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Massachusetts Audubon Society, Inc.

 208 South Great Road
 Lincoln, MA 01773
[P] (781) 2599500
[F] (781) 2598899
http://www.massaudubon.org
rarnaud@massaudubon.org
Rick Arnaud
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INCORPORATED: 1896
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2104702

LAST UPDATED: 08/10/2016
Organization DBA Mass Audubon
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of the Mass Audubon is to protect the nature of Massachusetts for people and for wildlife. We serve as a leader and a catalyst for conservation, by acting directly to protect the nature of Massachusetts and by stimulating individual and
institutional action through conservation, education, and advocacy. 

Mission Statement

The mission of the Mass Audubon is to protect the nature of Massachusetts for people and for wildlife. We serve as a leader and a catalyst for conservation, by acting directly to protect the nature of Massachusetts and by stimulating individual and
institutional action through conservation, education, and advocacy. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $23,839,594.00
Projected Expense $23,839,594.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Advocacy
  • Conservation
  • Education

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of the Mass Audubon is to protect the nature of Massachusetts for people and for wildlife. We serve as a leader and a catalyst for conservation, by acting directly to protect the nature of Massachusetts and by stimulating individual and
institutional action through conservation, education, and advocacy. 

Background Statement

Mass Audubon protects 36,500 acres of land throughout Massachusetts, saving birds and other wildlife, and making nature accessible to all. As Massachusetts’ largest nature conservation nonprofit, we welcome more than a half million visitors a year to our wildlife sanctuaries and 20 nature centers. From inspiring hilltop views to breathtaking coastal landscapes, serene woods, and working farms, we believe in protecting our state’s natural treasures for wildlife and for all people–a vision shared in 1896 by our founders, two extraordinary Boston women. Today, Mass Audubon is a nationally recognized environmental education leader, offering thousands of camp, school, and adult programs that get over 225,000 kids and adults outdoors every year. With more than 125,000 members and supporters, we advocate on Beacon Hill and beyond, and conduct conservation research to preserve the natural heritage of our beautiful state for today’s and future generations. 

 

 


Impact Statement

Through our guiding strategies of conservation, education, and advocacy, Mass Audubon has a meaningful impact on the land and people of Massachusetts every day of the year. Mass Audubon permanently protects more than 36,500 acres of land across Massachusetts, providing important opportunities for all people to experience the wonders of nature firsthand while also safeguarding a wide range of habitats and native species. Mass Audubon is one of the largest statewide providers of environmental education programming for youth, families, and adults. Our statewide network of wildlife sanctuaries, nature centers, and museums serve as the base for our work in education and community outreach. Our education programs take place at our sites as well as in communities across the Commonwealth in partnership with schools, classrooms, and community-based organizations. Mass Audubon’s Advocacy Department works with other conservation organizations, the Governor’s office, legislators, and citizen groups to help shape and strengthen environmental laws and regulations at the state, federal and local levels of government.


Needs Statement

Acquisition and permanent protection and stewardship of land;
Educational programming for children of all ages, especially underserved populations;
Scientific research of declining bird populations and protection of critical bird species; and
Advocating for strong environmental policies at the local, state and federal levels.

CEO Statement

At Mass Audubon, we often comment that our mission is both elegantly simple and highly appropriate—protecting the nature of Massachusetts for people and wildlife—and that we use three extremely powerful strategies to advance that mission: conservation, education, and advocacy. It is only when we integrate these strategies that we can achieve maximum impact, and we acknowledge that our work is only possible because of our members and supporters.

Together we are working towards a bold vision for the Commonwealth of  Massachusetts in which nature—whether found in a city park or deep inside the forests of western Massachusetts or along the 1,500 miles of Massachusetts coastline—is valued as essential to quality of life in the Commonwealth, and people live with appreciation and respect for the complex ecological systems that sustain life on earth.
 

