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Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston, Inc.

 200 High Street, Suite 3B
 Boston, MA 02110
[P] (617) 994-4700
[F] (617) 994-4701
www.bgcb.org
[email protected]
Becky Crawford
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INCORPORATED: 1893
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2103922

LAST UPDATED: 10/03/2018
Organization DBA Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston (BGCB) is to help young people, especially those who need us most, build strong character and realize their full potential as responsible citizens and leaders.
 
We do this by providing: 
  • a safe haven filled with hope and opportunity,
  • ongoing relationships with caring adults, and
  • life-enhancing programs.

Mission Statement

The mission of Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston (BGCB) is to help young people, especially those who need us most, build strong character and realize their full potential as responsible citizens and leaders.
 
We do this by providing: 
  • a safe haven filled with hope and opportunity,
  • ongoing relationships with caring adults, and
  • life-enhancing programs.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Income $25,671,000.00
Projected Expense $27,036,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Education & STEM Program
  • Leadership Programs
  • Sports & Fitness Programs
  • The Arts
  • YouthConnect

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston (BGCB) is to help young people, especially those who need us most, build strong character and realize their full potential as responsible citizens and leaders.
 
We do this by providing: 
  • a safe haven filled with hope and opportunity,
  • ongoing relationships with caring adults, and
  • life-enhancing programs.

Background Statement

Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston (BGCB) has been enriching the lives of children and teens from challenging economic, social, and family circumstances for nearly 125 years. BGCB's outstanding history in the community began in 1893 when its first local Club, the Bunker Hill Boys' Club, opened in Charlestown. The Roxbury Club (now Yawkey Club of Roxbury) followed in 1910, and the South Boston Club opened in 1938. In these early years, the "Boys Club" focused on activities such as carpentry, printing, and painting.  In 1981, girls became full Club members at all BGCB locations and the organization's name changed to reflect this advancement.

BGCB's service network has grown significantly over the last two decades. The original Chelsea Club (now Gerald and Darlene Jordan Club/Kraft Family Youth Center) opened in the Innes Housing Development in 1993, and the Blue Hill Club/George Robert White Youth Development Center in Dorchester opened in 1995 in response to spikes in neighborhood youth violence. Our YouthConnect program, which places licensed clinical social workers in Boston police districts, was founded in 1996, and in 2000, BGCB opened its first Shared-Space Club located in a public school. Our newest Club, the Mattapan Teen Center, opened in the former branch library building in Fall 2014 as BGCB's first Club dedicated to meeting the needs of local teenagers. The organization's growth is largely attributed to the tremendous support we receive from our exceptional stakeholders, including nearly 300 program partners, 1,500 volunteers, and generous individual and institutional donors, contributing 80% of BGCB's annual operating budget.
 
 
Today, BGCB has 6,000 active Club members and, in total, serves 14,000 young people, ages 6 to 18, annually in our 11 Clubs, and through our programs and partnerships in Boston and Chelsea.

Impact Statement

Academic & Life Success: Members will gain the skills, knowledge, training, and education to pursue their goals/interests. Of our 68 high school seniors, 94% graduated last spring; 91% of graduates were accepted to college/trade school. Last year, 93% of members ages 6–18 were on grade level, with 80% receiving mostly As and Bs on their report cards. 95% percent of BGCB members expect to graduate high school, while 88% expect to go to college, putting them on track to earn more than double the salary of people without a degree.

Healthy Development: Members make and model healthy physical, social, and emotional choices. All our staff work to promote mental health, self-esteem, and resiliency, critical antidotes to many of the risks and challenges our members face in their lives. BGCB’s Health360 Initiative, our comprehensive health and wellness strategy, encourages members and staff of all abilities to engage in daily physical activity, make healthy nutrition choices, employ good decision-making skills, and avoid risky behaviors. Last year, 77% of BGCB members engaged in at least 60 minutes of physical activity at least three days per week; 54% met that activity target at least 5 days/week. Nearly 70% of club members eat fruit 2+ times/day; 40% reported eating 3+ vegetables/day.

Character & Community: Members develop healthy relationships with peers and adults while building the character to be role models and leaders. Youth who volunteer just one hour per week are 50% less likely to abuse substances or engage in other risky behaviors. 53% of BGCB teens volunteered at their Club, school, or community at least once a month last year, compared to 25% of Massachusetts adults who volunteer. Among all members, 81% agreed that they had engaged in activities to help their community.


Needs Statement

BGCB depends upon private contributions for roughly 80% of our annual operating budget. Garnering consistent annual support is crucial to our ability to continue to meet the evolving educational, social and emotional needs of the youth we serve. Unrestricted gifts allow us to use the money where it is needed most, but gifts may be designated to support a specific Club or program, or our targeted efforts.


CEO Statement

I am honored to serve as Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston's Nicholas President and CEO, and to lead this highly effective organization through an important period in its history.
 

Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston owes so much to our founders and the stewards of our mission through the decades. Today, we benefit from an exceptional reputation for our life-enhancing programming, caring staff, and welcoming facilities; a reputation that was developed and nurtured by staff and Board members who served our organization before us. We take very seriously our responsibility as the caretakers of this legacy.

 

We are deeply inspired by the productivity of so many of our Club alumni who have made life-long commitments to serving the community. We are grateful for the ongoing generosity and dedication of our Board members from the Local Advisory Boards, Board of Trustees, Board of Directors, Senior Advisory Board, and Artemis Circle. We are excited about the energy and desire to give back that our Friends Council members and Trustees Emeriti are bringing to the organization.

 

I am so proud to work with our dedicated youth development staff who bring their creativity, passion and teamwork to answer the question “How can I help this child today to have a brighter future tomorrow?”

 

We are proud to be celebrating 125 years of service to Boston, and look forward to continuing to focus on the kids, families and communities who need us - and you - the most.

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
City of Boston- East Boston
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
BGCB's service network extends across Boston and in Chelsea and includes 11 Clubs. 

