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Boston Arts Academy Foundation Inc

 174 Ipswich Street
 Boston, MA 02215
[P] (617) 2336672
[F] (617) 6358854
www.bostonartsacademy.org
dhealey@bostonartsacademy.org
Duncan Remage-Healey
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INCORPORATED: 1999
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3454898

LAST UPDATED: 03/01/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The Boston Arts Academy Foundation (BAAF) was established to raise essential funds for Boston Arts Academy, our city’s only public high school for the arts. BAAF raises 35% of the school’s budget from private sources to pay for the arts teachers, programming, and student wellness initiatives not covered by the school district. Without such support, our city’s young people, living in one of the cultural capitals of the world, would not be able to attend a public arts high school.

Boston Arts Academy (BAA) provides Boston's low-income students with access to an arts and academic education not otherwise available to them. BAA prepares a diverse community of aspiring artist-scholars to be successful in their college or professional careers and to be engaged members of a democratic society. Students of all levels of academic ability attend BAA through our academic-blind admissions process. An average of 94% of BAA graduates are accepted to college - most the first in their families to do so.

Mission Statement

The Boston Arts Academy Foundation (BAAF) was established to raise essential funds for Boston Arts Academy, our city’s only public high school for the arts. BAAF raises 35% of the school’s budget from private sources to pay for the arts teachers, programming, and student wellness initiatives not covered by the school district. Without such support, our city’s young people, living in one of the cultural capitals of the world, would not be able to attend a public arts high school.

Boston Arts Academy (BAA) provides Boston's low-income students with access to an arts and academic education not otherwise available to them. BAA prepares a diverse community of aspiring artist-scholars to be successful in their college or professional careers and to be engaged members of a democratic society. Students of all levels of academic ability attend BAA through our academic-blind admissions process. An average of 94% of BAA graduates are accepted to college - most the first in their families to do so.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $2,676,982.00
Projected Expense $2,676,982.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • College Preparatory Academic Curriculum
  • Literacy Development Initiative
  • Student Health and Wellness
  • The Center for Arts in Education
  • Visual and Performing Arts Education

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Boston Arts Academy Foundation (BAAF) was established to raise essential funds for Boston Arts Academy, our city’s only public high school for the arts. BAAF raises 35% of the school’s budget from private sources to pay for the arts teachers, programming, and student wellness initiatives not covered by the school district. Without such support, our city’s young people, living in one of the cultural capitals of the world, would not be able to attend a public arts high school.

Boston Arts Academy (BAA) provides Boston's low-income students with access to an arts and academic education not otherwise available to them. BAA prepares a diverse community of aspiring artist-scholars to be successful in their college or professional careers and to be engaged members of a democratic society. Students of all levels of academic ability attend BAA through our academic-blind admissions process. An average of 94% of BAA graduates are accepted to college - most the first in their families to do so.


Background Statement

Boston Arts Academy (BAA) was founded in 1998 based on the conviction that academics and the arts are equally important to students’ development and level of achievement. As the city’s first and only public high school for the visual and performing arts, BAA provides Boston’s low-income students with access to a quality arts and academic education not otherwise available to them. Boston Arts Academy prepares a diverse community of aspiring artist-scholars to be successful in their college or professional careers by providing a full arts and college-preparatory education. Every year, over 700 students from every Boston neighborhood audition to fill only 120 spots at BAA. Our academic-blind admissions process ensures that students of all levels of academic ability have the opportunity to pursue their passion for the arts. As proof of the efficacy of the BAA model, an average of 94% of BAA graduates are accepted to college -- most being the first in their families to reach this milestone.

Boston Arts Academy serves a diverse student body, with 71% of our 440 students coming from low-income households. 43% of students are Hispanic, 38% are African American, 14% are white, 3% are Asian, and 2% are mixed race. Students come from 15 different Boston neighborhoods, with the greatest concentration (44%) living in the challenging inner-city neighborhoods of Dorchester, Roxbury, and Mattapan. 40% of students enter high school reading below grade level, 32% speak English as a second language, and 18% have documented learning disabilities.

