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Bridgewell, Inc.

 471 Broadway
 Lynnfield, MA 01940
[P] (339) 8832112 x 8832112
[F] (339) 883-2112
Bridgewell, Inc.
ngramolini@bridgewell.org
Nancy Gramolini
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INCORPORATED: 1958
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2296940

LAST UPDATED: 03/10/2017
Organization DBA --
Former Names Greater Lynn Mental Health and Retardation Association (2004)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Bridgewell mission statement: Inspired by the values of caring and respect, together we guide individuals with disabilities and other challenges to achieve and enjoy their highest quality of life and personal growth.

 
Bridgewell Values: In our relationships and all that we do, we will demonstrate these fundamental values: Caring, Respect, Dignity, Integrity, Safety, Wellness

Mission Statement

Bridgewell mission statement: Inspired by the values of caring and respect, together we guide individuals with disabilities and other challenges to achieve and enjoy their highest quality of life and personal growth.

 
Bridgewell Values: In our relationships and all that we do, we will demonstrate these fundamental values: Caring, Respect, Dignity, Integrity, Safety, Wellness

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $69,424,217.00
Projected Expense $69,700,972.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Affordable Housing and Homeless Services
  • Behavioral Health Services
  • Day Services for Individuals with Disabilities
  • Employment Training and Education
  • Residential Services for Individuals with Disabilities

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Bridgewell mission statement: Inspired by the values of caring and respect, together we guide individuals with disabilities and other challenges to achieve and enjoy their highest quality of life and personal growth.

 
Bridgewell Values: In our relationships and all that we do, we will demonstrate these fundamental values: Caring, Respect, Dignity, Integrity, Safety, Wellness

Background Statement

Bridgewell provides direct support to individuals living with disabilities and other life challenges. We work in 23 communities in eastern Massachusetts and serve just over 6000 individuals and their families each year. Bridgewell’s continuum of care includes residential services, day habilitation, counseling, clinical care, employment training, homeless services, affordable housing, and substance abuse and addiction services. Bridgewell’s core purpose is to help everyone we serve live as fully and independently as possible while achieving their own goals. Bridgewell’s programs are accredited by CARF International – a testament to the standards we embrace.

Bridgewell originated in 1958 as a child guidance center in Lynn, Mass., helping children with emotional difficulties. Greater Lynn Mental Health, as Bridgewell was formerly known, expanded to include adults with psychiatric disabilities in the early 1970’s. Around this time, the deinstitutionalization movement prompted the agency to open community-based residential programs for individuals with developmental disabilities and modify its name to Greater Lynn Mental Health and Retardation Association.  The agency soon became a leading service provider for individuals dually diagnosed with developmental and psychiatric disabilities, opening an outpatient clinic for this population in 1989. Further expertise soon included individuals with disabilities requiring medically intensive care.

Services continued to build in response to community needs in the 1990’s. Day programs offering skill-building, socialization, and employment opportunities soon augmented services for adults with developmental disabilities. The agency also expanded into congregate housing for formerly homeless individuals and individuals with disabilities, first in Lynn and later in Lowell. This further cemented our presence in Lowell, where services including group therapy for individuals with persistent mental illness continued to grow. A rebranding to Bridgewell came in 2005, recognizing the diverse population and geographic area served, which now extends to 23 communities across Essex and Middlesex counties.  


Impact Statement

Bridgewell is proud of the following recent organizational accomplishments:

  • After years of thoughtful planning, Bridgewell and Project COPE completed a merger in January 2014.
    For 40 years, Project COPE has provided community-based prevention, education and treatment services for individuals and their families struggling with addiction. Bridgewell is now partnering with Project COPE to strengthen supports in the community and bring essential services to a wider population.
  • The highest level of accreditation by CARF International - a testament to our leadership, vision and overall excellence in service provision.
  • Continued program expansion in direct response to community need. New services include a highly successful day program for young adults with autism and, based on this success, multiple residential homes for this population.
  • Bridgewell resident Elmer “Skip” Marshall won the 2013 Self-Determination award from the Association of Developmental Disabilities Providers (ADDP), while the 2013 ADDP Director Support Professional, Northeast Region award went to Bridgewell staff member Linda Conley.
  • A low staff turnover rate of 17%, well below the industry standard of 24%.
  • Bridgewell’s Assistant Director of Quality Assurance and Self-Advocacy Facilitator, Kelli Hyland, received the 2011 Richard J. Bond Supervisor Award of Excellence from the Providers’ Council.
  • Bridgewell nurse Leah Kamau was recognized in The Boston Globe’s 2013 “Salute to Nurses” for her exemplary work