Specifically, these Clubs are located in following neighborhoods:

  • Charlestown
  • Dorchester
  • Jamaica Plain
  • Mattapan
  • Roslindale
  • Roxbury
  • South Boston
  • City of Chelsea
In addition, our Youth Connect program places social workers in six police districts throughout the city, which include B-2 (Roxbury), C-11 (Dorchester), B-3 (Mattapan), D-4 (SouthEnd/Lower Roxbury), E-13 (Jamaica Plain), and A-7 (East Boston). YouthConnect also works in three citywide units: the School Police Unit, the Youth Violence Strike Force (YVSF; Gang Unit), and the Domestic Violence Unit. 

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Boys and Girls Clubs (Combined)
  2. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Leadership Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Education & STEM Program

 

Our Clubs' Education Program uses 5 key components: homework help and tutoring, high-yield learning activities, incentives, parental involvement, and collaboration with schools, all designed to strengthen academic success.

We provide Power Hour homework help/tutoring to 1,600+ youth every day, in addition to a wide variety of high-yield learning activities, including science, technology, and literacy activities, all supplementing and reinforcing members’ school-time learning.

Teens receive focused supports in our Life After the Club strategy to help them envision and prepare for their futures. Teens attend staff-led multi-day college tours, participate in career exploration and preparation activities including job shadowing, resume writing workshops, and mock job interviews, and learn about requirements for various careers so they can plan their high school course of studies.

Our Technology/STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) programming is centered in our Computer Clubhouses, and drives members towards age-appropriate goals:

- Grades 1 to 5: EXPOSE members to STEM content and careers. This is done through high-yield, targeted programming that utilizes hands on curriculum, experiential learning (i.e. field trips), and access to STEM professionals.

Evidence shows youth in gr. 1 to 5 are open and excited about STEM learning. The main goal is to nurture this excitement, demystify what a STEM professional is (not all white guys), and expose them to new STEM related experiences (adventure club, MOS, Green City Growers, MGH Stem Club).

- Grades 6 to 8: INSPIRE members to purse STEM courses, content, and careers. This is done by continuing to challenge members with exciting and interesting STEM related activities, as well as building relationships with STEM professionals and STEM career pathways.

Evidence shows youth in gr. 6 to 8 begin to lose interest in STEM subjects. The main goal is to continue to engage youth in STEM related activities. Youth in these grades begin to self-select into STEM courses in middle then into high school. The course path way that they set for themselves in these grades, will impact their career pathway options when looking into post-high school options.

- Grades 9 to 12: ASPIRE to purse STEM careers. We seek to support and motivate members in grades 9 to 12 to self-select into appropriate STEM courses and seek career experience/exposure to STEM careers. This is done by supporting members in their high school course selection, applying/gaining internships, career speakers, and career shadowing.

Evidence shows that youth in gr 9 to 12 need to self-select into the appropriate STEM courses, in order to set themselves up for success when they begin a post-secondary ed program in a STEM field. One of the biggest growing career fields is in the middle skilled STEM fields (middle-skill STEM jobs that require associate's degrees or occupational certifications—such as computer support specialists, web developers, and engineering technicians—are in the highest demand).

 
Budget  1,119,745
Category  Education, General/Other Afterschool Enrichment
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
Members will consistently complete homework and receive tutoring and supports as needed. This "homework first" approach will lead to good grades in school and a positive attitude towards their ability to success academically.
 
Teens will apply to join TechTeams to delve more deeply into a wide variety of technology fields and activities, and to take responsibility for learning and leading younger members in their STEM explorations.
Program Long-Term Success  A key goal for all BGCB members is to stay in school and graduate from high school with the skills, knowledge, training, and education to pursue their goals/interests.
Program Success Monitored By 

BGCB implements a range of evaluation tools to measure the impact of our programs, including annual member surveys, bi-annual family surveys, alumni surveys, focus groups, and program specific pre- and post-testing.

BGCB measures the following indicators to determine whether members are on track to achieve positive results in each of our priority outcome areas:

These are the outcomes measured for our Education Programs:

-Average daily attendance in Power Hour, a BGCA homework program that is part of the evidence-based Project Learn strategy
-Percent of high school senior members with a post-Club plan
-Percent of Club seniors who graduate high school
-Percent of members who feel what they learn in school will be useful in the future
-Percent of teens who can vision what a successful future looks like for themselves
-Percent of teens acquiring/achieving certain skills or milestones
Examples of Program Success 

Academic & Life Success: Our goal is that members will gain the skills, knowledge, training, and education to pursue their goals/interests. Of our 68 high school seniors, 94% (64 out of 68) graduated this spring, and 87% were accepted to a college or trade school (91% of graduating seniors). This compares to 73% of Boston Public School students who graduated in four years in 2017. Last year, 93% of our members ages 6 – 18 were on grade level, with 80% receiving mostly As and Bs on their report cards. 95% percent of BGCB members expect to graduate high school, while 88% expect to go to college, putting them on track to earn more than double the salary of people without a degree.


Leadership Programs

To help young people cultivate good character and citizenship, BGCB's leadership program ensures our members have opportunities to support and influence their Clubs and communities, develop a sense of civic responsibility, sustain meaningful relationships, and respect their own and others’ cultural identities. Leadership programs include:

- Keystone Club, ages 14-18, designed to positively impact participants in academic success, career preparation, and community service. 

- Torch Club, ages 11-13, helps members create activities in service to Club and community, education, health and fitness, and social recreation.

- Young Leaders program enables 13- to 14-year-old members to be junior counselors at our Summer Camps. They receive stipends for camp tasks and attend trainings focused on career exploration, conflict resolution, and community involvement.

- Junior Staff program hires Club teens to work as role models for young members and assist full-time staff.


Budget  112,600
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

All of these enriching programs are helping members develop skills, a positive self-image, and a desire to help others. At each Club, BGCB’s leadership programs are led by our professional, full-time Teen Directors and Masters-level, licensed social workers. By participating in BGCB’s targeted programs and activities, members are making significant progress toward achieving positive outcomes.

Program Long-Term Success 

BGCB’s leadership programs are a valuable community resource; they provide young people with a foundation of skills, relationships, and opportunities to which they might otherwise not have access to, and are increasing their ability to plan for and achieve success in their post-Club lives. In addition, these critical programs are empowering young people to develop the skills and knowledge needed to become responsible citizens and positive forces in their communities.