A number of our young artists – like many creative people – have a heightened sensitivity to the world. Through their study of the arts and BAA’s health and wellness programs, students become grounded, gain greater self-esteem, and build strong connections to school, family, and friends.

BAA is charged with serving as a beacon for artistic and academic innovation. BAA’s Center for Arts in Education fulfills this charge by sharing the practices that make Boston Arts Academy a proven leader in urban and arts education with local, national, and international learning communities. The Center’s innovative programs and initiatives collectively increase access to arts-based education for students in the Boston Public Schools, provide high-quality arts-based professional development for educators, and share effective arts-based curricula models developed by BAA.


Impact Statement

Accomplishments:

  • Boston Arts Academy received a 2015 STEAM Award from the President’s Council on the Arts and Humanities, Americans for the Arts, and the Ovation Foundation; the 2012-13 Outstanding Arts School Award from the Arts Schools Network; Color Magazine’s 2012 Leadership Organization Award; and the 2010 National School of Distinction in Arts Education Award by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
  • The BAA Foundation (BAAF) attracted the attention of internationally acclaimed pianist Lang Lang, with whom we are collaborating to provide piano instruction to students at the Orchard Gardens K-8 school.
  • BAAF raised funds to open a STEAM Lab at Boston Arts Academy in the fall of 2014. The Lab, which is the first of its kind in an urban public arts high school, integrates the arts into the study of science, technology, engineering, and math. This unique classroom is outfitted with technological tools that allow students to use the arts in devising novel solutions to problems, products, and ideas.

Goals:

  1. Work closely with BAA Headmaster to obtain Chapter 74 certification for the school’s Visual Design and Communications program, establishing BAA as Boston’s newest career and technical education high school.
  2. Obtain the resources needed to address the school’s high psychiatric hospitalization rate. Improve early identification of high-risk students and strengthen BAA’s prevention services.
  1. Provide resources to address the literacy needs of 40% of BAA students who enter high school reading below grade level, including the school’s growing number of English Language Learners.
4. Work closely with the Headmaster and Board of Trustees to obtain permanent facilities for BAA that alleviate classroom overcrowding, eliminate environmental deficiencies, are equipped with modern technology, and provide space for art instruction, practice, exhibition and performance that are comparable to public art high schools in other major cities with similar educational programs.

Needs Statement

Funding: Until the public and city government recognize and value public arts education, Boston Arts Academy’s existence is dependent on private funds. BAAF raises 35% of the school’s operating funds each year from private sources in order to maintain a full complement of teaching positions and mental health support services for our at-risk student population.

Mental Health: BAA has one of the highest student hospitalization rates in the District. Due to limited resources, staff time is spent mainly on crisis intervention rather than on prevention

Academic challenges: 40% of BAA freshmen read below the 9th grade level. Many have documented learning disabilities or speak English as a second language.

Artistic challenges: BAA has proven that the arts are highly effective in reaching low-income, urban students. Yet the lack of arts education opportunities in many elementary and middle schools means that most BAA students have limited prior training in the arts.

Facility: BAA has outgrown its shared building at 174 Ipswich Street. Fenway High School will relocate in 2015, freeing up 30,000 square feet of space for BAA. We look forward to working with the City and the school district on a renovation of our aging building so that it can fully support BAA’s arts and academic curriculum.


 


CEO Statement

Boston Arts Academy (BAA) is our city’s only public high school for the visual and performing arts serving 440 students. Founded in 1998 on the theory that academics and the arts are equally important to student development and achievement, BAA has emerged as an award-winning school with over 94% of graduates accepted to college – most the first in their families to do so.

