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Interseminarian-Project Place, Inc.

 1145 Washington Street
 Boston, MA 02118
[P] (617) 542-3740 x 412
[F] (617) 542-3860
https://www.projectplace.org
ssansone@projectplace.org
Sebastian Sansone
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INCORPORATED: 1967
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2457732

LAST UPDATED: 07/23/2019
Organization DBA Project Place
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Project Place is a supportive community that promotes hope and opportunity for individuals experiencing homelessness and poverty. Our goal is provide the skills, education and resources individuals need to obtain and sustain stable employment and housing.

Mission Statement

Project Place is a supportive community that promotes hope and opportunity for individuals experiencing homelessness and poverty. Our goal is provide the skills, education and resources individuals need to obtain and sustain stable employment and housing.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2019 to June 30, 2020
Projected Income $3,212,520.00
Projected Expense $3,212,520.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • GateHouse/Betty's Place
  • Reentry Services
  • Skill Building - Work Ready + Industry Internship Program
  • Social Enterprises
  • Veteran's Services

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Project Place is a supportive community that promotes hope and opportunity for individuals experiencing homelessness and poverty. Our goal is provide the skills, education and resources individuals need to obtain and sustain stable employment and housing.

Background Statement

Founded in 1967, Project Place has evolved over the years in response to the changing needs of individuals experiencing homelessness and poverty in the Boston community. Coupling innovative programming with case management and career services, Project Place provides meaningful employment, real opportunities, and hope to motivated men and women to change their situations. It is critical to our mission that clients not only obtain employment and housing, but they retain that stability long term.

To accomplish this, we provide an array of services and training opportunities including referrals, classroom-based work and life skills training programs, transitional employment, wrap-around case management, housing support services, job search guidance and alumni support for at least two years beyond job placement. Our goal is for each individual entered in our services to obtain self-sufficiency for continued success long after completing programming. All clients are served based on their Independent Service Plan which is developed one-on-one with the individual’s case manager and places equal emphasis on personal growth and skill development.

Project Place initially developed a name for itself as a safe haven for runaway and at-risk teens. Starting in the 1980s, Project Place shifted its role in the community by serving adults. During the 1990s we introduced our social enterprises, transitional employment that provides real job experience to clients, to further enhance our job training curriculum. In the early 2000’s, we introduced reentry targeted programming, for those returning to communities from incarceration, into our workforce development program. Most recently, we have added more advanced training to better equip clients with specific skills that will help them obtain jobs in today’s market. We have also gone deeper to offer uniquely focused services to meet the needs of those returning to communities from incarceration, homeless women (particularly those with children), veterans and their families, and individuals in recovery from substance abuse. As we continue to expand outreach and the scope of our services we are committed to maintaining the quality and depth of current programming.


Impact Statement

Accomplishments:

1. Provided 1,539 homeless/low-income individuals with assessments, referrals, and services in Fiscal Year 2019, ending June 30, 2019. Enrolled 435 directly into programs with the goal of employment and/or housing.

2. 226 clients were prepared to be 'Work Ready'.

3. Operated four social enterprises that provided transitional employment opportunities to 99 clients. The enterprises employee clients at minimum wage, are a great transitory process to a permanent position, and help overcome barriers such as large gaps in work history or out of date skills.
 
4. 116 clients received nationally-recognized credentials in either Customer Service, Commercial Driver Licensing (CDLs), ServSafe (food service) or OSHA10.
 
5. We achieved an employment placement rate of 68%, with 82% placed in stable housing.
 
Looking ahead, Project Place has set the following goals for the coming year.

Strategic Plan

Our goal is to continue to deliver effective and efficient programs that enable individuals experiencing homelessness and poverty the opportunity to change their lives and participate in today’s strong economy. We will continue to encourage individuals to take steps necessary to obtain employment and will continue to help them focus on this as a first step on a pathway of economic security. Our top 4 goals for the coming year are:

1. Create new structure and add additional resources involving stabilizing clients.
 
2. Enhance Industry Training and have more clients receive credentialing.
 
3. Further integrate the social enterprises into the industry training tracks, create more opportunities and increase number of clients employed by the enterprises.
 
4. Replicate our evidence-based Reentry model in new communities.



Needs Statement

1. Deepening our stabilization services; the comprehensive set of resources and services we offer to clients to help them secure basic needs, establish a strong support network, and overcome the barriers preventing change. We are seeking to provide additional stabilization resources and structure to allow more clients, who are motivated but not quite otherwise ready, to be able to enroll. This influx of clients requires stabilization-specific staff
 
2. Replicating all or parts of our reentry services in new counties and facilities. We will need to establish partnerships with new facilities as well as develop a curriculum to establish a baseline standard for quality control so individuals from other facilities can easily transition to our advanced programming. 
 
