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Career Collaborative, Inc.

 77 Summer Street, 11th Floor
 Boston, MA 02110
[P] (617) 424-6616
[F] (617) 424-6614
www.CareerCollaborative.org
Info@CareerCollaborative.org
Susan Schiro
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INCORPORATED: 1997
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3402682

LAST UPDATED: 07/07/2015
Organization DBA Career Collaborative
Former Names Career Connections Collaborative, Inc. (2001)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Career Collaborative ends working-class poverty by helping low-income adults get and succeed at life-changing jobs. Impressively, 65% of our participants achieve two years of continuous employment. In contrast, other organizations estimate that only 25% of their clients reach this benchmark. We achieve this remarkable result by helping participants get good jobs and mentoring them for at least two years.

Mission Statement

Career Collaborative ends working-class poverty by helping low-income adults get and succeed at life-changing jobs. Impressively, 65% of our participants achieve two years of continuous employment. In contrast, other organizations estimate that only 25% of their clients reach this benchmark. We achieve this remarkable result by helping participants get good jobs and mentoring them for at least two years.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2015 to Dec 31, 2015
Projected Income $1,010,100.00
Projected Expense $1,009,882.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Career Coaching
  • Job-Readiness and Job-Search Course
  • Job-Search

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Career Collaborative ends working-class poverty by helping low-income adults get and succeed at life-changing jobs. Impressively, 65% of our participants achieve two years of continuous employment. In contrast, other organizations estimate that only 25% of their clients reach this benchmark. We achieve this remarkable result by helping participants get good jobs and mentoring them for at least two years.

Background Statement

Since 1997, Career Collaborative has helped more than 2,000 low-income adults with their job searches. Our participants face high barriers to long-term employment: many have never had a steady job that taught new skills; others do not understand the unwitten rules of US workplaces. We help them get and keep good jobs. 

Our key programs and services:
  • Job-Readiness and Job-Search Course: During our four-week course, participants develop résumés, practice interviewing skills, build professional networks, and sharpen their understanding of the employer’s point-of-view. Some find a job during this month, the others continue into Job Club.

 

  • Job Club for job-search help: We run group meetings four days a week and staff members have weekly, one-on-one meetings with clients throughout job search. We work with participants until they get full-time permanent jobs, even if they initially accept temporary or part-time work. We often introduce participants to employers that have appropriate job openings for them.

 

  •  Career coaching: We mentor participants for at least two years after their initial job placement to coach them through unanticipated problems at work and at home and to encourage them in setting goals for promotion.

 

  • Referrals to other training and supportive services: We work with strategic partners to meet participants' additional needs. Interview clothes and winter coats for children are common needs, but participants can also need referrals to educational and training programs, temporary financial assistance, and occasionally help with legal problems.


 


Impact Statement

Career Collaborative is transformative for the people we serve, for their families, and for our community. Our participants move from unemployment and reliance on government subsidies to self-sufficiency. They become role models in their families and communities. Many participants refer family, friends, and acquaintances to Career Collaborative for assistance. 

In 2014:

·      We taught 137 new participants job-search and job-readiness skills; 105 of them (76%) completed our comprehensive four-week course.

·      76 course graduates accepted jobs. Their median initial income was $24,960. Half of the participants had no earned income in the year before they came to Career Collaborative.

·      We mentored 284 particpants, 65% of whom either have completed or will complete two years of continuous employment. 

Goals for 2015: 

  • We will teach 150 people job-search skills and at least 115 of them will complete our demanding job-readiness and job-search course.
  • At least 70 course graduates will accept jobs.
  • We will maintain our record of helping at least 63% of mentees achieve two or more years of continuous employment.

 

Five year strategic goals: 

  • There is no shortage of demand for our services from people striving to build good lives with rewarding work. But we are at capacity and without additional space and additional staff cannot serve more clients. Within 5 years, we will open at least one, and ideally two new locations in communities of great need within Massachusetts. When fully operational, each location will serve 300 clients (150 new participants and 150 or more previously-placed participants) each year.

 

  • We will test and refine our program model to ensure replicability.

 

  • We will increase the breadth and depth of our donor base enabling us to raise at least $1.8 million annually to support two locations ($2.5 million for 3 locations).

 


Needs Statement

To meet the urgent demands of lower-income adults for our workforce development services, the following are our most pressing needs: 

  • Job-Readiness and Job-Search Course. This 140-hour course, which includes 20 practice interviews with volunteers, costs $1,400 per client. Half the cost is covered by restricted grants. We need grants or donations to cover the balance of the cost.