Over 700 students apply each year for just 125 openings. This is one measure of the hope and hunger of so many urban youth who want to access arts classes and training that are otherwise unavailable to them. Sadly though, the arts are often the first to suffer budget cuts and elimination. The Boston Arts Academy Foundation (the Foundation) raises private donations to pay for the arts teachers, arts programming, and wellness services not covered by district allocations. Without these contributions our young people, living in the one of the cultural capitals of the world, would have no Boston Arts Academy.

The Foundation also helps the school to meet the second half of its mission - to serve as a "beacon of artistic and educational innovation." In 2005 the Foundation obtained Gates Foundation funding to launch the Center for Arts in Education at Boston Arts Academy (the Center). Over the past ten years, the Center has trained hundreds of educators and administrators from around the world in the school's best practices.

In close collaboration with the Foundation, the Center has also developed programs that benefit other public schools in the City of Boston including Alumni Creative Corps (BAA alums teaching arts to elementary school children) and Lang Lang's Key's of Inspiration at BAA, classical piano instruction for low-income youth funded by the world-renowned pianist of the same name. Boston Arts Academy is particularly proud to have been chosen by Lang Lang to pilot this ambitious program.

In addition to its efforts to keep the Arts in Boston Arts Academy, the Foundation raises funds to meet the mental health needs of 440 BAA students, 45% of whom regularly require clinician services and counseling. What previous studies have identified as artistic personalities having a heightened sensitivity to their world seems to be the case at Boston Arts Academy. With the level of intervention services on the rise, the Foundation is committed to raising the funds necessary to help BAA's over-stretched Health and Wellness Team implement an effective prevention model of service delivery.


Board Chair Statement

I have the distinct honor of serving as Chair of the Boston Arts Academy Board of Trustees. Our outstanding faculty and staff are committed to providing each student with the best possible arts and academic education. Their dedication to their students inspires me and my fellow Trustees to do all that we can to expand access to arts education, giving our city’s young people the opportunity to succeed as artist-scholar-citizens. One of the school’s most important strengths is the passion that BAA students bring to both their studies and their art. Equally important is the ability of our staff and Board to listen thoughtfully, debate each hurdle, and come up with workable solutions. Now in BAA’s 16th year, we have demonstrated that teaching through the arts helps students embark on, and remain on, a path to success in life. As a Board, we believe that our students’ creativity, fostered at BAA, uniquely positions them to respond to many of the unknown challenges of the 21st century.

The Board of Trustees sets the overall mission, philosophy, and policies of the school; provides fiduciary oversight; and supports the fundraising activities of the BAA Foundation. The Board is comprised of representatives of ProArts Consortium institutions, BAA faculty members, parents, one student, and community members with an impressive range of professional expertise. Board meetings are open to the community, with students participating at nearly every meeting. The Governing Council is a smaller working group of the Board of Trustees, serving as the Executive Council. In addition to the Board, Boston Arts Academy benefits from the volunteer support of the Family Council and the Council of Advocates. The Family Council provides strong support and advocacy for the school on a number of important issues, such as improving the school’s lunch offerings, student safety, MCAS/alternative assessments, undocumented students’ rights, and school facilities. Established in 2008, the Council of Advocates is a diverse group of community, educational and business leaders whose common goal is to support the mission and advance the success of the school. Members of the Council of Advocates act as well-informed ambassadors for the school, advocating for BAA in the broader community, contributing to its financial strength and providing ongoing advice to the school leadership, Trustees, and the BAA community. All of our volunteers are committed to fostering our students’ success in high school, college, and beyond.


Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (please select all areas as well)
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- West Roxbury

Boston Arts Academy serves 440 inner-city high school students who are residents of Boston. Our students come from each of the 15 different neighborhoods of the city, with the greatest concentration (44%) coming from Dorchester, Roxbury, and Mattapan. A number of students travel over an hour each way to attend Boston’s only public high school for the arts.