Program Success Monitored By 

BGCB implements a range of evaluation tools to measure the impact of our programs, including annual member surveys, bi-annual family surveys, alumni surveys, focus groups, and program specific pre- and post-testing.

BGCB measures the following indicators to determine whether members are on track to achieve positive results in each of our priority outcome areas:

Good Character and Citizenship

· Frequency of teens volunteering in the community

· Frequency of all members volunteering at the club

· Concern for other people

· Concern for the community

· Leadership acumen

· Conflict resolution skills

Examples of Program Success  Character & Community: Our goal is to help members develop healthy relationships with peers and adults while building the character to be role models and leaders. Youth who volunteer just one hour or more a week are 50% less likely to abuse alcohol, cigarettes, become pregnant, or engage in other risky behaviors. BGCB’s commitment to developing our members’ leadership skills BGCB’s commitment to developing our members’ leadership skills and a habit of volunteerism produces results, as 53% of teens responding on our annual member survey said they had volunteered at their Club, school, or community at least once a month, compared to 25% of Massachusetts adults who volunteer. Among all members, 81% agreed that they had engaged in activities to help their community.

Sports & Fitness Programs

Sports, Fitness & Recreation: BGCB’s programs encourage all members—boys and girls, both those athletically inclined and those talented in other areas—to engage in daily physical activity, make healthy nutrition choices, employ good decision-making skills, and avoid risky behaviors.

Daily opportunities for physical activity are offered in our gyms, aquatics centers, and throughout the Clubs. These programs teach skills to support life-long well-being, healthy habits, positive use of leisure time, stress management, and social skills, while having active fun in a safe environment. Members can participate in team or individual sports, dancing, swimming, outdoor adventure, yoga, rock wall climbing, and even meditation or fitness classes and clubs.
 
Budget  967,625
Category  Recreation & Sports, General/Other Athletics & Sports
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
Short-term, we see members staying active, learning new sports, participating in our inclusive (no try-outs) Club teams and leagues, and burning off energy in productive, healthy ways.
 


Program Long-Term Success  Our goal is for all members to practice healthy lifestyle choices, adopt a healthy diet, and make a lifelong commitment to fitness. All our staff work to promote mental health, self-esteem, and resiliency, critical antidotes to many of the risks and challenges our members face in their lives. BGCB's Health360 Initiative, our comprehensive health and wellness strategy, encourages members of all abilities to engage in daily physical activity, make healthy nutrition choices, employ good decision-making skills, and avoid risky behaviors.

 

Since launching Health360 agency-wide last year, our members have shown greater improvement in rates of exercise, healthy eating, and reduced substance abuse. While only 23% of Massachusetts adolescents engage in 60+ minutes of physical activity daily, 57% of BGCB members achieve that recommended level of physical activity. Nearly 80% of Club members eat fruit twice a day or more, compared with only 37% of the state’s adults.
 
Program Success Monitored By 

BGCB implements a range of evaluation tools to measure the impact of our programs, including annual member surveys, bi-annual family surveys, alumni surveys, focus groups, and program specific pre- and post-testing.

BGCB measures the following indicators to determine whether members are on track to achieve positive results in each of our priority outcome areas:

Healthy Lifestyles

· Number of days members report getting 60 min+ of physical activity

· Percent of members eating 2+/fruit per day

· Percent of members eating 3+/vegetables per day

By tracking these items, BGCB monitors members’ behavior and attitudes. The data are used to guide each Club in refining its offerings by choosing a mix of targeted programs that best meet the individual needs of each member. With our focus on continuous improvement, BGCB compares results across Clubs, by demographic group and over time, to analyze trends, highlight and replicate best practices and create programmatic or infrastructure interventions to support member development.

Examples of Program Success 

Our goal is to ensure that members make and model healthy physical, social, and emotional choices. All our staff work to promote mental health, self-esteem, and resiliency, critical antidotes to many of the risks and challenges our members face in their lives. BGCB’s Health360 Initiative, our comprehensive health and wellness strategy, encourages members and staff of all abilities to engage in daily physical activity, make healthy nutrition choices, employ good decision-making skills, and avoid risky behaviors. Last year, 77% of BGCB members engaged in at least 60 minutes of physical activity at least three days per week; 54% met that activity target at least five days per week. Nearly 70% of club members eat fruit twice a day or more, the 40% of members reported eating 3+ vegetables per day.

 


The Arts

Whether through visual or performing arts, BGCB’s Arts programs are designed to stimulate a variety of learning styles and emphasize creative discovery.

 
Members can explore photography, ceramics, jewelry, art appreciation, painting, fabric arts, and digital design, as well as many types of dance, theater, and creative writing.
 
Our Music Clubhouses provide one-on-one music lessons, group practices, performances, and the resources to record and mix the music members create.
Budget  --
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

Younger age groups rotate through the Art Room and Music Clubhouse daily, exposing members to a variety of media, artists, techniques and instruments for creative expression as well as opportunities to learn about different cultures through art and music. Teens can choose their creative activities including one-on-one music lessons, art appreciation, dance, digital design, and more. Members participate in one exhibit, show, reading, performance, or publication each season, allowing them to showcase their work and learnings. Members also attend art- and music-related field trips, including those that expose them to art and design-based or performance-focused career opportunities.

 

By learning to play an instrument or compose an original song, members learn self-discipline, build self-confidence, gain leadership experience, develop technology skills, exercise their creativity, express themselves, and develop a life-long appreciation for music. This fun programming is also an effective tool for attracting and retaining teens.

Program Long-Term Success 

The Arts at BGCB are designed to give members opportunities based on three key aspects of The Arts:

· Art Appreciation – learning about the arts throughout the ages and throughout the world.

· Art Creation – creating works of art in a wide variety of media.

· Art Performance – self-expression through movement.

Our Art Directors collaborate with other Club staff and programs to integrate the Arts into all areas of our core outcomes.

Program Success Monitored By 
With our focus on continual improvement, BGCB implements a range of evaluation tools to measure the impact of our programs, including annual member surveys, bi-annual family surveys, alumni surveys, focus groups, and program specific pre- and post-testing. A primary metric used across all programs is daily attendance as members rotate through our different program areas and activities.
 