 

  • Job-Search Services. We help more than 200 participants each year with job applications and provide intensive job-search support, including referrals to employers. On average, this costs $1,250 per participant. Donations and volunteers enable us to provide high-quality service to our clients in our shared quest to end working-class poverty.

 

  • Career coaching. Our mentoring program which is critical to our and our clients’ success, costs about $1,200 per client. Slightly more than 10% of this cost is covered by directed grants. Private support of this function is vital to our ability to support sustainable employment for our participants.

CEO Statement


Dear Friends, 

People often ask why I founded Career Collaborative and why I continue to volunteer full-time. I was raised in a family that assumed that I would be charitable: my first allowance was twenty cents; half of it was for charity.

 

In 1997 I decided to focus most of my charity on one problem in order to have a greater impact. I decided that I wanted to end poverty – for a few people. There are two points of leverage for ending poverty: employment and education. Of the two, employment pays off faster and it is easier to evaluate the effect of actions; so I picked employment.

 

Everyone should have the opportunity to support themselvesand their family, but I could not serve everyone. I decided to work with adultswho were motivated and capable but chronically unemployed or under-employed. They work at low-paying jobs with little chance for career advancement such as fast-food and temporary jobs.

 

It is difficult for these severely underserved adults to move onto a good career path: unanticipated problems prevent some of them from attending work regularly, others violate unwritten workplace norms, albeit unwittingly. They lack the social supports that help others through rough spots and teach others how to behave at work. I therefore decided that Career Collaborative needed to provide them with at least two years of consistent mentoring support.

 

I planned to hire an Executive Director for Career Collaborative, but after an extensive search, I did not find anyone I thought could do the job better than I could, so I went to work. After my first few clients, I was hooked! My first client was a young wife and mother with limited English. I helped her get a job in operations for a bank. Now she is an officer at State Street.

 

Career Collaborative has exceeded my initial goals, and I am still hooked. Each year, we help more than a few people navigate the path that leads to family self-sufficiency. It’s wonderful to see the glow on staff members’ faces when clients get good jobs and when clients visit to tell us about their successes. So I continue to serve as pro bono Executive Director, working with others to build programs for transforming lives, to raise the money to pay our terrific staff members, and to ensure that donations to CareerCollaborative reach the greatest number of people and help them build good lives for themselves and their families.

 

Thank you for your interest and your help!

 

Susan Fox Schiro, M.B.A., Ph.D., President and CEO

Career Collaborative


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

 Seventy-five percent (75%) of our participants are from communities in Boston, especially Roxbury, Dorchester, and Mattapan. The remaining 25% are from nearby cities like Everett and Brockton.

 

Organization Categories

  1. Employment - Employment Preparation & Procurement
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Career Coaching

While helping people get jobs is vital, it is even more important to help them keep those jobs. We help participants succeed by providing two years of career coaching for at least 200 clients each year. Career Collaborative staff calls, e-mails, and meets with participants who have accepted jobs and told us.  For the first six months, we are in touch with participants weekly. This gradually reduces to two contacts each month. We help participants work through issues that might otherwise affect their employment, from conflicts with coworkers to building new skills and getting the training and education they need to advance in their careers. We are highly focused and provide only services that help people get jobs, keep jobs, and make career progress. When participants have needs that are well met by other organizations such as housing, childcare, and transportation, we refer them to those organizations.
Budget  $232,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

Job retention is inherently a long-term process.  We define continuous employment as no break in employment of more than 17 days. We benchmark clients’ employment retention at 6, 12, and 18 months.  Our goal is for 83% of our clients to reach 6 months, 74% to reach 12 months, and 65% to reach 18 months.  We are reaching these goals.

Program Long-Term Success  This is the ultimate goal of Career Collaborative: to ensure that 63% of our mentored clients achieve two years of continuous employment.
Program Success Monitored By 

As hard as it is to get a good job, it is even harder to keep that job and succeed at it. During our regular calls (weekly for 6 months, gradually reducing to twice each month), we ask how things are going at work. Sometimes we call the person’s work number to verify her continued employment. These calls measure the success of our retention program. 

But we do not want to wait two years to find out whether we built an effective and supportive relationship with each mentee. We therefore look at indicators of our retention efforts and their effectiveness.

