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East End House Inc.

 105 Spring Street
 Cambridge, MA 02141
[P] (617) 876-4444
[F] (617) 868-3616
www.eastendhouse.org
[email protected]
Michael Delia
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INCORPORATED: 1953
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2104163

LAST UPDATED: 12/30/2016
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

East End House community center uses a holistic approach to promote the well-being, academic achievement, and successful transition to adulthood of children and youth from under-resourced families in Cambridge and surrounding communities.  As part of its approach, East End House provides support services to a diverse population, from infants to seniors, to strengthen family and community.

Mission Statement

East End House community center uses a holistic approach to promote the well-being, academic achievement, and successful transition to adulthood of children and youth from under-resourced families in Cambridge and surrounding communities.  As part of its approach, East End House provides support services to a diverse population, from infants to seniors, to strengthen family and community.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $2,723,138.00
Projected Expense $2,720,080.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Child Care Program
  • Emergency Food Program
  • Middle School Program
  • School Age Program
  • Senior Programs

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

East End House community center uses a holistic approach to promote the well-being, academic achievement, and successful transition to adulthood of children and youth from under-resourced families in Cambridge and surrounding communities.  As part of its approach, East End House provides support services to a diverse population, from infants to seniors, to strengthen family and community.

Background Statement

Since its inception in 1875, East End House has continued to respond to changing community needs. Well-baby clinics at the turn of the century, New Deal Programs during the Great Depression, and multilingual energy audits for lower-income families in the seventies are all examples of vital programs. In recent years, the agency has implemented Middle School and Youth Mentoring Programs; started Powerful Parenting, a parent education series for parents of young children; greatly expanded science and math curriculum for school age and middle school youth; and improved the quality of programming throughout the agency. 

 

Core Programming

  • Child Care Program: This full-day program serves children aged 15 months to 5 years and is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). The focus is on ensuring all children are kindergarten ready.
  • School Age Program: Afterschool and summer programs offer Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) learning, literacy, and health curriculum for children in kindergarten through fifth grade after school and full days during school vacations and summer months. The focus is on giving youth the academic and social skills to succeed in Middle School. 
  • Middle School Program:  The program operates after school and full days during school vacation weeks and summer months. It is administered in partnership with the Putnam Avenue Upper School, one of four public middle schools in Cambridge. STEM learning, leadership development and service learning are major curriculum components. There is also a Youth Mentoring Program. The program is free of charge to families.
  • Emergency Food Program: The Food Pantry, serving low-income familes, focuses on offering healthier foods when possible, accompanied with recipes in order to promote healthy lifestyles. The Free Farmer’s Market brings the Food Pantry to three low-income, senior housing complexes in Cambridge.
  • Senior Programs: The Senior Sunrise Activities Program meets twice a week. It offers area seniors a venue for socialization. Young at Hearty promotes healthy lifestyles through education and exercise opportunities.

Impact Statement

East End House’s Theory of Change sets forth a bold vision of creating a continuum of care from infancy through young adulthood for under-resourced children and youth. The long-term goal is for all youth to complete two years of college or be gainfully employed by age 24. Over the past few years, the agency has taken steps towards this goal.  Accomplishments include:

  • The Child Care Program has enhanced evaluation and tracking of program performance as well as child-specific indicators. The program uses Teaching Strategies Gold and the Bracken School Readiness Scale to measure effectiveness. 
  • A High School Program is in its pilot phase this year. Last year was dedicated to research and development which included a Youth Advisory Board who met regularly to help shape the program design and conduct a community needs assessment.
  • Powerful Parenting, a workshop series for parents of children ages 0-4 expanded this year. The popular workshop, which covers child brain development, positive discipline, school readiness, and health, is now offered to parents of elementary school children. 