3. Expanding the credentialing programs and universal industry training of our Industry Internship Program so participants are able to earn credentials in more areas and gain experience through internships and apprenticeships.
 
4. Re-invent the Social Enterprises, our transitional employment businesses, to employee more clients, gain more contracts, and overall increase the capacity/opportunity provided by them.

CEO Statement

Incorporated in the sixties, Project Place has stayed current to the needs of the community, providing innovative services with a focus on outcomes; creating programs that provide solutions to end individual homelessness and joblessness. We offer more than hope and opportunity; we provide a path out of poverty by helping individuals gain the skills, education and resources they need to live independently. 

We maintain an entrepreneurial approach that creates employment opportunities in small businesses but supports this with job training and case management services. In this way, an individual learns new skills in the classroom, practices work, establishes an employment history and receives individual help to obtain and retain permanent work. Our commitment goes beyond just helping people get back on their feet, we want to help individuals stay standing. To that end, we provide a minimum of two years follow-up services. 

The impact of our work is realized through our graduates – keeping in touch with over 250 alumni annually, we know we have made a difference in the lives of individuals in need by providing real opportunities – opportunities that have lead to careers and stable homes for our graduates. In a ten year period, on average, 77% of participants obtained employment, found housing or furthered their education and over 70% kept their housing and jobs for over a year – a record we are proud of.

Project Place also has a history of collaboration with various organizations and established formal partnerships. We focus on our core competency and partner with other providers to create the network of support many of our clients need to be successful and to eliminate duplication of services and a strain on limited resources. We have been recognized for our collaborations and established evidence best practice in the delivery of our services. 

In addition to achieving successful program outcomes Project Place has a commitment to strong fiscal management through diversifying its funding base, creating an independent earned income stream through operation of social enterprises, and has kept an eye on sustainability and growth. Tracking and caring about our success, evaluating our programs, running businesses, engaging donors – all manners of holding ourselves accountable to both our clients and supporters has made us an efficient and effective organization and established Project Place as a critical community resource for nearly half a century. Project Place is truly the charity that works!


Board Chair Statement

--

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Project Place serves homeless individuals from throughout the Greater Boston with a majority coming from Dorchester, Mattapan, Roxbury and South End neighborhoods.

Organization Categories

  1. Employment - Job Training
  2. Human Services - Homeless Services/Centers
  3. Housing, Shelter - Housing Search Assistance

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

GateHouse/Betty's Place

Project Place runs two housing programs. Betty’s Place is a transitional housing program offering housing services for women who are making the transition from the emergency shelter system to independent living.GateHouse offers permanent, affordable housing to 14 homeless individuals who are transitioning into permanent employment or employment training programs, with the option to access support services from other Project Place programs and staff.

Budget  $144,128.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Transitional Housing
Population Served Adults Homeless At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
Short-term, the two programs have slightly different measures of success. For Betty's Place, the short-term success is helping women transition to permanent housing ideally within 6 months (the average stay at Betty's Place). For GateHouse, residents may stay housed at GateHouse as long as they comply with all rules and regulations, including contributing 30% of their income to rent and remaining substance free.
 
.


Program Long-Term Success  The ultimate success of our transitional housing programs is to help individuals move from the shelter system/transitional housing to long-term permanent, stable, affordable housing and to retain their housing over the long term.
Program Success Monitored By  Project Place evaluates each program by its ability to facilitate an individual's transition from homelessness to self-reliance. For these programs we evaluate success by the numbers moving into permanent housing and keeping that housing over time. We feed outcome information directly into the agency database. It sets forth strategic objectives, a means of measurement, a targeted goal, and a year-to-date actual to determine whether or not we have met our success criteria. The information is utilized to monitor and improve client programming and to set performance outcomes and targets for employment and housing.
Examples of Program Success  This past year, 33 women were housed and assisted at Betty's Place with 94% securing permanent housing, and 45% were reunified with families.  At GateHouse 17 individuals were housed  over the course of the year: 94% remained stable and18% moved into more appropriate housing with 57% gaining employment.

