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Freedom House Inc

 5 Crawford Street
 Dorchester, MA 02121
[P] (617) 445-3700
[F] (617) 442-6201
www.freedomhouse.com
kshaw@freedomhouse.com
Katrina Shaw
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INCORPORATED: 1949
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2240448

LAST UPDATED: 05/19/2016
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Freedom House was founded in 1949 by sociologists and activists Otto and Muriel Snowden as a catalyst for promoting equality and access to quality education for people residing in lower-income communities throughout Boston. Our mission today is to transform the economic and cultural fabric of high-need communities through education and leadership development. We inspire young people to believe in their potential. We provide coaching and college-level learning from 9th through 12th grade, including high school credit accumulation and recovery to help students stay on track despite challenging life circumstances. In addition, we coach college students utilizing strategies that increase their persistence to graduate by empowering them to overcome systemic educational barriers to succeed. Inspired by our rich civil rights legacy, we also teach our students about the society in which they live, their role in society and how to become actively engaged in addressing social justice issues.

We also provide support to help people thrive in the digital age through free computing time, classes on computing basics, and tools to strengthen and enhance skills. Our Timothy Smith Technology Lab helps bridge the digital divide by providing academic support, technology education, and access to computers for neighborhood residents.

 Our vision is to be an educational beacon in the community that will inspire, educate and motivate people to commit to life long learning and civic engagement. 

Mission Statement

Freedom House was founded in 1949 by sociologists and activists Otto and Muriel Snowden as a catalyst for promoting equality and access to quality education for people residing in lower-income communities throughout Boston. Our mission today is to transform the economic and cultural fabric of high-need communities through education and leadership development. We inspire young people to believe in their potential. We provide coaching and college-level learning from 9th through 12th grade, including high school credit accumulation and recovery to help students stay on track despite challenging life circumstances. In addition, we coach college students utilizing strategies that increase their persistence to graduate by empowering them to overcome systemic educational barriers to succeed. Inspired by our rich civil rights legacy, we also teach our students about the society in which they live, their role in society and how to become actively engaged in addressing social justice issues.

We also provide support to help people thrive in the digital age through free computing time, classes on computing basics, and tools to strengthen and enhance skills. Our Timothy Smith Technology Lab helps bridge the digital divide by providing academic support, technology education, and access to computers for neighborhood residents.

 Our vision is to be an educational beacon in the community that will inspire, educate and motivate people to commit to life long learning and civic engagement. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2014 to Dec 31, 2014
Projected Income $998,000.00
Projected Expense $997,168.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • ComUniversity
  • Freedom House Summer Institute
  • Global Classroom
  • PUSH- Preparing Urban Students for Success in High School and Higher Education-High School Component
  • PUSH-Preparing Urban Students for Success in Higher Education -College Component

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Freedom House was founded in 1949 by sociologists and activists Otto and Muriel Snowden as a catalyst for promoting equality and access to quality education for people residing in lower-income communities throughout Boston. Our mission today is to transform the economic and cultural fabric of high-need communities through education and leadership development. We inspire young people to believe in their potential. We provide coaching and college-level learning from 9th through 12th grade, including high school credit accumulation and recovery to help students stay on track despite challenging life circumstances. In addition, we coach college students utilizing strategies that increase their persistence to graduate by empowering them to overcome systemic educational barriers to succeed. Inspired by our rich civil rights legacy, we also teach our students about the society in which they live, their role in society and how to become actively engaged in addressing social justice issues.

We also provide support to help people thrive in the digital age through free computing time, classes on computing basics, and tools to strengthen and enhance skills. Our Timothy Smith Technology Lab helps bridge the digital divide by providing academic support, technology education, and access to computers for neighborhood residents.

 Our vision is to be an educational beacon in the community that will inspire, educate and motivate people to commit to life long learning and civic engagement. 

Background Statement

When we were founded sixty-seven years ago, our initial goal was to centralize community activism in the fight for neighborhood improvement, good schools, and harmony among racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the Roxbury/Dorchester community. In 1974, when courts ordered Boston schools to desegregate, we established the Freedom House Institute on Schools and Education as a means of information dissemination to families, as well as to ensure the safety of school children being bused to hostile neighborhoods. The Institute grew to become a locus of community action, offering tutoring and teacher training, and providing a forum for communication between families and city administrators.Today, we focus on the basic right of every individual to have access to quality education. 