 

In the coming year, East End House will build upon successful programming to increase impact. Future plans include:

  • Launching the Social-Emotional Health Intervention Project (SHIP), a comprehensive intervention designed to address the mental health needs of middle school youth. The program trains out of school time staff alongside school day teachers to understand and impact the factors that contribute to positive social-emotional growth.
  • Continuing to improve performance management and evaluation of all programs. The agency uses Efforts to Outcomes (ETO) to track and analyze all demographic and outcome data. Reports will continue to be refined and used to continuously improve curriculum and programming, as well as ensure all children and youth are on track to reach milestones.  

 


Needs Statement

At this time, East End House's most pressing needs include:
1. Funding: East End  House raises approximately one-third of its budget through donations, grants and special events.  Funds are need for general operating as well as specific projects and programs.  Special projects include starting a High School Out of School Time Program; the Social-Emotional Health Intervention Project (SHIP), which addresses  mental health needs among middle school youth; and Generating and Evaluating New Adventures in Science After School (GENASAS), a youth science initiative.      
2.  Financial Assistance: Because our target population is our lower-income neighbors, we need to be sure every child is able to afford our services. East End House's sliding scale tuition, financing and flexible payment schedules require ongoing external support.
3. Volunteers: Each year, over 500 volunteers play a critical role in the agency's functioning.  East End House is especially seeking mentors who can devote a year of regular interaction with Middle School youth.
4. Fifteen (or more) Passenger Van: Currently nearly 50% of East End House's Middle School Program youth must leave on the latest school bus, leaving nearly 2 hours before the program ends.  A van would allow staff to drive students home at the end of the day and enable staff to take youth on more field trips.
5. Capital Improvement: The East End House facility is an older building with constant need for upkeep and repair.  It will also be necessary to expand physical space in order to meet growing community needs.

CEO Statement

East End House is a special place. It has been a part of the community for generations, providing stability and a safe haven where children and families can learn and grow. The Hobbs family is an example of how the agency impacted one family.  Lucy Hobbs is a single mother of two young sons. She worked in a coffee shop when she came to East End House and barely made enough for her family to get by. She enrolled both her sons in the Child Care Program, receiving much-needed financial assistance from the agency. 

 

This fall Lucy attended East End House’s Powerful Parenting, a workshop for parents of children ages 0-4. Raised by divorced parents who competed for her affection, Lucy grew up with few limits. “I didn’t feel like it was much of a family,” says Lucy. Wanting her children to know both discipline and the love of a devoted parent, Lucy turned to Powerful Parenting in the hopes of finding a positive way to effectively manage her growing boys. The course gave her skills and knowledge that built upon her inherent strengths as a parent leading to a happier, less stressful home for her and her boys. 

 

Now, Lucy is enrolled as a full-time nursing student at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy. She has new parenting skills and is on the path to financial stability for her and her sons. After being adopted by East End House’s Adopt-a-Family holiday program this year, Lucy spoke of the joy the presents brought into her home. With the support of East End House, Hobbs family has gained new skills and strength for the future while finding joy in the present.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
East End House focuses its services in Cambridge and the surrounding neighborhoods.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  2. Human Services - Child Day Care
  3. Human Services - Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash)

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Child Care Program

This program has 54 full-time slots for children ages 15 months to 5 years.  It is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).  The focus is on preparing children for kindergarten.  The program uses Teaching Strategies Gold and the Bracken School Readiness Scale to measure program effectiveness and track children's progress. Powerful Parenting, a parent education course for parents of young children was launched in 2010.

Budget  $755,023.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Child Care
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Short term outcomes include:

  • Toddlers exhibit a beginning knowledge of language and literacy 
  • Toddlers and preschoolers develop social skills to meet developmental milestones
  • Toddlers begin to understand concepts in mathematical thinking
  • Preschoolers have competence in basic language and literacy
  • Preschoolers grasp beginning scientific thinking
  • Preschoolers understand and can use basic mathematical concepts
Program Long-Term Success 

The Child Care Program aims to prepare all children academically and socially to succeed in kindergarten.