Organizational goals as outlined in the 2013-2018 strategic plan include:

1.       Maintain financial security and stability in an ever-changing economic time

2.       Further enhance and develop the skill and engagement of Bridgewell staff

3.       Extend and expand the diverse services Bridgewell offers

4.       Invest in the capabilities necessary to further enhance the delivery of quality services

5.       Enhance the public image and advance the community-based support of Bridgewell

 


Needs Statement

 

1.      Developing new and diversified revenue streams to ensure long-term financial stability

2.    Expanding Bridgewell’s support base to include more corporate, foundation, and other community partners 
 

3.      Recruiting new board members and volunteers for Bridgewell’s Human Rights Committees

4.      Establishing new business partners to increase employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities and individuals experiencing homelessness

5.       Increasing the volume of new hires and securing/developing new program space to meet rapid program expansion


 


CEO Statement

“A dream you dream alone is only a dream.
  A dream you dream together is reality.” - John Lennon

At Bridgewell, we aren’t afraid to dream and know that it takes the work of many to turn dreams into reality. For more than 55 years, we have partnered with an ever-growing community of visionaries, leaders and front-line practitioners in Massachusetts (& beyond) to spark bold, inventive ways to improve the lives of individuals with a variety of disabilities. Together, we build the will for change, stay ahead of the curve, seek out innovative new models of care and spread proven best practices.

As we look to the future, we can make a few predictions. We know that the commitment to delivering a quality continuum of care for the people we serve will remain deeply embedded in our work. We know we will continue to serve as thought leaders in the autism arenas and for those aging with disabilities. We know that we will continue to play a critical role in the fight against the opiate crisis and ongoing challenges facing those experiencing homelessness. And finally, we know that to accomplish these tasks, we must strive to serve as a model employer, supportive of best practices at all levels of service.

Together we will continue to turn dreams into reality.

 
Robert S, Stearns,President and CEO
February 2016
 

Board Chair Statement

Message from Board Chair Jeff Roy

It is truly an exciting time to be part of the Bridgewell family! Identifying new partners to expand and improve services and exercising agility to adapt to constantly changing needs for the individuals we serve is paramount to Bridgewell’s core strategy, mission and success.
 
In 2014-2015, the positive public recognition and surging demand for cutting-edge programs is a true testament to the hard work and dedication of the Bridgewell family in serving our local communities and positioning Bridgewell as a leading provider in serving the needs of individuals with disabilities. 
 
 
Message from Angelika Fretzen, Former Board Chair
 
I joined Bridgewell looking for an opportunity to bring my business and medical sciences background to a high-impact nonprofit that improves lives through direct services and healthcare.  I was immediately impressed with not only the scope and breadth of Bridgewell’s work (over 5,000 individuals served each year across 85 programs), but also the professionalism and high standards evident throughout the organization.

Despite a challenging economic climate, Bridgewell has continued to expand services in response to community needs over the past year. Coming from the biotech industry, I understand the importance of taking a long view into the future. Bridgewell is unique in its ability to anticipate emerging needs and address them in innovative ways.  For example, when signs of Alzheimer’s disease became increasingly prevalent among adults with developmental disabilities in Bridgewell’s care, the agency diligently developed appropriate treatment protocols and is now a leading authority on this topic.

Diversifying our revenue model is currently one of Bridgewell’s biggest challenges, and is central to our recently completed, five-year strategic plan. Bridgewell has already taken important steps, for example expanding the development department to increase the focus on individual, foundation and corporate donors. We are working hard to ensure that Bridgewell can continue to innovate and provide programs of the highest quality.

One of the most rewarding parts of my involvement with Bridgewell is speaking to staff about the important work they do every day. I hope the information and stories found here give clear insights into just how much Bridgewell is improving lives and making our community a better place to be, for everyone, regardless of the challenges they face.



