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Organization DBA Concord Museum
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Concord Museum educates visitors of all ages about the history of Concord and its continuing influence on American political, literary, and cultural life. The Museum's nationally significant collection serves as a catalyst for changing exhibitions, extended classroom learning, dynamic programs and publications relevant to an ever-changing world. Founded in 1886, the Museum is a center of cultural enjoyment for the region and a gateway to the town of Concord for visitors from around the world.

Mission Statement

The Concord Museum educates visitors of all ages about the history of Concord and its continuing influence on American political, literary, and cultural life. The Museum's nationally significant collection serves as a catalyst for changing exhibitions, extended classroom learning, dynamic programs and publications relevant to an ever-changing world. Founded in 1886, the Museum is a center of cultural enjoyment for the region and a gateway to the town of Concord for visitors from around the world.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2014 to Sept 30, 2015
Projected Income $1,672,183.00
Projected Expense $1,663,570.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1) School Programs
  • 2) The Concord Museum Collection
  • 3) Permanent and Changing Exhibitions
  • 4) Public Programs
  • 5) Community Outreach Programs

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Concord Museum educates visitors of all ages about the history of Concord and its continuing influence on American political, literary, and cultural life. The Museum's nationally significant collection serves as a catalyst for changing exhibitions, extended classroom learning, dynamic programs and publications relevant to an ever-changing world. Founded in 1886, the Museum is a center of cultural enjoyment for the region and a gateway to the town of Concord for visitors from around the world.

Background Statement

Concord, Massachusetts, occupies a special place in American history and is central to many ideals that we share as Americans. Due to the breadth of its outstanding collection, high quality scholarship, professional staff, and distinguished facilities, the Concord Museum is uniquely positioned to tell the story of the American experience from the pre-Revolutionary War era to the Literary Renaissance and beyond.
 
The Museum was founded in 1886 to preserve the collection of Cummings Davis, who assembled a collection of historical artifacts representing the town's past. Now open 362 days a year, the Museum serves a diverse local, regional, and national constituency from all 50 states and around the world and is a destination and resource for visitors interested in learning how Concord helped shape our nation. Core activities are exhibitions, school and public programs, and stewardship of its distinguished collection. The Museum has been continuously accredited by the American Alliance of Museums since 1973 and is the only institution in Concord to hold this distinction.
 
The Museum's nationally significant collection of 35,000 objects includes icons of American history, such as Paul Revere's lantern; exceptional Revolutionary War artifacts; the contents of Henry David Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond; Ralph Waldo Emerson's study; and superior Native American holdings. It also includes artifacts of everyday life in the Concord area, including exceptionally well-documented furniture, clocks, silver, ceramics, pewter, and textiles.
 
The Museum's education programs for all ages encourage a love of history, literature, and the arts. Curriculum-based school programs have enriched the lives of children from elementary through high school for over forty years and remain a trusted tool for classroom teachers.
 
The Museum's collection is also a catalyst to create rich and acclaimed exhibitions and public programs. Its core exhibition, Why Concord?, was developed with major support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Visitors learn about the roots of American democracy and Concord's remarkable role in our shared national values of freedom, self-government, environmentalism, and individual choice. Frequent changing exhibitions provide a broader national context. Lectures, tours, and community events further life-long learning and enjoyment for individuals and diverse groups, such as scout troops, youth groups, and retirement living centers.

Impact Statement

The Concord Museum presented exciting exhibits and programs in 2012, which significantly expanded audiences and reach. For example, the Museum was the only New England venue for the major show, Annie Leibovitz: Pilgrimage, which attracted unprecedented media attention and new visitors. Museum attendance in 2012 increased by 50% over 2011, and memberships are up by 47%.
 
The Museum is successfully expanding its financial base. Annual Fund revenues have grown by 36% since 2011. We have received significant new support from local, state, and national agencies and foundations, including a $141K grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services for Early Spring: Henry Thoreau and Climate Change. More than $100K in additional funds were raised for changing exhibits. Our Guild of Volunteers organized seven successful fundraising events, exceeding its annual goal.
 
