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Fruitlands Museums, Inc.

 102 Prospect Hill Road
 Harvard, MA 01451
[P] (978) 456-3924 x 289
[F] (978) 456-8078
www.fruitlands.org
ssmith@fruitlands.org
Suzanne Smith
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INCORPORATED: 1994
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2125003

LAST UPDATED: 11/17/2015
Organization DBA Fruitlands Museum
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Fruitlands Museum seeks to inspire and educate through art, nature and history.

Mission Statement

Fruitlands Museum seeks to inspire and educate through art, nature and history.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2015 to Dec 31, 2015
Projected Income $1,450,000.00
Projected Expense $1,450,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Art Education Classes
  • K-12 Programs and Adult Group Tours
  • Public Programs

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Fruitlands Museum seeks to inspire and educate through art, nature and history.

Background Statement

Fruitlands Museum, founded in 1914 by Clara Endicott Sears, takes its name from an experimental Utopian Community, who endeavored to live off “the fruit of the lands”.

The Fruitlands campus includes:

• The Fruitlands Farmhouse is the actual site of the transcendentalist community led by Bronson Alcott and Charles Lane in 1843.

• The Shaker Museum was the first Shaker Museum in the U.S. and is home to the largest archive of Harvard Shaker documents in the world.

• The Native American Museum houses a significant collection of artifacts that honor the spiritual presence and cultural history of the first Americans.

• The Art Museum hosts a variety of rotating exhibits throughout the year including artwork from the Fruitlands collection which contains 100 Hudson River School landscape paintings, and over 230 19th century vernacular portraits, the second largest collection in the country.

The Grounds boast over 210 acres with panoramic views of the Nashua River Valley, including 2.5 miles of walking trails.

Impact Statement

Fruitlands Museum uses its multidisciplinary collections and beautiful location to educate and inspire through art, history and nature. Through relevant exhibitions and programs, we create personal experiences that engage families, students and regional communities.

Our accomplishments in the past year include the culmination of our celebration of our 100th anniversary, which included a series of free admission days and innovative programming to attract new audiences.  We also completed our strategic business planning process and have a newly refreshed mission and vision for the institution. 
The revised vision and new core priorities for the institution calls for Fruitlands to become a vibrant player in the arts and cultural landscape of eastern/central Massachusetts: hosting community gatherings, providing learning opportunities for people of all ages, giving people multiple ways to connect with the land and the heritage of the people who lived on the land. To achieve that vision and put the institution on a firm financial footing, Fruitlands needs to address the following key strategic objectives:  

· Community: Continue to grow the audience through innovative programming, community outreach, and improved marketing activity.

· Collections: Invest appropriately in facilities and infrastructure to keep the property properly maintained and to safeguard the permanent collections.

· Excellence: Ensure that Fruitlands Museum remains an attractive and up-to-date destination for visitors  by offering the highest quality programming and amenities.

· Sustainability: Continue to build the donor base to ensure financial stability

· Innovation: Create the space for more robust programming, operation for more of the year, and increased potential for earned revenue by expanding and improving the existing Prospect House building.

Needs Statement

As an organization that is more than 100 years old, many of our most pressing needs relate to our facilities and our 210+ acre campus. Improvements to these areas would help the museum’s finances by opening up additional streams of both earned and contributed support.

1. Facilities improvements for improved mobility and safety- lighting, paving, sidewalks, and accessible ramps.

2. Expanded program space- the museum has only one indoor space dedicated to education programs, workshops, and classes. This multi-use space is important for school groups, family audiences, and life-long learners and is over-taxed by current needs. Without additional space, the museum’s reach is limited.

3. Facilities improvements for expanded operations- Among the first pressing improvements is the addition of heat/AC to the majority of the museum’s collection buildings. This is connected to needed improvements in providing utilities to these buildings.

4. Grow museum audience- Fruitlands is a hidden jewel in the Greater Boston and Central Mass. Museum community.Visitation and membership are not representative of the area’s population and are not growing sufficiently to sustain the institution.

5. Grow the museum’s support base, including donors and new board members.


CEO Statement

Fruitlands is a unique museum that combines art, history and nature to both inspire and educate. With our expansive campus featuring both indoor and outdoor programming, our patrons can enjoy a range of historical, native and fine arts; learn about the heritage of our region; walk our miles of trails; and enjoy a musical performance in a single visit. Shaped by the vision of our founder, Fruitlands works to remain relevant and engaging to new audiences  through partnerships and programs that support  our mission and enhance our communities.

Board Chair Statement

Fruitland’s spectacular view, the sense of calm respite I feel when I have been fortunate to be on the site as part of gatherings – both formal and informal - and the significant collections which tie the land back to the peoples who have lived in this space and wondered at the view in the past.