Reentry Services

CREW a partnership with the Suffolk County House of Correction, provides community reintegration services that start when women are still incarcerated and continue upon their release, with the goal of reducing recidivism and preventing homelessness and joblessness. POWR connects offenders to the individualized attention they need to overcome the barriers that stand in the way of gainful employment and successful community reentry. Both programs assist clients develop basic life and personal competencies, work readiness and job skills, and obtain the education and specific job training necessary for gainful employment. Boston Career Pathway Collaborative (BCPC), is a partnership with the Suffolk County House of Correction, and helps men and women participating in state or local work-release programs to gain job skills and experience necessary to succeed in growth occupations upon release. The House of Corrections worked closely with local employers in the design phase of the program.

Budget  $1,175,563.00
Category  Employment, General/Other
Population Served Adults Females Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program Short-Term Success  We measure short-term success based on a client’s ability to reintegrate into society, obtain employment and sustain it without criminal activity. Project Place focuses on the individual in a way that gives them the greatest chance to succeed. The women who are a part of this program are at the beginning of their journey to transition from being incarcerated into being successfully housed and employed. This is a life-altering transition on its own, and is coupled with the need for these women to address the issues that brought them to where they are. Outcomes are measured in the same way as other programs: although the goals may differ depending on the specific individual. 
Program Long-Term Success  Long-term, success of the program is measured in reduced recidivism and reduced homelessness and joblessness among female ex-offenders.
Program Success Monitored By  Project Place evaluates each program by its ability to facilitate an individual's transition from homelessness to self-reliance. We examine three areas: 1)SkillBuilding; 2) Outcomes; and 3) Retention. For this project, the outcomes are measured in very small steps as the population has multiple needs and problems that will take time, and in some cases, repeated intervention, to overcome.  Each client has an individual plan that sets outcomes and is revisited to measure progress.  Information on each client is updated on a monthly basis, using a recently developed database that tracks demographics, skill acquisition, job placement, housing and retention. Outcomes are fed into the agency database.  It sets forth strategic objectives, a means of measurement, a targeted goal, and a year-to-date actual to determine if we have met our success criteria. The information is utilized to monitor and improve client programming and to set performance outcomes and targets for employment and housing.
Examples of Program Success 
This year CREW served 42 women with an average placement rate of 34%, which compared to the national average of 11% for this population is quite successful; and 74% were placed in stable housing. The POWR program just began this year and as yet has not reported its outcomes.

Skill Building - Work Ready + Industry Internship Program

The Work Ready class is an introductory course that features classroom-based learning. The class runs for four weeks, year-round. Starting from the very basics, students learn lifeskills: math, literacy, and interpersonal communication. The ultimate goal for each course is to get clients prepared for a job. Curriculum includes learning to write resumes and cover letters, building self-confidence, understanding the expectations of the job market, and beginning their career searches. Students also have the chance for daily training in our computer lab, an incredibly useful skill that is quickly becoming essential to today's employers. Each class ends with a one-on-one mock job interview, conducted by volunteers and staff, with immediate feedback. This enables clients to begin the process of acing their next interview. During this class, clients are also working with their case manager to obtain the resources and support they need to succeed. Following their independent service plans, those in Project Place services are encouraged to develop their personal interests alongside their professional. No one path fits every client and case managers work to establish the most effective path forward for each individual. From here, some clients obtain jobs right away. Others may move on to either the Internship Industry Program, one of the Social Enterprises, or other opportunities available, like higher education.
 
Following Work Ready is the Internship Industry Program (IIP). This begins the transition from classroom-based learning to hands-on experience. Through advanced training in select, growing industries in Boston, clients obtain the skills to get their foot in the door to career tracks that have high potential of growth. Training encompasses skills in hospitality, customer service, manufacturing, logistics, transportation, warehousing, food service and more. Certification is also available, made possible through our program partners. We offer certifications in: OSHA, Customer Service, ServSafe for food service and safety, Commercial Drivers Licenses (CDLs), and forklift/hoisting. Still working with their case managers, career counseling sessions are also held regularly to narrow the path of clients according to their strengths, interests, and abilities.
 
Budget  $1,500,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Adults Homeless
Program Short-Term Success 
 The short term success goals for the program are to:
 
1. hold at least 10 Work Ready classes a year, with at least 20 participants each.
 
2. to serve 400 clients in the program, including alumni. 
 
3. to have participants prepared to enter the job market on a competitive level through understanding the expectations, goals and requirements.
 
4.  transition clients from the basic skill learning of Work Ready to the more advanced training that occurs in IIP.
 
