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Human Services - Foster Care

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Adoption Services

CFCS provides a range of services through its adoption program.  We provide adoption planning and case management services for children and teens in the custody of the Department of Children and Families.  We typically work with those children who face the greatest challenges to adoption: older children and teens, sibling groups, and children with medical, developmental, emotional and/or behavioral special needs.  We offer services to families who hope to adopt these children, providing training and home studies, guiding families through the matching and placement process, and offering post-placement family support.  Finally, we provide consultation services to the Department of Children and Families.
Budget  $339,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Adoption
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Short term success includes: 50 or more Informed prepared and committed pre-adoptive families trained each year, 50% or higher families and home completing MAPP approved for placement within 6 months, and 15 or more youth matched with new families each year.   

 
Program Long-Term Success 

Long-Term Success: 80% or more of youth placed with families for adoption are legalized within 1 year of placement.


Program Success Monitored By  Success Monitored By: data entry into our Efforts-to-Outcome (ETO) database, monthly key performance indicators tracking, quarterly management reporting, revenue from DCF for contract services completed, family surveys and annual program evaluations. 
Examples of Program Success  Examples of Program Success:  In FY17, 34 children served through case management, 8 adoptions legalized, 97 pre-adoptive families evaluated for adoption with 37 submitting applications, 30 families completing MAPP (MA approach to Partnership in Parenting,) 17 new families were approved to adopt, 18 families accepting placement, and completed 66 referrals for single service work for DCF for families or children. 

Intensive Foster Care (IFC)

Intensive Foster Care (IFC) provides transitional, therapeutic foster care for children referred by the Department of Children and Families.  The IFC team of foster parents and social workers provides specialized, round-the-clock care, support, and guidance for the children placed in the program.  Through this collaborative team effort we support the child's successful transition into a permanent placement - reunification with the birth family, guardianship, kinship care, adoption, or independent living.
Budget  $1,202,587.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Foster Care
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Short-Term Success:  Recruit and Train up to 15 new Foster Homes each year, minimize emergency disruptions for foster youth once placed, promote consistent medical and mental health care practices, support strong school attendance, 100% of participation for foster youth in at least one additional community activity. 
Program Long-Term Success  Long-Term Success: Retention rates over 80% of foster homes, less than 10% of CFCS youth requiring emergency internal moves, over 60% of eligible foster youth graduating high school or obtaining their Hi-Set by the age of 19.
Program Success Monitored By  Success Monitored By:
Examples of Program Success  Examples of Program Success:  In FY 17, the CFCS Intensive Foster Care Program supported with 22 Foster Homes to care for 42 foster youth, and Certified 6 new potential foster families in MAPP (Massachusetts Approach to Partnership in Parenting.) 25 youth successfully completed the school year promoting to the next grade level, with 2 more youth graduating High School, and 3 youth in College. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Robert P. Gittens
CEO Term Start Apr 2016
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Executive Director Bob Gittens comes to CFCS from Northeastern University where he had been Vice President for Public Affairs since 2003. Bob brings a passion for the welfare of children and families for which CFCS is well-known, in addition to his significant management experience. He served as Cabinet Secretary of the Commonwealth's Executive Office of Health and Human Services from 2001-2003 and was Commissioner of the Mass. Department of Youth Services (DYS) from 1997-2001. He was First Assistant District Attorney in the Suffolk County District Attorney's Office from 1992-1997 and Chairman of the Massachusetts Parole Board from 1990-92.

Bob holds a J.D. degree from Northeastern University School of Law and a B.A. in Political Science from Northeastern. He has played a distinguished role in the community as Chairman of the Massachusetts Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee and member of the Governor's Youth Violence Task Force. Bob has served as a board member of numerous organizations including Judge Baker Children's Center, Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, and Goodwill Industries.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Maria Z. Mossaides Nov 2008 Oct 2015
Denise Maguire -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Noreen Dolan Deputy Director --
Ms. Eleanor Dowd Senior Advisor --
Ms. Colleen MacRae CFO --
Mr. Brian McClusky Senior Director of HR --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 54
Number of Part Time Staff 63
Number of Volunteers 70
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 23%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 8
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 78
Hispanic/Latino: 10
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 3
Other (if specified): Portuguese
Gender Female: 75
Male: 25
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers N/A
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. William J. Mostyn III
Board Chair Company Affiliation Business Executive, Retired
Board Chair Term Oct 2015 - Sept 2018
Board Co-Chair Molly Newbold Downer
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation First Republic Bank
Board Co-Chair Term Oct 2012 - Sept 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Debjani Banerji Mass General Hospital Voting
Molly Newbold Downer First Republic Bank Voting
Erika Eurkus Senior Director, ACCION Voting
Gerald J. Fine Ph.D. Professor, Boston University Voting
Noor Hasan none Voting
Beth Kreidenweis VP, Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. Voting
Patricia Lorsch Community Vollunteer Voting
William Mostyn Retired Voting
Lisa Roberts SVP/Consumer Banking, Cambridge Savings Bank Voting
Dennis Scannell Community Volunteer Voting
William Tsoules Controller, Institute for Healthcare Improvement Voting
John Tyler Tyler Lynch PC Voting
Nan Sirna Waldstein Retired Social Worker Voting
Debra Wekstein Pioneer Investments, Consultant Voting
Ruth Whitney Retired Voting
Selam Woldeselassie Boston University Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 2
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 11
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 10
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 20%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Governance and Nominating
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $6,259,100.00
Projected Expense $6,215,400.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audited Financials