With $262K in capital grants, we are completing extensive preservation work on the Museum's 1930 building, including masonry repairs and a new slate roof.
 
A new 5-year Strategic Plan, created with significant Board, community, and staff input, has established ambitious goals for Engagement, Education, Collaboration, Financial Sustainability, and a Campus Master Plan.
 
Community outreach is greatly expanding. A new Community Access Program (CAP), in partnership with the Concord-Carlisle Community Chest, provides deeply discounted admission to area groups. New partnerships with the YMCA of Greater Boston and Big Brothers Big Sisters offer free admission to participants.
 
Building upon 2012, top goals for 2013 are to:
  • Broaden and deepen our reach to underserved communities in the region by establishing a vigorous and robust educational outreach program
  • Create a campus master plan, laying the groundwork for a capital campaign
  • Expand marketing, including the creation of a new marketing position
  • Further broaden our donor base
  • Collaborate in meaningful ways with other area community and history organizations

Needs Statement

  • Educational outreach: A key goal in our new Strategic Plan is the establishment of a robust and sustainable educational outreach model for underserved youth. Accordingly, we seek a $100K challenge grant to establish a 3-year pilot program to offer our education programs to low-income schools in Middlesex County.
  • Space: Our programs, collections, and operations have outgrown current space. A campus master plan, costing $100K, will provide the framework for addressing these needs to accommodate our growing visitors, programs, collection, and staff.
  • Digitizing our collection: While the Museum's new website offers a searchable online database of our Thoreau collection, we seek funding to digitize and provide online access to the remainder of our superb collection. Project costs total $150K.
  • Upgrade of permanent exhibitions, installed in 1993: More fully engaging our many audiences is a top priority. A more flexible design and the creative use of technology will make exhibits more accessible to all visitors, particularly younger learners. Costs will be identified through the campus master plan.
  • Preserving the teaching of history: History education is eroding, along with the lack of public engagement with history. The Museum is working with the Town to bring History Day, a national program, to Concord public schools. The cost of this multi-faceted effort over several years is $100K.

CEO Statement

The Concord Museum was founded by Cummings Davis, a self-educated man of modest means who recognized the importance of preserving the history of this town of national historic significance. Today, 150 years after he first exhibited his collection, the public understanding of history and its shared value has greatly diminished. With the hope of strengthening our common bonds, the Museum's new Strategic Plan seeks to address the erosion of history education in schools and the public's lack of engagement with history.
 
Our spectacular collections, combined with our location in a town of national historic importance, uniquely position the Museum to offer leadership in history education. A key goal identified in the Strategic Plan is to serve as an advocate and major resource--locally and regionally--for history education in Massachusetts schools. Although it is essential for students to learn about history to become better citizens and to understand critical lessons that can drawn from the past, American history has been increasingly marginalized in our schools' curriculums. Recent studies such as the 2010 National Assessment of Educational Progress show that American schools are failing to educate students about the past. Research on core knowledge indicates that museums such as the Concord Museum that undertake object-based experiential learning can best fill that gap.
 
The Museum's unique school programs connect real artifacts with people, places, and ideas. Serving more than 7,000 students annually, we have built strong partnerships with area schools over the last four decades and look to expand and deepen those relationships with schools throughout Middlesex County, especially in low-income areas. To achieve our mission to serve as a center for dynamic extended classroom learning for all, we feel that it is imperative to establish a robust educational outreach program for underserved audiences.
 
The Museum's nationally significant collection and location in historic Concord also provide a singular opportunity for it to serve as a model for reversing the trend of declining attendance at history museums. Our overall visitation increased by 50% last year, and we continually strive to reach new and expand existing audiences through dynamic exhibitions and programs that stimulate critical thinking about the past and its relevance to the present. As we evolve from a traditional history museum into a more engaging resource providing opportunities for deeper public involvement, we are well-positioned to provide leadership for other history organizations. 