 

Unlike other college access programs, Freedom House’s work reflects the symbiotic relationship between community and individual success. PUSH is an embedded high school and college model that: increases students’ college-going identity, helps students navigate the college application process, and, increases their ability to transition to, and complete college with confidence and success.

PUSH is research-based and modeled after a previous educational experiment. In 1988, Freedom House launched Project REACH, which was fully funded by the Stratford Foundation and ran through 1995. The original intent of Project REACH was to support students of color through college. However, an added benefit occurred: we discovered that our approach initiated a community transformation. During Project REACH, the graduation rate was 97% - with more than 300 students receiving their degrees. Of those, nearly 50% currently give back to their communities today. For example: several have chaired or served on the Board of Freedom House; one is a Boston City Councilor: one a college chancellor, and, one an entrepreneur who has donated several college online platforms to Freedom House that will allow select students to take certain college level courses free of charge. Project REACH was the city’s first community-based program of its kind targeting lower-income students of color. The program focused on economically disadvantaged students of color. Project REACH was designed to produce a cadre of future leaders while providing critical counseling throughout their college careers. Providing these students with the support they needed to get into, and graduate from college defined their ability to succeed.


Impact Statement

Our top achievements for 2015:

1) Fully implemented a college coaching model called PUSH (Preparing Urban Students for Higher Education) that increased college matriculation rates at our Boston Public Schools (BP)S partner high schools: from 63% to 91% at Snowden International and from 48% to 68% at the Jeremiah Burke.

2) Added the Freedom House Academy, a partnership with BPS that allows its old and close student population (17-21 year olds) to take online credit recovery courses at Freedom House with the assistance of a BPS teacher, a Freedom House college coach to motivate students to think beyond high school and a mental health specialist to help them address personal barriers to their academic success.

3) We completed logic models and revised outcome measurement plans for all of our programs to assure full alignment and implemented a salesforce database system to measure outcomes for all of our programs.

4) Received federal funding as a sub-grantee of The Boston Foundation and its funding alliance with the Social Innovation Fund for a maximum of three years

5) After raising over $1 million for our capital campaign, we acquired the old Grove Hall Library in Dorchester to begin renovations on a 21st century Freedom House that will provide more classroom and community space.

Our primary goals for 2016:

1) With renovations beginning on the Library in May, our goal is to raise an additional $1 million to assist with unforeseen needs, including a new roof, and have renovations completed by the end of the year

2) Complete Vision 2020, a strategic plan being created by the Board of Directors, the Chief Executive Officer and Senior Managers with input and guidance from the staff and an assessment of community needs and the needs of the students we serve.

3) Restructure staffing to meet organizational needs, including hiring another college coach to serve an additional 65 college students across our partner colleges: UMass Boston, Bunker Hill Community College and Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology; and to reorganize and grow our Development department in light of the financial needs of the organization due to program growth.


Needs Statement

1) We need to reset our capital campaign by creating two distinct phases: Phase I: to raise $1 million to complete renovations of the old Grove Hall Library at 5 Crawford Street by December 2016; and Phase II, finalizing a plan and funding strategy for original Freedom House building, located at 14 Crawford Street, loosely estimated to be a $7 million+ project

2) Build a Development team and department to have the capacity to address the needs of a growing organization

3) Select and purchase a fundraising database system and identify and train key staff on the system

4) Secure $20,000 to incorporate social emotional learning, positive peer relationships, study skills and academic support to increase student outcomes, as well as to broaden their geographical horizons in outdoor learning environments that promote and enhance that development

5) Complete revisions on our new Human Resources manual

 

CEO Statement

What began in a small office on Humboldt Avenue in Boston's Black community, has grown into a respected organization that has played a critical role on so many local and national issues. The accomplishments of the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s are notable but, like many organizations, Freedom House needs to build upon its capacity to be an effective organization in today’s modern world. Beginning with our programming and with an awareness of the disconnect between our current approach and desire to serve more of Boston’s students and families,  we created PUSH, a high school to college transition program that encourages students to participate in civic engagement and community organizing activities to further community development goals. We have a new, dedicated leadership team that respects the past and is able to move forward unhindered by it. We are a robust group of innovative, 21stcentury strategic thinkers who are poised to take on the challenges of this strategy with agility.

