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Walker, Inc.

 1968 Central Avenue
 Needham, MA 02492
[P] (781) 2922168 x 2922168
[F] (781) 2922168
Walker, Inc.
[email protected]
Roberta Goldschneider
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INCORPORATED: 1961
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2171186

LAST UPDATED: 09/15/2017
Organization DBA Walker
Walker Home for Children, Inc.
The Walker School
Beacon High School
Former Names George H. and Irene L. Walker Home for Children, Inc. (2014)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Walker transforms the lives of children and youth who are facing complex emotional, behavioral, and learning challenges by partnering with these children and youth, their families, and communities to nurture hope, build strengths, and develop lifelong skills.

 

Mission Statement

Walker transforms the lives of children and youth who are facing complex emotional, behavioral, and learning challenges by partnering with these children and youth, their families, and communities to nurture hope, build strengths, and develop lifelong skills.

 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $21,861,608.00
Projected Expense $21,757,075.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Beacon High School
  • Community-Based Acute Treatment
  • Residential Treatment Program
  • The Walker School

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Walker transforms the lives of children and youth who are facing complex emotional, behavioral, and learning challenges by partnering with these children and youth, their families, and communities to nurture hope, build strengths, and develop lifelong skills.

 


Background Statement

Walker's vision is that all children will thrive in their family, school, and community and that vision is deeply rooted from its early beginnings. In 1961, Dr. Albert E. Trieschman, a Harvard-trained psychiatrist, founded the organization. Over the years, Walker has exponentially expanded its programming to provide coeducational services to youth between the ages of 3 and 22 in therapeutic and academic programs across two campuses and in community settings. Walker provides critical services to children, teens, and families with significant emotional, behavioral, and learning challenges.

In addition to Therapeutic Residential Treatment, a flexible, family-driven program specializing in safety and stabilization, Walker's Needham campus programs also include:

 

  • The Walker School, an accredited K-8 academic program for children between the ages of 5 and 13;
  • Walker Therapeutic After-School, designed to help children solidify academic and behavioral progress; 
  • Community-Based Acute Treatment, a hospital-diversion program providing short-term emergency stabilization for children as young as 3 years old;
  • Respite Care, providing families with time away and support while providing structured activities to develop children’s social skills, and;
  • Ain Group Home, a home-like, living environment for children who participate fully in the community through public school attendance and extracurricular activities.

Walker Partnerships provides consultation, direct staff support, professional development, and evaluation services to more than 60 school systems, pre-schools, after-school programs, and educational collaboratives across Massachusetts.

Walker’s Watertown campus houses Beacon High School, a fully accredited therapeutic high school for adolescents experiencing anxiety, depression, emotional challenges, or learning difficulties.

Recently launched, the Walker Trieschman Institute for Research & Training creates learning opportunities that serve to increase the knowledge, skills, and abilities of all who work with children and youth.

In Fiscal Year 2014, Walker directly served more than 1,200 children, teens, and families from across Massachusetts in multidisciplinary programs on the Needham and Watertown campuses, impacting an additional 18,000 youth through training and consultation services.


Impact Statement

Walker's Strategic Plan 2014-2017 is a manifestation of its vision and mission and positions Walker at the leading edge of new practice, technology, and research. 

Highlighted Accomplishments in Fiscal Year 2014:

  1. Walker was licensed by the Department of Public Health for a mental health clinic.
  2. Walker's training and professional development arm, The Walker Trieschman Institute for Research & Training, was launched.   
  3. 50% of funding for Beacon High School's Building Fund was raised to complete the Nancy C. Lincoln Center on the Watertown Campus. 
  4. Diversity and inclusion work was expanded across the agency.   
  5. The Ain Group Home, a program for children with strong ties to the community, was opened.

The following goals describe how all parts of Walker will transform its traditions and achievements into future innovations.

Highlighted Goals:

  1. Using a Community and Family-Based Model, bring the "Walker without walls" approach to all programs, integrating its community, school, and residential programs. 
  2. Create a variety of therapeutic programming to educate children and youth who struggle with complex social, behavioral, neuro-developmental, mental health, and learning challenges. 
  3. Set a standard of excellence for professional development in training, supervision, and career advancement for all staff and professionals working in partnership with children, teens, and families. 
  4. Achieve a plan for long-term, sustainable financial heath that supports competitive, state-of-the-art resources (HR, Technology, Facilities) for administrative and operational excellence.

Needs Statement

  1. Walker's Annual Fund must raise nearly $2M each year, ensuring that future generations of children, teens, and families are supported with high quality programming that expands and transforms to meet the ever-increasing needs of youth facing a variety of mental health and learning challenges.
  2. Community Partnerships provide mutually-beneficial opportunities for Walker and organizations and corporations. 
  3. Walker capital projects provide restricted funds that work to enhance and expand programming. Currently, funding for the Beacon Building Project will help to fund the recently completed Nancy C. Lincoln Center housing guidance offices, an art and pottery studio, and gym on the Watertown campus.
  4. Volunteers provide their time and talents and offer unique experiences for youth in Walker programs as well as shared expertise with Walker staff and professionals.
  5. In-kind gifts help to underwrite critical needs each year, from toys for the holiday toy drive to books for our school libraries and backpacks for students.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Massachusetts-All Regions

Walker serves children  from 134 communities in Eastern Massachusetts.