Organization Categories

  1. Public & Societal Benefit - Single Organization Support
  2. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Performing Arts Schools
  3. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts Education

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

College Preparatory Academic Curriculum

Academics include math, science, humanities (a combination of English, social studies, history, and philosophy), and world languages (American Sign Language, Arabic, and Spanish). The academic curriculum is interdisciplinary, with the arts integrated into curricula. For example, BAA’s approach to traditional STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) education includes the arts to create STEAM. Students who struggle with math or science are more engaged and understand the material better, when they participate in STEAM projects. BAA is expanding career and technical education opportunities, giving students the chance to develop technical skills, gain professional experience, and/or take college-level courses. BAA is developing new partnerships to increase off-campus learning opportunities. The BAA curriculum prepares students well for the 21st century workplace. They develop critical thinking skills, solve problems in creative ways, learn to collaborate and work independently.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  The goal of the BAA curriculum is for all students to be ready for college by the time they graduate high school. The curriculum for each grade is mapped to scaffold to content and competencies in the next grade, and interdisciplinary connections are made whenever possible. For example, in the 9th grade Humanities class, students are expected to demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the political, religious, social, economic, and artistic aspects of one African society. In 9th grade Seminar, students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of writing in four genres: memoir, persuasive, compare and contrast, and research.
Program Long-Term Success  Aligning with Common Core standards, BAA’s goal is to prepare students for college and careers by developing reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language skills. All BAA courses are specifically designed to build the following competencies: ·Students demonstrate independence. ·Students build strong content knowledge. Students respond to the varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline. ·Students comprehend as well as critique. ·Students value evidence. ·Students use technology and digital media strategically and capably. ·Students come to understand other perspectives and cultures.
Program Success Monitored By  BAA believes that students can best demonstrate their skills and knowledge through portfolios, exhibitions and performances, in addition to traditional tests. Teachers develop their own assessments that are aligned with state standards, and allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and skills accurately. Culminating projects and exhibitions challenge students to apply and synthesize knowledge from various disciplines, and give students authentic opportunities to demonstrate their mastery of complex concepts. Stressing hands-on, experiential activities, the BAA curriculum pushes students to engage in higher level thinking and problem solving. A number of quantitative measures are also monitored, including: students’ grades, Sophomore Benchmark passing rate, number and diversity of students on the Honor Roll, MCAS scores, SAT scores, the number and variety of college acceptances, graduation rate, college retention, and number of years alumni take to earn college degrees.
Examples of Program Success 

97% of the Class of 2016 was accepted to college, with graduates accepted to Berklee College of Music, Boston Conservatory, Emerson College, Northeastern University, Oberlin College, and Temple University, among many others.

100% of BAA students passed the 2016 English, math, and science MCAS exams, exceeding the school district and the state passing rates.

BAA’s four-year adjusted graduation rate is 90%, compared to the District rate of 78%.

BAA’s dropout rate is 1%; compared to the District rate of 6%.


Literacy Development Initiative

On average, 40% of BAA students enter 9th grade reading somewhere between a 4th and 8th grade level, making it extremely difficult for them to access the curriculum and master high school level content. 32% of our students speak English as a second language, 18% have documented learning disabilities, and some students have had extended absences from school, often due to family crises. Unfortunately, some students struggle with more than one of these issues. BAA’s Literacy Development Initiative is an innovative, school-wide program that is succeeding in tackling this critical issue. Through this program, we have consistently improved the reading abilities of at least 80% of those students who read below grade level. Professional development for teachers who work with our lowest performing students, including English Language Learners, is a critical part of the program. The Literacy Development Initiative includes the Summer Reading Program. This is an intensive five-week summer program for students who are two or more grade levels behind in reading. Through daily targeted work in small groups, students typically make significant gains over the course of this program. Without intervention, many of these same students would regress, putting them even farther behind their peers. Both the school year and summer programs have a tremendous impact on students. Many experience success in school for the first time as a result of the Literacy Development Initiative.
Budget  $49,420.00
Category  Education, General/Other Literacy
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  At least 80% of students who are identified as struggling readers by their scores on standardized reading assessmentswill increase their reading comprehension skills by at least one grade level at the end of one year.
Program Long-Term Success  ·Improve students’ reading skills, so that all BAA students can learn together at a high school level. Students will be able to read and understand increasingly challenging material, and will also read more for pleasure. ·Strengthen all BAA teachers’ abilities to identify reading challenges, and address the literacy needs of English Language Learners. With ongoing training and support, teachers will learn to adapt course materials and instruction to meet the needs of students at all reading levels.
Program Success Monitored By 

