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Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston, Inc.

 50 Congress Street, Suite 730
 Boston, MA 02109
[P] (617) 994-4700
[F] (617) 994-4701
www.bgcb.org
info@bgcb.org
Alexandra Fuchs
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INCORPORATED: 1893
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2103922

LAST UPDATED: 01/30/2015
Organization DBA Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

 

Mission StatementMORE »

Our mission is to help young people, especially those who need us most, build strong character and realize their full potential as responsible citizens and leaders.
 
We do this by providing: 
  • a safe haven filled with hope and opportunity
  • ongoing relationships with caring adults
  • and life-enhancing programs

Mission Statement

Our mission is to help young people, especially those who need us most, build strong character and realize their full potential as responsible citizens and leaders.
 
We do this by providing: 
  • a safe haven filled with hope and opportunity
  • ongoing relationships with caring adults
  • and life-enhancing programs

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $19,103,000.00
Projected Expense $18,250,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • YouthConnect

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Our mission is to help young people, especially those who need us most, build strong character and realize their full potential as responsible citizens and leaders.
 
We do this by providing: 
  • a safe haven filled with hope and opportunity
  • ongoing relationships with caring adults
  • and life-enhancing programs

Background Statement

For more than 120 years, Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston (BGCB) has helped young people, especially those most in need, build strong character and realize their full potential as responsible citizens and leaders. BGCB achieves this mission by providing a safe haven filled with hope and opportunity, ongoing relationships with caring adults, and life-enhancing programs. BGCB has nearly 8,000 Club members and, in total, we serve 15,000 young people, ages 6 to 18, annually in our 11 Clubs, and through programs and partnerships in Boston and Chelsea. Our service network has grown significantly over the last two decades. This is thanks to the tremendous support we receive from our exceptional community stakeholders, which includes more than140 program partners, 1,500 volunteers, and individual and institutional donors contributing 85% of BGCB’s annual operating budget.


Impact Statement

BGCB expects and empowers our members to graduate from high school prepared for college, trade school, military service, or employment; to become engaged citizens, involved in the community and registered to vote; and to practice healthy lifestyle choices. Studies show that Boys & Girls Clubs have the greatest positive impact on these outcomes when young people attend the Club at least once a week (or 52 times per year), and are retained as members for multiple years. BGCB reaches thousands of youth; however, based on research about Boston neighborhoods, we estimate that an additional 25,000 youth from low-income households still do not have access to out-of-school time programs. For these reasons, our strategic vision is not only to broaden our reach, but also deepen our impact on young people through consistent, long-term membership in high-quality programs. Our goal is to grow our service footprint and increase by 30% the number of members who attend with the frequency necessary to ensure a positive impact on their future, from 5,000 in FY13 to 6,500 by FY17.


Needs Statement

BGCB depends upon private contributions for nearly 85% of our annual operating budget. Garnering consistent annual support is crucial to our ability to continue to meet the evolving educational, social and emotional needs of the youth we serve. Unrestricted gifts allow us to use the money where it is needed most, but gifts may be designated to support a specific Club or program, or our targeted efforts.


CEO Statement

I am honored to serve as Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston's Nicholas President and CEO, and to lead this highly effective organization through an important period in its history.
 

Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston owes so much to our founders and the stewards of our mission through the decades. Today, we benefit from an exceptional reputation for our life-enhancing programming, caring staff, and welcoming facilities; a reputation that was developed and nurtured by staff and Board members who served our organization before us. We take very seriously our responsibility as the caretakers of this legacy.

 

We are deeply inspired by the productivity of so many of our Club alumni who have made life-long commitments to serving the community. We are grateful for the ongoing generosity and dedication of our Board members from the Local Advisory Boards, Board of Overseers, Board of Directors and Senior Advisory Board. We are excited about the energy and desire to give back that our new Friends Council members are bringing to the organization.

 

Outside forces may have made the past two years challenging, but our community rose to meet that challenge. I am so proud to be part of an organization in which the staff rallied around our mission with so much creativity, passion and teamwork, and our supporters asked, “How can I help?”

 

As we complete our 116th year and celebrate 100 years of service to the Roxbury community, we continue to focus on the kids, families and communities we serve.