Geographic Area Served

METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
CENTRAL REGION, MA
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Fruitlands Museum is located in Harvard, Massachusetts. It is a destination for visitors from throughout New England, but predominantly Eastern to Central Massachusetts.

Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts & Culture
  2. Arts,Culture & Humanities - History Museums
  3. Environment - Forest Conservation

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Art Education Classes

Fruitlands Museum offers an array of art classes and workshops in fine art, crafts, and traditional art. We have an outstanding roster of professional artists who provide instruction for students from beginners to the most advanced. Art classes at Fruitlands are rooted in the museum’s exemplary collection of Hudson River School landscape paintings, early American portraits, traditional art such as cabinetmaking and crafts such as weaving, beading, and more. In addition to our fine remarkable collections, many classes take inspiration from the museum’s remarkable landscape and stunning vistas of the Nashua River Valley. Oils, watercolors, baskets, pastels, nature journals, ceramics, photography, Shaker weaving and more can be found in our seasonal calendar of classes.

Budget  $7,500.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Visual Arts Instruction
Population Served Adults Children Only (5 - 14 years) Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success 

Short goals include:
  • Boost attendance and revenue through greater attendance generated by new and improved program offerings
  • Cultivate return attendance by creating customized learning experiences for various age and skill levels and/or developing new art classes based on temporary exhibitions
  • Public Programs:
  • Build audiences by offering a diverse and robust roster of programs for a variety of interests and demographics, both during the museum’s main season and during the winter months
  • Earn return visits with ever-changing, timely programs
  • Establish a reputation as a destination for family outings and social experiences among peer groups.
  • Garner a dedicated following for keystone programs such as Summer Concert Series, Harvest Festival, WinterFest and other landmark programs

 

Program Long-Term Success 

Art Education: 1) Inspire creativity while enabling participants to hone skills and develop talent in a variety of media, 2) Draw inspiration from fine and applied art of the past, 3) celebrate contemporary art and the creative spirit

Program Success Monitored By 

Success is monitored by (1) revenue (2) class enrollment size (3) student engagement with museum collections (4) number of art students who become museum members (5) number of students who return to continue taking classes.

Examples of Program Success 
Public programs and art education continue to thrive at Fruitlands thanks in part to a nimble calendar of classes and events that is ever-changing with the introduction of new scholarship; bringing in new performers, artists and lecturers; and creating special experiences such as nature walks and family events to welcome new audiences to the museum. Tried and true landmark programs such as Harvest Weekend and WinterFest continue to grow and improve, too, and serve as a reason for visitors to return year after year.

K-12 Programs and Adult Group Tours

Fruitlands Museum believes that we all continue to learn even long after finishing a formal education. That’s why we have developed a variety of informative and entertaining tours designed to especially for adult and senior groups. During a group visit to Fruitlands, participants receive customized tours led by trained historic interpreters who tailor programs to respond to the interests of the group. In addition to guided tours, Fruitlands Museum also offers lecture style presentations to regional assisted living facilities, libraries, and community organizations. Drawing on the rich history and diverse collections of Fruitlands, these Outreach Programs bring the museum right into community living rooms, making access to the museum that much easier for seniors and adults
Budget  $33,500.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success 

K-12 and Adults:

  • Boost attendance and revenue through greater attendance generated by new and improved program offerings
  • Cultivate return attendance by creating customized learning experiences for various age levels and/or developing new guided tours of special exhibitions
  • Motivate teachers to engage with museum programming for students by developing and offering professional development opportunities that explore museum collections and how to use them in the classroom
  • Provide access to museum collections to populations that are unable to travel to Fruitlands by providing interactive presentations at local schools, senior centers, and community organizations
Program Long-Term Success 

K-12/Educators: 1) spark curiosity and inspire lifelong learning, 2) bolster classroom learning and critical thinking skills, 3) deepen understanding and appreciation of art, history, and cultural landscape of New England, 4) educators come to see museum programs and collections as resources for enriching classroom learning

Adult Groups and Outreach Programs: 1) enhance lifelong learning, 2) deepen understanding and appreciation of art, history, and cultural landscape of New England, 3) participants come to see museum visits as a social experience through which participants share experiences, knowledge, and ideas
Program Success Monitored By  We will measure success by the number of participants and the frequency of visits by participants.
Examples of Program Success  Currently celebrating its 100th anniversary, Fruitlands Museum dramatically expanded the number and quality of programs offered to its constituencies in 2014. Programs for students and educators underwent formal evaluation and revision in recent months. Key programs were improved to align with existing and emerging learning and instructional standards while others were newly created to support the use of museum resources in the classroom. Indicators for the coming spring suggest that Fruitlands will reap greater attendance in all K-12 programming, which we take as a marker of success in an area of services with a long history of strength. Centennial exhibitions provided the Education Department with an opportunity to develop group tours for adult and senior audiences that uniquely conveyed key concepts for each of the museum’s collections in a way that had not happened in previous years. The new tour format proved highly successful with a record attendance of over 500 people in 2014. We intend to continue with new touring structure into 2015. Additionally, Fruitlands will expand services to schools and community organizations by doubling the number of outreach programs on offer. These new programs will enable the museum to reach new audiences with diverse programming as well as offer additional educational experiences to clients who have hosted outreach programs in the past.