The elements that make Freedom House successful are its ability to weld the staff into a team where efforts are meshed into an enabling force; the willingness to share its power and pool its resources with other organizations; and to undertake efforts to achieve common goals of raising community standards of living. Freedom House needs general operating funds to grow/strengthen our core, to scale our direct service education programming to ensure the long term success of all the elements of our mission. Our ability to serve youth and the community depends upon our incredible staff and we need to make a significant investment in our human resource strategy and to strengthen our culture as we mobilize our diverse and culturally competent team towards social and economic justice. The State of Black Boston Study was released and its key finding was that a persistent racial gap between Blacks and Whites remains in terms of median income, and other groups remains regardless of the type of family structure or the education attained by Black persons. This is why Freedom House was created in 1949 and why our work is so critical today.  We serve nearly 2020 students and community members and building a larger, state of the art facility will enable us to serve more residents, helping to improve their social and academic outcomes.  

 


 

Board Chair Statement

Freedom House is in its 67th year of operation and continues to build upon the successes we have had over the last several years in helping our community find its voice in the education debate facing our school system and innovating with dynamic new programs. We are doing this while also providing much needed educational support to our neighborhood students who sadly are often left behind by a school system focused more on “getting the kids through” than ensuring that our young people have the skills necessary to succeed in an increasingly competitive global economy.
 
There are many challenges ahead. With so many resources going to global issues, local organizations like Freedom House are struggling to raise the funds necessary to continue our work at a grass roots level and that work has never been more important. The challenges in the economy mean the kids in our neighborhoods will need a quality education even more to make sure they are ready for what lies ahead and our parents will need to be better organized to ensure their children are not forgotten in an increasingly strained system. There are many worthy causes to support but we hope you will chose to support the teenagers who attend Freedom House's programs and more broadly, our programs serving inner city neighborhoods.  
 
While I am new to Freedom House, I am aware of the struggles of those with less resources trying to attain quality education and the supports needed to be successful. That is why I am an educator and why I provide outreach beyond the classroom to students in need. I am committed to Freedom House and its mission.
 
 

Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
Greater Boston Region-Dorchester Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Roxbury Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Mattapan Neighborhood
Freedom House serves Boston's inner-city corridor of Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan and is located in Grove Hall, along the bordering line of Roxbury and Dorchester. Poverty rates in Grove Hall are high, – 29% of individuals live below the poverty level compared to 20% in the city  nine percent in the state, and 12% in the nation. A higher percentage of young people are living below the poverty level than in the general population. (37% of youth under the age of 18.)  Grove Hall has the highest rate of violent crime among youth in the city.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Education N.E.C.
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

ComUniversity

 Leverage partnerships with schools, colleges, corporations and technology companiesthroughComUniversitytoProvide Pathways to Lifelong Learningand civic leadership. Freedom House has served as a hub for Boston’s diverse urban community and as a catalyst to promote equality and civil rights. From marches and sit-ins to college and career workshops and programs, Freedom House has given generations of parents and young people the tools and strategies of effective advocacy that lead to real and sustainable personal and community change. In recent years, Freedom House has sought to continue these efforts through The Snowden Center for Civic Engagement and Action, which convened and engaged community residents in advocacy and partnership efforts to enhance the understanding of and reduce education disparities within low-income neighborhoods and communities of color in Boston. Continuing this legacy, Freedom House has partnered with the University of Massachusetts Boston (UMASS Boston) to establish ComUniversity, a partnership between Freedom House and UMASS Boston’s College of Public and Community Service.  The ultimate goal of ComUniversity is to create a space where corporations, universities and communities can use their creative energies to develop innovative approaches to community development. 
Short-term goals: To demystify the college experience by providing community access to university level coursework and credit within the heart of the community in partnership with UMass Boston and UniversityNow.
To engage the community and university in a reciprocal, collaborative process as co-creators of knowledge, skills and action plans to advance the goals and objectives of the community
  • To help the community and the university jointly identify issues, assess assets and needs and develop strategies to mobilize resources to transform communities
Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Minorities K-12 (5-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success   
  • Annually 20% of Freedom House’s PUSH college students will enroll and complete one ComUniversity course
  • Annually 25% of Freedom House’s PUSH high school students will enroll and complete one ComUniversity course and receive college credit before high school graduation
  • 30% of ComUniversity course enrollments will be local community residents and students
  • 70% of enrolled students successfully pass and complete courses

