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International Institute of Boston Inc

 1 Milk Street
 Boston, MA 02109
[P] (617) 695-9990
[F] (617) 695-9191
www.iine.org
iinegrants@iine.org
Jeffrey Thielman
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INCORPORATED: 1935
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2104325

LAST UPDATED: 09/02/2016
Organization DBA International Institute of New England
International Institute of Lowell
International Institute of New Hampshire
International Institute of Boston
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of the International Institute of New England is to invest in the future of New England's cities and towns by preparing immigrants for participation in the social, economic, and political richness of American life through active citizenship.

Mission Statement

The mission of the International Institute of New England is to invest in the future of New England's cities and towns by preparing immigrants for participation in the social, economic, and political richness of American life through active citizenship.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2015 to Sept 30, 2016
Projected Income $5,109,976.00
Projected Expense $5,022,041.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Civic Engagement
  • Community Services
  • Economic Advancement
  • Education and Literacy

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of the International Institute of New England is to invest in the future of New England's cities and towns by preparing immigrants for participation in the social, economic, and political richness of American life through active citizenship.

Background Statement

For nearly a century, the International Institute of New England (IINE) has welcomed and supported families and communities as they bridge the gap between their former lives and a new future in the United States. Successive waves of immigrants and refugees have historically settled in the Northeast – from the Irish and Italian immigrants of the late 1800s, to Vietnamese migrants in the 1970s and 1980s, to Iraqi, Somali, and Bhutanese refugees today. In an average year IINE works with more than 2,000 individuals from 100 different countries. Many are families, trying to resettle and succeed in the United States. Some of the clients have suffered persecution and forced migration, and have chosen to rebuild their lives in New England. Others are immigrants and students who seek English language learning, employment and skills training in order to advance their employment prospects as they work to achieve economic self-sufficiency. All contribute to New England's social diversity and economic strength and all share the hope of a better life for their families and their children. IINE invests in the future of our cities and towns by preparing them for the social, economic, and political richness of American life.


Impact Statement

Each year, IINE serves more than 2,000 refugees and immigrants across our three sites in Boston and Lowell, Mass. and Manchester, N.H. We have three overarching objectives: 1) provide refugees and immigrants with the resources, skills, and knowledge to transition confidently into their new lives in America; 2) ensure families and individuals achieve economic independence by providing high quality employment counseling, workforce development training, and job placement services; and 3) support client pathways to citizenship.

Major accomplishments in the past year include:

  • Resettled over 150 refugees in Greater Boston who were fleeing persecution from countries worldwide, including Afghanistan, Bhutan, Burma, Congo, Eritrea, Iran, Iraq, Somalia, and Sudan. Across our three sites last year, IINE welcomed 621 individual refugees last year.

  • Recognized nationally for our cultural orientation program for refugees that provides four weeks of education and includes field trips to social and cultural locations.

  • Earned the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education's highest rating for our Evening English for Speakers of Other Languages program, which served 99 students in Boston.

  • Served 448 students in our English for Employment program (231 in Boston, 125 in Lowell, and 92 in Manchester, N.H.).

  • Enrolled 75 adults in intensive vocational training programs; 85% of these clients were placed in jobs within six months of completing the program.

  • Provided employment counseling services to 435 clients in all three sites, placing 72% of these clients in sustained, paying positions.

Needs Statement

New England’s foreign-born residents face linguistic, economic, educational, and health barriers that impede their pathways to self-sufficiency.


1. Limited English language proficiency impedes integration. It limits access to health care services, schools, and career advancement. Approximately 53 percent of foreign-born residents in Manchester, 45 percent of foreign-born residents in Boston, and 67 percent of foreign-born residents in Lowell are characterized as Limited English Proficient.

2. Non-transferable job skills limit options for gainful employment, and those with this profile require significant workforce training to become competitive job applicants. Labor market projections clearly show the growing share of jobs now requiring middle communication and technical skills. High school credentials are no longer sufficient to secure jobs with family-sustaining wages.

3. Foreign-born residents with significant health and mental health challenges often struggle to adjust to life in the U.S. Vulnerable populations are at increased risk of experiencing disruptive health complications due to previous poor nutrition, poor sanitation, and limited access to and awareness of adequate medical care.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Massachusetts-All Regions
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (please select all areas as well)
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- Harbor Islands
City of Boston- West Roxbury
BERKSHIRE REGION, MA
CAPE &ISLANDS REGION, MA
CENTRAL REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
The International Institute of New England serves vulnerable new Americans throughout Greater Boston, Greater Lowell, and Southern New Hampshire. Its three site offices are located in Boston and Lowell, Mass. and Manchester, N.H., with field sites in Lynn, Mass. and Nashua, N.H. 