Program Success Monitored By 

Teaching Strategies Gold and the Bracken School Readiness Scale are used to monitor progress.

Examples of Program Success 

In the spring of 2012 over 90% of preschoolers were kindergarten ready.


Emergency Food Program

The Emergency Food Program consists of three components:

  1. Food Pantry: Over 300 families each month receive fresh produce, meat, dairy and non-perishable foods from the Pantry.  There is an emphasis on providing healthy choices and recipes.  
  2. Free Farmer's Markets: Over 100 households benefit from the Markets each month. They are held in three low-income, senor housing complexes in Cambridge. Many residents are unable to make it to the pantry due to limited mobility so staff brings the Pantry to the residents.
  3. Thanksgiving Basket Giveaway: Each Thanksgiving over 800 families receive a turkey (or voucher to purchase one) and all the ingredients to make a traditional meal.
Budget  $234,309.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Outlets
Population Served Adults Families Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success 

Some of the goals for the Emergency Food Program include:

-More than 800 families will receive Thanksgiving Turkey Baskets in November.

-Over 500 children will open presents in December thanks to the Holiday Toy Drive.

-Each month, more than 100 elderly and disabled residents of Cambridge's low income housing complexes will engage in social activity and receive fresh produce from the Free Farmer's Markets.

-1,700 people in Cambridge and surrounding towns will secure food this year through the Emergency Food Program.

Program Long-Term Success 

The Emergency Food Program aims to reduce food insecurity in Cambridge and the surrounding towns.  New parents will be able to raise their children with all the basic essentials they need.  Seniors will eat healthy food even if they are not physically or financially able to acquire fresh groceries on their own.  All children will feast on Thanksgiving and open presents in December.

Program Success Monitored By  The Emergency Food Program uses formal assessment tools to measure impact.  Free Farmer's Market and Emergency Food Program consumers take satisfaction surveys twice a year.  The surveys include questions about food preferences and ease of access.  East End House tracks outcomes and monitors the agency's overall impact using a customized version of Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), a sophisticated database software package.  All process and outcome data is centralized in this system.  The database enables staff to generate regular reports to measure progress towards discrete benchmarks and outcomes.  Senior staff use the data to create quarterly action plans for program improvement.  East End House fosters a culture which makes program evaluation and improvement part of the daily routine for all staff.
Examples of Program Success 

Pedro first came to East End House feeling down.  Despite all his hard work, the economy was slow and he simply could not find enough work.  Saddened by his financial situation, he arrived at East End House's food pantry in need of groceries.  Several months later, Pedro returned to East End House.  This time, he brought a bag of food with him.  "You guys really got me through a tough time," he said, "It's not much, but I want to give back now that things are going better."  Today, Pedro is a successful documentary photographer.  His work has been featured across the United States as well as in his native El Salvador.  Pedro's story is one example of how the Emergency Food Program at East End House helps people in times of need.


Middle School Program

This program was created based on a pressing community need for services for this population.  It serves youth in sixth through eighth grade after school and full days during school vacation weeks and summer months. The program operates in partnership with the Putnam Ave Upper School, one of four public middle schools in Cambridge. Curriculum stresses STEM learning, leadership development and career exploration.  High school readiness is a major theme.

Budget  $481,711.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

The following short-term outcomes are essential to reaching the long-term goals:

  1. Youth have relationships with pro-social peers
  2. Youth exhibit  problem-solving skills
  3. Youth exhibit organizational skills
  4. Youth can set and track their own goals
  5. Youth have a high internal locus of control
  6. Youth miss fewer than 3 days of school per semester
  7. Families support academic success
  8. Youth have positive relationships with school teachers
Program Long-Term Success 

The Middle School Program has three long-term outcomes based on research that points to the skills youth need to be successful.