  • Our outreach to mentees:
    • How many mentees do we reach out to each month? 
    • How many phone messages, voice mails and e-mails do we send/leave?
  • Mentees responding to our calls and e-mails:
    • How many mentees are in touch with us?
    • How often do they meet with us, talk to us, or exchange e-mails with us?
Examples of Program Success 

Retention is improved by positive relationships and on-going interactions on a consistent basis.  For example, Rosie came to us from Aid to Incarcerated Mothers without a high school degree or computer skills.  We helped her get a job as a customer service agent at a pharmacy.  One day she called up: “I’m so mad at my boss; I’m going to tell him where to get off.”  Our counselor swallowed hard and asked: “Would you like to discuss some other approaches?”  Rosie kept her job, received four raises, and bought a three-family house.  Her boss called her “The Queen of Customer Service.”  


Job-Readiness and Job-Search Course

People need to be able to get jobs to be self-sufficient. Each y ear 150 new participants take our month-long course, which runs 11 times a year. Students spend 48 hours in class, 80 hours doing individual work (meeting with employment counselors, preparing résumés and cover letters, locating jobs and applying for them), and 12 hours in individual practice interviews with volunteers who are professionals, executives, and managers.

The course teaches three skills critical to success:

  • Understanding and adapting to the employer’s point of view. For example, topics include work-appropriate dress and handling challenging co-workers.
  • Setting goals. Initially, participants set daily job-search goals; later, we help them set long-term career goals.
  • Networking.We teach participants to network with each other, family, friends, and former employers and coworkers.
Budget  $186,023.00
Category  Employment, General/Other
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

 Our short-term goal for the job-search course is for 76% of our students to complete the four-week course. 

 

Program Long-Term Success 

 The ultimate goals of Career Collaborative are to ensure that the adults we work with get good jobs – jobs they want, jobs with growth potential – and that they remain continuously employed. We believe that the course helps us achieve these long-tem goals by teaching clients essential skills for job-searchsuccess, by increasing their understanding of the employer’s point-of-view, and by increasing their willingness to adapt to unwritten workplace norms.

 

Program Success Monitored By 
  • Participant satisfaction with the job-search course: Our clients say that we have “the best job-search course in Boston!” They rate their satisfaction with the course and we track this number. In 2014, average satisfaction with the course was 9.7 on a 10-point scale.
  • The number of clients who start the course: Our goal is 150 per year. 
  • The percentage of course participants who complete the course: Our goal is 76%.  In 2014, 105 clients (76%) completed the course.
Examples of Program Success 
For some clients, like Ceci, our Job-Readiness and Job-Search Course provides all the help they need to get an entry-level job.  

Ceci immigrated from China and earned a certificate as a Medical Assistant, but she could not get a job in her field.  The course taught her how to interview and network.  One week after completing the course, she heard about a part-time job at a Chinese doctor’s office; Ceci went to the office, interviewed for the job, and got it.


Job-Search

 A supportive community, especially one that helps arrange job interviews with good employers, makes it easier to sustain people’s motivation to keep applying and interviewing for jobs, especially in this down economy. People who work closely with us during job search get higher incomes: $28,000 compared to $22,000 for those who self-place. We provide group and individual job-search support which continues until the client gets an appropriate full-time permanent job. When clients lose their jobs or when their hours are reduced, we welcome them back into Job Club meetings and urge them to collaborate with our staff, including individual meetings, until they are re-employed. 

 

Budget  $289,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Search & Placement
Population Served Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

Our job search program is working if eligible participants are consistently active in applying for appropriate jobs, going on interviews, and informing us about applications and interviews that they schedule on their own.  Additionally, participants who have part-time or temporary jobs continue job search with our help.

Program Long-Term Success 

The ultimate goal of Career Collaborative is to ensure that the adults we work with get good jobs – jobs they want, jobs with growth potential, and remain continuously employed for two years.  The long-term success of the job-search program is for at least 60% of our job-search course graduates to get jobs that are appropriate for them.

Program Success Monitored By 
Indicators of our support for participants and their follow-through during job-search:
  • We record job leads.  Are we helping clients find job openings?  Are they applying for these jobs?
  • We record job applications and our support for the application.  Did we advocate for the client? 
  • We record job interviews.   Did the client get an interview? 
  • We record placements:  Are clients getting jobs?  What percentage of the initial jobs are full-time permanent jobs? 
Examples of Program Success 
Many clients, even those who initially are able to get entry-level jobs, need our help to get full-time permanent jobs with career potential.
 
For example, while Ceci got a job on her own, the job was only 24 hours a week, which did not pay enough to meet her needs. She asked us to help her search for a full-time job. A few months later, she moved to a good job at Manet Community Health Center earning $29,000 a year. 
 
Recently, she wrote her counselor,“I like my new job. It’s just the target job I described. I have a respectful work environment.  People are helping me a lot. . . In this job I have more clinical responsibilities. Sometimes I need to translate for patients and type Chinese letter, so I learn a lot from this job.”