Board Chair Statement

Mass Audubon's Strategic Plan 2015–2020 places special emphasis on connecting our rich history with the possibilities of the future. The Plan validates existing actions, and embraces new ones, that will strengthen and expand our leadership role to effectively advance conservation in Massachusetts. Through our network of wildlife sanctuaries, we will continue to provide places for everyone to connect with the natural world. And, informed by science, we will employ our tested strategies of conservation, education, and advocacy to make Mass Audubon even more relevant, engaging, effective, and sustainable.

 


Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
BERKSHIRE REGION, MA
CAPE &ISLANDS REGION, MA
CENTRAL REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE

Our conservation work serves all of Massachusetts. As Massachusetts’ largest nature conservation nonprofit, we welcome more than a half million visitors a year to our wildlife sanctuaries and 20 nature centers.

Organization Categories

  1. Environment - Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
  2. Animal Related - Wildlife Sanctuaries
  3. Environment - Environmental Education

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Advocacy

We work with other conservation organizations, legislators, universities and citizen groups to shape, strengthen and ensure the fulfillment of environmental laws, policies and regulations. We inform and educate people about pending legislation and its potential impact, enable the public to better understand the government's actions regarding environmental issues, and provide data and analysis to help guide public policy.

 

We publish Losing Ground—documenting and analyzing land development trends and patterns in Massachusetts—which is cited frequently as one of the most effective analytical tools available to inform statewide land protection and planning initiatives. Through our Shaping the Future of your Environment statewide outreach and advocacy program, we work at the community level with municipal officials, business leaders, and civic groups to help them protect their natural resources, and to promote civic engagement in efforts to increase sustainable development.

Budget  $733,780.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Implementation of the Community Preservation Act in half of the communities in the Commonwealth, including five small cities.

Establishment within the state budget a “1% for Nature” benchmark.

Informed the public, especially policy decision makers and the media, about Mass Audubon’s climate change strategy and role.
Program Long-Term Success 

Having a measurable impact on the administration’s goals for conservation and stewardship, providing additional funding for land protection, and for the introduction of measures that will support affordable housing and smart growth while thoughtfully protecting open land.

Increased local capacity for actions to improve stormwater management, reduce flooding, adapt to climate change, and protect and restore greenways

Development of environmentally protective siting and operating standards for off-shore and land-based wind power for Massachusetts

Program Success Monitored By 

Mass Audubon follows Board approved master plans for education, land protection, science, advocacy, communications and other key organizational initiatives (drawn up following our 2015 strategic plan, each with specific tasks and timetables). Annually, detailed work plans for every division/department/region are compiled by staff, reviewed by senior management and presented to the Board for approval. The Board also reviews year-end reports based on these plans. We use a series of strategic metrics to measure our progress in achieving specific goals & to prioritize future activities.

Metrics

·         State funds committed by the Commonwealth to land protection

·         State funds  dedicated to stewardship and land management activities

          Successful passage of priority bills by the state legislature

·         # of acres of old growth forest and other ecologically sensitive forest in reserve status

·         # communities reached through our Shaping program

 
Examples of Program Success  What’s dark and green all over? It’s the city of Boston as many of the towers which define the skyline turn off their lights at night twice a year, during the spring and fall migratory bird seasons. Mass Audubon’s advocacy department coordinates this Lights Out program. The Hancock Tower, for example, starts dimming their architectural lights, and their interior lights above the 20th floor, from 11pm-5am. Now almost four dozen other Boston skyscrapers also participate. That’s good news for migratory birds as thousands die each year because they get distracted by the tall lit buildings in the Northeast and collide with them. Turning out the lights also makes good business sense for building owners as energy is the largest operating expense for commercial buildings. Reducing power use also helps reduce carbon emissions, resulting in cleaner air and direct health benefits. What’s good for birds is good for people too. 