Measures of Academic Progress Test (MAP) and Diagnostic Assessment of Reading (DAR) administered by certified Reading Specialists.

Examples of Program Success 

For the past several years, data have shown that year-round intervention, coupled with professional development for teachers, is an effective means of improving students’ reading abilities. Data from 2013-14 show that 86% of students who began 9th grade reading three or more grade levels below the norm improved by at least one grade level by the end of 10th grade, with many improving by two or more grade levels. While improvement of one grade level may not seem like significant progress, it is actually remarkable for students who are dealing with learning disabilities, have limited exposure to reading, and have second language issues to make such a gain in reading ability.


Student Health and Wellness

BAA is a full-inclusion school, welcoming students with a range of physical, learning, and social/emotional disabilities. Because 71% of our students come from low-income families and 44% live in Dorchester, Roxbury and Mattapan where neighborhood violence plays a role in their lives, many are at high risk for anxiety and depression. Each year, 45% of BAA students rely on the school’s Health and Wellness Team for mental health services. Strong partnerships with Children’s Hospital and South Shore Mental Health increase students’ access to these services, which include: on-site mental health counseling free of charge from licensed clinicians; a health curriculum for 9th graders on depression/anxiety, substance abuse prevention, sexual health, and healthy relationships; highly trained special education teachers who work with students who have learning disabilities, physical disabilities, and social/emotional challenges; and group counseling for students with common concerns, such as grief and loss support and gender identity issues. BAA has created a safe and nurturing environment where students feel protected. Many students are happy to stay late for our extended school day and for rehearsals as BAA is safer than their neighborhoods.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Education, General/Other Special Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

The Health and Wellness Team (HWT) serves as the steward of the BAA community’s overall health. Working together with the arts and academic faculty, HWT provides a range of services so that every student can be successful at BAA. The team takes a proactive, holistic, and preventative approach to school safety, student health and wellness, and academic support. Offering on-site nursing services, mental health counseling, family counseling, peer mediation, parent/caregiver outreach, test preparation, tutoring, college and career services, and special services for students with a range of disabilities, HWT works closely with students, teachers, and families to provide targeted and effective support services.

Program Long-Term Success 

Our students are challenged on a daily basis to navigate an increasingly complex and often dangerous world. In addition to the usual pressures of adolescence, BAA students also contend with neighborhood violence, poverty and homelessness, and low expectations engendered by racial and ethnic stereotypes. Students’ families struggle to make ends meet, with parents often working multiple jobs. Many students either work part-time, or care for siblings after school and in the evenings, leaving little time for homework. While we have no control over these external forces, BAA has developed a number of effective strategies that help students succeed in school. Privately-raised funds support the services outlined above. Without these programs, many BAA students would drop out of high school, and would never even consider college.

Program Success Monitored By 

We are very concerned by the increase in the number of student psychiatric hospitalizations over the past three years, and are actively working to strengthen our wellness programs in order to change this disturbing trend. We recognize that we need to collect more in-depth information about our students’ lives and their risk and protective factors on an annual basis. Currently, the effectiveness of our wellness programs is monitored by collecting data on services provided, including number of students served through individual and small group counseling, number of crisis assessments conducted, number of referrals to outside agencies, number of student hospitalizations for mental health issues, number of students involved in peer mediation program and effectiveness of conflict resolution sessions, and number of counseling sessions held for families.