  1. Youth exhibit  pro-social skills
  2. Youth have positive school engagement
  3. Youth have the internal assets they need for a successful future
Program Success Monitored By 

The Middle School Program utilizes a number of evidence-based tools to measure progress towards outcomes. Tools include:

  1. SAYO: These surveys, developed and validated by the National Institute of Out of School Time (NIOST), are completed by youth, staff and school teachers 2-3 times a year. They measure academic and social-emotional progress.
  2. APT: This observation tool, developed by NIOST, provides feedback on the overall program quality.  Staff are trained to observe classes and transitions and rate them on a rubric. Results are discussed at staff meetings and program improvements made.
  3. Developmental Assets Checklist: Based on the Search Institute's Developmental Assets, this form is completed by staff on each youth at least three times a year.  Results are used to measure the overall program's effectiveness in building these assets as well as to identify areas of strength and improvement for individual  youth.
  4. Dimensions of Success (DOS); This is a tool developed by Program in Education, Afterschool and Resiliency (PEAR), an affiliate of Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital, measures the effectiveness of science curriculum.  PEAR researches and staff observe science classes, rate them on a number of dimensions of best practice.
Examples of Program Success 
  1. Results of the Developmental Assets Checklist reveal that youth who attend the program at least 3 days a week consistently, improve on at least two assets over the course of a year.
Observations using the DOS tool reveal that science curriculum has become more effective in engaging youth and teaching content  over the past three years.

School Age Program

This program provides an enriching environment for children in kindergarten to fifth grade after school school and full days during school vacation weeks and summer months.  Curriculum stresses science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) learning, literacy and health.  Middle school preparedness is the goal.

Budget  $493,571.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Short term outcomes are:

  • High school attendance
  • Passing in all homework assignments
  • Children have a vision of their future selves
  • Children demonstrate conflict resolution skills
  • Children demonstrate good communication skills
  • Parents are pro education
  • Parents attend school and afterschool events
Program Long-Term Success 

The long-term outcomes for the program are:

  • Children are committed to their academic success
  • Children exhibit positive adult and peer relationships
  • Families are invested in their child's academic success
Program Success Monitored By 

The program uses the SAYO and APT, evidence-based tools designed by the National Institute for Out of School Time (NIOST) to measure program quality. 

Examples of Program Success 

Tessa came to East End House when she was 15 months old. When she began to struggle with reading in first grade, her mother reached out to the School Age  Program staff. 

 

 Tessa's teachers at East End House designed a concentrated homework plan to help her during the after school program; the coordinated with  her mother to arrange for special services during  the school day; and advised  her on the benchmarks Tessa should be reaching.  Two years later Tessa has an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and is thriving at school and East End House.


Senior Programs

The Senior Activities Program consists of two main components:

  1. Sunrise Senior Activities Program: The group meets twice a week to listen to lectures, go on trips, play games and participate in workshops.  The goals is to decrease social isolation.
  2. Young at Heart: This health and wellness initiative gives seniors an opportunity to exercise with Qi Gong and yoga classes as well as a Walking Club.  There are also presentations on relevant health issues.
Budget  $128,376.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Senior Services
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Elderly and/or Disabled Other Health/Disability
Program Short-Term Success 

In the next year, East End House plans to:

-Offer monthly senior seminars in collaboration with the Cambridge Health Alliance.

-Pair seniors with volunteer opportunities through the Cambridge Senior Volunteer Clearinghouse.

-Continue to assess seniors' needs and develop new programming around those needs.

Program Long-Term Success 

According to the 2011 Cambridge Community Development Department's Demographics and Socioeconomic Profile, there are 10,758 people over the age of 65 living in Cambridge.  Roughly 40.5% of these seniors live alone.  Older adults who perceive high levels of support and companionship have a nearly 70% chance of reporting very good or excellent health, compared to only 40% among isolated seniors.  Cognizant of these factors, East End House pursues a future when all seniors have appropriate opportunities for social engagement and resources for health and wellness.