Conservation

For more than 110 years, Mass Audubon has led efforts to preserve the Commonwealth’s critical habitats. Through our own conservation initiatives, and through our partnerships with others, we preserve our natural heritage for the benefit of all, and our work takes place in urban, suburban, and rural areas of the state. Our statewide land protection strategy is designed to identify the lands most important to preserving nature in a changing world and providing places for people to connect with the natural world. On our 35,000 acres of sanctuary land we protect 175 of Massachusetts' 430 endangered or threatened species and 20 of the approximately 30 regional and globally significant communities, and we also protect endangered coastal nesting birds and their habitats. Our scientists, with the help of thousands of trained citizen scientist volunteers, conduct scientific research to help to inform and guide conservation action throughout the state.  
Budget  $8,805,360.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
Population Served General/Unspecified General/Unspecified General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 


Protection of an additional 2,500 acres of Mass Audubon-owned priority lands, and open our 100th sanctuary to the public.

 Dissemination of a report on the “State of the Commonwealth’s Birds” and further identification and implementation of highest priority bird conservation actions.

Engaged 7,500+ volunteers in our research and monitoring projects on the restoration and management of salt marshes, grassland bird habitat, and coastal heathland communities; on controlling non-native invasive species; and on coastal waterbirds

Protection of approx. 150 coastal bird nest sites every field season

 
 
Program Long-Term Success 

Mobilized Mass Audubon’s science and land protection resources and, with our members and partners, worked to preserve the state’s diminishing natural heritage.
 
Strengthened land protection and stewardship strategies that safeguard the ecological resources of our sanctuaries
 
In collaboration with others, permanently protecting a diversity of habitats sufficient to sustain the ecological integrity of the Commonwealth in response to climate change and other ecosystem stresses.

Deepened our knowledge and understanding of the Commonwealth’s biological heritage as we determine the response of species to climate change and other stressors.

Understanding, evaluating, and protecting birds and their habitats through applied research and conservation programs and by engaging the public in bird conservation activities.

Program Success Monitored By 

Mass Audubon follows Board approved master plans for education, land protection, science, advocacy, communications and other key organizational initiatives (drawn up following our 2015 strategic plan, each with specific tasks and timetables). Annually, detailed work plans for every division/department/region are compiled by staff, reviewed by senior management and presented to the Board for approval. The Board also reviews year-end reports based on these plans. We use a series of strategic metrics to measure our progress in achieving specific goals & to prioritize future activities.

Conservation Metrics:

# Acres protected by Mass Audubon, including priority acres

# Conservation assists provided to other land trusts/communities

# Acres protected for conservation state-wide

# of acres of old growth forest and other ecologically sensitive forest in reserve status

 # Plovers, terns and other coastal nesting birds protected

# Sanctuary inventories completed on targeted species
 
 
Examples of Program Success  A Coastal Waterbird Volunteer’s story: I’d never even seen a piping plover, but after going out to the beach several times with an experienced monitor I watched “my” first pair nest. Then, after a storm took out the first nest, they nested again and successfully raised four chicks. I was totally awed by the dedication of the pair as they protected their young—little tiny fluff balls on toothpicks. After I understood the adversity these amazing birds face in nesting successfully, how could I not want to do whatever I could to help protect them? Every year it’s a new chance to educate people about the need to share their beaches with these spunky little birds so I can’t see how I’ll ever get tired of doing my little bit to help.

Education

Our public programs (a diverse spectrum that attracts the interest of adults and children of all ages) support our mission by connecting people to the natural world. Over 500,000 people visit our statewide sanctuary system annually to participate in a program, enjoy an event, or volunteer in a research project. Our programs are designed to inspire participants to want to learn more about nature and how they can protect it. Tailored to meet a range of abilities (from teaching toddlers about farm animals to college level programs on bird behavior), we offer a continuum of lifelong learning opportunities. We are also the state’s largest environmental education provider. Our school programs help over 225,000 children a year learn about nature. Our programs take exploration and discovery out of the classroom, translating academics into real world experiences. We also help educators teach natural history in their own schoolyards to support in-school learning.
Budget  $8,805,360.00
Category  Environment, General/Other
Population Served Families General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Further strengthened and focused sanctuaries and programs to better serve a broad range of constituents. Increased the number of programs for underserved populations in urban communities.