Geographic Area Served

Northeast Massachusetts Region
NORTHEAST REGION, MA

Bridgewell operates programs in 23 communities in the North Shore and in Merrimack Valley areas of Massachusetts, including Amesbury, Beverly, Billerica, Chelmsford, Danvers, Dracut, Haverhill, Lowell, Lynn, Lynnfield, Medford, Melrose, Merrimac, Peabody, Salem, Salisbury, Saugus, Stoneham, Swampscott, Tewksbury,Topsfield, Wakefield, and Wenham. 

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers
  2. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Mental Health Treatment
  3. Housing, Shelter - Housing Support

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Affordable Housing and Homeless Services

 

Bridgewell is long recognized as a leader in providing safe and affordable housing to individuals with disabilities and formerly homeless individuals in the Lynn and Lowell areas. Opportunities range from rooming houses to apartment living, and many include rental subsidy programs funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

Pathfinder Apartments and Drop-in Center

Located in Lowell, Pathfinder Apartments comprises housing units for 12 men who are formerly homeless, have a disability and meet very low income guidelines. Residents are supported 24/7 and receive case management services that help them work towards independent living and community integration.

The adjacent Pathfinder Drop-In Center offers a safe place for homeless individuals to have a meal, take a shower, wash laundry, or take refuge from the streets. Open 8 AM to 8 PM every day to men and women, the center supports on average 30 to 40 individuals per day and serves over 46,000 meals per year. Assistance with entitlement applications and linkages to other community providers are also offered.

Affordable Housing

Bridgewell manages 100+ units of affordable housing. Most units offer a form of sponsor-based subsidy under the HUD Shelter Plus Care and SRO Mod Rehab Programs, with the eligibility criteria being homeless and/or disabled. Case Management Services are offered with the subsidized units.

HUD Mainstream Housing Choice Voucher Program

Bridgewell administers 200 housing vouchers for very low income individuals with disabilities and their families so that they can afford safe and affordable housing.

Representative Payee Services

Bridgewell’s HUD funded representative payee services help transition homeless individuals to permanent housing and teach individuals money management skills needed to maintain housing. Staff members act as administrators appointed by the Social Security Administration to assist in the management of finances and with securing housing and subsidies.

Vocational Interest Program (VIP)

Bridgewell’s VIP program helps individuals in Lynn who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless to find employment and build careers. Please see the “Employment Training” section for more information. 

 


Budget  .
Category  Housing, General/Other Affordable Housing
Population Served Homeless Adults People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 

 

For Bridgewell’s affordable housing programs, short-term success means that residents develop self-determination, achieve housing stability and build skills in financial management and other life skills areas.

For the Drop-In Center, short-term success means that an average of 35-45 homeless individuals per day are served three nutritious meals and are referred to partner agencies for needed services, and the center operates at 100% capacity. 

 


Program Long-Term Success 

 

As with all Bridgewell programs, long-term success is aligned with our mission to help individuals with disabilities and other challenges achieve and enjoy their highest quality of life and personal growth.

This means that individuals in affordable housing maintain housing eligibility through effective case management services, while making progress toward self-directed goals established in Individual Action Plans. Areas addressed in Individual Action Plans include physical health, substance abuse/addition, vocational/employment, and personal care, to name a few. 

It also means positive feedback through HUD program monitoring reports and annual licensing reviews administered by the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health.

 


Program Success Monitored By 

 

·        Program satisfaction is monitored through annual surveys administered through Bridgewell’s Quality Assurance Department. Surveys obtain feedback on services from program participants in the following core areas: services; respect; safety; decisions; activities; and assistance.

·        HUD program monitoring reports

·        Annual licensing reviews through the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health

·        Tracking retention of residents in supportive housing 

 


Examples of Program Success 

 

Sulaiman came to the U.S. from Sierra Leone in 1991. He became homeless after experiencing a series of setbacks, and was admitted to Pathfinder’s residential program with hope for the future and a passion for food. He showed a strong commitment to his stabilization by becoming a model resident, and is now working toward his dream of attending culinary school and becoming a chef as the full-time cook for the Pathfinder Drop-In Program.