One of the most striking reflections of the success of our Arts program can be seen in the art our members create. BGCB's Edgerley Family South Boston Club has created productions of The Lion King and Annie, both starring Club members as actors, singers, dancers, and with music and sets created by our members. Our young musicians perform throughout their neighborhoods - at Porch Fest, local road races, and at BGCB's own Music and Art showcases.
Examples of Program Success  Dawn, an alumna of the South Boston Club, graduated from Berklee College of Music, and completed her externship in Music Therapy at the Club. Growing up in foster care, Dawn says she never had much to call her own, except music. At the Club, Dawn now works with many children from unstable, low-income households, and aims to teach them that music can provide the sense of consistency they need. One Club father, a single parent following his wife’s death, described Dawn as “the most vital and important female figure in my twin boys’ lives.” Since the boys Matt & Mark have had the opportunity to work with Dawn – one plays bass guitar, the other keyboard – “they have grown, developed, and displayed a sense of confidence in every area and facet of their lives...Dawn has a patience, tenderness, and complete devotion to them and their needs along with every single child she meets or works with.” Matt and Mark continue to perform with the Club’s Harmaniacs band.

YouthConnect

YouthConnect Social Workers serve youth arrested or involved with the criminal justice system, and those identified as high-risk by police officers. Alongside police, these Social Workers serve clients in Boston's "hot spot" neighborhoods experiencing high rates of criminal activity and gang violence: A-7 (East Boston), B-2 (Roxbury), B-3 (Dorchester/Mattapan), C-11 (Dorchester), D-4 (South End/Lower Roxbury), E-13 (Jamaica Plain) plus 3 citywide units: Youth Violence Strike Force (YVSF - Gang Unit), Domestic Violence, and School Police.

These youth face multiple challenges: exposure to trauma, mental illness (self or family), chronic substance abuse, poor educational achievement, and/or gang involvement. Last year, 86% of YouthConnect clients expressed personal safety fears, 76% had trauma history, 91% were struggling with a mental health issue. Young people exposed to violence are more likely to have trouble in school and engage in delinquent behaviors. They face additional stressors including poverty, housing instability, substance abuse, family criminal behavior, acute trauma, and violence.

These barriers impact their capacity to manage day-to-day life, making YouthConnect services critical to helping these high-risk youth prepare for a more stable future. Understanding the complex needs of these clients, staff use a holistic, comprehensive approach, customized for each family, while providing prevention and intervention strategies. Unlike many mental health service providers, YouthConnect Social Workers meet with clients wherever they are most comfortable (school, community, at home, etc.); our services are free, voluntary, and not time-bound. This community-based, clinical model instills trust and promotes collaboration with partners like BPD, leading to a greater likelihood of positive outcomes for clients.

YouthConnect offered services to 956 police-referred clients last year and provided services to 812 (85%). An additional 288 youth family members, primarily clients’ siblings, also received clinical services, for 1,110 total youth served last year. YouthConnect utilizes a 4-tier treatment plan:

1. Intake & Assessment: Youth/families who accept services receive a clinical assessment to determine strengths, needs, and stressors to plan appropriate levels of service. Families are asked what assistance they would like to improve their situation. Social Workers determine which agencies are already involved with the youth and family to strengthen these relationships.

2. Resource Coordination: YouthConnect clinicians provide short-term interventions to arrange appropriate resources meeting short- and long-term needs, connecting clients to pre-existing community-based social service providers. These meet a variety of needs including recreational, educational, spiritual, employment, legal and/or mental health. Typical duration in this tier: 1 – 3 months.

3. Clinical Case Management: YouthConnect Social Workers facilitate collaborative case conferences with clients’ pre-existing major service providers (DYS, DCF, and school-based services) to identify roles and coordinate culturally appropriate care given the needs of the family. This open-ended level of service aims to create a safety net of services for the youth/family. Typical duration: 6–12 months.

4. Therapy Services: YouthConnect Social Workers provide weekly therapy to youth and their families for issues related to truancy, delinquency, safety, substance use, school performance, victimization, and family functioning. At this stage, youth are generally seen individually; family meetings are held monthly. Typical duration: 1–3+ years, based on individualized treatment goals.

YouthConnect services are driven by the individual’s or family's needs, rather than mandates or insurance, allowing services to impact the entire family with supports for the parents/guardians and younger siblings. Oftentimes, the most effective intervention is to improve the stability of the entire home.

Budget  $1,088,222.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Families At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

YouthConnect’s objectives are for clients to exhibit fewer high-risk factors and behaviors, take ownership of their decisions, engage with key community resources, be better equipped to make positive life choices, and be on track to a more hopeful future. Specific goals include:

  • Provide mental health and advocacy services to referred youth and families as deemed appropriate by YouthConnect social workers.
  • Build additional supports for young people so they have a safety net of caring professional adults.
  • Enhance family stability and supports.
  • Coordinate services for families between varied social service agencies and juvenile justice providers so that roles and responsibilities are clear, duplication is minimalized, treatment strategies are appropriate and cultural competency is maintained.
  • Reduce high risk behaviors that are associated with arrest and incarceration.
Program Long-Term Success 
By taking the time to build strong relationships with youth, YouthConnect’s clinically-trained social workers provide flexible, creative support services to police-identified young people. Understanding the complexity of these clients and using a holistic, comprehensive approach, staff work with families on an individualized basis and focus on prevention and intervention strategies. Our community-based, clinical model encourages partners such as BPD to trust and collaborate with YouthConnect,which leads to a greater likelihood of a positive future outcome for participating youth. 

 

In addition,YouthConnect’s innovative clinical model allows social workers not only to assist a wide-range of at-risk and high-risk youth, but to truly make an impact on the entire family. YouthConnect also works directly with siblings and parents/guardians to address their concerns and needs. We know that sometimes the most effective intervention is to enhance the supports of the caregiver so he/she, in turn, can improve the stability of the entire household. 

 
 
 
Program Success Monitored By 

The YouthConnect model has proven to be highly effective in dealing with this targeted population that fuels around 42% of all gun-related violence in the City of Boston. Former Boston Police Commissioner William Evans stated, “YouthConnect is a valuable partner in Boston Police Department’s violence prevention effort, providing at-risk youth with resources and skills necessary to create successful pathways for positive life-choices.” Since its inception, YouthConnect has helped over 14,000 at-risk youth get back on track.