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Susan Fox Schiro
CEO Term Start Dec 1997
CEO Email Susan@CareerCollaborative.org
CEO Experience Susan Fox Schiro, the co-founder and President of the Board of Directors of Career Collaborative, performs the functions of an Executive Director for Career Collaborative. Previously, she worked as an organizational consultant, advising clients on start-up issues, organizational structure, and team building. She has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in management, organizational behavior, and organization theory at Babson, Bentley, Northeastern, Suffolk and the University of Hartford. Previous positions include working as an operational controller for Connecticut General and an economist for the Connecticut Department of Commerce. She has been on the Board of Save the Harbor/Save the Bay where she served as a member of the Executive Committee and Treasurer. Susan holds a BA from Harvard College, an MBA from the University of Cincinnati, and a PhD in Organization Studies from the Sloan School at MIT.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Nancy Vescuso Senior Program Director

Nancy manages program staff members and has overall responsibility for the day-to-day operation of the program. Nancy has over 30 years of experience in human resources and consulting. As an independent consultant for 13 years, she trained managers, designed and implemented new programs, and raised funds for a nonprofit. She was Vice President of Human Resources and Administration at Systems Engineering Inc., an IT consulting firm; Corporate Director of Human Resource Development and Organizational Development at Fidelity Investments; and Manager of Human Resource Development and Employee Relations at Brigham and Women's Hospital. In addition to extensive graduate studies concerning urban Americans living in poverty and community based solutions, she has a MA in Mastery Learning and Curriculum Design from Michigan State University and a BS cum laude from Emerson College. Nancy joined Career Collaborative in 2008.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Career Collaborative has strong relationship with other organizations to provide a career pathways continuum. Many agencies who provide adult basic education, English classes, and HiSET preparation refer their participants who need jobs to Career Collaborative. When Career Collaborative’s participants need help with other issues (like needing more English classes or finding housing), the staff refers them to agencies that focus on those services. This proposal includes agreements with Boston Housing Authority, Boston Public Schools Department of Adult Education and Community Services, East Boston Harborside Community School, Fenway CDC, Foundation for Boston Centers for Youth & Families, and Urban College of Boston.

Career Collaborative also has strong relationships with employers. The staff connects with human resource professionals in order to help program participants get interviews for good jobs. The Employer Advisory Board, with representatives from 14 companies, advises the staff on employment trends and brainstorms job opportunities for job seekers in addition to facilitating job interviews for participants. This proposal includes letter of support from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston University Medical Center, Bullhorn, John Leonard Employment Services, Metropolitan Boston Housing Partnership, Maloney Properties, People’s United Bank, Shobuy.com, Tufts University, and The Village Bank. These agencies also provide volunteers, and John Leonard provides administrative skills testing and feedback in kind.

 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 14
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 200
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 83%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 14
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Art Papas
Board Chair Company Affiliation Bullhorn
Board Chair Term Jan 2015 - Dec 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Dennis G. Assad Retired Voting
Mr. Jeffrey T. Black private investor Voting
Mr. R. Hilliard "Hilly" Ebling Windhaven Investment Management Voting
Ms. Mary B. English Avalon Investments Voting
Mr. Harry "Hawk" S. Furman Vesuvio Entertainment Corp. Voting
Mr. William "Bill" H. Gallagher ADS Financial Systems Solutions Voting
Mr. Jerome "Jerry" J. Jacobs Argent Wealth Management Voting
Mr. Art Papas Bullhorn, Inc. Voting
Prof. Beatrice Lorge Rogers Tufts University Voting
Dr. Susan Fox Schiro Career Collaborative Voting
Mr. William "Bill" F. Weihs Boston Financial Data Services Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Nakia Adams Pine Street Inn NonVoting
Ms. Cheryl Barrett Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary NonVoting
Ms. Sandra Bernatos Amtrak NonVoting
Ms. Jennifer DeLucia John Leonard Employment Specialists NonVoting
Mr. Wilgens Gabriel Boston University Medical Center NonVoting
Ms. Amie Kravetz Spaulding Hospital NonVoting
Mr. Jason Kukelka Shoebuy NonVoting
Ms. Diana Meyer Massachusetts General Hospital NonVoting
Mr. Marc Perreault Canon Business Process Services NonVoting
Ms. Annette Smith Tufts University NonVoting
Mr. Gorden Souza The Community Builders, Inc. NonVoting
Ms. Michelle Spicer Maloney Properties NonVoting
Ms. Pamela Turcotte Boston Medical Center NonVoting
Ms. Galia Wise Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center NonVoting