 Recruited Mass Audubon members from every city and town in the Commonwealth by expanding public visibility and building community.

Enhanced visitor services, improved accessibility for all, and strengthened informal visitor education initiatives.

Program Long-Term Success  Engaging and motivating people across all populations, locations, abilities, and interests to learn about, enjoy, and become inspired to act to protect the nature of Massachusetts. Nature—whether found in a city park or deep inside the forests of western Massachusetts or within an urban greenway or along the 1,500 miles of Massachusetts coastline—is valued as essential to quality of life People have learned to live with appreciation and respect for the complex ecological systems that sustain life on earth, and work together to ensure that they are protected.
Program Success Monitored By 

Mass Audubon follows Board approved master plans for education, land protection, science, advocacy, communications and other key organizational initiatives (drawn up following our 2015 strategic plan, each with specific tasks and timetables). Annually, detailed work plans for every division/department/region are compiled by staff, reviewed by senior management and presented to the Board for approval. The Board also reviews year-end reports based on these plans. We use a series of strategic metrics to measure our progress in achieving specific goals & to prioritize future activities.

Education Metrics:

  • # of education participants and programs
  • # of sanctuary visitors
  • # of web interactions and unique website visitor
  • #of new and rejoining members
  • # of program participants from underserved communities
  • # of fully accessible nature centers
 
Examples of Program Success  Getting high school students interested in anything outdoors in these times of computers and smartphones can be a challenge. Mass Audubon, however, is making inroads on connecting urban youth with the natural world around them - even in a city as densely developed as Lawrence where we are reaching teens by working in close collaboration with a local organization. Partnering with Groundwork Lawrence, we are working with a group of high school students who are learning about local environmental community initiatives. With the support of our scientists and educators, the teens learn about local flora and fauna, and then use their new knowledge to undertake Rapid Ecological Assessments of the parks along the Spicket River Greenway, documenting their ecological value. They also acquire valuable leadership skills in the process by making presentations on their findings to civic leaders and residents.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We view three environmental threats as most significant to our work: habitat loss, climate change, and loss of people’s connection to nature.

While Massachusetts has successfully preserved many important lands and habitats, we continue to lose unprotected open space at an alarming rate. In some ecologically significant parts of the state, the very last acre of natural land is threatened by development; in others key wildlife corridors and connections are being lost. We are looked to as a statewide leader in ecological management and land stewardship, we model and share best practices with private landowners and other conservation organizations, and we advocate for additional environmental protection initiatives at the local, state and federal levels.

The disruptive effect of rapid climate warming is a major threat to people and wildlife in the Commonwealth and on the planet. Current expectations for climate change create challenges for our economy, security, and health. Rapid increases in overall global temperatures will accelerate sea level rise and the alteration of habitats all over the world. We have the opportunity to motive 100,000 members to conserve energy as we “lead by example” in demonstrating renewable energy use at our Nature Centers statewide. We also use our 35,000 acres as a “living laboratory” for monitoring and adapting to the impacts of climate change. 

Finally, one of the major trends of the 21st century is the erosion of the bond between people and nature, especially children. We must heal this breach, not only because nature enriches our lives but because a healthy vibrant environment is needed for our emotional and physical well-being. Mass Audubon sanctuaries offer outdoor respite for all, and we are committed to creating a more welcoming environment that is relevant, inclusive and accessible to all. 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Gary Clayton
CEO Term Start Oct 2015
CEO Email gclayton@massaudubon.org
CEO Experience

The Mass Audubon Board of Directors appointed Gary Clayton as President of Mass Audubon in October 2015. Previously, Gary served as Vice President of Conservation Programs since 1989.