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

METROWEST REGION, MA
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
NATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL
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Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts & Culture
  2. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Museums
  3. Arts,Culture & Humanities - History Museums

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

1) School Programs

The Museum is a vital educational resource. More than 7,000 K-12 students from all socio-economic backgrounds and more than 50 towns across Massachusetts and 15 states visit the Museum annually for award-winning object-based learning programs.
 
On-site school programs enable students to learn from real artifacts and to discover the origins of the American ideals of freedom, self-government, and the ability of individuals to affect change. Students explore the world of Thoreau, analyze objects and documents as primary sources, and solve dilemmas as 18th-century citizens. Historical detective work and role-playing are combined with problem solving, tactile learning, and critical thinking so that students have fun and come away with a real sense of history.
 
Programs align with State Curriculum Frameworks and are multi-disciplinary to support students with different learning styles. Programs for students with special needs, English language-learners, and home-school groups are also offered. 
Budget  $135,300.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Museum Education
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
The Museum's high quality, interactive on-site school programs will reach more than 7,000 students from more than 50 communities this year, including Lowell, Reading, Woburn, and other towns in eastern Middlesex County. Over 90% of participants rate their experience positively.
 
We will maintain our close educational partnership with the Concord-Carlisle public schools. We will also serve more low-income schools and students in the region and, through aggressive fund-raising, plan to offset the cost of admission and transportation for more classes. In particular, our outreach efforts will target schools in Everett, Lowell, Framingham, Somerville, Waltham, and Woburn. Museum experiences with authentic artifacts, historical landscapes and buildings, living history encounters, and hands-on activities will enrich history education in underserved communities where access to up-to-date, effective resources for teaching history and off-site visits might be otherwise impossible. 
Program Long-Term Success 
The Museum's school programs seek to address the need that a democratic society has for informed and thoughtful citizens, educated in American principles and concepts. Students will have a deeper understanding of American history and be more likely to participate in the democratic process as adults.
 
To achieve this success, the Museum will continue to serve as an advocate for history education in Massachusetts schools, collaborating with teachers and families to make museum experiences and history education integral to a child's learning. Perhaps most importantly, more low-income school districts in Middlesex County will participate in the Museum's high quality school programs.
 
Given its location, the Museum is ideally situated to provide such services. Unknown to many residents, stark socio-economic disparities exist in Middlesex County. People of color comprise more than 23% of the population, though this percentage is over 40% in several cities. Foreign-born residents account for over 17% of the population.
Program Success Monitored By 
School program success is measured by statistics and by formal and informal evaluations from teachers and students. The Museum recently updated our teacher surveys with the goal of obtaining more thoughtful and productive feedback. We also created stronger post-visit activities that evaluate student learning and overall program experience.
 
The Museum's Teacher and Education Advisory Committees provide periodic review and recommendations. The Museum thoroughly reviews the Committees' feedback to improve the quality of our programs.
 
The Museum also partners with other local institutions and schools to participate in grant-funded teacher workshops, which provide a forum for sharing ideas, techniques, and scholarship that enrich both the teaching and museum professional. For example, the Museum participates annually in several acclaimed NEH-funded training workshops for teachers nationwide. 
Examples of Program Success 
Concord third-graders have participated in the Museum's curriculum-based school programs for over 40 years. Teachers are partners, advisors, and strong advocates for the program.
 
The Museum has built strong partnerships with other area schools, which have demonstrated an ongoing commitment to our object-based, experiential programs taught by skilled educators. Over 90% of participants in our school programs rate their experience positively, and 84% of schools return for at least two consecutive years.
 
Innovative programs are growing. Through the new Rivers and Revolutions curriculum at Concord-Carlisle High School, the Museum is offering intensive internships for high school students. We are also piloting multi-disciplinary science and history lessons to accompany our Thoreau and Climate Change exhibition. According to teachers, the program is "showing our students that their work can be nationally significant and useful to scientists, giving new importance to work they do in the classroom."