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)

  • BGCB's service network extends across Boston and in Chelsea and includes 11 Clubs.

Specifically, these Clubs are located in following neighborhoods:

  • Charlestown
  • Dorchester
  • Jamaica Plain
  • Mattapan
  • Roslindale
  • Roxbury
  • South Boston
  • City of Chelsea
In addition, we place social workers in five police districts throughout the city, which include B-2 (Roxbury), C-11 (Dorchester), B-3 (Mattapan), D-4 (SouthEnd/Lower Roxbury), E-13 (Jamaica Plain). YouthConnect also works in two citywide units: the School Police Unitand the Youth Violence Strike Force(YVSF Gang Unit). 
 
BGCB also operates Camp Harbor View, which provides summer programming on Boston's Long Island and serves youth from across the City.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Boys and Girls Clubs (Combined)
  2. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Leadership Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

YouthConnect

 YouthConnect is an innovative program of the BGCB in partnership with the Boston Police Department. YouthConnect places licensed clinical social workers in police stations to provide voluntary prevention, intervention and advocacy services to high-risk and proven-risk youth and their families who are arrested or getting involved with the criminal justice system, and those who have already been identified as worrisome by police officers. We primarily serve clients in Boston’s “hot spot” neighborhoods, which are experiencing the highest rates of criminal activity and gang violence. Our clinical model is holistic and allows our social workers to create customized individual treatment plans that include referrals, clinical case management, advocacy, counseling, and parental guidance. All YouthConnect services are home or community-based, free, voluntary, are not time limited, and are driven by the individual’s needs, rather than mandates or insurance.

 

Budget  $832,200.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Families At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

YouthConnect’s objectives are for clients to exhibit fewer high-risk factors, take ownership of their decisions, engage with key community resources, be better equipped to make positive life choices, and be on track to a more hopeful future. Specific goals include:

  • Provide mental health and advocacy services to referred youth and families as deemed appropriate by YouthConnect social workers.
  • Build additional supports for young people so they have a safety net of caring professional adults.
  • Enhance family stability and supports.
  • Coordinate services for families between varied social service agencies and juvenile justice providers so that roles and responsibilities are clear, duplication is minimalized, treatment strategies are appropriate and cultural competency is maintained.
  • Reduce high risk behaviors that are associated with arrest and incarceration.
Program Long-Term Success 
By taking the time to build strong relationshipswith youth, YouthConnect’s clinically-trained social workers provide flexible, creative support services to police-identified young people. Understanding the complexity of these clients and using a holistic, comprehensive approach, staff work with families on an individualized basis and focus on prevention and intervention strategies. Our community-based, clinical model encourages partners such as BPD to trust and collaborate with YouthConnect,which leads to a greater likelihood of a positive future outcome for participating youth. 

 

In addition,YouthConnect’s innovative clinical model allows social workers to not onlyassist a wide-range of at-risk and high-risk youth, but to truly make an impacton the entire family. YouthConnect also works directly with siblings and parents/guardians to address their concerns and needs. We know that sometimes the most effective intervention is to enhance the supportsof the caregiver so he/she, in turn, can improve the stability of the entire household. 

 
 
 
Program Success Monitored By 

Our community-based, clinical model encourages partners such as BPD to trust and collaborate with YouthConnect, which leads to a greater likelihood of a positive future outcome for participating youth and long-term reduction in community violence and crime. YouthConnect also works to improve the long-term success of families by addressing multi-generational issues that impact this work. For this reason, YouthConnect specifically is designed to provide services to parents/guardians, teens, and younger siblings. We know that sometimes the most effective intervention to help a young person is to assist his/her parent or guardian in obtaining what he/she needs. This will inevitably have a positive impact on the teen’s social and emotional health and help stabilize and support the entire family – now and in the future.

Examples of Program Success 

A preliminary study sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found the significant changes in YouthConnect clients, including a 58% drop in weapon carrying, 64% decrease in aggressive behavior, and a significant 71% decline in victimization.

