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Organization DBA Maria Droste Counseling Services
Maria Droste Services
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Good Shepherds’ Maria Droste Services provides professional psychological counseling and holistic therapy services on a short or long term basis for those persons who are experiencing difficulties at-home, at work, in school or in relationships, regardless of their ability to pay. We aim to remove the barriers that prevent human, emotional, psychological, social, mental, volitional and spiritual growth by treating each person with respect and compassion so that each person may recognize her/his innate worth and find reconciliation within oneself and with others.

Mission Statement

Good Shepherds’ Maria Droste Services provides professional psychological counseling and holistic therapy services on a short or long term basis for those persons who are experiencing difficulties at-home, at work, in school or in relationships, regardless of their ability to pay. We aim to remove the barriers that prevent human, emotional, psychological, social, mental, volitional and spiritual growth by treating each person with respect and compassion so that each person may recognize her/his innate worth and find reconciliation within oneself and with others.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $362,595.00
Projected Expense $394,033.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Professional Counseling and Holistic Therapy Services

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Good Shepherds’ Maria Droste Services provides professional psychological counseling and holistic therapy services on a short or long term basis for those persons who are experiencing difficulties at-home, at work, in school or in relationships, regardless of their ability to pay. We aim to remove the barriers that prevent human, emotional, psychological, social, mental, volitional and spiritual growth by treating each person with respect and compassion so that each person may recognize her/his innate worth and find reconciliation within oneself and with others.

Background Statement

Maria Droste Services was started in 1992 in Quincy by the Sisters of the Good Shepherd, an international congregation of Apostolic and Contemplative Sisters who have established social service ministries in 73 countries since 1835.The success of a comparable program, established by the community in New York City in 1982, inspired the creation of the program in Quincy.

From its founding until 2001, Maria Droste Services was funded primarily by a grant from the Sisters of Good Shepherd, supplemented by client fees. In 2001, MDS began to decrease its dependence on the religious order, both for funding and for governance. Financial support from the religious order was expected to decrease, due to the recession’s impact on its investment portfolio. A locally based Board of Directors was formed and began to assume more financial responsibility for the project.

For 21 years the director of MDCS was a member of the religious order; when Sr. Lorraine Bernier suddenly passed away in 2013, the Board hired Michael Shanahan (M.Div., LMFT) as the agency’s first lay director. With Mr. Shanahan's leadership, MDCS has grown considerably: since FY12-13 revenue and expenses have increased 83%. Our 2012 strategic plan highlighted the need for a greater percentage of fees to come from health insurance reimbursements in order to be able to serve more un- and under-insured clients. Fortunately, with Mr. Shanahan's enrollment on more insurance panels, we have captured significantly more revenue for the agency. Even with those increases, only 27% of our total organizational budget in FY15-16 can be met by fees for service.

MDCS can see clients within 2-10 days, and they pay what they can for our services, typically between $0 and $20. in 2015 we served 232 individuals, including 74 families with children.

 


Impact Statement

Last year (in our FY 14-15, which closed June 30, 2015) MDCS progressed along three complimentary tracks: it continued growth in services provision, professionalism, and financial stability. First, the agency received two grants (from Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation’s Catalyst Fund and the Agnes Lindsay Trust totaling $8881), allowing us to significantly upgrade our in-house technology resources and improve our website.

Second, we added two counselors to our roster to increase our capacity to serve immigrants and transgender, bisexual, queer, lesbian, and gay individuals. In May 2015 the Board approved the employment on a half-time basis of Danielle L. Owen, LADCII, a MA state-licensed alcohol and drug counselor. Ms. Owen has over 14 years counseling experience both in Ireland and Massachusetts, working with the Irish emigrant and Irish American community in Massachusetts. She began volunteering with Maria Droste Counseling Services in 2008, establishing a very respected and much needed practice among greater Boston’s Irish emigrants and Irish-Americans. The addition of a new fee-for-service counselor now enables us to be more inclusive of the LGBTQ community which is in line with our mission to provide services to all.

In CY 2015, new client calls to our agency were up 25% over the previous calendar year. From January 1 to June 30, 2015, intakes for substance abuse tripled over the previous six months. For the first time the majority of intakes during this six months period was of men: 21 men vs. 15 women. Also notable was that more than half of these callers had state or Federal health insurance. Undoubtedly contributing to this increase in the number of male referrals is that MDCS has recently developed a positive collaborative relationship with the probation department at Quincy District Court.

Goals for this year are to hire 1-2 new fee-for-service clinicians, increase the money we receive from grants, and begin talking about a second fundraiser.