YouthConnect works to address the underlying problems and social issues that contribute to juvenile crime and delinquency by working with the entire family, not just the troubled youth. Data has shown that lack of family supports and multiple generational experiences of arrest and violence significantly affects risky behavior in youth. Using YouthConnect's four-tier service model, social workers develop and provide appropriate intervention strategies. On average, throughout the year, social workers:

  • Initiate over 1,000 referrals to a variety of community-based agencies;
  • Spend over 4,000 hours providing clinical case management services;
  • Spend 680 hours creating safety plans with clients;
  • Provide 1,600 sessions of individual and/or family therapy.

We measure outcomes based on a psycho-social assessment that evaluates 18 domains of a person's life to determine the level of needs of the individual and family. Once assessments are completed, staff create goals identified by the client that are specifically tied to the assessment scores that were captured. Social workers complete assessments intermittently throughout our time working with a family, and a final assessment occurs when the client completes their treatment plan to show the progress a family or young person has made throughout their time with YouthConnect.

Examples of Program Success 

The most recent study sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found significant changes in YouthConnect clients, including a 58% drop in weapon carrying, 64% decrease in aggressive behavior, and a significant 71% decline in victimization.

Clients are teens like Daisy* who is working with her YouthConnect Social Worker to stay on track towards high school graduation, and shares this progress report:

Daisy is a 17-year-old Asian female living in East Boston with her elderly aunt. A-7 officers have been concerned about this client due to her previous involvement with both 18th street and MS-13 affiliated peers, as well as frequently engaging in truancy and running away last year. When I met Daisy, it became clear that she has put tremendous effort into changing things for herself and continues to display motivation to maintain these changes. Recently promoted to 12th grade at her high school, Daisy has been working with staff to ensure that she meets graduation requirements. Though she does struggle with attendance, she has been active in brainstorming strategies that could address the barriers she faces and recently agreed to participate in night classes to make up credits she is missing.

Early on, Daisy agreed to meet with me weekly for therapy sessions to discuss both her past behaviors as well as current challenges. From the beginning, I have been impressed by her level of insight and her willingness to be open in conversations where she not only acknowledges her mistakes, but talks about lessons she's learned and how she hopes her peers can be spared from having to learn the same lessons. We frequently talk about the dangers of associating with peer gangs, conflicts that arise in the community, and the decisions that she constantly must make to keep herself and her loved ones safe.

While Daisy still stumbles from time to time, she has shown the capacity to utilize supports when needed and continually demonstrates a desire to reach goals. She is currently looking into applying to colleges, and has begun to attend informational meetings at local colleges. Daisy has spoken about her desire to go into social work, so that she can support young people who may be going through experiences similar to those she has faced, and hopefully make a difference in their lives.

*Names were changed to protect the confidentiality of the individuals served by YouthConnect.

YouthConnect has become a national model for urban areas dealing with youth delinquency and violence - fostering similar youth outreach efforts in US communities like Albuquerque, NM. In April 2012, YouthConnect's Executive Director, Andrea Perry, was recognized by the White House as a Champion of Change for Youth Violence Prevention. Additionally, YouthConnect's leadership has trained law enforcement, social workers, and youth-serving agencies from locally and abroad on best practices and strategies used when working with youth in the juvenile justice system.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Josh Kraft
CEO Term Start July 2008
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Josh Kraft, Nicholas President and CEO, is in his 28th year of serving youth at Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston. Prior to accepting his current role in 2008, he was the Founding Executive Director of BGCB’s Gerald and Darlene Jordan Club in Chelsea. For 15 years, he led the after-school program from the basement of a public housing development, until the current state-of-the-art building could be built.

Josh serves on the boards of Beaver Country Day School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Camp Harbor View Foundation and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Foundation. He is a co-chair of the Hate Crimes Task Force for Massachusetts and also an Overseer for Lasell College.

Concurrently, Josh is the President of New England Patriots Charitable Foundation where he oversees numerous initiatives, such as Game Change: The Patriots Anti-Violence Partnership, the Community MVP Awards and Celebrate Volunteerism.

He received his Bachelor’s from Williams College, and his Master’s in Education and Social Policy from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Becky Crawford Executive VP, Development

Becky Crawford, Executive Vice President of Development, joined Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston in 2010, serving first as the Director of Individual Giving until assuming her current role in 2015. She now leads the team of 19 professionals in fundraising activities that generate more than $18 million annually from individual, corporate, foundation and government funding sources. Becky works closely with the CEO and the Boards of Directors and Trustees, as well as with Committees including Board Governance, Campaign & Major Gifts, Development & Marketing, the Corporate Leadership Council, the Friends Council comprised of young professionals and the Artemis Circle for women. She also managed the implementation of BGCB’s Opening Doors comprehensive fundraising campaign that launched in July 2012 and raised nearly $130 million, exceeding the Campaign goal of $125 million. Becky has more than 25 years of non-profit management experience. Prior to joining BGCB she was the Director of Individual Giving at the New England Aquarium, worked at the Boston Symphony Orchestra managing development communications and the Boston Symphony annual fund and as Director of Marketing at Boston Ballet. She has a BS in Journalism and BA in Spanish from the University of Kansas and also studied media management at the graduate level.

Patricia Gannon Executive Vice President, Finance & Planning

Patricia (Trish) Gannon, Executive Vice President, Finance & Planning, Chief Financial Officer, joined BGCB in 2006. Gannon provides strategic leadership for the organization and direct oversight of all financial functions, ensuring long-range sustainability as well as fiscal stability for the agency's programs and Clubs. She manages a range of activities to support the financial, facility and technological functions of the agency, including relationships with auditors, vendors, and insurance companies. Formerly, Trish served as VP for Fiscal Affairs and CFO of Merrimack College, where she provided strategic direction for a broad range of operations. She spent 10 years in senior leadership positions at the Massachusetts Development Finance Agency, formerly Massachusetts Industrial Finance Agency, and began her career as Assistant to the CFO at Boston's Children's Museum. Driven by a lifelong passion for the not-for-profit sector, Trish has served on boards and committees for several nonprofit organizations. She holds a B.A. in Economics from the College of the Holy Cross and an M.P.A. from Suffolk University.