 

Program Long-Term Success 
  To prepare residents and students for a life of involvement and committed citizenship
To provide the community (through Freedom House) with a building and an infrastructure for sustained engagement leading to social change
 
 
 
Program Success Monitored By 
 

ComUniversity’s success will be evaluated against several data sets including: student perception and satisfaction data collected through surveys and class enrollment data as well as grades provided by UMASS Boston. Freedom House will utilize data from UniversityNow testing and UMASS Boston’s existing course evaluation methods to evaluate the effectiveness of ComUniversity courses compared to other courses offered by the university.

Examples of Program Success 
Students will received certificates or college credits.  Community members participate actively in civic engagement programs.

Freedom House Summer Institute

 

The Summer Intensive Institute is a critical element of the access and success approach. It provides intensive math review, English and writing, financial aid advising, and enrollment assistance during the summer months to better prepare students for the college transition. We support students’ college preparation while still in high school, ensure a successful arrival on campus for incoming freshman and develop the ability to thrive in a college environment. Workshops cover topics such as: College 101: How to Survive Freshman Year;  Paying for College:  Overview of the Financial Aid Process and Strategies;  Writers’ Workshop: Tips and Tools to Improve Your College Writing; Time Management and Effective Study Skills;  Managing Change, and Transitioning from High School to College Life. Students also focus on community service and civic engagement training. In 2013, we added on-line courses in partnership with UniversityNow.

 

 

Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served College Aged (18-26 years) Minorities Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success 
FH provides the coaching and support necessary tonegotiate both the college application process and to navigate he new terrain of college. 
High School students have road map for college selection and application process.
 College students are better prepared to transition from high school to college and enroll in first semester.  Students preparing to enter college attend retreat and college transition information sessions.
Program Long-Term Success 
The number of remedial courses taken in college are reduced which enables students to utilize their funds for college credit bearing classes.
 
High School students and parents have a better understanding of the college going process earlier  in the student's high school experience
 
Program Success Monitored By 
1) number of college level classes tested into on the accuplacer test versis remedial classes.
2) Pre and post surveys
3) Civic Engagement project selected and completed
4) Pathways to Success Goals Project Completed
5) UniversityNow reports generated from student online courses
6) Participation in seminars/retreats.
 
Examples of Program Success 
t/b/d

Global Classroom

 Global Classrooom in Grove Hall to providePathways to Global Competitiveness.

Issues such as a lack of basic education not only prevent individuals from being fully employed but also constrain business development, as firms find it difficult to move up the value chain by producing more sophisticated or value-intensive products with under developed human resources.  Our colleges have the capacity to produce a strong 21stCentury workforce, however, there is a growing disconnect between college level learning and high school graduates’ college readiness skills. This challenge impedes the US’ ability to produce an educated 21st century workforce.  Freedom House seeks to deepen its relationship with current and potential corporate funders to provide the following opportunities for students and residents:

  • Timothy Smith Computer Lab – including multi-lingual computer classes and math, English and science classes and college classes delivered through new technology such as iPads and other mobile devices.
  • Corporate Sponsored Academic Competitions and Challenges tied to college scholarships
  • Teen Technology Gurus – intergenerational exchange where teens teach basic phone and computer technology to local seniors
  • Physical/Virtual Global Exchange & Global Community Projects in collaboration with similar or complimentary missions and communities in other countries around the globe
Budget  $139,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served Minorities College Aged (18-26 years) Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success   

  • Annually 50% of Freedom House’s PUSH high school students will participate in a virtual or physical global exchange experience
  • Annually 30% of Freedom House’s PUSH college students will participate in a virtual or physical global exchange experience
  • Annually 30% of Freedom House’s PUSH students and their families will participate in Cultural Forums
  • PUSH Student Advisory Council will plan and host Town Hall Meetings with participation from 10% of PUSH students, other local community residents and elected officials
  • 70% of enrolled participants in technology-based learning classes will complete their class and participate in at least one additional Global Classroom activity or program
Program Long-Term Success    Global Classroom Goals:
  •  Tap into the innovation and successful partnerships that corporations bring to higher education by providing a community-based platform for meaningful corporate partnerships that advance lifelong learning and enhance the global competitiveness and college readiness of local students
  • Promote positive intergenerational and cultural exchange and interconnectedness
  • Maximize networks, technological advances and resources towards helping students develop a more competitive college going and post college resume