2) The Concord Museum Collection

The Museum's superb collection of 35,000 objects is the only comprehensive collection of Concord history and culture. It contains American icons, such as Paul Revere's lantern; exceptional Revolutionary War artifacts; the contents of Henry David Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond, including the desk on which he wrote Walden; Ralph Waldo Emerson's study; and superior Native American holdings. It also includes major holdings related to everyday life in the area, including well-documented paintings, furniture, clocks, silver, and textiles.
 
The Museum maintains a high standard of professional collections care and follows museum best practices in the cataloguing, exhibition, storage, and conservation of objects. A new website offers a searchable online database of the Henry David Thoreau collection, the largest collection of Thoreau objects in the world. The Museum seeks grant support to digitize and provide online access to the remainder of its collection.
 
Budget  $169,100.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Museums
Population Served Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) US& International
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

3) Permanent and Changing Exhibitions

The Museum's core exhibition, Why Concord?, uses the collections to explore Concord's remarkable role in our shared national values of freedom, self-government, environmentalism, and individual choice.
 
An active roster of changing exhibitions explores new ideas and puts the Museum's collections in a broader national context. In 2012, the Museum was the first stop on a national tour and only New England venue for the exhibition, Annie Leibovitz: Pilgrimage, organized by the Smithsonian Museum of American Art.
 
In 2013, Early Spring: Henry Thoreau and Climate Change, explores three centuries of careful observation of seasonal data in Concord, which has made the town one of the best places in the world to study climate change. A new mobile application, Concord's Thoreau Trail, engages visitors inside and out. In the fall, Daniel Chester French: Sculpture from His Concord and Chesterwood Studios, will be the first show of this renowned sculptor in 30 years.
Budget  $659,800.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Curatorial Work & Exhibitions
Population Served Families Adults US& International
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

4) Public Programs

The Museum's public and family programs foster a lifelong love of history, literature, community culture, and the arts. An engaging and diverse calendar of public programs maximizes our ability to reach broad local, regional, and national audiences and has established the Museum as a center for learning and cultural enjoyment for all ages.
 
The Museum is a trusted resource for exploring the important principles that have shaped America. Accordingly, the Museum strives to offer an array of widely appealing programs to enhance awareness of Concord's past and its influence on American political, literary, and cultural life. Programs include forums, lectures, gallery talks, informal discussions, film screenings, author readings, town walks, community-based programs and open houses, living history performances, family-focused programs, craft workshops for adults and children, and hands-on history programs.
 
Attendance at public programs, exhibition openings, and events increased 127% in FY12. 
Budget  $84,500.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Museums
Population Served Adults Families Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

5) Community Outreach Programs

The Museum is deeply committed to serving students from all socio-economic backgrounds, broadening horizons, and enriching lives across generations. Accordingly, we partner with a broad group of area organizations, such as Big Brothers Big Sisters, local Boys and Girls Clubs, and the Highland Street Foundation, to offer free or greatly reduced admission. Our Community Access Program (CAP) provides deeply discounted admission to clients of agencies supported by the Concord-Carlisle Community Chest, including Open Table, Concord Family and Youth Services, Concord Housing Authority, Domestic Violence Services Network, and Minuteman Arc.
 
We also seek to reach students, regardless of socio-economic background, through participation in programs such as the Associated Grant Makers Summer Fund camp programs and the YMCA of Greater Boston's Summer Learning Project, designed to close the achievement gap between low-income students and their higher income peers. 
Budget  $35,800.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Museums
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent People/Families with of People with Disabilities Families
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Margaret R. Burke
CEO Term Start Jan 2011
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Margaret R. Burke was appointed Executive Director of the Concord Museum in 2011. She brings visionary and strategic leadership skills, strong museum and other not-for-profit management experience, an exceptional fund-raising track record, and an outstanding background in the arts and humanities.
 
From 2007-2011, Ms. Burke was Director of Foundation Development at WGBH in Boston, where she oversaw a 10-person department raising national foundation support for programs such as American Experience, FRONTLINE, Masterpiece, and NOVA.
 