Michelle Perez Vichot Executive VP, Operations

Michelle Perez, Executive Vice President, Operations, began working at BGCB in 1999. Prior to her current role, Michelle was Executive Director of the Gerald and Darlene Jordan Boys & Girls Club, in Chelsea, a position she held for eight years. Michelle joined the Jordan Club staff as the Club Social Worker in 1999 and was then promoted to Director of Operations. Under her leadership the Jordan Club has benefited from an array of innovative programs, expanded partnerships and increased involvement in the Chelsea community. Michelle has worked as a clinical social worker in a variety of settings, serving both youth and families, including working at New York City’s Grand Street Settlement where she led the summer camp. She received her B.A. in Psychology and Elementary Education from Curry College and earned a Masters in Social Work from New York University. In May 2011, she completed the Certificate Program at Boston University’s Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Junior NBA Program of the Month National Basketball Association (NBA) 2017
Positive Club Climate Initiative - one of a handful of Clubs nationwide selected to pilot the Positive Club Climate program in conjunction with Yale School of Emotional Intelligence Boys & Girls Clubs of America 2017

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2012
United Way Member Agency 1993
Boys and Girls Clubs of America 1906
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

BGCB works with nearly 300 program partners agency-wide, including colleges and universities, local schools and community centers, other non-profits, local businesses, and public agencies. Whether we are working with the Boston Police Department, Partners HealthCare, Boston Public Schools, or the Museum of Fine Arts, collaboration strengthens all aspects of our operations and enables us to provide members with access to a diverse range of affordable opportunities.

The following list represents some of BGCB’s larger and more formal partnerships that are essential to our success:

· Music & Youth Initiative and Berklee College of Music; 

· Museum of Fine Arts;

· Northeastern University;

· Massachusetts General Hospital;

· Boston Police Department;

· Boston Public Health Commission;

· Boston Public Schools and Community Centers:;

· Generations, Incorporated provides trained literacy volunteers who mentor Club members in grades 1-3 to help them become fluent readers.

MIT, Northeastern University, Harvard University, Simmons College, and other schools give BGCB access to volunteers, mentors, service-learning partnerships, capacity building support, and professional development.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 171
Number of Part Time Staff 106
Number of Volunteers 1,500
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 87%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 66
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 3
Caucasian: 122
Hispanic/Latino: 54
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 18
Other (if specified): 12 multi-racial
Gender Female: 165
Male: 101
Not Specified 1

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Bruce Jacobs
Board Chair Company Affiliation Westfield Capital Management
Board Chair Term Oct 2017 - Oct 2020
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Maureen Alphonse-Charles City Year, Inc. Voting
Andrew G. Arnott John Hancock Investments Voting
Anita Beckenstein Community Volunteer Voting
Jeffrey C. Bloomberg Gordon Brothers Group, LLC Voting
Michael E. Bronner Digitas and Upromise, Inc. Voting
Emily Brown Community Volunteer Voting
Joseph P. Campanelli Flagstar Bank Voting
James Canfield McCall & Almy Voting
Miceal Chamberlain Bank of America Voting
Lilian W. Cheung Harvard School of Public Health Voting
Laurence Chud Harvard Medical School Voting
Dr. Kevin Churchwell Boston Children's Hospital Voting
Robert B. Cleary Jr. Colliers International Voting
Stephanie Connaughton Community Volunteer Voting
Michele Courton Brown The Efficacy Institute Voting
Jonathan G. Davis The Davis Companies Voting
Andrew Dreyfus Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Voting
William A. Earon Coastal Capital Advisors, LLC Voting
Sandra M. Edgerley Community Volunteer Voting
Corinne L. Ferguson Community Volunteer Voting
Karen M. Firestone Aureus Asset Management LLC Voting
Mike Gordon Vinik Asset Management LLC Voting
Vicary M. Graham BNY Mellon Voting
Donna K. Hazard Community Volunteer Voting
Joseph L. Hooley State Street Corporation Voting
Ogden Hunnewell Nordic Properties, Inc. Voting
Durant A. Hunter Ridgeway Partners LLC Voting
Bruce Jacobs Westfield Capital Management Voting
Melissa Janfaza Community Volunteer Voting
David E. Johnson Bain & Co. Voting
Darlene L. Jordan Gerald R. Jordan Foundation Voting
Brian J. Knez Castanea Partners Voting
Michael A. Krupka Bain Capital Partners Voting
Richard D. Lassen Deloitte Voting
Elena M. Matlack Community Volunteer Voting
Holly McGrath Bruce The Highland Street Foundation Voting
Christopher J. McKown Iora Health Voting
Edvaldo Morata Eneas Voting
Janice Morris Fidelity Investments Voting
Brian T. Moynihan Bank of America Voting
Elizabeth Nabel Brigham & Women's Hospital Voting
John Nadas Choate, Hall, & Stewart LLP Voting
Farhad Nanji Highfields Capital Management Voting
Thomas J. Niedermeyer Jr. The Office of TJN Voting
Saul J. Pannell Wellington Management Co. Voting
Randy Peeler Berkshire Partners LLC Voting
Scott Powell Santander, US Voting
Bryan Rafanelli Rafanelli Events Management Voting
Bernadette T. Rehnert Community Volunteer Voting
Laura C. Reynolds Community Volunteer Voting
Peter Riehl Bain Capital Voting
Paul J. Rooney EBS Insurance Brokers, Inc. Voting
Jack Ryan GE Voting
Jack Sebastian Goldman Sachs Voting
Greg A. Shell GMO LLC Voting
Robert J. Small Berkshire Partners LLC Voting
Dana Smith Community Volunteer Voting
Susan Florence Smith Christie's Voting
R. Gregg Stone III Kestrel Management, LLC Voting
Michael J. Swenson Goldman, Sachs & Co. Voting
Richard A. Voke Law Office of Richard A. Voke Voting
Herbert S. Wagner III The Baupost Group Voting
Damian Wilmot Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc Voting
Frank V. Wisneski Wellington Management Co. Voting
Stephen Woodsum Summit Partners Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 54
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 1 Middle Eastern
Gender Female: 21
Male: 34
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Diversity & Inclusion
  • Executive
  • Facilities
  • Finance
  • Human Resources / Personnel
  • Investment
  • Marketing
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $32,648,360 $22,113,584 $25,385,683
Total Expenses $26,550,622 $25,014,897 $22,489,290