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $5,947,040 $5,513,491 $5,729,185
Total Expenses $5,976,512 $5,756,304 $5,508,655

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $0 $0 $0
Individual Contributions $335,782 $304,358 $263,301
Indirect Public Support $77,837 $81,589 $83,691
Earned Revenue $5,143,642 $4,756,581 $4,578,844
Investment Income, Net of Losses $135,950 $86,757 $551,984
Membership Dues $0 $0 $0
Special Events $249,516 $283,424 $242,171
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $4,313 $782 $9,194

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $4,824,359 $4,698,399 $4,475,957
Administration Expense $843,558 $781,654 $761,802
Fundraising Expense $308,595 $276,251 $270,896
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 0.96 1.04
Program Expense/Total Expenses 81% 82% 81%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 47% 41% 46%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $9,249,143 $9,600,256 $9,890,515
Current Assets $922,210 $765,285 $826,947
Long-Term Liabilities $2,590,383 $2,649,253 $2,706,788
Current Liabilities $643,557 $778,717 $725,289
Total Net Assets $6,015,203 $6,172,286 $6,458,438

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 12.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.43 0.98 1.14

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 28% 28% 27%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

CFCS’s ultimate goal is to ensure that all children are able to live and grow within a safe, loving, nurturing family, free of abuse and neglect, if not with their birth family, then with one that will embrace them and make a permanent, life-long commitment to love and care for them. We are committed to the development of a system of care that values the integrity and strength of the family and the development of the capacity for communities to support families and children who are struggling.

The youth and families we serve come from many cultural, racial, ethnic backgrounds and sexual orientations. The youth have often experienced varying life stressors such as trauma, substance abuse, physical abuse, behavioral health issues, developmental disabilities, educational difficulties, violence and neglect. Many of their families have struggled with a range of issues including substance abuse, domestic violence, mental health concerns, as well as poverty. In addition, the youth may have experienced early and/or extensive separations from their family of origin and a series of placement experiences which may include psychiatric hospitalizations, residential treatment programs, group homes or foster care.

Over the next 3-5 years, CFCS will continue to work for meaningful change by providing the services, supports and advocacy needed to help strengthen families, prevent out of home placement of children, reunite children with their families, develop alternative permanent plans through adoption, guardianship, kinship and lifelong connections, and prepare youth to successfully transition to adulthood with the necessary educational, vocational and lifelong supports. We will continue to collaborate with our families, youth, public, private and community partners, to collect data to identify what is working and what is not; to seek funding to demonstrate new and innovative approaches to service delivery and to advocate for access to the range of educational, health, legal, recreational and therapeutic services needed.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Each year CFCS provides a range of services to over 1,500 families and individuals in 95 communities in the Boston, Greater Boston and Northeast areas of the state. Our programs: Adoption, Family Support and Stabilization (FSS), Intensive Foster Care (IFC), Group Homes for Transition Age Youth (16-21), Independent Living (IL), and our Developmental Disabilities Program (DDP) are rooted in a commitment to permanence for children, adolescents, and individuals and in maximizing each individual’s opportunity to grow and development.

We are committed to preventing children from being separated from their families by providing a number of support, stabilization and clinical services, such as: parenting classes, group sessions, in home services, respite services; counseling and specialized developmental services for children and adults with developmental disabilities and to provide access to other therapeutic, educational, recreational, housing and legal programs. If a youth is unable to remain with their family, we are dedicated to developing alternative permanent plans through adoption, guardianship, kinship care and identification of caring adults as lifelong connections.

CFCS has a holistic approach that recognizes the unique needs, strengths, hopes and dreams of each consumer. All CFCS services are individualized, trauma informed, strengths based, with a focus on positive youth development. At the heart of our service planning are our consumers who, as full participants in the team, guide and direct the process.

To ensure the delivery of quality services, CFCS has employed a well-trained, qualified work force. Our hiring process, job descriptions, weekly supervision, clinical consultations, training and staff evaluations focus on ensuring that our staff has the knowledge, tools and competencies to serve this population. To properly meet the needs of our consumers, our staff is culturally competent, diverse and multilingual.