In this role, Sulaiman diligently provides high quality nutrition to homeless individuals. He is proud of his kitchen and credited with consistent public health certifications. He has demonstrated excellent leadership, training many individuals who are required to perform community service. Sulaiman’s transition plan includes working in a local restaurant as a cook, then culinary school. 



Behavioral Health Services

 

Bridgewell’s Behavioral Health Services include outpatient psychotherapy and medication management for individuals with psychiatric and developmental disabilities. Our experienced team of providers ensures that individuals and their families/guardians, other care providers and advocates are active collaborators in the process of recovery, growth and change.

Bridgewell Counseling Services (BCS) - Lowell and Chelmsford

Our standard outpatient services include medication assessment and management, diagnosis and treatment, and individual, couples, and group psychotherapies. BCS in Chelmsford also provides services to children and families.

The Sovner Center – Danvers

The Sovner Center specializes in psychiatric assessment, medication management and psychotherapy services to adults with a dual diagnosis of developmental and psychiatric disability.
 
Lowell Adult Day Treatment (LADT)

LADT is a structured 5-day per week, intensive group psychotherapy program for individuals with severe mental illness who may also have co-occurring substance abuse disorders. The LADT team of clinicians works collaboratively with individuals and their provider team to avoid inpatient hospitalization; better manage symptoms of mental illness; increase independence and socialization skills; and achieve educational, occupational and recovery goals.

START Clinical Support Services

START (Systemic, Therapeutic, Assessment, Respite & Treatment) provides short-term, community-based crisis prevention, intervention and behavior support for individuals dually diagnosed with developmental and psychiatric disabilities. The clinical support team is uniquely qualified to assist in preventing crises and minimizing the need for unnecessary psychiatric hospitalization.


 


Budget  .
Category  Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

For individuals served, short-term success will vary from person to person based on diagnostic assessments, but generally, it means improved mental health and quality of life through skill development and other recovery-related goals. Measurements tracked across the board for each individual and aggregated for outcomes reporting include functioning in areas such as quality of life, self-confidence, depressive symptoms, psychosis, and suicidality.

For behavioral health services as a whole, short-term success means:

 ·        Maximum utilization of services through decreases in no-show and cancellation rates and/or increases in average daily attendance

 ·        Maximum program satisfaction on the part of individuals served in areas including: overall service satisfaction; personal empowerment with regard to service decision making; satisfaction with therapist and med provider; and feelings of safety and respect within the program.

 ·        Maximum service access for all individuals served

 ·        Increased program revenue over previous fiscal year

Program Long-Term Success 

As with all Bridgewell programs, long-term success is aligned with our mission to help individuals with disabilities and other challenges achieve and enjoy their highest quality of life and personal growth. For behavioral health services, this means continual improvement in mental health indicators and achievement of personal recovery goals. 

Additional indicators of long-term program success include:

·        CARF accreditation

·        Positive feedback from and being the preferred provider for partners such as the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health

Program Success Monitored By 

For each individual, progress towards treatment goals is monitored through Treatment Outcome Package (TOP), a multidimensional client assessment and outcome measurement tool, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), a rating scale used to measure a range of psychiatric symptoms.

Utilization of services is monitored through analysis of attendance and no-show data as well as billing reports.

Program satisfaction is monitored through annual surveys administered through Bridgewell’s Quality Assurance Department, which obtain feedback on services from program participants in the following core areas:  overall satisfaction with service, opportunities for decision-making, satisfaction with therapists and medical providers, and feelings of safety and respect.

Service access is monitored by: tracking the waiting periods for intake evaluations, therapy appointments, medical appointments, and emergency medical appointments.

Productivity/revenue is monitored through monthly finance reports.  

Examples of Program Success 

Mike has received services through Bridgewell’s Sovner Center, START Clinical Services and also START Respite for several years.  Mike is a shy man of few words, but when comfortable he shows his warm sense of humor. 

In 2011, Mike experienced a dramatic change in his mental health, including auditory hallucinations, thoughts of self-harm, and refusal to eat. After unsuccessful med changes and a psychiatric hospitalization, Mike transitioned to START Respite as part of his recovery.  Mike developed a particularly close relationship with his START behavioral specialist.  Through her unique approach, she engaged Mike and reintroduced activities he had lost pleasure in, such as library visits and listening to his favorite music.  Gradually, Mike began to come out of his shell.