 


Needs Statement

 

 

 

The agency’s top priority is unrestricted funding that we can direct to providing free or low cost counseling. Our counselors work below the market rate. Despite mandated health coverage, we still see nearly 15% of new clients walk through the door with no health coverage. But, increasingly we see clients—the working poor—with health coverage but who cannot afford their $25-$35 per-session copays or deductibles in the range of $2,000 - $3,000. Even those with Mass. Health (and no copays or deductibles to worry about) come to us due to 6-10 week waits at clinics that take their insurance. We often get referrals from larger mental health centers or hospitals and doctors’ offices with their patients who cannot meet deductibles or copays.

Funding is by far our largest need followed by increasing licensed, qualified staff so that we can do more of what we already do so well. The need for our services is great but we are limited by our small staff and volunteers. The transition from this agency being run primarily by religious sisters to an all-lay stay has meant that the budget must include salaries and payments to staff that are market-rate salaries. The sisters were mostly supported by their community and received a stipend for their work in the agency.

 


CEO Statement

What I hear from clients who sit in our waiting room and what I find myself repeating when asked if I like my job is that just being in our offices you can "feel" that this is a special place. I try to capture this by stating that "the energy is good here." I believe that the love that was sewn into our office space in 1992 by the original Sisters of the Good Shepherd (a Catholic women's religious group), continues to shine. Even though today we have one remaining active Sister as we have migrated to an all-lay staff and volunteers, the good energy remains as strong as ever.

My original worry when I took the job in 2013 as the first "lay" Director was about how I could replicate what the Sisters did and keep that charism going. But I have learned that our volunteers and staff and board of directors are all people who believe in our mission and support us. They and we continue what the Sisters started by our believing in the inherent goodness of what we do and who we are. The "good energy" continues not just because we believe in the mission but because of the experiences our clients have: they experience healing and a renewed sense of hope in their lives.

When you start a non-profit because of a perceived need in the community that is not being addressed, and you're able to deliver a quality product that addresses that need, the good energy flows because real people who had been suffering and neglected by the system, find that their needs are being addressed, that someone does care, and that they too can experience healing. Good energy begets good energy. I feel fortunate to work at a place that combines my mental health skills as a licensed clinician with my passion and belief in living a life that offers others the opportunities and sense of self-worth and dignity that I have been blessed with in my life. To whom much has been given, much will be expected. I would have it no other way.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

South Shore, Greater Boston, and Metro West communities.

Organization Categories

  1. Health Care - Community Health Systems
  2. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Substance Abuse Dependency, Prevention & Treatment
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Professional Counseling and Holistic Therapy Services

Our primary program is providing quality professional counseling and holistic therapy services.

 

We offer psychotherapy, short and long term treatment, individual, couples, family and group counseling, spiritual direction and massage/holistic therapies. Services are offered in 50-60 minute sessions often scheduled weekly. Each client is assigned a specific therapist who works with him/her throughout the treatment process. The clinical therapist makes an assessment of the client, at admission and discharge, using the DMS IV criteria and guidelines from the Diagnostic Statistical Manual issued by the American Psychiatric Association.

 

Through therapy they have the opportunity to look at the issues and family functioning that causes them to have low self-esteem, self-worth and inability to cope. The result is that they function at a much higher level in the family, in their relationships and socially and occupationally in the larger community.

Budget  $215,000.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Outpatient Mental Health Treatment
Population Served General/Unspecified People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success   Providing successful client services is a fundamental index of success for the organization. As our reputation in the community is that we serve all regardless of ability to pay, our clientele is overweighted toward those 1) have no health insurance, 2) are seeking mental health care for the first time and 3) are also experiencing a moderate to severe life crisis, such as unemployment, marital difficulties, substance abuse, domestic violence and criminal justice involvement. Women with substance abuse problems may fear loss of child custody or be involved in an abusive relationship with a partner. Young people may be having problems in school or at home.
Program Long-Term Success  Forming a successful long-term relationship with a therapist is a measure of successful client services. The course of therapy can last three months or three years. Through therapy we aim to empower each client to seek and obtain the services they require to meet their basic daily needs. Inherent in this outcome is that clients will break the cycle of dysfunctionalism that imprisons them and develop skills and strengths to ensure a healthier, productive life.

To start, our therapists evaluate the presenting problem of each client. Then the therapist and client agree a realistic action plan to target each problem area and assess available resources in the community and determine the barriers, if any, that need attention. Clients who need help through case management services are earmarked for immediate attention. Following through on the action plan is monitored weekly with each client through a 60 minute counseling session.