Gary Clayton has overall management responsibility for Mass Audubon’s Advocacy, Education and Diversity, Ecological Management, and Land Protection and Stewardship Departments as well as our statewide 36,500-acre system of nature reserves. He directs a multidisciplinary staff located at headquarters and field offices throughout the state; and develops and administers an approximately $23 million dollar annual operating budget. As a volunteer community leader, he has, or presently serves, as chairperson of his town’s Board of Selectmen, Planning Board, Natural Resources Commission, and Community Preservation Committee. Prior to joining Mass Audubon, Gary was employed for twelve years with the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, including four years as a senior environmental executive with the Department of Environmental Protection.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Laura A. Johnson JD Jan 1999 Dec 2012
Henry Tepper -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Nora Ann Frank VP of Philanthropy

Nora Frank joined Mass Audubon in 1998 as the Manager of Major Gifts. She has held a variety of roles then and currently serves as the Vice President for Philanthropy, overseeing fundraising and membership functions.  Prior to Mass Audubon she was the Director of Marketing and Development at Germaine Lawrence Inc. an Arlington based human service organization providing residential treatment for emotionally and behaviorally challenged adolescent girls. Nora received a BA from Cornell University and an MBA from the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Bancroft Poor VP Operations

Bancroft Poor serves as Vice President for Operations and Chief Financial Officer for Massachusetts Audubon Society.   He is also one of three Assistant Treasurers, elected as an officer by the Board of Directors. He has served Mass Audubon in these capacities since 1994 and has been an employee of Mass Audubon since 1984.   He is a graduate of Harvard College and has a Master’s degree in Public and Private Management from the Yale School of Management.   In addition to his roles at Mass Audubon, he serves as a Director and as the Treasurer for both the Quebec Labrador Foundation and the US Offshore Wind Collaborative.

In his role as Vice President for Operations and Chief Financial Officer at Mass Audubon, Bancroft Poor is in charge of all administrative, information technology, human resources, capital assets and planning, and financial functions, including budget preparation and monitoring, annual audit and tax preparation, operations at the Audubon Shop, insurance, contracting, investment liaison and banking.  He is a member of the senior management team and one of the primary staff contacts with the Board of Directors, serving as staff liaison to the Board Administration/Finance, Auditing, and Investment Committees.  He supervises a staff of nineteen and reports to the President.  In addition, he manages Mass Audubon’s Belize program and works extensively on Mass Audubon’s climate change initiative.

Ms. Leti Taft-Pearman Vice President for Marketing and Commnunications --
Gail Yeo Vice President of Conservation Programs --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Environmental Merit Award EPA - Region 1 2016
Secretary’s Award for Excellence in Energy and Environmental Education Massachusetts Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs 2016
Environmental Merit Award EPA Region One 2013
Best of the Vineyard/Best Camp Martha’s Vineyard Magazine 2011
Educator of the Year Massachusetts Marine Educators 2011
Non-Formal Educator of the Year Award New England Environmental Education Alliance 2011
Paul Winske Access Award Stavros Center for Independent Living 2011
River Stewardship Award SuAsCo River Stewardship Council 2011
Community Access Award Bay State Council of the Blind 2010
Congressional Citation Congress of the United States 2010
Peg Howard Barrier Free Environment Award United Cerebral Palsy Association of Berkshire County 2009
Secretary’s Award for Excellence in Energy and Environmental Education Commonwealth of Massachusetts 2009
Visionary Award Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment 2009
Environmental Service Award Mass. Association of Conservation Commissions 2007
Energy Trendsetter Award Regional Environmental Council 2006

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
National Land Trust Alliance 2004
AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) 1999
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
American Camping Association (ACA) - Accreditation 2011
Charity Navigator 2011
Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2010