5. have clients obtain certification. This not only is critical for making them competitive candidates in the market, but also has significantly increased the starting placement wages for graduates. Furthermore, having certification is a great tool for advancement in one's career.  
 
Outcomes measured include: the number of clients enrolled, the number of classes held, the number who begin and complete the classes; the number who obtain a job upon leaving their program; the number who move into extended training or into our social enterprises.
 
Program Long-Term Success 

Success is determined not only by measuring the obtainment of housing and or employment, but that they are retained. Acquiring skills will ensure that individuals continue to grow in their career, develop self-sufficiency and overcome future obstacles such as the loss of a job or housing.  Outcome information is collected at initial intake, during the program and then post job placement at 3, 6, 9 months – up to two years, to determine if we have met success criteria. We look at: 1) Skill-Building -- increased education, job and personal skills, and self-confidence; 2) Outcomes -- attainment of employment, housing or educational goals; and 3) Retention -- maintaining or progressing in
vocational and/or educational program; either a job upgrade or enrollment. The outcomes can measure very small steps as the population has multiple needs that take time. Data is collected upon entry and at exit from the program and fed into an overall agency database for use during annual reviews.







 

Program Success Monitored By   Project Place evaluates each program by its ability to facilitate an individual's transition from homelessness to self-reliance. We examine three areas: 1)Skill Building; 2) Outcomes; and 3) Retention. For this project, the outcomes are measured in very small steps as the population has multiple needs and problems that will take time, and in some cases, repeated intervention, to overcome.  Each client has an individual plan that sets outcomes and is revisited to measure progress.  Information on each client documented by the upon intake, and updated on a monthly basis, using a recently developed database that tracks demographics, skill acquisition, job placement, housing and retention. We feed outcome information directly into the agency database. It sets forth 6-10 strategic objectives, a means of measurement, a targeted goal, and a year-to-date actual to determine whether or not we have met our success criteria. The information is utilized to monitor and improve client programming and to set performance outcomes and targets for employment and housing.
Examples of Program Success 
In the past year, more than 220 individuals completed this program. 80% of these clients improved their life circumstances by either obtaining work, obtaining stable housing or advancing in an educational or training program.  76% obtained jobs.

Social Enterprises

The 4 social enterprises operated by Project Place provide a great opportunity for clients to gain skills relevant to their desired industry, to get experience with the structure and expectations of the workplace, and to fill in large gaps in work history, resumes, and references. The revenue generated from the enterprises contribute to 20% of our operating budget, making these enterprises partially self-sustainable. The four enterprises we run are:

Clean Corners…Bright Hopes (CCBH): an outdoor maintenance, landscaping, and janitorial enterprise that operates throughout the Boston community to provide cleaning and other beautification services. CCBH improves neighborhoods aesthetic appearance, creates environments welcoming to residents and guests, and is a positive influence in the areas they service.
 
Project Pepsi: a vending machine service enterprise in which men and women load and unload products for vending machines and transport them throughout the Boston area. This enterprise is an entry point for individuals seeking a logistics-driven career path.
 
HomePlate: food preparation and services training enterprise that fulfills catering requests for corporate and private clients, operates a daily lunch program for Project Place clients and staff in the in-house commercial kitchen. 
 
Working Opportunities for Women (WOW): Our newest social enterprise at Project Place, WOW engages women by offering business services for local producers of specialty products. Employees in WOW get a hand in everything from light assembly and production, to packaging and labeling, to order fulfillment and sales and marketing. Women receive on-the-job skills and experience to change their lives. With their case managers, women (especially mothers) work on balancing personal and work life, securing benefits that come with having a family, and obtaining personal security.
Budget  $865,222.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Adults Homeless Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers
Program Short-Term Success  Our signature program uses a unique model of offering clients real pay for real work in a supported environment with wrap-around support. We provide clients with real work experience in an environment where we can help them learn life skills and coping techniques to balance work and other life stresses as they arise.  They complete a work shift: working five days a week for 4-6 months.  In addition they attend classes, learn computer skills and work with a case manager/employment specialist to identify employment goals.  Short term success is measured in completion of their work responsibilities,  completing an employment cycle, their development of skills and participation in job search efforts. 
Program Long-Term Success   Project Place' Social Enterprises gives client employees real work experience that provides them with a work history that supports job search efforts and provides on the job training which offers opportunities for individuals to learn the rigors of work with ongoing support, supervision and direction.  Individuals develop the skills the need to succeed in a work environment; skills that go beyond vocational training.  They learn how to manage change, be successful employees and move develop a career future. 
Program Success Monitored By   Project Place evaluates each program by its ability to facilitate an individual's transition from homelessness to self-reliance. We examine  1)SkillBuilding; 2) Outcomes; and 3) Retention. For this program, the outcomes are measured in small steps: coming to work on time, completing a full week, completing all tasks assigned, etc. Each client has an individual plan that sets outcomes and is revisited to measure progress.  Information is documented upon intake, and updated on a monthly basis, using a database that tracks demographics, skill acquisition, job placement, housing and retention. We feed outcomes directly into the agency database. It sets forth strategic objectives, a means of measurement, a targeted goal, and a year-to-date actual to see if we meet success criteria. Success is monitored by the number of clients who enter the enterprises; the number who complete a training period; and the number who obtain a permanent job at the end of their transitional employment.
Examples of Program Success 