From 2002-2007, she was Executive Director of the Maryland Humanities Council, a statewide grant-making foundation that she transformed into a vigorous and visible institution providing meaningful public humanities programs to 1.5 million Marylanders each year. A major statewide initiative, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Remembrance and Reconciliation, was awarded the Schwartz Prize from the Federation of State Humanities Councils for nationally significant public humanities programs. She authored History and Social Studies in Maryland: A Cause for Concern, revealing the narrowing of the arts and humanities curriculum in Maryland public schools, and co-chaired the Social Studies Task Force for the Maryland State Department of Education, resulting in significant curriculum reform.
 
Previously, as a cultural resources consultant, Ms. Burke provided professional services in strategic planning, organizational development, programming, and fund-raising to organizations throughout New England and the mid-Atlantic region. She was Director of Museums and Properties and Director of Development at Historic New England (formerly SPNEA); and Curator of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art.
 
A scholar in the field of American art, Ms. Burke holds a Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Delaware, an M.A. in Early American Culture from The Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum and the University of Delaware, and a B.A. in Art History from Wheaton College. 
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Adrienne Donohue Registrar and Collections Manager --
Ms. Susan H. Gladstone Director of Development --
Ms. Michelle Guertin Assistant Director of Finance and Administration --
Ms. Carol L. Haines Manager of Exhibitions and Design --
Ms. Leah Walczak Director of Education and Public Programs --
Mr. David F. Wood Curator --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
American Association for State and Local History --
American Association of Museums - Member --
Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau --
Metrowest Nonprofit Network --
Women in Development --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
American Association of Museums --

Collaborations

In its 125-year history, the Concord Museum has developed broad and long-standing relationships with organizations throughout New England, which continue to grow.
 
The Museum identified "Collaboration" as one of the five goals of its new strategic plan and partners routinely with organizations in the Concord area. It has partnered with the Concord public schools for over 30 years to provide K-12 educational experiences. In 2012 it collaborated with Louisa May Alcott's Orchard House on Annie Leibovitz: Pilgrimage; and with the Concord Free Public Library and Concord CAN on Concord Reads: About Farming and Food. Major upcoming collaborations include the Four Centuries of Massachusetts Furniture project; the Daniel Chester French exhibition with Chesterwood, NPS, and area sites; and the April 19, 1775 exhibition with the Lexington Historical Society.
 