 

Program Success Monitored By  Our partnership with UniversityNow founded by Freedom House’s Project Reach Alum, Gene Wade will roll out this summer as a pilot for high school and college students. The mission of UniversityNow is to help ensure that affordable, high quality post-secondary education is available to people everywhere. To accomplish this, we are building a network of the most affordable and accessible accredited universities in the world, starting with the launch of New Charter University. Their vision is a world in which no one is deprived of access to quality education — a world in which students can obtain recognized college degrees that improve their futures, without taking on the burden of student debt. This includes employing:
  • Technology-assisted learning environments focused on efficiency and student success;
  • Peer-to-peer learning communities where students share their knowledge and skills, and help each other obtain recognized degrees and credentials;
  • Pedagogical models where the faculty serves as mentors and coaches as well as subject matter experts;
  • Evaluation systems that measure student achievement on whether students meet standards that are rigorous, clearly articulated and recognized.

Global Classroom programs will be evaluated via survey using a pre and post-test design. Surveys will assess participants’ perception and satisfaction as well as increased awareness, knowledge, attitudinal and behavioral changes through self-report.

 

Examples of Program Success 
t/b/d

PUSH- Preparing Urban Students for Success in High School and Higher Education-High School Component

 PUSH High School helps students hone their academic, leadership and civic engagement skills, complete their college applications and financial aid forms, and select colleges that are right for them. By creating a culture of “high expectations”, PUSH helps students develop the skills, strategies and support networks necessary to complete high school and advance to and succeed in college. We provide coaching and support that focuses on the relevance of what they are learning; reinforcing the importance of obtaining a credential or degree and provide soft skills training-critical hinking, team work and community organizing.We teach short and long term goal setting, how to execute a strategy and and help them make the connection between school and careers. FH has established a new partnership with Snowden International High School to serve 400 students to provide college readiness programming. During the summer, we have small group intensive programs to pilot new components.
Budget  $303,572.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success   

80 to 100% of students who regularly participate will:

  • Attain school attendance of 80% or higher.
  • Achieve and maintain a 2.5 GPA or higher.
  • Develop and implement the yearly community awareness project.
  • Create and execute a personal success plan.
  • Increase their awareness of and appreciation for civic engagement.
Program Long-Term Success   

90% of students:

  • Be promoted to the next grade and/ or graduate from high school.
  • Remain actively involved in civic engagement opportunities in their schools and/or communities.
  • 50% will register for post secondary program or college
Program Success Monitored By  Students fill out surveys after each component of the program.  During initial roll out at Snowden International HS, we received an assesment of the content from a consultant.  School Guidance Counselors and Teachers provide feedback.  Student college applications are tracked and FAFSA financial aid applications are tracked with students and with UAspire.  Student college admitances are tracked and enrollment.  We are fortunate to work so intensively with a high school which is tracking many data points and over time we will have a longitudinal study.  Staff is required to make periodic presentations and reports to the Board of Directors.

 

Examples of Program Success   

Students review the common college application form, financial aid forms, visit local colleges and attend seminars on careers and college majors. For civic engagement students go through a curriculum and pick an issue to work on such as Unexcused Absence,a forum where students provide different perspectives about chronic absenteeism in BPS.Workshops were created to help students develop crucial communication skills such as expressing ideas and persuading others. Backpack Monologues targeted the social/emotional issues youth experience on a daily basis. Students  expressed the challenges they face, andoffered potential solutions to the issue. Students who participated in this process gaineda better understanding of how to use the breadth of their personal assets, a variety of acting skills, knowledge of how to direct and be directed. Suspended Dreams (Zero Tolerance) continued work around the issue of chronic absenteeism in Boston Public Schools.