Examples of Program Success 

In 2013-14, the Health and Wellness Team provided 266 students with a total of 1,614 individual counseling sessions. 75% of these students received short-term counseling, 8% received medium-term counseling, and 17% received long-term counseling. 67% of students seeking individual counseling presented with social/emotional concerns. Crisis assessments were conducted for 86 students. Of these students, 18 were hospitalized. Fifty-three students participated in support groups, which included: Social Skills, Cognitive Behavior Therapy/Friendship, Gay/Straight Alliance, Senior Support, Grief Support, and AGAPE, a project started by a BAA alumnus, where social/emotional issues are addressed through circles, open discussion, and artistic expression. Peer mediation was used in seven incidents, and 24 classroom-based interventions were conducted, involving 160 students.


The Center for Arts in Education

BAA’s Center for Arts in Education works vigorously to strengthen public education by advocating for the inclusion of the arts as an essential component of the K-12 curriculum. Through its programs, the Center shares the practices that make Boston Arts Academy a proven leader in urban and arts education with local, national, and international learning communities. The Center develops and implements programs that increase access to arts-based education, disseminate effective arts-based curricula developed through BAA, and provide high quality arts-based professional development for educators.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Education, General/Other Curriculum Development
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

The Center invites educators into the BAA “laboratory,” sharing innovations in curriculum, school climate and culture, and arts education. Each year hundreds of educators from around the world visit BAA to gain insight into its best practices in urban and arts education.

Program Long-Term Success 

The Center will build and refine its programmatic focus to serve as an innovative, arts-centered learning community that continues to challenge the dominant education paradigm. The Center will also continue to place a greater emphasis on supporting local and regional learning communities through innovative, arts-based programs, resources and advocacy.

Program Success Monitored By  A standing committee of the Board of Trustees provides oversight for the Center for Arts in Education.
Examples of Program Success 

The Alumni Creative Corps is a teaching artist residency program that delivers arts instruction to 650 students in the Boston Public Schools in a variety of disciplines. Lang Lang’s Keys of Inspiration provides sequential piano instruction for students in grades 3 through 8 at Orchard Gardens K-8 school and for all Boston Arts Academy music majors. During the 2013-2014 school year, the Center made it possible for over 20 BAA faculty members and several students to attend and /or present at 16 educational conferences around the country. In October, 2014, the Center hosted its 10th annual Center Institute, which provided educators, school administrators, and graduate students with the time, space, and support to imagine innovative possibilities for their classrooms, schools, and communities. The National Artist Teacher Fellowship Program offers arts teachers from public arts high schools the opportunity to immerse themselves in their own creative work, interact with other professional artists, and stay current with new practices.


Visual and Performing Arts Education

As the only public high school for the arts in Boston, BAA offers students a unique opportunity to pursue their passion for the arts while also receiving a college-preparatory academic education. Students major in dance, music (instrumental or vocal), theatre, or visual arts. Each student spends at least 10 hours per week in arts classes. The arts curriculum, which is developed by BAA faculty, exceeds state and national standards. BAA is committed to developing technical and career education pathways within our arts curriculum that give students the chance to explore facets of their chosen arts majors that have the potential to open up new opportunities for college study and careers. These include design and visual communications, music technology and production, film/media production, and fashion technology. The arts are the key to BAA’s success. Students shine in their arts classes – they learn quickly, are motivated to work hard, and are more likely to take leadership roles. These skills and attitudes are transferable to all academic subjects, to college, and to the workplace.
Budget  $0.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other General Arts Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  80% of students will pass their Sophomore Benchmark.
Program Long-Term Success  The schedule and program of study will allow more upper classmen to have off-campus artistic experiences such as internships and professional apprenticeships.
Program Success Monitored By  Each arts department has two benchmarks: a sophomore review and a senior exit requirement. Requirements for the sophomore review vary from department to department, but all sophomores must maintain a weighted average of 77% in order to advance to the 11th grade. All senior exit benchmarks require students to give a performance or exhibition that demonstrates seriousness of purpose and their mastery of the curriculum. Arts classes are designed to develop students’ talents, allowing them to explore special interests, and perform/demonstrate/exhibit the products of their work. For example, senior dance students are required to create a finished and polished piece of choreography complete with costume and lighting design ideas as an exit requirement. They must also be able to articulate their vision of imagery, design, and choreographic structure. Students write artist statements for the recital program, and reflect on their process for their final portfolios.
Examples of Program Success 