Collaborations

We collaborate with hundreds of other entities that reflect the broad range and diversity of our activities. They include, but are not limited to, federal and state agencies, municipalities, numerous other local, regional and statewide conservation/land protection organizations and coalitions, civic groups, and educational institutions.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Mass Audubon key administrative personnel include Gary Clayton, President since 2015 (formerly VP of Conservation Programs since 1989); Gail Yeo, VP of Programs since 2016 (formerly Regional Director since 2004); Nora Frank, Vice President of Philanthropy since 2011 (formerly in  several different roles going back to 1998); Bancroft Poor, VP of Operations since 1984; Leti Taft-Pearman, VP of Marketing and Communications since 2015. Sanctuary Directors report to their respective Regional Directors (there are three regions: Central & Western Massachusetts, No. Shore/Greater Boston, and Southeast and Islands) who, in turn, report to the Vice President of Programs. Other key senior staff include our Chief Scientist, and the Directors of Marketing and Communications, Land Protection, Public Policy and Government Relations, Information Technology, Ecological Management, Capital Assets and Planning, Education and Diversity, and Membership. All of the Society’s personnel and financial operations are managed from headquarters in Lincoln.
 
Our fiscal year runs from July 1 to June 30, with our budget development beginning in January—when each sanctuary and department evaluates and presents its financial requirements. These are reviewed and modified by senior management based on program priorities, funding opportunities, and expense projections. Final budget projections are then presented to the Board for review and approval. The President, VP of Operations, and individual program/department directors monitor the operating budget on a monthly basis. Three Board committees: Audit, Administration/Finance, and Investment also oversee the financial operations, and independent financial consultants provide the Investment committee with advice on the management of Mass Audubon’s endowment. We typically end the fiscal year with a slight surplus (because of unbudgeted bequests), which is, per Board policy, transferred to a Board reserve fund that is managed in conjunction with the endowment. The reserve fund is often used to fund projects that are unlikely to attract donor support. Despite the recent economic downturn, there have been no significant budgetary issues.

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 225
Number of Part Time Staff 800
Number of Volunteers 12,300
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 85%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 221
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 151
Male: 74
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Blanket Personal Property
Boiler and Machinery
Builders Risk
Commercial General Insurance
Commercial General Liability
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Computer Equipment and Software
Crime Coverage
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
Employee Benefits Liability
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
Fiduciary Liability
Fine Arts and Collectibles
Flood
General Property Coverage
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
Life Insurance
Liquor Liability
Medical Health Insurance
Property in Transit and Off Premises
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Water Craft and Aircraft
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Extra Expense Insurance

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Jared Chase
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Board Chair Term Nov 2012 - Nov 2017
Board Co-Chair Ms. Beth Kressley Goldstein
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Retired Marketing
Board Co-Chair Term Nov 2008 - Nov 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Robert Ball Wellington Management Company Voting
Catherine Campbell Feinberg, Campbell and Zack Voting
Jared Chase Retired Voting
Richard Chute No Affiliation Voting
Donald Cooper Nixon Peabody Voting
Ms. Paula Cortes Cortes Associates Voting
Nicholas d'Arbeloff New England Energy Innovation Voting
Thomas DeMarco, III Fiduciary Trust Company Voting
Birgitta Dickerson Boston Consulting Group Voting
Nina Doggett No Affiliation Voting
Kathleen Emrich Retired --
Christopher Klem Ropes and Gray Voting
Erik Knutzen No Affiliation Voting
Beth Kressley Goldstein No Affiliation Voting
Virginia Lawrence No Affiliation Voting
William Madar No Affiliation Voting
Kevin McLellan McKinsey & Co. Voting
Deborah Miller No Affiliation Voting
Michael Pappone Goodwin Procter Voting
Helen Pounds No Affiliation Voting
James Saalfield Still River Fund Voting
Anne Snyder No Affiliation Voting
James Sperling Rubin and Rudman Voting
David Straus No Affiliation Voting
Ms Rosamond Vaule Writer Voting
Henry Woolsey Conservation Biologist Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 26
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 13
Male: 13
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • --
  • Administration
  • Audit
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Investment
  • Marketing
  • Membership
  • Nominating
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Project Oversight
  • Scientific Advisory

