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Organization DBA Goodwill
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries’ mission is to help individuals with barriers to self-sufficiency to achieve independence and dignity through work. Not charity, but a chance.
 
Goodwill’s vision is to be recognized throughout eastern and central Massachusetts as a leader in helping individuals with barriers to self-sufficiency to enter and succeed in the workplace. Goodwill empowers people to build on their strengths to transform their lives through work. It actively engages businesses in all aspects of its endeavors and presents employers with qualified and committed workers. Its social enterprises offer training and work experience for individuals and economic vitality for communities. 

Mission Statement

Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries’ mission is to help individuals with barriers to self-sufficiency to achieve independence and dignity through work. Not charity, but a chance.
 
Goodwill’s vision is to be recognized throughout eastern and central Massachusetts as a leader in helping individuals with barriers to self-sufficiency to enter and succeed in the workplace. Goodwill empowers people to build on their strengths to transform their lives through work. It actively engages businesses in all aspects of its endeavors and presents employers with qualified and committed workers. Its social enterprises offer training and work experience for individuals and economic vitality for communities. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $35,141,000.00
Projected Expense $35,141,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Workforce Development: Career Services
  • Workforce Development: Job Training
  • Youth Initiative

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries’ mission is to help individuals with barriers to self-sufficiency to achieve independence and dignity through work. Not charity, but a chance.
 
Goodwill’s vision is to be recognized throughout eastern and central Massachusetts as a leader in helping individuals with barriers to self-sufficiency to enter and succeed in the workplace. Goodwill empowers people to build on their strengths to transform their lives through work. It actively engages businesses in all aspects of its endeavors and presents employers with qualified and committed workers. Its social enterprises offer training and work experience for individuals and economic vitality for communities. 

Background Statement

Goodwill's job training programs and career services will help over 8,000 unemployed individuals get on the path to a job, and a life of self-sufficiency; Goodwill’s youth programs will help young people achieve in school, develop as leaders, explore college and career options, and transition successfully from high school to higher education or the workplace.
 
Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries (Goodwill) was founded in Boston's South End in 1895. Reverend Edgar J. Helms was concerned about the many impoverished immigrants who were living in the area and conceived the idea of training and employing them to collect unwanted household items for resale. The work provided the local residents with needed job skills and a paycheck, while the sale of the goods provided low-cost items for the community and paid the workers' wages. The system proved a success, and Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries became the first in what is now a worldwide network of 179 independent affiliates that have helped millions of people facing barriers to employment to enter the workforce and help young people transition successfully to adulthood.
 
Goodwill is operating under a five-year strategic plan adopted by the Board of Directors in 2013 that outlines the following steps necessary to achieve its vision:
  • Add services that improve job placement and retention outcomes.
  • Launch the reconfigured Youth Initiative.
  • Extend services to at least three additional low-income communities in Massachusetts.
  • Launch a computer recycling social enterprise.
  • Open new stores serving additional low-income communities.
  • Ensure that there is a strong leadership team with a clear continuity plan.
  • Develop and implement a comprehensive marketing and resource development plan.
  • Upgrade technology. Each year, the organization develops an annual plan with specific objectives designed to continue to implement the strategic plan and build on the progress that has been achieved to date.
 
 

Impact Statement

In order to advance the strategic plan and operate the organization effectively, Goodwill develops an organization-wide annual plan with specific, measurable objectives. The Board of Directors reviews the annual plan and budget in advance of the start of the year and monitors performance quarterly during the year.
 
During the fiscal year ending June 30, 2016, Goodwill achieved the following five key objectives:
 
1.  Continued to help individuals obtain and retain jobs.
  • Served 6,964 and place 1,038 at Boston Career Link.
  • Served 612 in job training programs and place 210.
  • Actively engaged 156 employers with 10 mass hiring and 219 on sites.
  • Continued innovative programs for individuals with developmental disabilities including operating Project SEARCH at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital.
  • Redefined the Youth Initiative to reflect the requirements of the U.S. Department of Justice GoodGuides Grant.
2.Grew the retail and the computer recycling enterprises.
  • Grew donations by 24% and developed processes to manage the volume.
  • Built a pipeline of new store sites.
  • Developed a model for job resource centers in Goodwill Stores.
  • Took the computer recycling social enterprise to the next level by reconfiguring and selling laptops at affordable prices in The Goodwill Stores.
3. Raised the profile of Goodwill by effectively leveraging the Ad Council's pro-bono; Donate Stuff. Create Jobs" Campaign.
 
4. Assured that Goodwill has the leadership and talent to implement the strategic plan by strengthening the recruiting and onboarding processes; assessed the skills of the leadership team and formulated development plans; and continued to follow the succession planning program.
 
5. Addressed the infrastructure needs of the organization including: assessment and selection of a point of sale system for the retail enterprise and completion of a site assessment of the headquarters and developed an investment plan.
 

Needs Statement

Goodwill is able to provide exemplary job training, career services and youth development programming thanks to community support from individuals, businesses, and foundations.
 