The Sophomore Benchmark passing rate for 2013-14 was 90%. Students win numerous awards, honors, and scholarships from festivals, competitions, summer programs, and colleges. Over the past year, the BAA Jazz Quintet won First Place in the Small Ensemble/Combo category at the 2014 Berklee College of Music High School Jazz Festival; three visual arts students won Gold Keys and one won a Silver Key in the 2015 Boston Globe Scholastic Art and Writing Awards; one student won a Silver Key for writing in the same competition; two BAA music students were invited to participate in the 2014 Massachusetts Music Educators Association All-State Festival; a BAA student was the only bassist selected to perform in the All-State Jazz Big Band; and BAA students won Superior Musician and Outstanding Musician awards at the Berklee High School Jazz Festival.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As the only designated high school for the arts in the Boston Public Schools, Boston Arts Academy (BAA) offers students a unique opportunity to pursue their passion for the arts while receiving a college-preparatory academic education at the same time. BAA makes this opportunity available to all Boston residents, regardless of prior grades, test scores, or classes passed. The school is committed to serving Boston’s neediest students, even if they have never taken an art class. BAA admits students solely on the basis of their artistic potential, without regard for prior grades, classes passed, or test scores. As a result, students have a wide range of academic abilities, and a high percentage of BAA students struggle academically. BAA’s teachers, administrators, and Health and Wellness staff make every effort to ensure that each student is able to learn at a high school level. Due to a lack of arts education opportunities in the majority of the Boston Public Schools and the high cost of extracurricular lessons, most students who apply to BAA have had little or no previous training in the arts. Both students and teachers work very hard to overcome this training deficit, in order to make BAA graduates competitive with their peers from wealthier school districts at high school arts festivals and for college programs. Boston Arts Academy has an outstanding track record of success with Boston’s young people. Educating a diverse group of aspiring artist-scholars, 71% of whom come from low-income families, is a challenging task. Over the past 15 years, BAA is proud to have achieved the following:

--An average of 94% of BAA graduates are accepted to college, and most are the first in their families to pursue higher education.

--BAA’s MCAS scores consistently exceed district averages, and often meet or exceed state-wide averages.

--Students win numerous awards, honors, and scholarships in their arts disciplines each year from festivals, competitions, summer programs, and colleges.

--BAA’s four-year adjusted graduation rate is 93%, compared to the District rate of 71%.

--BAA’s dropout rate is 1%; compared to the District rate of 6%.

While it is daunting for the BAA Foundation to annually raise over 35% of the school budget from private funds (a figure that grows each year), the proven results of Boston Arts Academy demonstrate that this additional investment is delivering huge returns.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Duncan Remage-Healey
CEO Term Start Aug 2016
CEO Email dhealey@bostonartsacademy.org
CEO Experience
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. David Dines Development Associate --
Mr. Duncan Remage-Healey Interim Executive Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
GRAMMY Signature Enterprise Award GRAMMY Foundation 2016
School of Opportunity Silver Award National Education Policy Center 2016
STEAM Award President's Council on the Arts and Humanities, Americans for the Arts, and the Ovation Foundation 2015
Outstanding Arts School Award Arts Schools Network 2013
GRAMMY® Signature Enterprise Award GRAMMY Foundation 2011
National School of Distinction in Arts Education John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts 2010
Breakthrough High School National Association of Secondary School Principals 2004
National School Library Media Program of the Year Award American Association of School Libraries 2004
Mentor School Coalition of Essential Schools 2003
Best of Boston Non-Profit Boston Magazine 2002
Exemplary Art School Award Network of Visual and Performing Art Schools 2002