PUSH-Preparing Urban Students for Success in Higher Education -College Component

PUSH College helps High School students access the best support network and resources that ensures their successful graduation from 2- and 4-year colleges.  We provide transition and continued college support through 1) On-going Summer Institutes, 2) the development of high leverage peer and mentoring support networks, and 3) by providing timely “on” and “of” campus advising to remove historical barriers that prevent college success.  Our staff provides coaching to help them develop strong academic behaviors, and self-advocacy skills. We have piloted an innovative “embedded” community based organization (CBO)/college partnership model with UMASS-Boston which offers an intensive and intentional, student-focused approach to college support. Our goal is to double the college graduation rate within a 3-6 year time frame by providing intensive wrap around services for 300-400 students. 
Budget  $307,618.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served Minorities General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 
 In 2011-12, PUSH will serve 80-90 students, 5-10 3rd year community college participants, 18 2nd year college students, 25 college freshmen receiving intensive support, 50-60 high school seniors benefitting from PUSH workshops and referral resources.  PUSH will ultimately offer intensive support to over 100 college students as well as workshop support for 50-60 high school seniors – a total capacity to reach 130-160 students annually.   PUSH will provide intensive support on college preparation, transition support from high school to college, and ongoing support during college : high school workshops, an intensive summer institute between their high school graduation and college enrollment; on- and off-campus college advising to help students overcome barriers that historically prevent college success,   group mentoring, peer support networks throughout participants’ senior year of high school through their college graduation. 
Our plan to scale the program calls for increasing the number of students served July 2013-June 2014 to 135 and July 2014 to June 2015 to 229, 

 

 

Program Long-Term Success 
Significant improvement in college graduation rates for low income and minority students.  Doubling the rate for BPS grads from 35% for 4 year colleges and 13% for community colleges.
Implementation of remote delivery service model for out of state students.  
FH has built a culture and systems that enables studentsto begin college preparation early and transition into college.
Non-Academic Barriers have been reduced: Student levels of self-confidence, self-esteem and motivation are supported by PUSH case management, peer and adult mentor networks and relationship building with minority professionals.   
 Reduce Academic Barriers: 2.5+ GPA is a strong indicator of a student’slevel of commitment to obtaining a degree, level of academic self-confidence, academic skills.
Expanded Integration with Institutions of Higher Learning: in addition to the embedded model at UMass Boston and Bunker Hill, partner with community colleges with transitional support to increase persistence. 

 

Program Success Monitored By 
Push will track the following outcomes through Sales force: quantitative and qualitative data from colleges including grades and gpa, re-enrolement by semester, number of credits on track to graduate in 3-6 years, services accessed by student, number of remedial courses taken if any, financial aid.  Coaches document their interactions with students with comments.
95%of high school participants will engage in college planning and take appropriate steps to prepare for college.
100% of high school participants will have clearergoals and expectations about their college plans
85% of college participants will achieve a GPA of 2.0 or higher.
100% of entering college freshmen will enroll in first semester, and 90% will enroll in the second semester.
50% of college participants will advance from remedial coursework.
85% of college freshmen will be on track to earn a degree in 3 to 5 years.
85% of college participants will enroll in on-campus college support programs at their institutions
Examples of Program Success   FH/ UMass Boston collaborated to pilot a new approach for university/CBO coordination. PUSH Staff are “Affiliated Staff” of UMass Boston allowing the same access as to students and information as employed staff.  We attend staff meetings and are able to connect our students to academic and other support services. We attend the school wide Advisory Collaborative and monthly Advising Center meetings to review all of our students' academic status, supports needed and potential activities the university can implement to promote persistence.  

Two of our freshmen were struggling academically and according to policy, students are allowed 1 hour per week of tutoring.  we were able to intervene and now they  receive 5 hours of tutoring per week as well as intensive academic advising & support. Both students increased their cumulative GPAs.  A student  has been chosen as the first to launch the Peer Mentoring program at the university as a  paid mentor. Our students met with the Chancellor.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 
We believe that the PUSH program needs to be expanded to serve more students at community colleges and in the future, we would like to replicate our earlier Project Reach program which ran from 1988-94 which served all students living in Boston and attending colleges anywhere in the country.  We had a 97% graduation rate and our college transition program is a forerunner of the programs you see today.   PUSH is differentiated because of its summer program, mentorships and efficacy seminar but especially its new innovative embedded model partnership with UMass Boston is unique. PUSH provides additional case management with more intentional and systematic support to UMass Boston students in order to ensure their long term success.  FH staff are embedded as affiliated non paid employees so they can holistically serve students; more readily access information, attend staff meetings and training, have information on student academic progress and more easily connect students to academic support and extra-curricular activities andrespond to red flags such as poor student attendance and academic alert status. They provide individualized counseling particularly around add/drop courses, withdrawal or pass deadlines, registration deadlines and connecting students to resources particularly if not meeting academic benchmarks.
 