Goodwill seeks the following to continue opening doorways of opportunity for those who seek greater independence and the chance to achieve economic self-sufficiency:
  • Financial support for Goodwill's Workforce Development: Career Services.
  • Financial support for Goodwill's Workforce Development:  Job Training Programs.
  • Financial support for Goodwill’s Youth Initiative.
  • Financial support for investment in technology – both hardware and software – to assure that the organization offers state-of-the-art services and operates in accordance with best practices.
  • Financial support for Goodwill’s strategic plan to expand its services within its service territory.
  • Business partners to support Goodwill’s employment and career service programs by participating in training, offering industry briefings and hiring participants.
  • Corporate volunteers to help with Goodwill’s mission services.
 

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Central Massachusetts Region
Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
Metrowest Region
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
Goodwill serves 265 communities in eastern and central Massachusetts through its employment training programs, career services, and broad based programs for youth. The majority of program participants come from disadvantaged communities especially those neighboring Goodwill’s  headquarters, including Dorchester, Mattapan, Roxbury and the South End.

Organization Categories

  1. Employment - Goodwill Industries
  2. Employment - Job Training
  3. Youth Development - Youth Development-Business

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Workforce Development: Career Services

Goodwill’s Career Services through Boston Career Link, the one-stop career center Goodwill operates, include career counseling, interview skills, resume-building, workshops, job postings, on-line job search, computer match and more. The preponderance of individuals enrolled are from economically distressed neighborhoods, have low educational attainment, and are out of work. Goodwill also engages employers to provide opportunities for individuals through active on-site recruitment.

Budget  $1,235,947.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Search & Placement
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  Serve 7,500 individuals; obtain training vouchers for 85 individuals; place 1,000 individuals in jobs.
Program Long-Term Success  Enhance individual self-sufficiency and improve economic vitality for economically distressed neighborhoods in Boston.
Program Success Monitored By  Goodwill establishes annual goals and objectives at the beginning of the fiscal year including new initiatives and quantitative and qualitative measures. Performance is reviewed regularly to determine progress toward achieving success; departments review data on a monthly basis and quarterly reports are provided to the Board of Directors and all staff.
Examples of Program Success 

Last fiscal year, Career Services served 7,708 individuals through Boston Career Link, placing 1,025 into jobs. Goodwill also engaged 156 employers on-site, participating in 10 mass hiring events and 219 other on-site recruitment events.


Workforce Development: Job Training

Goodwill's Job Training Programs provide a comprehensive array of case management, job skills and work readiness training, internships, job placement, and post-placement supports to help individuals from underserved communities to get on a path to a job and self-sufficiency. The majority of the individuals enrolled are low- and very-low income women, typically mothers raising children on their own, facing barriers ranging from domestic violence to welfare dependency to limited work-histories. Goodwill also engages employers in Job Training to provide opportunities for individuals through a variety of methods. Some businesses participate in the development of training curricula, present in classes, and offer mock-interview opportunities, and hire graduates.

Budget  $743,153.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served At-Risk Populations Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  Enroll 200 individuals in Job Training programs; place 160 in competitive employment; support individuals to persist in their jobs and attain retention benchmarks.
Program Long-Term Success  Enhance individual self-sufficiency and improve economic vitality for economically distressed neighborhoods in Boston by training individuals to enter the workforce and build a career.
Program Success Monitored By  Participant information is tracked using a web-based database called Efforts to Outcomes (ETO). Goodwill staff records activity information such as enrollment, class participation and completion; and internships and outcomes including placement, wage and benefit data and retention at 30 and 90 days.
Examples of Program Success  Last fiscal year, Job Training programs enrolled 323 individuals and placed 146 in competitive employment.

Youth Initiative

Goodwill has a long tradition of working with Boston, Massachusetts-area youth, offering a number of academic, recreational and career-oriented programs and activities throughout the year for local young people with great potential, but limited opportunities. Goodwill's Youth Initiative includes the Youth Mentoring Program, the After-School Academy for Boys and Girls, and opportunities for summer camp and jobs.

Budget  $317,250.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Families
Program Short-Term Success  Enroll 120 youth ages 12 to 18.
Program Long-Term Success  Assist youth in traditionally underserved neighborhoods in Boston to bridge to adulthood through academic support, mentorship, and career and college exploration.
Program Success Monitored By  Participant information is tracked using a web-based database called Efforts to Outcomes (ETO). Program staff track participant attendance, participation in career and college exploration activities, and mentorship information.
Examples of Program Success  Last fiscal year, the Youth Initiative provided mentoring or academic support to 135 individuals and placed 13 into summer employment.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Joanne K. Hilferty
CEO Term Start Aug 1995
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Joanne Hilferty has served as President of Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries (Goodwill) since 1995. In concert with the Board of Directors, she provides strategic leadership and direction to assure the organization fulfills its mission which is to help individuals with barriers to self-sufficiency to achieve independence and dignity through work.

For almost 10 years prior to her appointment at Goodwill, Hilferty was an executive in health care information businesses in the Boston area and in Southern California. She also worked at senior levels in New York State government, ending her tenure as deputy commissioner for the Office of Mental Health.