Public Programs

Fruitlands Museum supports lifelong learning for adults, children and families with a variety of educational experiences throughout the year. Films, concerts, lectures, walking tours, gallery talks, artist demonstrations, family days and more – many free with admission – await our visitors. Each program we offer is designed to connect to the museum’s mission to celebrate and honor the art, history and landscape of Fruitlands. That means finding presenters, artists, scholars and experiences that draw upon our collections in entertaining, informative, and unexpected ways, ultimately sparking curiosity, extending knowledge, or creating personal meanings within our visitors.
Budget  $47,500.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults Families
Program Short-Term Success 

· Build audiences by offering a diverse and robust roster of programs for a variety of interests and demographics, both during the museum’s main season and during the winter months

· Earn return visits with ever-changing, timely programs

· Establish a reputation as a destination for family outings and social experiences among peer groups.

· Garner a dedicated following for keystone programs such as Summer Concert Series, Harvest Festival, WinterFest and other landmark programs
Program Long-Term Success  The goal of this programs is to 1) spark curiosity and inspire lifelong learning in young and old, 2) deepen understanding and appreciation of art, history, and cultural landscape of New England, 3) build a connection between the museum and visitors, making ideas, art, and events of the past relevant to 21st century life, 4) visitors come to see museum visits as a social experience through which participants share experiences, knowledge and ideas.
Program Success Monitored By  Success is measured by attendance and number of participants in activities.
Examples of Program Success 

Public programs and art education continue to thrive at Fruitlands thanks in part to a nimble calendar of classes and events that is ever-changing with the introduction of new scholarship; bringing in new performers, artists and lecturers; and creating special experiences such as nature walks and family events to welcome new audiences to the museum. Tried and true landmark programs such as Harvest Weekend and WinterFest continue to grow and improve, too, and serve as a reason for visitors to return year after year.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Wyona Lynch-McWhite
CEO Term Start July 2012
CEO Email wlynch-mcwhite@fruitlands.org
CEO Experience

Wyona Lynch-McWhite has been Executive Director of Fruitlands Museum since July 2012. From 2008 -2011, Lynch-McWhite served as the Deputy and then Executive Director of Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, MA. Fuller Craft (founded 1969 and renamed in 2004) is New England’s only museum of contemporary craft, and is dedicated to the objects, ideas, and insight that inspire both patrons and artists to explore life through the art of contemporary craft.

 

Prior to joining Fuller Craft, Lynch-McWhite served as Director and Chief Curator of the Eleanor D. Wilson Museum, the art museum of Hollins University in Roanoke, Virginia. A graduate of Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, she earned her M.F.A. from Columbia College in Chicago, completing a thesis entitled: “Defining Culture: African American Identity and Photography”. While in Chicago, Ms. Lynch-McWhite began her museum career at The Museum of Contemporary Photography and then joined the staff of the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

She currently serves as a board member on the American Alliance of Museums’ Leadership and Management Network, and has previously served on the College Art Association Museum Committee and was a Director at Large on the South Eastern Museums Conference governing council. In addition to her work with national, regional, and local museum organizations, she has served as Chair of the Roanoke City Arts Commission, and as national grant reviewer for the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Martin Gredinger CFO Martin R. Gredinger, CPA,CFP® brings over 30 years of professional financial management experience as a strategic advisor, Controller, and CFO to Fruitlands Museum. Martin is a member of the Massachusetts Society of CPA’s, and has been featured both in the Boston Herald and on cable TV for his work in the areas of tax and financial planning. He has taught at Newbury College, and has served on several not for profit boards in key leadership positions. Martin holds a BA from Syracuse University and an MBA from the University of Connecticut. He is principal of Martin R.Gredinger CPA, CFP®, a firm specializing in CFO services, tax preparation and personal financial planning. Martin has been involved with Fruitlands Museum, and formerly Fuller Craft Museum for a combined eight years
Ms. Melissa Kershaw Director of Education and Public Programs

Melissa Kershaw has over 20 years of experience delivering high quality, interdisciplinary programs for students, educators, adults and families in art and history settings. She has expertise in creating educational experiences that support lifelong learning using an extensive repertoire of gallery teaching strategies, interpretation of historic properties and archives, and art studio activities. Kershaw began her career in museum education as Historic Interpreter at Colonial Williamsburg. She brought her passion for history, architecture, art and cross cultural expression to her position of Manager of Student and Educator Programs at the Peabody Essex Museum, in Salem, Massachusetts. In 2011, Melissa joined the staff at the Nantucket Historical Society and developed a vigorous schedule of public programs including family programs, theater productions, community events, and a lecture series. Ms. Kershaw serves as Director of Education and Public Programs at Fruitlands Museum where she oversees educational programming for adults, families, and students. Melissa manages the museum’s interpretive staff, creates curricula-focused fieldtrips for student groups, organizes enrichment opportunities for adult and senior organizations, and develops an ambitious roster of public programs for adults and families. Ms. Kershaw earned a Bachelor of Science in Anthropology from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and completed a Masters Degree in the Liberal Arts with a concentration on Museum Studies from Harvard University Extension School.