In the past year,  Clean Corners…Bright Hopes, Project Pepsi, Working Opportunities for Women, and HomePlate provided 86 clients with transitional employment jobs and 61.5% of those clients found permanent employment. 100% of social enterprise clients have retained employment after 6 months and 82%  retained employment after one year. 

 


Veteran's Services

Our Veterans Services, which includes our Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP), and our outreach partnership with the New England Center for Veterans, allows us to provide our programs with tailored services specific to veterans. In addition to traditional case management and support services, clients are assessed for veterans’ benefit eligibility, provide referrals for Veterans Affairs offices and give assistance in obtaining discharge papers. Project Place served 135 veterans last year, enrolling 70 into our programs, helping 33 obtain employment. 

Budget  $207,253.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Veterans Homeless Adults
Program Short-Term Success  Short-term, we measure success in terms of small steps. For our veterans, reintegrating into society (whether it has been three weeks or thirty years since they completed their service) is a huge hurdle to overcome, and we strive to help make this transition more manageable.  Obtaining discharge papers, connecting with the VA, finding the other services that may be needed (counseling, medical attention, etc) and helping find employment and housing resources are all short term successes. Also, for those enrolled in our programs, successes can be measured in terms of showing up to class, completing assignments, meeting with specialists and case managers.  For all veterans, the ultimate goal is to find and retain permanent employment and housing, and by focusing on these smaller successes and celebrating them, we help men and women move towards long-term success.
Program Long-Term Success  For the long term, success will be measured by an veteran's ability to attain self-sufficiency, whether it be stable housing, employment or enroll in a training or education program.  Veterans Services is measured by our ability to identify and serve veterans, to engage them to enroll in programs and to follow them through post placement services so that the skills they develop are retained over the long term.  Our measurement of outcomes is the same as all our other programs: the data is collected at intake and assessed over the course of their participation and in intervals post program completion.  The data is collected and entered into the agency database and evaluated on a regular basis as part of program and agency evaluation.
Program Success Monitored By 

Project Place evaluates each program by its ability to facilitate an individual's transition from homelessness to self-reliance. We examine three areas: 1)Skill Building; 2) Outcomes; and 3) Retention. For this project, the outcomes are measured in very small steps as the population has multiple needs and problems that will take time, and in some cases, repeated intervention, to overcome.  Each client has an individual plan that sets outcomes and is revisited to measure progress.  Information on each client documented by the upon intake, and updated on a monthly basis, using a recently developed database that tracks demographics, skill acquisition, job placement, housing and retention. We feed outcome information directly into the agency database. It sets forth 6-10 strategic objectives, a means of measurement, a targeted goal, and a year-to-date actual to determine whether or not we have met our success criteria. The information is utilized to monitor and improve client programming and to set performance outcomes and targets for employment and housing.

Examples of Program Success  This past year, we assisted 135 veterans with triage, referral services and placement. We enrolled 70 into our programs, and assisted 33 individuals in obtaining permanent employment.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Suzanne Kenney
CEO Term Start June 1995
CEO Email skenney@projectplace.org
CEO Experience
Suzanne Kenney, Project Place Executive Director, has over 25 years experience in directing and managing human service programs, serving children, homeless, ex-offenders and those with disabilities. She has served at Project Place for over 20 years. Suzanne’s ability to forge critical community relationships, recognize and respond to opportunities for funding and expansion of resources, and provide focused, mission-driven strategic thinking on behalf of the agency accounts for the entrepreneurial spirit and success of the Project Place. During her tenure the agency’s net assets have increased by over 225% and programming has expanded two-fold. Suzanne was instrumental in securing City land to develop a new facility, and in initiating a Capital Campaign to help fund that endeavor, which has lead to further expansion of the agency’s programs and services, with plans to serve more individuals in 2017. She has received several most recently, the 2011 Wainwright Social Justice Award from Eastern Bank, recognizing those who have achieved outstanding success in addressing issues of social justice. Suzanne has earned a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Fairfield University, a Masters in Public Administration from Suffolk University and is a board member of Eureka Communities, the Massachusetts Housing Alliance, and the South End Business Alliance.
 