The Institute's central office is co-located with the Boston site office in downtown Boston, easily accessible to our clients via public transportation.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Ethnic/Immigrant Services
  2. Employment - Job Training
  3. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Voter Education/ Registration

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Civic Engagement

IINE offers a range of programs designed to support new Americans to reach their goals of self-sufficiency and self-efficacy and in response, we have defined programs in three categories: 1. Community Services, 2. Workforce Development and 3. Civic Engagement
 
3. Civic Engagement
Cultural orientation programming; Citizenship preparation and application assistance.
 
Budget  $1,000,000.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Immigrants' Rights
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 
Examples of how IINE defines short-term success within our Civic Engagement Programs include:
  • All enrolled clients will successfully complete a cultural orientation course.
  • Eligible clients will engage in U.S. citizenship preparation, successfully complete the citizenship exam and successfully complete the application for citizenship. 
Program Long-Term Success 

Examples of how IINE defines long-term success within our Civic Engagement Programs include:

  • All enrolled clients will become familiar with U.S. customs and cultural orientation and awareness will allow them to successfully engage in their communities, 
  • Eligible clients will become U.S. citizens
Program Success Monitored By  Success is measures by cultural orientation pre/post test; % successful completion of citizenship coursework preparation; successful completion of citizenship exam; successful submission of U.S. citizenship application.
Examples of Program Success 

When Olf came to the U.S. from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, he had no prior English language training, making it exceptionally difficult to communicate and connect with fellow Americans. Since he started taking English classes at the Institute about a month after arriving in America, he has mastered the language and assimilated into American culture. Olf has enrolled in a citizenship class and is becoming familiar with  the naturalization process while learning the rights and responsibilities of an American citizen. His literacy skills are improving and he will be able to pass the English, Civics, Reading and Writing tests. 


Community Services

IINE offers a range of programs designed to support new Americans to reach their goals of self-sufficiency and self-efficacy and in response we have defined programs in three categories: 1. Community Services, 2. Workforce Development and 3. Civic Engagement.

1. Community Services:

Intake and Resource Clinic; Refugee Reception and Placement; Case Management; Youth Programming; Family Reunification; Health Navigation; Anti-Trafficking Services
Budget  $2,000,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Ethnic & Immigrant Groups
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees At-Risk Populations Families
Program Short-Term Success 

Examples of how IINE defines short-term successes within our Community Services Programs include: 

  • Self-Efficacy: All enrolled clients will be assessed for barriers to navigating community resources and public benefits, and will develop action plans to remove barriers and achieve success in resource and benefit access.
  • Health Navigation: All enrolled clients will be provided orientation to the U.S. healthcare system, will be provided assistance in securing health insurance and will connected to a primary care physician.
Program Long-Term Success 

Examples of how IINE defines long-term success within our Community Services Programs include: 

  • Self-Efficacy: All enrolled clients will strengthen their understanding and success in navigating the community resources and public benefits to which they are entitled.
  • Health Navigation: All enrolled clients will strengthen their understanding and success in navigating health services, resulting in better access to care and overall health improvement.
Program Success Monitored By  Success is measured by: Successful completion of action plans; obtainment of community resources and public benefits; obtainment of health insurance; consistent, low-barrier health engagement.  These measures are documented in case notes and client records.
Examples of Program Success 

Client Y and his wife were recently granted Haitian Parole status. They were referred to the Intake and Resource Clinic by the coordinator of the evening ESOL program. The family needed assistance meeting their basic needs in addition to attending ESOL classes to increase their likelihood of finding a job. Staff from the Intake and Resource Clinic was able to provide winter coats to the family and help the family to apply for health insurance. The entire family is now covered by health insurance and able to see a primary care doctor to address their health needs. The family will continue to participate in other services at the IIB and receive any additional assistance necessary from the Intake and Resource Clinic in order to remove barriers to obtaining self-sufficiency.