Organization Categories

  1. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Residential Mental Health Treatment
  2. Education - Special Education
  3. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Beacon High School

Beacon High School is a fully accredited, coeducational therapeutic high school for adolescents experiencing anxiety, depression, or other emotional challenges. Last year, Beacon provided academic and specialized programs to 77 students between the ages of 14 and 22 from the Greater Boston area. Beacon provides a supportive and nurturing environment that addresses emotional and academic issues in a comprehensive integrated manner for students who are experiencing significant emotional and psychological problems or learning difficulties.
 
Budget  $3,171,262.00
Category  Education, General/Other Education, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Last year, 100% of Beacon graduates pursued post-high school transitional programs, employment, or college. Every graduate who applied to college was accepted.
Program Long-Term Success  Walker's vision is that all children will thrive in their family, school, and community.
Program Success Monitored By  An important part of Walker’s vision for success is to provide high quality, effective programs and services that respond to the needs of children and families. Walker’s Program Improvement, Compliance, and Technology (PICT) Department is responsible for evaluating the impact of Walker’s programs and services. The PICT Department collects, analyzes, and reports data, enabling Walker staff to plan treatment, track outcomes, and report data to a variety of stakeholders.
Examples of Program Success  Last year, 100% of Beacon graduates pursued post-high school transitional programs, employment, or college. Every graduate who applied to college was accepted. 

Community-Based Acute Treatment

Walker’s Community-Based Acute Treatment (CBAT) hospital-diversion program provides short-term emergency stabilization and support to children between the ages of 3 and 13 who are actively experiencing severe emotional crisis. CBAT is a community alternative to psychiatric hospitalization where family involvement is strongly encouraged in order to support the children in the most effective way possible. CBAT serves children as young as 3 years old.

Budget  $2,509,417,000.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Residential Mental Health Treatment
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Infants to Preschool (under age 5)
Program Short-Term Success 

The ICBAT provides a family-centered, developmentally appropriate program for children in acute emotional and behavioral crisis. The primary goals of the program are:

  • to stabilize the child and return him/her to the least restrictive environment as quickly as possible;
  • to provide thorough clinical assessments and diagnostic services;
  • to provide academic support and instruction in order to maintain academic skills; and
  • to facilitate the child's return to home or a transition to a long-term therapeutic environment by ensuring that appropriate services are in place.
Program Long-Term Success 

Walker's vision is that all children will thrive in their family, school, and community.

Program Success Monitored By 

An important part of Walker’s vision for success is to provide high quality, effective programs and services that respond to the needs of children and families. Walker’s Program Improvement, Compliance, and Technology (PICT) Department is responsible for evaluating the impact of Walker’s programs and services. The PICT Department collects, analyzes, and reports data, enabling Walker staff to plan treatment, track outcomes, and report data to a variety of stakeholders.

Examples of Program Success 

Last year, 212 children received services through these programs.

 

Residential Treatment Program

Walker's Residential Treatment Program is a nationally accredited, fully licensed, Chapter 766-approved, flexible, family-driven program specializing in safety, stabilization, assessment, and treatment for children between the ages of 5 and 14. Designed for children who struggle with complex challenges, this program helps children build social, emotional, and behavioral skill so they may ultimately live successfully with family. 

Budget  $5,590,134.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Residential Mental Health Treatment
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Children Only (5 - 14 years) Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Last fiscal year, 80% of students in Walker's residential program stepped down to a less restrictive setting, with three-quarters of those children returning to their families. 
 
Program Long-Term Success 

Walker's vision is that all children will thrive in their family, school, and community.

Program Success Monitored By  Walker’s Program Improvement, Compliance, and Technology (PICT) Department is responsible for evaluating the impact of Walker’s programs and services. The PICT Department collects, analyzes, and reports data, enabling Walker staff to plan treatment, track outcomes, and report data to a variety of stakeholders. 
Examples of Program Success  Last fiscal year, 80% of students in Walker's residential program stepped down to a less restrictive setting, with three-quarters of those children returning to their families. 

The Walker School

The Walker School is a Chapter 766-approved K-8 academic day program for children between the ages of 5 and 13 with complex behavioral, learning, and emotional challenges.