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $1,526,340 $1,284,221 $1,170,840
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $1,526,340 $1,284,221 $1,170,840
Individual Contributions $17,093,775 $17,525,237 $15,540,303
Indirect Public Support $573,683 $596,248 $621,462
Earned Revenue $3,101,984 $1,021,815 $1,018,663
Investment Income, Net of Losses $6,547,247 $-807,498 $76,779
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $341,693 $453,967 $587,803
Other $3,463,638 $2,039,594 $6,369,833

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $20,592,330 $19,488,676 $17,067,175
Administration Expense $2,265,724 $1,924,438 $1,863,955
Fundraising Expense $3,692,568 $3,601,783 $3,558,160
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.23 0.88 1.13
Program Expense/Total Expenses 78% 78% 76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 19% 19% 21%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $108,366,853 $106,301,568 $108,664,134
Current Assets $19,995,450 $23,201,694 $26,214,465
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $1,926,789 $5,959,242 $5,420,495
Total Net Assets $106,440,064 $100,342,326 $103,243,639

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $65,000,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 4.5%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 10.38 3.89 4.84

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. Please note, the total revenue amount for all fiscal years above includes non-operating activities such as capital campaign contributions and expenses, pension liability adjustment, loss on disposal of buildings and equipment, change in donor intent, net realized gains on investments, net unrealized losses on investments, etc. Please refer to the Statement of Activities pages in the audited financial files above for further detail.

Documents


Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Academic & Life Success: Our goal is that members will stay in school and gain the skills, knowledge, training, and education to pursue their goals/interests.

Healthy Development: Our goal is to ensure that members make and model healthy physical, social, and emotional choices.

Character and Community: Our goal is to help members develop healthy relationships with peers and adults while building the character to be role models and leaders.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Academic & Life Success: Through our Project Learn strategy, we provide age-appropriate homework help, tutoring, academic supports and guidance to approximately 1,734 youth daily. They enjoy high-yield learning activities designed to inspire curiosity and exploration while supplementing and reinforcing their schoolwork. Members participate in PowerHour, our homework 1st approach to our culture prioritizing academics. Younger members receive homework help, tutoring in math and literacy, and engage in a variety of STEM activities from constructing towers with gumdrops and toothpicks to donning lab coats and goggles to mix their own glow-stick solutions. Life After The Club is our college/career readiness program for teens, designed to help them achieve growth and progress in each of the key indicators of Academic Success, Employment, Financial Literacy, Leadership, and Healthy Lifestyles. They receive guidance to explore careers as well as the education and skills needed to pursue those interests both during and beyond high school. They tour colleges in New England as well as Historically Black Colleges & Universities. They study for their SATs and learn how to apply for college financial aid.

Healthy Development: Our staff promote mental health, self-esteem, and resiliency, critical antidotes to many of the challenges our members face in their lives. BGCB’s Health360 Initiative, our comprehensive health and wellness strategy, encourages members and staff of all abilities to engage in daily physical activity, make healthy nutrition choices, employ good decision-making skills, and avoid risky behaviors. Our Clubs serve nutritious, hot dinners when members arrive, often the only hot meal of a child’s day. Clubs also offer culturally-sensitive healthy cooking and nutrition programs for members and their families through our Farm to Family dinner events. The Clubs give members the opportunity to experience a variety of physical activities – dance, yoga, Zumba, running clubs, sports teams, and aquatics. Four of our Clubs participate in a wheelchair basketball program, part of our Inclusion Initiative to serve youth with disabilities. Our Clubs also offer “no try-out” sports leagues, giving any members who are willing to fully participate the opportunity to improve their skills and be part of a team.

Character and Community: Youth who volunteer 1+ hour/week are 50% less likely to abuse substances, become pregnant, or engage in other risky behaviors. BGCB provides structured leadership development programming, empowering members to take responsibility for themselves and their communities through Torch Club for ages 11–13 and Keystone Club for older teens. Participants develop leadership skills, a sense of civic responsibility, and respect for their own and others’ cultural identities as they plan, implement and volunteer during activities in their Clubs and the larger community. Our Young Leaders program helps “tweens” transition as they enter those critical teen years, and provides job-readiness skills and stipends for Young Leaders who are “hired” to work/learn at our Summer Camps. Torch and Keystone Club members organize neighborhood clean-ups, visit nursing homes to socialize with and entertain the residents, and launch donation drives for hurricane victims, local homeless populations, and animal shelters. Their hands-on involvement helps them see that they may be “just kids,” but they can still make a positive difference. Social/Emotional Learning is a foundation of BGCB’s programs and activities, from Music to Athletics, to navigating crowded hallways. The Club experience gives members the opportunity to learn and practice the skills that are critical to their success in school, their communities, and their careers. Members learn teamwork, collaboration, listening, critical thinking, accepting feedback, and managing frustration in the supportive environment of their Club, where it is safe to make mistakes and learn to improve.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston (BGCB) has been enriching the lives of children and teens from challenging economic, social, and family circumstances for 125 years. BGCB's outstanding history in the community began in 1893 when its first local Club, the Bunker Hill Boys' Club, opened in Charlestown. The Roxbury Club (now Yawkey Club of Roxbury) followed in 1910, and the South Boston Club opened in 1938. In these early years, the "Boys Club" focused on activities such as carpentry, printing, and painting. In 1981, girls became full Club members at all BGCB locations and the organization's name changed to reflect this advancement.

BGCB's service network has grown significantly over the last two decades. The original Chelsea Club (now Gerald and Darlene Jordan Club/Kraft Family Youth Center) opened in the Innes Housing Development in 1993, and the Blue Hill Club/George Robert White Youth Development Center, now the Berkshire Partners Blue Hill Club, in Dorchester opened in 1995 in response to spikes in neighborhood youth violence. Our YouthConnect program, which places licensed clinical social workers in Boston police districts, was founded in 1996, and in 2000, BGCB opened its first Shared-Space Club located in a public school. Our newest Club, the Mattapan Teen Center, opened in the former branch library building in Fall 2014 as our first Club dedicated to meeting the needs of local teenagers. The organization's growth is largely attributed to the tremendous support we receive from our exceptional stakeholders, including nearly 300 program partners, 1,500 volunteers, and generous individual and institutional donors, contributing 80% of BGCB's annual operating budget.