Economic Advancement

IINE works with individual, institutional, government, and corporate partners to help refugees and immigrants integrate into their new communities. Our work centers on four core service areas:

3. Economic Advancement – The Institute’s staff works tirelessly to help immigrants and refugees find quality employment, and we offer a range of skills training programs that help clients prepare for and access better paying jobs and careers. 
Budget  $2,000,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Examples of how IINE defines short-term success within our Workforce Development Programs include: 

  • All enrolled clients will be provided an assessment of their economic security and assistance in developing an action plan to achieve or strengthen their self-sufficiency goals.
Program Long-Term Success 
Examples of how IINE defines long-term success within our Workforce Development Programs include:
 
  • 100% of enrolled clients will attain self-sufficiency and economic stability via employment, skills training and business development services that are attuned to the shifting needs of local labor markets and that deliver a family-sustaining wage.
Program Success Monitored By 

Completion of action plans; attendance in classes; # jobs applied for; # job offers received; job retention measured at 30 and 90 days; successful graduation in skills training programming; match savings; business strengthenings. Measures are documented in case notes, program reporting and case records.

Examples of Program Success 

A Tibetan client of IINE left a Nepalese refugee camp in 2008 to be reunited with her father here. To support her family, she took an entry-level job at Dunkin Donuts after her arrival. She was not satisfied in entry-level positions so she enrolled in the Institute’s ESOL program in 2009. After attending the program’s career fair, she was interested in the Institute’s Occupational Training Program. She applied for a place and was informed that to enroll she would need to improve her English writing skills. She told her ESOL instructor who gave her additional writing assignments and encouraged her to come to class early for homework help sessions. In 2010, she was accepted into the Occupational Training Program. After graduation, she secured a housekeeping position at the Charles Hotel, which she still holds today. She continues her English studies at the Institute and focuses on improving her computer skills in order to apply for a housekeeping supervisor position.


Education and Literacy

IINE works with individual, institutional, government, and corporate partners to help refugees and immigrants integrate into their new communities. Our work centers on four core service areas:

2. Education and Literacy – A major focus of our work, and the subject of this proposal, is teaching new Americans English and scaffolding their literacy skills. The stronger new Americans’ English skills are, the more likely they will attain economic self-sufficiency and become active and engaged community members on the path to citizenship. Our work in this area includes contextualized vocational English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and more traditional ESOL programming.  
Budget  --
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success  a
Program Long-Term Success  a
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  a

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Jeffrey Thielman
CEO Term Start July 2015
CEO Email jthielman@iine.org
CEO Experience

Jeffrey Thielman was appointed IINE President/CEO in summer of 2015. For the 18 years prior, Jeff played a key role in the growth of the Cristo Rey schools across the country. He served as the first Development Director of the original Cristo Rey school in Chicago, from 2001 to 2009 he managed the scale up of the Cristo Rey model to 24 sites, and from 2009 to 2015 served as President of Cristo Rey Boston High School.

Prior to joining the staff of the original Cristo Rey school, Jeff was a trial attorney in Boston and worked in the financial services industry. Between college and law school, Jeff served for three-and-a-half years as a Jesuit International Volunteer in Tacna, Peru, where he was a teacher and founded a program for street children called the Center for the Working Child, which has been replicated in several cities in Peru. He co-authored a book called Volunteer: With the Poor in Peru on the founding of the Center.

Jeff lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, serves on the town’s School Board (School Committee), and he and his wife have three children. Jeff has undergraduate and law degrees from Boston College, and he is fluent in Spanish.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Carolyn Benedict-Drew Mar 2006 June 2015

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Cheryl Hamilton Director of Partner Engagement and Northern Tier Operations

Cheryl Hamilton joined the International Institute in the summer of 2015. Since graduating from Clark University where she currently teaches a course on immigrant integration, Cheryl devoted her career to advancing refugee resettlement. She has more than fifteen years of experience in the field, including most recently serving as Associate Director for External Relations as RefugePoint, a Cambridge-based international humanitarian organization.

Previously, she served as National Coordinator for RefugeeWorks (now Higher Advantage), a program of Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Services in Maryland and Director of the New Migration Project and the Center for Preventing Hate. Between 2001-2003, Cheryl helped manage the unexpected migration of 2,500 Somali refugees to her hometown in Maine.

A relentless storyteller, Cheryl also wrote and performed a one-woman show entitled Checkered Floors based on the Somali resettlement to Maine. She routinely appears in storytelling productions throughout New England, including performing on The Moth MainStage in 2014.

Ms. Rita McDonough Chief Financial Officer

Rita McDonough joined IINE as Chief Financial Officer in February 2013.

Rita brings over 25 years of accounting, financial and management experience in both the non-profit and for-profit sectors. At IINE, Rita oversees all fiscal, contractual, facilities and IT matters and is the liaison for external funding agencies and auditors. Rita was instrumental in the May 2015 sale of IINE’s building at One Milk Street, Boston, which provided for the financial stability of the Institute by establishing an endowment with the sale proceeds.