 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mr Gueirmo Rodriques Jan 1998 Jan 1994
MS. Julie Rusk 1985 1987

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mrs. Katy Dirks Director of Development --
Ms. Polly Hanson Associate Director --
Mr. Alan Lehmann Director of Finance and Social Enterprise --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Bright Idea for innovative service delivery Ash Center of Decomocratic Change, Harvard University 2012
Nominee for the Innovation Award for Nonprofits Small Business Association of New England 2012
Wainwright Social Justice Award Eastern Bank 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Massachusetts Housing and Shelter Alliance (MHSA) --
Massachusetts Nonprofit Network --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

In addition to our memberships in the Mass Housing and Shelter Alliance we have worked collaboratively with several local non-profit organizations. Project Place has a long-held belief that we cannot solve homelessness alone. We are part of Boston’s Continuum of Care alliance of 90 non-profits that coordinate homeless services. We work with service providers treating specific needs, i.e. mental health, addiction, domestic violence, etc. providing their clients housing, job training and employment skills. After completing our programs, we work with clients to transition them into other partners' programs: New England Center for Veterans (security training program) and BEST who offers hospitality, OSHA and advancing cooking and training classes both onsite and off-site. For the past 9 years we have operated a program for incarcerated women, both pre and post their release in partnership with the Suffolk County Sheriff's Dept. House of Corrections. We also collaborate with others around funding and new program development. We are currently the lead agency, managing a grant for the Dept. of Labor to provide a host of services to assist female offenders reenter the community and provide outreach services to a collaboration serving homeless veterans.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 34
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 75
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 71%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 15
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 17
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 21
Male: 14
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration No

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms Mary Kelleher
Board Chair Company Affiliation Gibson Sotheby's International Realty
Board Chair Term June 2016 - June 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Emanuel Alves John Hancock Financial Services Voting
Rajeev Balakrishna Courier Corporation Voting
Fran Berlioz-Seux Vertex Pharmaceuticals Boston Voting
Cathy Claflin Retired Voting
Eileen Connors Volunteer Voting
Bill Dillon Goulston & Storrs Voting
David Dirks Mellon Capital Investment Voting
Sara Gottman Mullen Lowe Group Voting
Jamie Hoag Lawyer Voting
Mary Kelleher Gibson Sotheby's Int'l. Real Estate Voting
Michael Kineavy The Cronin Group Voting
Jeffrey Nataupsky John Hancock Financial Services Voting
Jim Stowe Consultant Voting
Heather Wells Heather G. Wells Ltd. Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ruth Rollins Elizabeth Sone House NonVoting

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 3
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 71%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 40%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Housing and Community Development
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $2,997,598 $5,939,610 $2,770,713
Total Expenses $2,911,959 $3,306,095 $2,917,730

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $1,721,016 $1,516,293 $1,271,796
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $1,721,016 $1,516,293 $1,271,796
Individual Contributions $622,234 $659,057 $558,209
Indirect Public Support $0 -- --
Earned Revenue $449,960 $727,275 $717,403
Investment Income, Net of Losses $3,881 $2,759 $13,187
Membership Dues $0 $6,830 --
Special Events $177,758 $178,614 $209,069
Revenue In-Kind -- $2,500 $1,049
Other $22,749 $2,846,282 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $2,271,785 $2,480,541 $2,480,827
Administration Expense $476,068 $544,338 $180,578
Fundraising Expense $164,106 $281,216 $256,325
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.03 1.80 0.95
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 75% 85%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 7% 12% 13%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $1,529,676 $8,798,379 $15,461,436
Current Assets $1,282,759 $1,034,730 $1,003,392
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $1,900,000 $10,403,039
Current Liabilities $235,732 $226,909 $1,020,442
Total Net Assets $1,293,944 $6,671,470 $4,037,955

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
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2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
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3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.44 4.56 0.98

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 22% 67%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials for FY15 and FY14 and per the 990 for FY16.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. Please note, the Other revenue category for FY15 includes: forgiveness of note receivable, forgiveness of mortgage debt and loss on sale of retail commercial space.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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