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Royal L. Bolling Jr. Computer Learning Resources NonVoting
Mr. Michael F. Cronin Weston Presidio NonVoting
Mr. Steve Grossman Massachusetts NonVoting
David Henderson Esq. Nutter McClennen & Fish NonVoting
Mr. Mel King The South End Technology Center@ Tent City NonVoting
Mr. Tim R. Palmer Charlesbank Capital Partners NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 3
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 81%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 67%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2015 to Dec 31, 2015
Projected Income $1,010,100.00
Projected Expense $1,009,882.00
Form 990s

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2014 Audited Financial

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $939,892 $796,462 $803,730
Total Expenses $938,571 $790,627 $797,266

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$498,015 $454,554 $505,892
Government Contributions $27,847 $37,682 $24,651
    Federal -- -- $24,651
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $27,847 $37,682 --
Individual Contributions $414,043 $304,170 $273,032
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $-13 $56 $155
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $717,888 $650,942 $674,297
Administration Expense $75,806 $61,122 $60,733
Fundraising Expense $144,877 $78,563 $62,236
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.01 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 76% 82% 85%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 15% 10% 8%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $610,028 $614,185 $615,603
Current Assets $595,922 $593,453 $588,161
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $10,583
Current Liabilities $21,727 $27,205 $23,875
Total Net Assets $588,301 $586,980 $581,145

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $0.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 27.43 21.81 24.64

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 2%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Career Collaborative breaks the poverty cycle for low-income adults in Greater Boston. We do this by helping chronically unemployed adults get good, full time jobs and coaching them through their first two years of employment. Our participants are predominantly women, minorities, and parents. Half are immigrants. They have been on a merry-go-round of menial jobs, job loss, and unemployment. We help them get good jobs and build careers in order to achieve permanent economic self-sufficiency.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

 

Our program has three phases:

-  Job-Readiness and Job-Search Course - People need to be able to get jobs to be self-sufficient. New clients take the month-long course. Students spend 48 hours in class, 80 hours doing individual work (meeting with employment counselors, preparing résumés and cover letters, locating jobs and applying for them), and 12 hours in individual practice interviews with volunteers who are professionals, executives, and managers.

-  Job Club - A supportive community, especially one that helps arrange job interviews with good employers, makes it easier to sustain people’s motivation to keep applying and interviewing for jobs. We provide group and individual job-search support which continues until the participant gets a good full-time permanent job.

-  Career coaching - While helping people get jobs is vital, it is even more important to help them keep those jobs. We help participants succeed by providing two years of career coaching. We help them work through issues that might otherwise affect their employment, from conflicts with coworkers to getting the training and education they need to advance in their careers. We are highly focused and provide only services that help clients get jobs, keep jobs, and make career progress. When clients have needs that are well by other organizations such as housing, childcare, and transportation, we refer them to those organizations.

 


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

 

Career Collaborative has been building and refining its program since 1997. Its exceptional staff and Board is committed to ending poverty (please see the Management tab for more information). Career Collaborative benefits from a great deal of support in Boston. The Board of Directors (12 members) determines policy, raises funds, monitors organizational performance and finances, and makes strategic plans for Career Collaborative. All directors make financial contributions and serve as ambassadors to Boston’s business community. The members of our Employer Advisory Board keep us abreast of employment trends and help us find job opportunities for clients.

We collaborate formally and informally with other agencies. Other nonprofits help us meet participants' needs outside of employment. We also refer participants to other organizations for needs ranging from business clothing to help with domestic violence situations. in turn, many nonprofits and government agencies refer unemployed adults to Career Collaborative.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Career Collaborative knows it is making progress by the number of people we help get full-time permanent jobs and by the percentage that retain their jobs.


For 2015 our goals are for

- 150 adults to enroll in the job-search course and 115 to complete it.
- 70 course graduates to get jobs and 20 previously-placed participants to move into full-time permanent positions.
- More than 63% of our mentees to achieve two years of continuous employment.

We also know by the number of referrals we receive from other organizations and past participants that the people we serve are satisfied with our program.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Career Collaborative has help hundreds of low-income adults get good jobs and move toward economic self-sufficiency. Our participants break the cycle of poverty and serve as role models to their children and community. People who had been chronically unemployed no longer need welfare. People who once received social services become service providers. They buy homes. They refer their friends to our program. The benefits of our work ripple through the community.

Career Collaborative is continually evaluating and improving its programs, and its next step to replicate. It is in the five year strategic plan to develop a second site and prepare for a third.