Budget  $3,663,716.00
Category  Education, General/Other Special Education
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Children Only (5 - 14 years) Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Last year, The Walker School enrolled 109 students and 87% showed measurable growth in writing from the 2013-2014 year to the 2014-2015 year. 
Program Long-Term Success  Walker's vision is that all children will thrive in their family, school, and community.
Program Success Monitored By  Walker’s Program Improvement, Compliance, and Technology (PICT) Department is responsible for evaluating the impact of Walker’s programs and services. The PICT Department collects, analyzes, and reports data, enabling Walker staff to plan treatment, track outcomes, and report data to a variety of stakeholders. 
Examples of Program Success  More than 35% of students enrolled are significantly behind grade level in their academic progress. Last year, The Walker School enrolled 109 students and 87% showed measurable growth in writing from the 2013-2014 year to the 2014-2015 year.
 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Susan M Getman MSW
CEO Term Start May 2012
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Susan M. Getman, MSW became President & CEO of Walker in May 2012, taking over as the agency’s third executive director in its  history. Prior to joining Walker, Getman was Senior Director for Casey Family Programs, a national foundation based in Seattle dedicated to improving child welfare outcomes for children and families. She spent five years as DSS Deputy Commissioner, leading the Massachusetts Department of Social Services and spearheading the early work aimed at transforming the agency’s child welfare practice model. Prior to DSS, Getman oversaw the operations of residential, family, educational, and community based programs and services as executive vice president for Wayside Youth and Family Support Network, having worked earlier in her career in leadership roles for the Massachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children (MSPCC) and the Town of Framingham.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Dr. Richard W. Small Ph.D. May 1985 May 2012

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Barbara Bjornson CPA, MBA Vice President of Finance --
James Montgomery-Hyde M.A. Vice President of Human Resources --
Scott M. Preston Ph.D. Vice President of Performance Improvement --
Gene Takahashi LICSW, Ph.D., MBA Senior Vice President of Program Operations --
Ms. Carolyn Wood VP, Advancement --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 276
Number of Part Time Staff 65
Number of Volunteers 300
Number of Contract Staff 19
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 71
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 213
Hispanic/Latino: 23
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 2
Gender Female: 215
Male: 96
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Karl H. Trieschman
Board Chair Company Affiliation AIG Global Investment
Board Chair Term Sept 2016 - June 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Carolyn Culbreth Ain No Affiliation Voting
Dr. Lillian Sober Ain Ph.D. No Affiliation Voting
Mr. Mark S. Ain Kronos Incorporated Voting
Ms. Sharon Carleton R.N. No Affiliation Voting
Mr. J. Linzee Coolidge Beacon Hill Apartments NonVoting
Mr. Matthew Gellene Bank of America Voting
Ms. Kristi Glenn-Washington No Affiliation Voting
Mr. Daniel H. Gorton MSW No Affiliation Voting
Ms. Sonya Hamori No Affiliation Voting
Reverend Debora Jackson D.Min No Affiliation Voting
Mr. Jason H. Jenkins Intex Solutions, Inc. Voting
Mr. Alexander D. Jones Esq. Ginsburg, Leshin, Gibbs & Jones, LLP Voting
Ms. Maureen O. Kelly Ed.D. Massachusetts College of Art and Design Voting
Ms. Kathleen Maffa Krailo PT, MS No Affiliation Voting
Mr. Michael B. Moskow Michael B. Moskow & Company Voting
Dr. Erna Schwartz Place Ph.D. Psychologist Voting
Dr. Suzanne E. Reiss M.D. The Reach Institute Voting
Mr. Paul G. Shorthose Chameleon Environments LLC Voting
Mr. Patrick J. Spratt No Affiliation Voting
Dr. Gayl Crump Swaby Ph.D. Institute for Health and Recovery Voting
Mr. Steven M. Tannenbaum Greenwood Investments, Inc. Voting
Mr. Benjamin W. Thorndike FOC Partners Voting
Mr. Karl H. Trieschman No Affiliation Voting
Mr. David White No Affiliation NonVoting
Ms. Anne A. Wolf No Affiliation NonVoting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 22
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 11
Male: 12
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $21,538,329 $21,706,490 $20,372,076
Total Expenses $21,480,480 $20,488,069 $19,227,782

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $765,186 $1,221,300 $1,296,126
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $20,217,647 $19,943,985 $18,393,891
Investment Income, Net of Losses $79,295 $177,538 $219,693
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $463,103 $363,432 $443,208
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $13,098 $235 $19,158

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $17,771,364 $17,081,005 $16,540,335
Administration Expense $3,252,512 $3,013,799 $2,296,434
Fundraising Expense $456,604 $393,265 $391,013
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.06 1.06
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 83% 86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 37% 25% 22%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $24,336,578 $24,223,365 $22,550,997
Current Assets $5,335,231 $5,345,921 $5,941,899
Long-Term Liabilities $5,411,160 $4,942,297 $4,606,700
Current Liabilities $2,654,978 $2,352,894 $2,088,967
Total Net Assets $16,270,440 $16,928,174 $15,855,330

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value $4,500,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.01 2.27 2.84

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 22% 20% 20%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals as the breakdown was not available.
 
Please note, in 2015 the organization changed its name from The George H. and Irene L. Walker Home for Children, Inc. to Walker, Inc.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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