When Mike’s mother became ill and he could no longer live with her, his START behavioral specialist helped him transition to a community residence and continued seeing him regularly to ensure he was settled.  Recent reports are that Mike smiles more, seems more self-confident and does not hesitate to engage with staff.  He has participated in Best Buddies, takes a computer class and cooks a meal each week with staff.  While Mike visits his mother every weekend, he is also starting to create a life of his own.



Day Services for Individuals with Disabilities

Bridgewell provides a variety of Day Habilitation Services to adults with mild to severe developmental and physical disabilities, with the goal of helping participants achieve and enjoy their maximum potential and personal growth. Program sites are located in Lynn, Danvers, Melrose and Medford.

Day Habilitation programs promote community experience and growth in areas including self-care, nutrition, household skills, communication, socialization, and sensory, motor, and behavioral development. Services are provided on-site and in the community to offer a variety of learning environments and promote community engagement, while both on and off-site employment opportunities are offered through the Boston Street location in Lynn.  
 
New Program for Transitioning Young Adults with Autism

Bridgewell recently opened the Rosewood Drive Day Habilitation Center in Danvers in response to the growing number of young adults with autism who are "turning 22" and aging out of the education system – a rapidly expanding group with unique, largely unmet needs. According to Autism Speaks, 500,000 children with autism will become adults with autism over the next decade. 

Rosewood Drive helps young adults with autism smoothly transition from the education system and build fulfilling, participatory adult lives. The program provides a community-based, highly structured daytime experience that includes opportunities for ongoing learning and skill-building, physical activity, nutrition, employment, recreation, therapy (speech, occupational, and physical), and additional clinical supports.

The program model was developed under the direction of Bridgewell’s Director of Day Services, Nancy Marticio, herself the parent of a child with autism. Ms. Marticio has worked in close collaboration with other parents of young people with autism, experts from the Lurie Center for Autism at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Augmentative Communication Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, and Bridgewell’s own clinical staff. The state of the art Rosewood Drive Center was custom-renovated for this population. For example, specialized rubber flooring is used throughout the space to absorb sudden, loud sounds, thereby mitigating sensory issues common to individuals with autism. 
 

 


 

Budget  .
Category  Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Adults People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 

 

For the individuals served, short-term success means growth, skill development and attainment of personal goals in core areas including self-help; sensory-motor; communication; social; independent living; and behavior.

For day habilitation programs as a whole, short-term success means program enrollment at or near full capacity; high program satisfaction on the part of individuals served and their families/guardians; and satisfactory performance as determined by the Mass. Department of Developmental Services (DDS). 


 

Program Long-Term Success 

 

As with all Bridgewell programs, long-term success is aligned with our mission to help individuals with disabilities and other challenges achieve and enjoy their highest quality of life and personal growth.

For day programs, this means individuals continue to grow and make progress toward personal goals over the long-term. It also means participants stay with Bridgewell, which we ensure through programming of the highest quality that is also fun, educational, and incorporates new technology to keep individuals interested and motivated. Additional indicators of long-term success include program expansion; high staff retention; and CARF accreditation 


 

Program Success Monitored By 

 

Personal goals for each individual are established and monitored through individual support plans, including five year goals and yearly measurable objectives.  An interdisciplinary staff team collaborates with individuals served and families/guardians to outline goals and behavioral support strategies based on the specific needs and desires of each individual. Support plans are reviewed quarterly.   

Program satisfaction is monitored through annual surveys administered through Bridgewell’s Quality Assurance Department. Surveys collect feedback on services from program participants in the following core areas: services, respect, safety, decisions,activities, and assistance.

Program utilization is tracked through monthly attendance forms versus maximum program capacity.

DDS satisfaction with program performance is monitored through quarterly visits and the survey and certification process. 

CARF International accreditation is obtained through a rigorous peer review process culminating with a site-visit from a team of independent national surveyors. 


 

Examples of Program Success 

When Bernadette started attending the day program for individuals with developmental disabilities at Bridgewell's Boston Street Center in Lynn, she was primarily wheelchair-bound due to her weight. With the help of Bridgewell, Bernadette made a commitment to get active, get healthy, and in doing so, transform her life. Through her incredible strength and determination, she has since lost over 200 pounds and traded in her wheelchair! 