Ms. Suzanne Myer Smith Director of Development Suzanne Myer Smith joined Fruitlands Museum in November 2014. Previously, she was the Manager of Development Operations at the Worcester Art Museum where she managed all fundraising activities, supervised gift entry and database management, and oversaw all reporting and strategic planning. Before joining the development office at WAM, Suzanne worked with Outreach Programs in the Education department managing the youth scholarship and outreach programs. Prior to the Worcester Art Museum, Suzanne was the Managing Director at the Freed Center for the Performing Arts at Ohio Northern University where she developed fundraising programs including membership, corporate sponsorship and grant management. She also taught undergraduate classes in Arts Management and Grant Proposal Writing at Ohio Northern University. Suzanne has a bachelor’s degree in visual arts from Eckerd College and master’s degree in art education/arts administration from Florida State University. Suzanne has actively volunteered in her community and has served as the chairperson of the Rutland Cultural Council for a total of 14 years.
Mr. Mike Volmar Chief Curator --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
American Association of Museums - Member 2015
National Trust For Historic Preservation 2015
New England Museums Association (NEMA) 2015
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 10
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Marie LeBlanc
Board Chair Company Affiliation Transitions Liquidation Service
Board Chair Term Jan 2015 - Jan 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Ken Cochrane Pulse Logic Voting
Ms. Eileen deCastro Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Kent dur Russell Museum Professional Voting
Ms. Ellen Hazen Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Todd Helwig Mirick O'Connell Voting
Mr. John Laupheimer Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Marie LeBlanc Transitions Liquidation Services Voting
Ms. Kerry Lewis Landscape Architect Voting
Mr. John Ott Retired Voting
Ms. Heidi Siegrist Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Peter von Loesecke The MBA Tour Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Collections
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Education
  • Facilities

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2015 to Dec 31, 2015
Projected Income $1,450,000.00
Projected Expense $1,450,000.00
Form 990s

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

2009 Form 990

Audit Documents

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $1,490,168 $1,272,319 $2,015,893
Total Expenses $1,525,426 $1,541,773 $1,428,251

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,004,699 $850,029 $884,172
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $400,808 $304,573 $272,093
Investment Income, Net of Losses $14,739 $47,261 $795,473
Membership Dues $40,392 $38,544 $29,432
Special Events $28,806 $29,725 $28,364
Revenue In-Kind -- -- $2,000
Other $724 $2,187 $4,359

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $948,898 $848,351 $852,117
Administration Expense $455,431 $552,709 $473,454
Fundraising Expense $121,097 $140,713 $102,680
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.98 0.83 1.41
Program Expense/Total Expenses 62% 55% 60%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 16% 11%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $16,280,654 $16,053,484 $14,445,608
Current Assets $344,408 $186,820 $163,260
Long-Term Liabilities -- $0 $0
Current Liabilities $186,440 $302,015 $95,137
Total Net Assets $16,094,214 $15,751,469 $14,350,471

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.85 0.62 1.72

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990 for fiscal years 2014 and 2013, and per the audited financials for fiscal year 2012. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Legal proceeds from a settlement are referenced in the 2010 and 2011 audits posted above. More information will be posted by the nonprofit as it becomes available. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Fruitlands Museum is dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of our collections within a unique museum campus. The Museum uses its multidisciplinary collections and beautiful location to educate and inspire through art, history and nature. Through relevant exhibitions and programs, we create personal experiences that engage families, students and regional communities.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

We have just completed a comprehensive strategic plan and business model. This plan will drive our future goals and provide direction for new initiatives. The next steps will be completion of a systems replacement analysis and development of a facilities plan.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Fruitlands is well positioned for success due to the quality of our programs and exhibitions as well as our experienced staff. We are also fortunate to have dedicated board members who have a broad range of talents and are committed to moving the museum forward.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Progress toward goals is reported to the board monthly through an organizational dashboard that reflects financial goals, attendance and programming goals. We are looking forward to expanding upon our goals and objectives now that the strategic plan is complete.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Our strategic business plan is complete and we are working on a comprehensive facilities plan. The results of this plan will help us determine our goals going forward.