 

YouthConnect has become a national model for urban areas dealing with youth delinquency and violence - fostering similar youth outreach efforts in US communities like Albuquerque, NM.  In April 2012, YouthConnect's Executive Director, Andrea Perry, was recognized by the White House as a Champion of Change for Youth Violence Prevention.  Additionally, YouthConnect's leadership has trained law enforcement, social workers, and youth-serving agencies from locally and abroad on best practices and strategies used when working with youth in the juvenile justice system. 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Josh Kraft
CEO Term Start July 2008
CEO Email jkraft@bgcb.org
CEO Experience

Josh Kraft, an entrepreneurial leader and experienced manager, is Nicholas President and Chief Executive Officer of Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston. Josh brings his dedication to youth work to his leadership of the organization, whose high-impact programs enable 14,000 children and teens from low-income neighborhoods in Greater Boston to become responsible citizens and leaders.

An alumnus of Williams College with a Master of Arts degree in Education and Social Policy from Harvard Graduate School of Education, Josh is the Founding Executive Director of Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston's Gerald and Darlene Jordan Club in Chelsea. Josh led the after-school program from the basement of a public housing development serving 75 youth per day through four temporary spaces, until the current state-of-the-art 44,000 square foot building could be built. Josh joined Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston at the South Boston Club, where he led an outreach program for at-risk youth. After graduating from college, he worked as a teacher and coach at a local prep school.

Josh serves on the Board of Directors for Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Foundation, Boston After-School & Beyond, and Julie’s Family Learning Program in South Boston, and is a volunteer soccer and basketball coach in Newton.

Concurrently, Josh manages community relations as the Director of Strategic Partnerships for the New England Patriots Foundation. In this role, he coordinates and oversees numerous team-led initiatives, including: License Plate Campaign, Kids Cafe Partnership, Patriot Platelet Pedalers and Community MVP Awards.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Alexandra Fuchs Chief Advancement Officer --
Patricia Gannon Executive Vice President, Finance & Planning --
Jerry Steimel Executive Vice President / Operations --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Bridge Award for Exceptional Partnership - Condon Club Triumph Collaborative of Boston Public Schools 2009
Executive of the Year Award - Andrea Swain Yankee Chapter of the Association of Boys & Girls Clubs Professional Association 2009
Navigation Award for Extraordinary Improvement in Program Quality - Sumner Club Triumph Collaborative of Boston Public Schools 2009
Science Club of the Year - Yawkey Club of Roxbury United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley 2009
Character and Leadership Development Honor Award - Camp Harbor View Boys & Girls Clubs of America, Sponsored by MetLife Foundation 2008