Program Success Monitored By  Seniors complete an evidence-based survey that measures social connectedness and levels of isolation.  Young at Heart and the Sunrise Senior Activities Program track attendance and collect surveys after each workshop.  Participants in the Sunrise Senior Activities Program gather for a planning session every year to evaluate completed events and plan for the coming months.  Focus groups have also helped assess interest and measure community need.  East End House tracks outcomes and monitors the agency's overall impact using a customized version of Efforts to Outcomes (ETO), a sophisticated database software package.  All process and outcome data is centralized in this system.  The database enables staff to generate regular reports to measure progress towards discrete benchmarks and outcomes.  Senior staff use the data to create quarterly action plans for program improvement.  East End House fosters a culture where program evaluation and improvement are part of the daily routine for all staff.
Examples of Program Success  Millie has been coming to East End House for almost 60 years.  She was involved in the children's programs as she grew up in Cambridge, and now she is an active participant in the Senior Program.  "East End House has been like a family to me," she reflects, "I fell like it's a home--a second home."  Every stage of life demands different types of support, and East End House is there to provide that support for people of all ages.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Michael J. Delia LICSW, CFRE
CEO Term Start Sept 1996
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Under Michael’s leadership, East End House’s budget has increased by several fold and services expanded. During his tenure, End East End House has received numerous accolades, including the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network’s Award for Excellence in Management in 2010, Family Strengthening Award from the Annie E. Casey Foundation in 2009 and 2010 and, in 2010 became the first organization nationwide to get dual accreditation from the Council on Accreditation (COA) for its Out of School Time Programs and as an agency.

 

Michael received a Masters Degree from the University of Chicago in Social Service Administration and a Bachelor of Arts Degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo, graduating Magna cum Laude and a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He received advanced training in management from Harvard Business School, MIT Sloan School of Business, and Roosevelt University in Chicago, serving as a fellow in a yearlong program for senior managers of human service organizations sponsored by the City of Chicago. Michael currently serves on the Board of Directors of the United Neighborhood Centers of America and Alliance for Children and Families, and has served as a board member and officer of local and national child, youth family organizations in the past, including serving from 2004-2009 as the Chair of the Cambridge Chamber of Commerce’s Community Outreach Committee.  In 2005 he was chosen as one of Boston Event Guide's "30 Extraordinary Bostonians."

 

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Marty Zack Jan 1979 Mar 1996

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Catharine Downs EdM School Age Program Director Catharine earned a Master's degree in Education from Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. During her graduate work, Catharine studied how to design and implement strategies and interventions to support under-resourced students in achieving academic success. Catharine has experience working with youth in after-school programs in Philadelphia and in Cambridge, where she was a group leader in East End House's School Age Program from 2003-2006. She also taught pre-school for one year in Uganda, East Africa. She was an AmeriCorps member in Philadelphia, working with uninsured patients in a community health clinic. Following her AmeriCorps experience, she worked in a dropout prevention program for teen mothers for three years, where she worked closely with school staff and the community to develop programs to support young mothers.
Rebecca Gallo LCSW, MPH Senior Director of Evaluation and Development Rebecca earned a Masters degree in Social Work and a Masters degree in Public Health from Columbia University and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from American University. Her graduate studies and field work focused on community program development and clinical social work. She is a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) and has experience developing community programs and working with individuals, families, and children in non-profit organizations in Washington D.C., New York City, and the Greater Boston area. She has also served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Cote d'Ivoire, West Africa where she worked to improve community health in a rural village. Rebecca has been at East End House since 2007 where she has been working to enhance agency evaluation systems and increase the capacity of the development office.
Mrs. Stephanie Gendron Senior Director of Youth Opportunities --
Kimberly Harrington-Marcellino Marketing and Development Director --
Camille Imbimbo-Platt Child Care Program Director Camille received her EEC Director II Certification after working in the field of Early Childhood Education for over 20 years. She gained eight years of experience working for a not-for-profit social service agency in Boston before joining the East End House staff, and she has been working at East End House since 1993. Camille has participated in, and works closely with, other collaborating organizations including the Zero to Eight sub-committee and Cambridge Community Partnership for Children. In addition to her own continuing professional development, Camille has presented workshops and trainings for other Early Childhood Educators and Directors at the annual Teaching for Change Conference at the Cambridge Rindge and Latin High School. Under her leadership, the East End House's Child Care program achieved Accreditation by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), which recognizes program excellence.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Familys Count: Family Strengthening Award Annie E. Casey Foundation and United Neighborhood Centers of America 2010
Management Award Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2010
Familys Count: Family Strengthening Award Annie E. Casey Foundation and United Neighborhood Centers of America 2009