Prior to IINE, Rita spent three and a half years at the Learning Prep School (LPS) in Newton, MA as their Chief Financial Officer. During her tenure at LPS, Rita navigated and successfully problem solved a number of financial issues to ensure the school’s financial future, including negotiating a significant tuition increase with the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Operational Services Division.

Rita’s prior positions included key management roles in the human services, health and utility fields, as well as 7 years of public accounting experience in audit and tax for various industries.

Rita resides in Marshfield, MA and has 2 daughters. She graduated from University of MA-Boston with a BS in Management/Accounting and is a licensed CPA.

Ms. Aisha Necoechea Site Director - Boston --
Ms. Alexandra Weber LICSW Chief Program Officer

Alexandra “Xan” Weber, LICSW, has worked at the International Institute since 2008.

As the Chief Program Officer, Xan is responsible for managing the organization’s overall strategic program direction as well as its three sites in Boston and Lowell, MA and Manchester, NH.

Prior to her current role, Xan served at IIB as the Director of Community Services from 2008-2013, managing the site’s refugee resettlement program, various victim services projects, and behavioral health services. In 2014, Xan was promoted to the dual role of Head of Strategic Direction, Programs and Boston Site Director. She was responsible for helping reshape IINE’s overall strategic program plan.

As a licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Xan specializes in non-profit program management and family systems therapy. Xan holds degrees from Georgetown University and the University of Iowa, where she received her Master’s in Social Work. Xan lives with her husband and two kids in Jamaica Plain, MA.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 38
Number of Part Time Staff 27
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 31
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 8
Caucasian: 43
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 45
Male: 17
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. William Gillett
Board Chair Company Affiliation Southern New Hampshire University
Board Chair Term May 2012 -
Board Co-Chair Mr. Cornel Catuna
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation BJ's Wholesale Club, Inc.
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Cornel Catuna BJ's Wholesale Club Voting
Mr. Zoltan Csimma Retired Voting
Ms. Jean Franchi Dimension Therapeutics Voting
Mr. Georges Gemayel PhD Retired Voting
Mr. William Gillett Southern New Hampshire University Voting
Ms. Taeiss Haghighat Triton Systems Voting
Ms. Rushna Tejani Heneghan Charles River Laboratories, Inc. Voting
Mr. William Krause Moody, Lynn & Lieberson, LLC Voting
Ms. Rita McDonough International Institute of New England Exofficio
Dr. Frederick Millham MD South Shore Hospital Voting
Ms. Beth Murphy Principle Pictures Voting
Ms. Deborah Shufrin Brandeis University Voting
Mr. David Sullivan Esq. Murtha Cullina LLP Voting
Mr. Jeffrey Thielman International Institute of New England Exofficio
Mr. Michael Wyzga Biotechnology Consultant Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 4
Other (if specified): Persian, Romanian
Gender Female: 7
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2015 to Sept 30, 2016
Projected Income $5,109,976.00
Projected Expense $5,022,041.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited financials

2011 Audited financials

2010 Audited financials

2009 Audited financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $15,736,223 $6,104,099 $6,107,008
Total Expenses $6,226,789 $6,045,604 $6,384,353

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $410,569 $448,011 $372,348
Indirect Public Support $116,820 $107,305 $103,740
Earned Revenue $4,504,634 $4,759,287 $4,566,649
Investment Income, Net of Losses $-534,458 $5,865 $36,481
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $193,891 $79,133 $252,120
Revenue In-Kind $577,429 $541,622 $775,670
Other $10,467,338 $162,876 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $4,411,729 $4,392,806 $4,482,165
Administration Expense $1,598,820 $1,460,730 $1,679,694
Fundraising Expense $216,240 $192,068 $222,494
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 2.53 1.01 0.96
Program Expense/Total Expenses 71% 73% 70%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 30% 30% 31%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $11,408,429 $7,410,319 $7,690,400
Current Assets $2,570,935 $1,172,898 $1,408,556
Long-Term Liabilities -- $6,405,692 $6,531,710
Current Liabilities $1,537,885 $643,517 $856,075
Total Net Assets $9,870,544 $361,110 $302,615

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.67 1.82 1.65

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 86% 85%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals as the breakout was not available.
 
The Other revenue category in the charts and graphs above for FY14 includes a capital grant.  For FY15, the Other revenue category includes amortization of financing fees and a gain on sale of a building (net of related income taxes). 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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