The Museum was a founding member of the Concord Historical Collaborative, which includes The Old Manse; Orchard House; Concord Free Public Library; Concord Art Association; Concord-Carlisle Community Education; Walden Pond State Reservation; The Wayside; The Walden Woods Project; Emerson House; The Thoreau Society; Thoreau Farm Trust; and the Concord Chamber of Commerce.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 10
Number of Part Time Staff 32
Number of Volunteers 200
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % 90%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 43
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 35
Male: 10
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Churchill G. Franklin
Board Chair Company Affiliation Acadian Asset Management LLC
Board Chair Term Sept 2009 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Kyle Barnard Business Owner and Construction Manager Voting
Ms. Nancy Barnard H-K Designs Voting
Ms. Miranda Boylan Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Richard Briggs Jr. Consilium Partners LLC Voting
Dr. Margaret Burke Concord Museum (Executive Director) Voting
Mr. Dennis Burns Morgan Stanley Voting
Mr. Gregory Creamer PNC Financial Voting
Mr. Ralph Earle Clean Energy Venture Group Voting
Mr. John Ferrell Retired, YMCA Voting
Ms. Lisa Foote Retired Voting
Ms. E. Kate Galusza Co-President, Museum Guild of Volunteers Voting
Mr. William Huyett McKinsey & Co. Voting
Ms. Nicole Picard Kelly Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Ben Lewis TIAA-CREF Voting
Mr. Charles Parrott Retired Attorney Voting
Ms. Anna Winter Rasmussen Save Our Heritage, Inc. Voting
Ms. Laura Reynolds Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Dale Ryder Co-President, Museum Guild of Volunteers Voting
Mr. Vinod Sahney Institute for Health Care Improvement Voting
Mr. Paul Selian State Street Financial Center Voting
Mr. Charles Ziering Retired Software Executive Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Theodore Alfond -- --
Ms. Michele Bembenek -- --
Mr. Keith Block -- --
Mr. Richard D. Briggs Jr. -- --
Ms. Mary P. Brody -- --
Ms. Anne F. Brooke -- --
Mr. Peter A. Brooke -- --
Ms. Joan Campbell -- --
Mr. Stephen W. Carr -- --
Ms. Tara Cederholm -- --
Ms. Jennifer Coash -- --
Ms. Ann Marie Connolly -- --
Ms. Diana Cowles -- --
Ms. Mary Ann Ferrell -- --
Ms. Janet H. Franklin -- --
Ms. Martha S. Fritz -- --
Ms. Leann Griesinger -- --
Ms. Martha Hamilton -- --
Ms. Sarah Hindle -- --
Mr. Winston R. Hindle -- --
Ms. Jean Haley Hogan -- --
Ms. Susan Hunt -- --
Ms. Lauren Huyett -- --
Ms. Gail Keane -- --
Mr. Jonathan M. Keyes -- --
Ms. Judy Blaikie Lane -- --
Mr. Christopher J. Lindop -- --
Ms. Joan Burden Litle -- --
Ms. Diana Moore -- --
Ms. Jane Musser Nelson -- --
Ms. Sarah B. Newton -- --
Mr. Daniel O'Connor -- --
Ms. Hilda Parrott -- --
Mr. George Reichenbach -- --
Ms. Sue Revis -- --
Mr. Robert L. Reynolds -- --
Ms. Letitia Richardson -- --
Mr. Gilbert M. Roddy Jr. -- --
Mr. Joseph V. Roller II -- --
Ms. Bonnie Rosse -- --
Ms. Patricia A. Satterthwaite -- --
Mr. Pieter Schiller -- --
Mr. Richard W. Spaulding -- --
Ms. Martha J. Wallace -- --
Ms. Ann Webster -- --
Ms. Roxanne Zak -- --
Ms. Margaret Ziering -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 21
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 9
Male: 13
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Collections
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Investment
  • Marketing
  • Membership
  • Nominating
  • Technology

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2014 to Sept 30, 2015
Projected Income $1,672,183.00
Projected Expense $1,663,570.00
Form 990s

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audited Financial Statement

2012 Audited Financial Statement

2011 Audited Financial Statement

2010 Audited Financial Statement

2009 Audited Financial Statement

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $2,132,694 $2,717,773 $1,490,281
Total Expenses $1,842,459 $1,661,322 $1,598,637

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$37,800 $44,950 $21,500
Government Contributions $12,500 $357,879 $9,800
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $12,500 $357,879 $9,800
Individual Contributions $936,676 $732,511 $740,538
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $359,679 $436,887 $318,997
Investment Income, Net of Losses $378,650 $802,295 $31,844
Membership Dues $68,065 $61,359 $47,494
Special Events $303,851 $239,266 $253,033
Revenue In-Kind $35,473 $42,626 $67,075
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $1,372,149 $1,210,851 $1,026,016
Administration Expense $201,044 $176,612 $332,026
Fundraising Expense $269,266 $273,859 $240,595
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.16 1.64 0.93
Program Expense/Total Expenses 74% 73% 64%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 21% 20% 23%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $9,267,035 $8,970,353 $8,100,065
Current Assets $982,764 $914,573 $1,244,181
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $140,000
Current Liabilities $120,483 $114,036 $160,199
Total Net Assets $9,146,552 $8,856,317 $7,799,866

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $7,100,000.00
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose N/A
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 8.16 8.02 7.77

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 2%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Concord Museum is working on the way our expenses are allocated going forward.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials.  Program expenses include merchandising and public relations as the organization considers these programming expenses, which tie well to the 990.

Documents


Other Documents

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Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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