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

BAA relies on partnerships with many organizations to increase its effectiveness and connect students with needed services, including: Actors’ Shakespeare Project, ArtsEmerson, Berklee College of Music, Boston Athletic Association, Boston Police Department, Boston Public Library, Boston Public Schools Arts Office, Boston Symphony Orchestra, Boston University, Celebrity Series of Boston, Children’s Hospital, Emmanuel Music, Griffin Museum of Photography, Harvard University, Huntington Theatre Company, Institute of Contemporary Art, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Massachusetts General Hospital, Peer Health Exchange, Project Bread, Simmons College, TERC, Tufts University, World Music/CRASHarts,and many others. As part of its strategic planning process, BAA is looking to strengthen its partnerships with community arts organizations in the coming years. In particular, BAA wants to offer more opportunities for students who seek pre-professional or pre-vocational training to deepen their arts training.BAA also wants to increase the number of internships and job opportunities available so that students are better prepared for college and career choices upon graduation.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 250
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Dr. Lee Pelton
Board Chair Company Affiliation President, Emerson College
Board Chair Term July 2015 - June 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Sonia Alleyne Boston Arts Academy Family Council Voting
Mr. Christopher Aviles Boston Arts Academy faculty Voting
Ms. Tynika Booth, Board Clerk Boston Arts Academy NonVoting
Ms. Ann Carter, Vice Chair CEO, Rasky Baerlein Strategic Communications, Inc. Voting
Mr. Robert Chambers Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Anne Clark Headmaster, Boston Arts Academy Exofficio
Ms. Allegra D'Ambruoso Boston Arts Academy faculty Voting
Mr. David Eppstein Retired, Masco Corporation Voting
Ms. Jennifer Hayes BAA Family Council Voting
Mr. Tony James Vice President, Network Development, Partners Healthcare Voting
Ms. Mary Lentz Executive Vice President, McCall & Almy Voting
Ms. Karen Kast McBride BAA Family Council Voting
Ms. Nicole Mullen Boston Arts Academy faculty Voting
Dr. Linda Nathan Boston University School of Education Voting
Ms. Kamiya Parkin BAA Student Body President Voting
Dr. Lee Pelton, Board Chair President, Emerson College Voting
Ms. Eve S. Rounds Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Susan Schechter Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Kathy Sharpless Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Voting
Ms. Katherine Sloan President Emerita, Massachusetts College of Art and Design --
Mr. James Supple Retired, Fidelity Investments Voting
Ms. Tonya Tedesco BAA Family Council Voting
Ms. Katie Umile CEO, iCapital Voting
Mr. J. Curtis Warner Jr. Assistant Vice President for Community and Governmental Affairs, Berklee College of Music Voting
Ms. Karimah Williams Boston Arts Academy teacher Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 8
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 16
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 18
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 95%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 35%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Executive
  • Facilities
  • Finance

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,405,486 $2,236,089 $2,870,184
Total Expenses $2,340,976 $2,342,282 $2,179,929

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $1,161,195 $1,480,103 $2,090,230
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $-87,126 $65,105 $2,894
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $162,682 $543,249 $635,027
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $168,735 $147,632 $142,033

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,658,656 $1,699,679 $1,770,436
Administration Expense $271,128 $294,964 $177,878
Fundraising Expense $411,192 $347,639 $231,615
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.60 0.95 1.32
Program Expense/Total Expenses 71% 73% 81%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 31% 17% 8%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $4,570,520 $5,561,032 $5,825,119
Current Assets $2,152,361 $3,450,916 $4,098,249
Long-Term Liabilities $0 -- $0
Current Liabilities $127,371 $139,527 $213,786
Total Net Assets $4,443,149 $5,421,505 $5,611,333

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 16.90 24.73 19.17

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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