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

When we reflect on our achievements and consider our work across the state, especially in the context of daunting challenges here and elsewhere, we find our values to be a source of strength and resolve for the organization. We are proud to carry out our work in  with the same passion and commitment shown by our founders Harriet Hemenway and Minna Hall more than 100 years ago. Their love of nature—like ours today—continues inspiring action. Our credibility and teamwork are the foundation of our organization, as we aspire to have our work support people and community for many years to come.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $23,839,594.00
Projected Expense $23,839,594.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

2008 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $23,401,515 $44,899,642 $32,696,130
Total Expenses $26,768,237 $25,097,119 $24,427,580

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $1,209,894 $1,507,795 $763,635
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $1,209,894 $1,507,795 $763,635
Individual Contributions $10,793,609 $13,012,232 $9,444,366
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $9,059,701 $8,520,987 $8,118,137
Investment Income, Net of Losses $-1,399,439 $18,126,055 $10,702,603
Membership Dues $3,438,887 $3,396,060 $3,362,275
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $262,824 $336,494 $252,714
Other $36,039 $19 $52,400

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $22,098,882 $20,633,396 $20,414,180
Administration Expense $2,938,470 $2,856,340 $2,578,855
Fundraising Expense $1,730,885 $1,607,383 $1,434,545
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.87 1.79 1.34
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 82% 84%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 14% 11% 14%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $242,474,582 $243,744,134 $224,348,325
Current Assets $11,666,266 $9,025,473 $6,883,508
Long-Term Liabilities $4,583,150 $4,046,220 $4,912,986
Current Liabilities $6,607,378 $5,047,138 $4,587,086
Total Net Assets $231,284,054 $234,650,776 $214,848,253

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
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3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value $114,903,253.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 4.6%
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose Mass Audubon, as an organization, is not currently involved in a capital campaign. However, we frequently undertake targeted capital campaigns for the acquisition of land or renovations to our Nature Centers.
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.77 1.79 1.50

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 2% 2% 2%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Mass Audubon has continued to have strong operating budget performance in the past few years. While endowment income in the annual budget has remained relatively flat in the in recent years as we slowly lower our endowment spending rate, program or earned income (generated primarily by our sanctuary system), gift/grants/government contracts, and membership dues achieved all-time records and exceeded their budget targets in FY 2014 (July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2014), our most recent fiscal year. We project that program revenues and membership dues will exceed these FY 2014 amounts and again reach all-time records in FY 2015. Mass Audubon’s FY 2015 operating budget is $22.5 million.

One of Mass Audubon's financial strengths comes from having four separate, strong revenue streams to support its operations: program/earned revenue (37%), endowment income (24%), gifts/grants/government contracts (20%), and dues income (16%). In many instances, when one of these sources of income is not performing up to expectations, another revenue source will compensate for the shortfall. Program or fee-for-service income has become the single largest source of operating revenue in recent years and has grown rapidly. More than 40% of this program revenue is generated by Mass Audubon’s summer day and residential camp programs.

The Board of Directors works very closely with staff to develop annual operating budgets and to provide financial oversight through three Board committees: Audit, Investment, and Administration/Finance. Mass Audubon's staff and Board have worked closely together over the past few years to align strategic and annual plan aspirations with financial planning and to adjust to changing economic conditions. The Board and its committees also provide close oversight on capital spending which, depending on projects underway, can range in any given fiscal year from $1 million in land acquisition and new construction/renovation projects to several million dollars. Although the Board maintains a healthy reserve fund to tap in the event of a financial crisis, the Board hopes not to need to use this funding and did not dip into this reserve in any significant way during the recent recession.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. Please note, the total revenue amounts listed, for all three years above, include non-operating revenues, such as capital grants.
 
For the FY 2008, FY 2009, FY 2010, FY 2011, and FY 2012 audits, the independent auditors issued a qualification to their opinion regarding the recording of donated land at nominal amount.  Please review the auditors opinion for further information.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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