Bernadette's new lifestyle includes all of Boston Street's weekly exercise groups and regular use of the exercise bike in the Boston Street gym. In addition, she now enjoys walks and yoga class in her free time. Bernadette is also a very active participant in Boston Street's nutrition group, and enjoys researching, selecting, and preparing healthy recipes for her cooking group. 

Bernadette's whole world has opened up in so many ways. Currently, she is reading up on the rules of the road in a driver's manual and expanding her artistic repertoire through a weekly painting class. The possibilities for Bernadette are endless, and we can't wait to see what her future brings!

Please see also the testimonial from a parent at our day program for young adults with autism, in the "Program Comments" section below.

 

 



Employment Training and Education

 

Bridgewell has a successful history of helping individuals with disabilities and other challenges enter the workforce. Current employment support programs include The Boston Street Center and the Vocational Interest Program (VIP). 

Bridgewell's Boston Street Center (BSC) Employment Program in Lynn facilitates employment opportunities for adults ages 18 to retirement who have developmental disabilities, including work onsite at Bridgewell or out in the community. Bridgewell works with each individual to assess skills and develop employment goals based on abilities and interests. Support is provided in all aspects of job readiness including hygiene, workplace expectations, training and skill development, resume development, interview techniques, job search, and on-the-job training. Day habilitation services are also available at this site for individuals who need them as an enhancement to their vocational supports.

Bridgewell’s innovative Vocational Interest Program (VIP) helps individuals in Lynn who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless to find employment and build careers. Services start by addressing barriers to employment such as court involvement, language needs and child care, followed by an assessment of strengths and setting of short and long-term career goals. Job readiness trainings are offered including workplace ethics and etiquette, resume development, interviewing skills, refining reading and writing, and basic computer skills. Through VIP’s professional office environment, individuals can acquire a mailing address, voicemail box and e-mail address. 


 

 
Budget  .
Category  Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Adults People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities Homeless
Program Short-Term Success 

For individuals served, short-term success means development of core vocational skills, including personal care, communication, interviewing, coping, etc., and successful participation in on and/or off-site employment.  Additional indicators include high program satisfaction on the part of individuals served and their families/guardians, where applicable; and high satisfaction on the part of employment partners. 

Program Long-Term Success 

 

As with all Bridgewell programs, long-term success is aligned with our mission to help individuals with disabilities and other challenges to achieve and enjoy their highest quality of life and personal growth.

For employment programs, this means individuals achieve and/or make meaningful progress toward their career goals; high job retention for individuals placed in employment; growing numbers of employment partners; increases in the number of people successfully employed in the community (versus working on-site at Bridgewell); and CARF accreditation.


 


Program Success Monitored By 

The development of vocational skills and progress towards career goals for each individual are tracked via individual support plans.

Employment placements are tracked and evaluated through annual employer satisfaction surveys, in additional to individuals support plans.

Program satisfaction on the part of participants is monitored through annual surveys administered through Bridgewell’s Quality Assurance Department, which obtain feedback on services from program participants in the following core areas: services, respect, safety,decisions, activities, and assistance.

CARF accreditation is obtained through a rigorous peer review process culminating with an extensive site-visit from a team of independent national surveyors. 

 


Examples of Program Success 

Bridgewell's Employment Supports program supports individuals with developmental disabilities in their work at businesses throughout the North Shore community. Rachelle has worked at Petco in Peabody since 2009, where she cleans and stocks shelves. Rachelle is very proud of her job. The store manager appreciates Rachelle's positive attitude and willingness to help out with whatever needs to be done. 

Rachelle's hard work at Petco was highlighted in The Connector, a quarterly publication for North Shore nonprofits with a circulation of more than 55,000. To celebrate her fame in print, Rachelle took a break from work and hosted a signing party, where she autographed copies of the article while refreshments were served.

Going forward, Rachelle's goal is to work even harder by adding one more day to her weekly Petco schedule. 

 



Residential Services for Individuals with Disabilities

 

 

Community Residences

Through our Residential Services, Bridgewell provides supportive homes in the community to more than 350 individuals with developmental and physical disabilities and those who are dually diagnosed with psychiatric disabilities. Our comfortable, single-family style residences offer comprehensive supports based on each individual’s preference and need. All services are tied to the core purpose of helping individuals with disabilities lead and direct their own lives, and also facilitate the strengthening of relationships among housemates, in the community and with family members and friends.