Today, BGCB has 6,000 active Club members and, in total, we serve 14,000 young people, ages 6 to 18, annually in our 11 Clubs, and through our programs and partnerships in Boston and Chelsea.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

BGCB is committed to continuous improvement, using the latest research and our internal data analysis to assess programs to maximize positive outcomes for our members. Our direct service staff consistently measure our programmatic effectiveness via qualitative data to ensure our young people attain and maintain positive outcomes.

BGCB implements a range of validated evaluation tools to measure the impact of our programs, including annual member surveys, bi-annual family surveys, alumni surveys, focus groups, and program specific pre- and post-testing.

We administer the Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s (BGCA) National Youth Outcomes Initiative Survey (NYOI), a tool comprised of questions from validated sources and approved by a national Internal Review Board. Organizations take the base survey which includes elements about emotional and physical safety, recognition, supportive relationships, opportunities and expectations, fun, character and leadership, academic success, and health and wellness. At BGCB, we also add modules asking questions from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, and administer the comprehensive survey to a representative sample of members in all age groups and all Clubs.

BGCB has also piloted use of Harvard University’s PEAR Institute’s social/emotional learning survey, to better gauge the strengths and needs of individual members.

We use all these survey results to review key elements of our members’ experience and social emotional development including the following indicators to determine whether members are on track to achieve positive results in each of our priority outcome areas:

Academic & Life Success

  • Average daily attendance in Power Hour, a BGCA homework program that is part of the evidence-based Project Learn strategy
  • Percent of high school senior members with a post-Club plan
  • Percent of Club seniors who graduate high school
  • Percent of members who feel what they learn in school will be useful in the future
  • Percent of teens who can vision what a successful future looks like for themselves
  • Percent of teens acquiring/achieving certain skills or milestones

Character and Community

  • Frequency of teens volunteering in the community
  • Frequency of all members volunteering at the club
  • Members concern for other people
  • Members concern for the community
  • Members’ leadership acumen
  • Members’ conflict resolution skills

Healthy Development

  • Number of days members report getting 60 min+ of physical activity
  • Percent of members eating 2+/fruit per day
  • Percent of members eating 3+/vegetables per day
  • Percent avoiding alcohol, drugs, sexual activity

By tracking these items, BGCB monitors members’ behavior and attitudes. The data are used to guide each Club in refining its offerings by choosing a mix of targeted programs that best meet the individual needs of each member. With our focus on continuous improvement, BGCB compares results across Clubs, by demographic group and over time, to analyze trends, highlight and replicate best practices and create programmatic or infrastructure interventions to support member development.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

FY18 Academic & Life Success Outcomes: Last year, 93% of our members (ages 6–18) were on grade level, with 80% receiving mostly As and Bs on their report cards. 95% percent of BGCB members expect to graduate high school, while 88% expect to go to college. These high expectations are significant, since our members are from communities with historically low graduation rates, and very low college graduation rates. In 2017, for example, only 73% of Boston Public School seniors graduated, well below BGCB’s result in which 94% of our high school seniors graduated. In FY18, 91% of our graduating seniors were accepted to college/trade school and 85% of teens who attended weekly last year obtained summer 2018 jobs.

Through our pre- and post-test surveys, we can determine the progress our teens made on the Life After The Club success indicators:

  • 90% of our teens showed improvement in one or more of the LATC measures.
  • 89% of teens said that they “know how to use technology to solve problems” (an 8% increase).
  • 71% of teens are “good at Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint” (a 15% increase).
  • 53% of teens in grades 10-12 now have a cover letter (a 9% increase).
  • 86% have a resume (an 11% increase).
  • 550 Club teens gained jobs through our Young Leader, CIT, Jr. Staff, or Summer Youth Jobs initiative, giving them the invaluable experience of applying/interviewing for these positions, plus on-the-job workplace skills and supervision in a supportive atmosphere.

FY18 Healthy Development Outcomes: BGCB’s Healthy Development initiatives are having an impact on our members. Last year’s results include the following achievements:

  • BGCB served 236,978 healthy meals and 85,962 nutritious snacks to members.
  • 77% of BGCB members engaged in at least 60 minutes of physical activity at least three days per week; 54% met that activity target at least five days per week (compared to 17% of Massachusetts adults exercising 60 minutes 7 days/week).
  • Nearly 70% of Club members eat fruit twice a day or more (compared to 14% of the state population).
  • 40% of members reported eating 3+ vegetables per day (compared to 11% of the state population).
  • Our Charlestown Club’s Swim Team won their third straight Division 2 National BGCA Championships, held in St. Petersburg, FL.
  • 92%+ reported that they abstained from using alcohol and/or marijuana.
  • Clubs offered workshops, small group mentoring with Social Workers, and gender-responsive programs focused on bullying prevention, substance abuse prevention, body image, hygiene, sexual health and responsibility, and safe driving – all designed to give members the knowledge and strength to make healthy lifestyle choices. Our Passport to Manhood group for boys focused on identifying their personal values, health, hygiene, fitness, and education priorities for their futures as well as yoga and gun safety. Girls’ groups covered topics ranging from self-respect and healthy relationships to open discussions on mental health issues.

FY18 Character & Community Outcomes: Club members made significant progress in our Character & Community measures:

  • 53% of teens responding on our annual member survey said they had volunteered at their Club, school, or community at least once a month (compared to 28% of Massachusetts residents).
  • The volunteerism habits our Clubs nurture last well into adulthood. Our last survey of BGCB alumni showed that 75% are actively involved in their communities because of the Club.
  • Among all members, 81% engaged in activities to help their community.
  • 89% say they feel they can stand up for what they think is right, even if their friends disagree.
  • 91% agreed that “If something is really hard, I keep working at it.”
  • 86% report that when making decisions, they try to think about how other people will be affected
  • 68% agree that if they set goals, they take action to reach them.