Hilferty currently serves as Treasurer of the board of Associated Industries of Massachusetts, as well as a member of the boards of Goodwill Industries International, and the Massachusetts Council of Human Service Providers, Inc. She has been appointed to numerous Boston economic development advisory groups.

Goodwill has been named a Top 100 Women-Led Businesses in Massachusetts by the Boston Globe Magazine and the Commonwealth Institute. Hilferty has been awarded the Brava Smart CEO award, the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce Pinnacle Award for not-for-profit management, the Women’s Business Hall of Fame Award and the Providers’ Council Executive Director of the Year Award.

She is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Brown University and has a master’s degree in public affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Joy Burghardt Vice President, Programs and Services --
Heather Kenney Vice President, Human Resources --
Paul MacNeil Vice President, Operations --
Jason Marshall Vice President, Retail --
John Ricketts Vice President, Finance & CFO --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
John Gould Award for Education and Workforce Development Associated Industries of Massachusetts 2016
Top 100 Women-Led Businesses in Massachusetts The Boston Globe Magazine and The Commonwealth Institute 2016
Top 100 Women-Led Businesses in Massachusetts The Boston Globe Magazine and The Commonwealth Institute 2015
Top 100 Women-Led Businesses in Massachusetts The Boston Globe Magazine and The Commonwealth Institute 2014

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Massachusetts Council of Human Service Providers --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Employment and Community Services - 3 Year Accreditation 2014
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 545
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 480
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 191
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 31
Caucasian: 206
Hispanic/Latino: 116
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Not Specified
Gender Female: 285
Male: 259
Not Specified 1

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Robert P. Gittens Esq.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Cambridge Family and Children's Services
Board Chair Term Jan 2016 - Jan 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Paul Andrew Harvard University Voting
Nancy L. Aubrey CPA RSM US LLP Voting
Kevin T. Bottomley People's United Bank Voting
Julie Celano Consultant Voting
Karen Coppola The TJX Companies, Inc. Voting
John Doucette People’s United Bank Voting
Jane C. Edmonds J.D. Babson College Voting
Joanne K. Hilferty Morgan Memorial Goodwill Industries Voting
E.J. Landry Deloitte & Touche LLP Voting
Stephanie Lovell Esq. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Voting
Sally Mason Boemer Massachusetts General Hospital Voting
Mary L. Reed Tartt's Day Care Centers, Inc. Voting
Kevin Reynolds The Waldwin Group Voting
Linda E. Thompson New England Baptist Hospital Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 10
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Compensation
  • Executive
  • Investment
  • Nominating

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $35,141,000.00
Projected Expense $35,141,000.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audited Financials

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $33,160,563 $33,546,329 $34,019,195
Total Expenses $33,715,409 $32,418,992 $31,546,760

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$4,847,956 $4,583,612 $4,641,405
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,641,623 $1,891,802 $1,660,338
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $19,570,853 $19,148,063 $18,800,701
Investment Income, Net of Losses $96,192 $1,250,991 $2,504,823
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $6,989,360 $6,586,126 $6,302,250
Other $14,579 $85,735 $109,678

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $29,441,162 $28,515,286 $27,295,961
Administration Expense $3,083,515 $2,851,606 $2,709,550
Fundraising Expense $1,190,732 $1,052,100 $1,541,249
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.98 1.03 1.08
Program Expense/Total Expenses 87% 88% 87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 18% 16% 24%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $40,038,988 $39,875,636 $38,350,672
Current Assets $6,517,962 $5,391,929 $4,049,916
Long-Term Liabilities $13,974,401 $14,060,817 $14,020,219
Current Liabilities $3,067,486 $2,262,872 $1,905,842
Total Net Assets $22,997,101 $23,551,947 $22,424,611

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $14,770,125.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.12 2.38 2.13

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 35% 35% 37%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

In the current fiscal year ending June 30, 2017, the annual plan aims to achieve the following five key objectives:
 
1.  Assure the delivery of effective programs and services and expand to meet evolving needs. 
  • Serve 7,500 (including 1,000 who are 24 and under) and place 1,000 at Boston Career Link, and secure the charter through the competitive bid process. 
  • Serve 570 and place 195 in job training programs. 
  • Actively engage 130 employers with 6 mass hiring and 200 on-site recruitment events. 
  • Launch the reconfigured Youth Initiative youth development program leveraging internal resources and serve 120. 
  • Expand services for young people with developmental disabilities to additional sites. 
  • Operate workforce development classroom programs in another community. 
2. Grow the retail and other social enterprises.
  • Have at least two new stores open or underway and two in the active pipeline. 
  • Renovate the Somerville store in the first quarter. 
  • Open and successfully operate an online bookstore. 
  • Expand the computer recycling social enterprise to include an active training program. 
3. Raise the profile of Goodwill and generate philanthropic support.
 
4. Assure that Goodwill has the leadership and talent to implement the strategic plan.
 
5.Address the infrastructure needs of the organization including IT and Facilities.  
 
 
 

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?



3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?



5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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