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2012
United Way Member Agency 1993
Boys and Girls Clubs of America 1906
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 131
Number of Part Time Staff 100
Number of Volunteers 1,500
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 76
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 113
Hispanic/Latino: 39
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 136
Male: 95
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Jonathan G. Davis
Board Chair Company Affiliation The Davis Companies
Board Chair Term Nov 2010 - Nov 2013
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Maureen Alphonse-Charles City Year, Inc. Voting
Jeffrey C. Bloomberg Gordon Brothers Group, LLC Voting
Michael E. Bronner Digitas and Upromise, Inc. Voting
Emily Brown No Affiliation Voting
Joseph P. Campanelli Flagstar Bank Voting
Lilian W. Cheung Harvard School of Public Health Voting
Laurence Chud Harvard Medical School Voting
Stephanie Connaughton Community Volunteer Voting
Michele Courton Brown The Efficacy Institute Voting
Jonathan G. Davis The Davis Companies Voting
William A. Earon Coastal Capital Advisors, LLC Voting
Sandra M. Edgerley No Affiliation Voting
Corinne L. Ferguson Community Volunteer Voting
Karen M. Firestone Aureus Asset Management LLC Voting
John Fish Suffolk Construction Company Voting
Susan E. Florence Christie's Voting
Ruthanne Fuller N/A, Strategic Planner Voting
Robert Gallery Bank of America Voting
Mike Gordon Vinik Asset Management LLC Voting
Vicary M. Graham BNY Mellon Voting
Lawrence D. Greenberg Alydar Capital Voting
Donna K. Hazard Community Volunteer Voting
Ronald A. Homer RBC Global Asset Management (U.S.) Inc. Voting
Joseph L. Hooley State Street Corporation Voting
Ogden Hunnewell Nordic Properties, Inc. Voting
Durant A. Hunter Ridgeway Partners LLC Voting
Bruce Jacobs Westfield Capital Management Voting
David E. Johnson Bain & Co. Voting
Jeffrey F. Jones Edwards Angell Palmer & Dodge, LLC Voting
Darlene L. Jordan Gerald R. Jordan Foundation Voting
Marilyn T. Keane Community Volunteer Voting
Brian J. Knez Castanea Partners Voting
Thomas A. Knott Consultant Voting
Michael A. Krupka Bain Capital Partners Voting
John D. Macomber Building Vision, Inc. Voting
Elena M. Matlack Community Volunteer Voting
Holly McGrath Bruce The Highland Street Foundation Voting
Christopher J. McKown Iora Health Voting
William L. McMahon Thermo Fisher Scientific Voting
Janice Morris Fidelity Investments Voting
Brian T. Moynihan Bank of America Voting
Thomas Niedermeyer Liberty Square Asset Management Voting
Saul J. Pannell Wellington Management Co. Voting
Randy Peeler Berkshire Partners LLC Voting
Bryan Rafanelli Rafanelli Events Management Voting
Bernadette T. Rehnert Community Volunteer Voting
Laura C. Reynolds Community Volunteer Voting
Paul J. Rooney EBS Insurance Brokers, Inc. Voting
Meredith C. Shachoy CMS Partners LLC Voting
Greg A. Shell GMO LLC Voting
Robert J. Small Berkshire Partners LLC Voting
Dana Smith No Affiliation Voting
Troy L. Stanfield Castanea Partners Voting
Kimberly Steimle Suffolk Construction Co., Inc. Voting
R. Gregg Stone III Kestrel Management, LLC Voting
Michael J. Swenson Goldman, Sachs & Co. Voting
Richard A. Voke Law Office of Richard A. Voke Voting
Herbert S. Wagner III The Baupost Group Voting
Frank V. Wisneski Wellington Management Co. Voting
Stephen Woodsum Summit Partners Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 50
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): 1 Middle Eastern
Gender Female: 23
Male: 34
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Diversity & Inclusion
  • Executive
  • Facilities
  • Finance
  • Human Resources / Personnel
  • Investment
  • Marketing
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $19,103,000.00
Projected Expense $18,250,000.00
Form 990s

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $40,784,461 $20,491,342 $22,728,263
Total Expenses $20,483,724 $19,132,153 $17,706,075

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- $3,950,411 --
Government Contributions $1,259,982 $1,055,955 $806,950
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $1,259,982 $1,055,955 $806,950
Individual Contributions $30,397,051 $11,742,606 $11,846,324
Indirect Public Support $612,686 $746,109 $791,013
Earned Revenue $3,081,323 $3,091,376 $2,841,048
Investment Income, Net of Losses $3,887,535 $-385,905 $4,856,702
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $425,186 $592,860 $204,154
Other $1,120,698 $-302,070 $1,382,072

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $14,063,040 $13,145,958 $12,009,557
Administration Expense $3,334,605 $3,196,282 $2,997,472
Fundraising Expense $3,086,079 $2,789,913 $2,699,046
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.99 1.07 1.28
Program Expense/Total Expenses 69% 69% 68%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 10% 16% 20%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $92,038,617 $72,697,985 $71,850,177
Current Assets $13,392,155 $914,905 $12,730,586
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $724,500
Current Liabilities $2,577,144 $3,537,249 $3,324,130
Total Net Assets $89,461,473 $69,160,736 $67,801,547

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $22,000,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose BGCB is has begun the quiet phase of comprehensive campaign which includes a $10 million investment in renovations to the South Boston Boys & Girls Club.
Campaign Goal $10,000,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates July 2012 - June 2017
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.20 0.26 3.83

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 1%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Please note the Administration expense category for fiscal years 2013, 2012 and 2011 includes "depreciation expense." For fiscal years 2013 and 2012, the Administration expense category also includes "comprehensive campaign expenses."
 
The Other revenue category above for fiscal years 2013, 2012 and 2011 includes "pension liability adjustment" and "recovery of doubtful pledges,"  when applicable. 
 
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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