The FH board and staff in 2014 will focus on how to effectively serve more students with expanded program offerings. We have created an indepth business plan to scale our program with student and fundraising targets for each year. Our capital investment campaign to bring in general operating funds for programs and to build a new facility is critical so that we can innovate.  We are constrained by the current funding environment and constantly writing grants to get through each program year.
 
 Freedom House finds it difficult to engage Donor or Foundation enthusiasm despite proven success in serving Boston's inner city neighborhoods, low income and minority citizens and creating the conditions for young people to succeed in college and  high school. 
 
In 2013, we added coaching staff to maintain a 50-1 student ratio, created a strategic plan 2013-15 to scale our programs to serve 1000 students and families and launched 2 new programs ComUniversity and the Global Classroom.   Along with our partners, we will pilot online college courses this summer.
 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Katrina Shaw
CEO Term Start Sept 2012
CEO Email kshaw@freedomhouse.com
CEO Experience

Katrina Shaw joined Freedom House in September 2012 as the new Chief Operating Officer responsible for programs, operations and strategy.  She succeeded Gail Snowden as CEO in 2013.  Previously,  as Co-Executive Director of City Year Louisiana,  she provided executive leadership for the multi-city site of 90 employees and volunteers.  As an AVP of the State Street Corporation Foundation, Katrina managed a multi-million dollar portfolio of funding to over 300 charitable organizations globally.n
Islands.  She planned and co-led the development of a strategic plan for
corporate philanthropy and community affairs that strategically leveraged
corporate philanthropy, employee volunteerism, matching gifts, employee giving campaigns, disaster relief efforts and corporate event sponsorships.  She has a Masters of Social Work from Boston College and a B.A. from Spelman College. 

She is responsible for the attainment of FH's mission, financial and human resource management, board engagement, fund raising/capital campaign, community relations, programs, operations and budget of $998K.  She manages all aspects of this 65 year old nonprofit particularly financial discipline, expense controls and donor development.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mr. Ricardo Neal Jan 2003 Aug
Ms. Gail Snowden Aug 2013 Aug

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Debra Farrar-Parkman Development Officer --
Mr. Tyler Seever Director of Programs and Operations

Tyler Seever brings over ten years of experience in the non-profit sector to the Freedom House team. Before coming to Freedom House, he founded Project Humanity, a non-profit delivering clean water to villages in northern Uganda. Tyler has worked in the nonprofit sector doing grant writing, fundraising, program development, and defining and promoting organizational goals and mission. He has also worked with the Dept. of Mental Health, Boston Public Schools, and NGOs in Haiti to develop and implement trauma response plans.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Associated Grant Makers/Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Freedom House is a part of the Success Boston Initiative and works with Bottom Line, Hyde Sq. Task Force, Private Industry Council, ASA and UAspire Boston.
Freedom House partners with UMass Boston, Bunker Hill, Pine Manor College, Roxbury Community College, Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology, Mass PEP, Snowden International High School and Burke HS. We also collaborate with Boston United for Students, the Multi-cultural Drop out Collaborative, Families United for Educational Leadership and the Timothy Smith Computer Centers.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Our current needs include a program manager, program coordinator and case manager, a mentor coordinator and a volunteer coordinator.  The appropriate staffing configuration will free up the CEO to focus on value-added activities, external relationship building and board development. 