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Afterschool Alliance --
Associated Grant Makers --
Massachusetts Nonprofit Network --
United Way Member Agency --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Council on Accreditation (COA) [for Children and Family Services] - Accreditation 2010
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) - 5 Year Accreditation 2007

Collaborations

East End House collaborates with a number of organizations to improve program quality.
  • Program in Education, Afterschool and Resiliency (PEAR), an affiliate of Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital: PEAR researchers assist with evaluation of science programming in the Middle School Program and have trained all staff on their Dimensions of Success (DOS) tool which measures curriculum quality.  They are also partnering on a youth mental health initiative called  SHIP (Social-Emotional Health Intervention Project). 
  • Cambridge Creativity Commons: This is a local art studio. East End House staff have designed curriculum in collaboration with a local artist to infuse STEM learning into art. Last year youth designed their own mobiles, learning about physics as well as different artistic techniques.
  • Biogen Idec Community Lab: The lab is the only lab space in Cambridge that allows middle school youth use the space. The lab is set up so the Director, in collaboration with staff, has curriculum for middle school youth exposing them to what scientists do on a daily basis. The program visits the lab at least twice a year.
  • Coalitions: The agency is part of a number of coalitions including the Cambridge 0-8 Council; Cambridge Challenge; Massachusetts Assoc. of Settlement Houses.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 17
Number of Part Time Staff 13
Number of Volunteers 550
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 12
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 7
Caucasian: 69
Hispanic/Latino: 12
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 23
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Susan Lapierre
Board Chair Company Affiliation Senior Vice President and Community Relations and CFA Officer; Cambridge Savings Bank
Board Chair Term July 2010 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Kathryn Bloom retired, Biogen Foundation --
Michael Delia President & Chief Executive Officer; East End House Exofficio
Kristin Doeberl Associate, Looney & Grossman, LLP Voting
Todd Ellis Chief Financial Officer, FSG Voting
William Gartner Consultant --
Susan Lapierre Senior Vice President and Community Relations and CRA Officer; Cambridge Savings Bank Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 3
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 85%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Audit, Compliance and Controls

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $2,641,692 $2,496,117 $2,235,288
Total Expenses $2,631,958 $2,494,649 $2,328,759

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $595,104 $611,137 $678,464
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $595,104 $611,137 $678,464
Individual Contributions $754,641 $834,507 $600,861
Indirect Public Support $52,585 $61,844 $65,941
Earned Revenue $616,576 $412,647 $454,603
Investment Income, Net of Losses $137 -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $52,925 $42,235 $51,530
Revenue In-Kind $569,724 $533,279 $382,924
Other -- $468 $965

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $2,210,014 $2,125,141 $1,993,231
Administration Expense $259,851 $215,048 $224,725
Fundraising Expense $162,093 $154,460 $110,803
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.00 0.96
Program Expense/Total Expenses 84% 85% 86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 11% 10% 8%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $1,046,811 $1,030,089 $991,827
Current Assets $693,077 $677,617 $629,822
Long-Term Liabilities $64,813 $73,464 $81,573
Current Liabilities $105,616 $89,977 $45,074
Total Net Assets $876,382 $866,648 $865,180

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $0.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 6.56 7.53 13.97

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 6% 7% 8%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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