Through our case management system, CFCS tracks Staff and client inputs, outputs, and outcomes, and receives input from staff and consumers to identify what is working and what is not. We utilize this system as a learning tool that helps staff understand the clinical model and the impact of their interventions. Monthly and Quarterly reports are integrated into weekly supervision and performance evaluations.

CFCS will continue to build strong stable relationships with our families and youth, our staff, our Board of Directors, our public, private and community partners. With concrete information provided by our data base, we will share information re: the strengths and challenges of the existing system of care and develop recommendations for the change.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

CFCS benefits from a history of community support dating back more than 143 years. Founded in 1873 as the Avon Home, an orphanage for homeless children in Cambridge, CFCS has evolved through time and changing community needs into a vibrant network of caring families, staff, and community volunteers committed to serving children and strengthening families. CFCS continues to adapt its programs to respond to the needs of today’s families and their children.

Currently we employ over 100 dedicated and caring staff with extensive clinical knowledge and language expertise. We enjoy strong working relationships with state agencies, such as the Department of Children & Families, Department of Mental Health, Department of Developmental Services, and Department of Early Education & Care; strong partnerships with fellow service providers through the Providers Council, Children’s League and Cambridge Nonprofit Coalition. Our affiliations with graduate schools has expanded our capacity to provide individualized services to youth and families and to provide opportunities’ in the areas of research, expert consultation, staff development, internships, and employment. Through a number of public and private funding sources, CFCS is able to maintain a stable financial footing to support our staff and clients with quality programming and to pilot new and innovative approaches.

Committed to improving outcomes for our families with the involvement of consumers, staff, board members, managers, community partners, we re-examined and updated our program logic models to include clearly defined measurable outcomes and developed a multi-pronged quality assurance system. Based on a continuous learning approach, our Quality Assurance system includes: regular review of client outcomes, an updated data information system (Efforts to Outcomes) ETO, revised job descriptions based on competencies, and an inclusive review process that includes the Family Advisory Committee, the Human Rights Committee, Program Committee of the Board, and other feedback mechanisms such as client and staff satisfaction surveys and the annual evaluation of each program.

Through this process, we are able to identify what is working and what is not and to provide information to the public, private, legislative and community partners with whom we are actively involved in developing solutions to remove the systemic barriers and challenges that often prevent our families and youth from accessing needed services.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

CFCS will measure progress by analyzing the data collected in our information system and the feedback from our consumers, staff and community partners. Data will measure progress against our identified goals, key indicators for quality services, achievement of client outcomes and effectiveness of programmatic operations.

To evaluate the effectiveness of each program, CFCS is developing program logic models with measurable outcomes that will include initial, intermediate and long term goals. Indicators for meeting our client outcomes include: enhancing the consumers’ ability to identify situations that trigger inappropriate behavior; the development of coping skills needed to manage behavior and improvement of their self-awareness and self-confidence. Indicators for reaching programmatic goals include tracking of: home visits, therapy sessions, critical incidents, school attendance, employment and graduations. Progress to meeting the goals will be reviewed and evaluated by consumers, staff, board members and our public and private funders. The findings will help us modify and adjust the programs each year.

In terms of our advocacy , we continue to share our data with our partners to work together to identify short term and long term goals for the development of a system of care that is seamless and meets the needs of our consumers.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

CFCS continues to work toward our long term goal of developing a system of care that ensures all children are able to live and grow within a safe, loving, nurturing family, free of abuse and neglect, if not with their birth family, then with one that will embrace them and make a permanent, life-long commitment to love and care for them.

Much of the existing service delivery system is fragmented, focusing on specific problems, not on the family as a whole. Most families have needs that cross over the existing specialized programs and are often only able to receive one type of service which although helpful does not take into account the myriad of issues that need to be addressed in order to provide safe, nurturing families for children. Families and youth who are struggling often do not have access to services that will strengthen their families and prevent out of home placement of their children. Through a number of grants and private donations, CFCS has been able to develop some new and innovative approaches in our Adoption program, our Family Support & Stabilization program, and our Group Homes for transition age youth.

CFCS works in collaboration with the Walker School in Needham, and Massachusetts Adoption Resource Exchange (MARE), on a broad Permanency Initiative including a pilot program to streamline the adoption process for young children placed in residential settings; to provide extensive preparation, support and therapeutic services for the families and youth; and to implement creative approaches for the recruitment of pre-adoptive homes.

In our Group Homes for transition age youth 16-21, with several grants we have developed a specialized life skills/permanency program to support each youth’s successful transition to adulthood that includes: individual and group services in the areas of education, employment, health, housing, financial management, healthy relationships and the development of lifelong connections .

In our Family Support and Stabilization Program, with some private funding, we have invested in a bilingual multi-cultural program and in providing a new parenting group entitled “Parenting Journey” in both English and Spanish.

We continue to work with our public, private and community partners to advocate for change and although we have not reached our long term goal we are slowly raising awareness of the issues and introducing new and creative solutions. .