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 14
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 25
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 80%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 11
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Andrew Sobers
Board Chair Company Affiliation GMH Mortgages, LLC
Board Chair Term Dec 2015 - Dec 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Antoinette Coakley esq. stop and shop Voting
Mr. Michael Glavin Somerville Community Development Voting
Ms. Lisa Guscott Long Bay Management Voting
Mr. Gintas Krisciunas Boston Medical Center Voting
Mr. Gary Morton Liberty Mutual Voting
Dr. Keith Motley UMass Boston Voting
Ms. Susan O'Connor timothy smith center Voting
Ms. Jessie SaintCyr Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Lori Smith-Britton Community Resources Consulting LLC Voting
Mr. Andrew Sobers GMH Mortgage Services, LLC Voting
Ms Natasha Williams Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Jeffrey Zinsmeyer community volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Herbert Cohen Esq. HSCohen Law NonVoting
Dr. Jemadari Kamara University of Massachusetts Boston NonVoting
Ms. Jessica Lipnack NetAge NonVoting
Ms. Tulaine Montgomery New Profit NonVoting
Mr. Richard Olson Federal Reserve Bank of Boston NonVoting
Ms. Gail Snowden Retired Exofficio

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 10
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 82%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 4%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We have the opportunity to bring more people onto our board with specific expertise. We have created a board matrix to help with the decision process.  Besides diversity and cultural competency, we need members with access to resources particularly financial.  We are committed to bringing on board members in the 25 to 40 age cohort in order to have a generational transfer of power in place.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2014 to Dec 31, 2014
Projected Income $998,000.00
Projected Expense $997,168.00
Form 990s

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

2008 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $933,889 $783,696 $847,934
Total Expenses $674,333 $647,918 $640,912

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$656,011 $572,083 $563,813
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $102,365 $34,312 $72,113
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $778 $60,397 $61,720
Investment Income, Net of Losses $633 $567 $474
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $107,095 $72,298 $119,408
Revenue In-Kind $66,747 $1,485 --
Other $260 $42,554 $30,406

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $331,914 $258,024 $308,152
Administration Expense $201,639 $263,284 $233,959
Fundraising Expense $140,780 $126,610 $98,801
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.38 1.21 1.32
Program Expense/Total Expenses 49% 40% 48%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 16% 19% 13%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $1,157,441 $899,764 $765,857
Current Assets $932,492 $722,599 $574,389
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $34,771 $37,086
Current Liabilities $38,942 $6,050 $5,606
Total Net Assets $1,118,499 $858,943 $723,165

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $1,030,431.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose To raise money to build a new building and provide operating investment capital for programs
Campaign Goal $6,500,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates June 2012 - Dec 2015
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $1,400,000.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 23.95 119.44 102.46

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 4% 5%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Freedom House is financially stable and we have a three year scale plan with revenue targets.  Our Current College Access and Success Coaching Programs are receiving investments from new funders as part of this process and we are launching two new programs ComUniversity and the Global Classroom for which we are seeking funding for the remainer of this year and for next year.  Our financial processes are strong and income and expense are closely managed.  Our challenges are primarily around raising funds for the capital campaign to replace our current facility.
 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials. As this organization is in a capital campaign, the Capital Campaign grant revenue has been included in the "Foundations and Corporations" line above, as well as the Total Revenue.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

In five years, the first group of high school freshmen we worked with will be graduating from college. These students will be the first students we have provided coaching from the start of their high school careers through to the end of their college careers. It is our main goal to see increased persistence in those students who have received the full dosage of PUSH. In order to achieve increased persistence we will:

· decrease the number of students in remedial coursework;

· increase SAT scores and GPAs (commonly we have students with a high GPA receiving low SAT scores and the inverse);

· and, show students that there is a path to a four year degree through community college.

Our indicators of success in five years include an increase in:

· four year college attendance,

· four year college success,

· two year college success;

· and, in students transferring from two-year to four-year colleges (specifically from Bunker Hill Community College to UMass Boston).

In addition to increasing persistence, we are striving to serve an additional 2500 students in 5 years and 5000 over 10 years.

We collect data through our Salesforce database and evaluate our success through analysis of that data. For both PUSH High School and PUSH College, we collect data from one-on-one coaching sessions wherein coaches administer surveys and report on their sessions. In PUSH College, student surveys are conducted yearly and they measure the student’s relationship with a positive role model. In PUSH High School, surveys are administered yearly and they measure the student’s confidence as a learner and their outlook toward their future. Additionally, PUSH coaches report on the social-emotional, academic, and economic well-being of the student based on their one-on-one sessions. This data ensures we have a targeted approach to meet the individual needs of students. Our ability to target students in need of more coaching or a referral provides us with the necessary framework to ensure student persistence and success throughout college.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?



4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?


 

 

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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