Program Success Monitored By  Client counselor relationships are premised on the privilege of confidentiality. A client’s willingness to sustain a relationship with a therapist is a positive indication that the service provided is working effectively. The agreed action plan provides benchmarks for both therapists and clients to mark progress. The therapist’s responsibility is to diagnose the clinical condition and work with the client to help them understand the condition and get treatment for it. Providing case management services is often fundamental to building a relationship of trust and respect between client and therapist and between the client and the agency. 

All of our clinical clients undergo a psychosocial evaluation and assessment in the initial sessions of therapy to determine a diagnosis on several of the 5 axes of the DSM, IV. Their treatment plan and duration of therapy is based on the findings of this evaluation and diagnosis.

Examples of Program Success   From 2010 to 2012 we received 64 teen referrals with diagnoses ranging from moderate to severe depression, anxiety, conduct disorder, and history of trauma/ PTSD. Among these teens we saw social complications such as suicide attempts, school bullying, substance abuse, sexual abuse, gang and criminal involvement. Over the past year we treated a 13 year old female who had symptoms of depression for 2 years, had attempted suicide and was cutting her arms daily. Lacking family health insurance, her mother was referred to Maria Droste. While completing the initial assessments, it became clear to the therapist that many of this young girl’s struggles stemmed from being bullied daily by her peers at school. An intervention was agreed at the school and the young girl was placed with new teachers and peers. While she still faces ongoing struggles with her classmates, she no longer reports bullying incidents or anxiety around attending school. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Michael Shanahan
CEO Term Start June 2013
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience  

Michael has been in the field of mental health for over 15 years. He is a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist (LMFT) and has previously served as Outpatient Clinic Director prior to his time at Maria Droste Counseling Services. Michael knows the world of mental health counseling and substance abuse treatment along with third party reimbursements. Michael also has a Masters of Divinity MDiv degree and was trained by the Jesuits and brings with him a a profound sense of the mission of MDCS along with his knowledge of the mental health field. Michael is a Clinical Fellow with the American Association of Marriage & Fmaily Therapists (AAMFT).

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

 

The agency collaborates and networks with many local groups that include Manet Community Health Center, Bay State Counseling, Interfaith Counseling Services, Father Bill's and Mainspring, City of Quincy Probation Department, Irish Immigration Center, One Life at a Time, Modern Assistance Program, Mass General Hospital, Quincy Hospital and a number of detox programs.  

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 8
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 4
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Karen Donnellan
Board Chair Company Affiliation Shields Healthcare Group
Board Chair Term Sept 2015 - Sept 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Stephen DesRoche Neponset Valley Survey Associates, Inc. Voting
Karen Donnellan Shields Healthcare Group Voting
Sr. Thomas Moore Fahey PhD Marriage Tribunal Rockville Centre Diocese Voting
Ellen Hafer Mass. League of Comm. Health Centers, Inc. Voting
Donna Kelble Eastern Bank Voting
Jane Maffie-Lee Partners HealthCare --
Maralin Manning Quincy Chamber of Commerce Voting
Kevin Mulvey Esquire Quincy Public Schools Voting
Barbara Niles Quincy Housing Authority --
Pat Queeney-Donovan Patricia & Company --
Michelle Stenburg Quincy Youth Arena --
Richard Welch Welch Healthcare and Retirement Group --
Robert Westwater Fidelity Investments Voting
Kathleen Whalen-Giannandrea Esquire Law Office of Kathleen Whalen-Giannandrea Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 10
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

   

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $362,595.00
Projected Expense $394,033.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 Review

2014 Review

2012 Review

2011 Review

2010 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $362,595 $324,181 $313,438
Total Expenses $394,033 $349,583 $334,378

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $177,454 $137,262 $131,931
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $177,454 $137,262 $131,931
Individual Contributions -- $15,000 $25,000
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $104,493 $93,866 $79,936
Investment Income, Net of Losses $91 $186 $231
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $75,508 $75,247 $74,138
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $5,049 $2,620 $2,202

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $297,642 $256,120 $248,169
Administration Expense $86,727 $84,713 $78,654
Fundraising Expense $9,664 $8,750 $7,555
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.92 0.93 0.94
Program Expense/Total Expenses 76% 73% 74%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 4% 4% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $292,269 $324,558 $343,615
Current Assets $276,004 $311,520 $328,976
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $26,286 $27,137 $20,792
Total Net Assets $265,983 $297,421 $322,823

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 10.50 11.48 15.82

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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