Residences accommodate on average four or five individuals and offer private bedrooms and shared living space. Bridgewell provides around-the-clock, highly-trained staff for homes requiring 24-hour supports, while our supported-living models provide less intensive supports for more independent individuals. In addition, emergency care is available for individuals in need of crisis stabilization and pre-planned respite care gives families or guardians a deserved rest.

 Specialized services include:

-        Alzheimer’s disease specialty residence

-        Hearing impaired specialty residence 

-        Medically intensive residences

·        Challenging behaviors specialty residences 

-        Young adult residence for those transitioning from residential schools 

-        Residences for young adults with autism 

-        Emergency and planned respite housing

 

Recreational Programs

An extensive selection of community-based recreational, volunteer, educational and social activities is also offered, including participation in the Massachusetts Special Olympics. Recreational activities encourage personal expression and building meaningful relationships, provide a chance to give back to the community, and to have some fun. Examples of activities include themed dances, exercise groups, Boston Duck Tours, and theater outings, and volunteer projects such as the beautification of Salem's Camp Naumkeag flagpole area.


 

 


 

 

Budget  .
Category  Human Services, General/Other Residential Care for Individuals with Disabilities
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 

 

·        Individuals served experience increased opportunities for community engagement

·        Individuals served meet goals outlined in individual support plans, which typically center on skill-building in activities of daily living as well as community engagement

·        Program satisfaction on the part of individuals served and their families/guardians, as measured through the annual satisfaction survey

·        Positive reporting/feedback from the Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS)


 

Program Long-Term Success 

 

As with all Bridgewell programs, long-term success is aligned with our mission to help individuals with disabilities and other challenges achieve and enjoy their highest quality of life and personal growth. For residential programs, this means we provide a home and support services of the highest quality that foster independence and personal development. Indicators of success in this area include program expansion (i.e. new residences);a committed and highly trained staff; and the top level of CARF accreditation. 


 

Program Success Monitored By 

 

·        Community engagement and progress towards personal goals are tracked via individual support plans

·        Program satisfaction is monitored through annual surveys administered through Bridgewell’s Quality Assurance Department. Surveys obtain feedback on services from program participants in the following core areas: services, respect, safety, decisions, activities, and assistance.

·        CARF accreditation is obtained through a rigorous peer review process culminating with a site-visit from a team of independent national surveyors. 

·        Bridgewell’s internal Training Dept. tracks trainings attended by each employee

·        Monitoring/reporting by DDS includes the survey and certification process; regular visits by the DDS Service Coordinator; and visits by the Citizens Advisory Committee, a group comprising individuals in DDS services (other than Bridgewell), parents of individuals in services, and other community stakeholders. 


 

Examples of Program Success 

 

Bridgewell’s residential programs include supports for individuals with developmental disabilities who, like George, are capable of independent living. George has grown tremendously during his time at Bridgewell. A focus on developing daily living skills such as self-care, cooking and housekeeping has enabled George to become more self-sufficient. When a staff member taught George about the importance of healthy eating and exercise, he lost over 40 pounds. George is very proud of his accomplishments and loves doing things on his own. As he says, “I’m proud of myself for being here. Bridgewell is my favorite place.”

 

 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We believe the following testament written by the father of a participant in Bridgewell's transitional program for young adults with autism perfectly illustrates why it’s so important to invest in the program as it grows, and also highlights important strengths of Bridgewell as a whole:

My name is Michael Manson, father and guardian of my 23 year-old autistic son Hadrian.

 

The Massachusetts educational system allows students to remain in the public educational system until age 22. On Hadrian’s 22nd birthday our family faced an abyss (as do all families of young autistic adults)– where would Hadrian go now, were there going to be any opportunities for him that would encourage and help maintain the few, but important skills he learned in school, would there be any staff or professionals who understood autism in his future or would he be relegated to the corner of the room slowly disengaging from his environment and losing the skills he worked so hard to master?

 

Our family visited all the available venues open to Hadrian, but despite the well-meaning, hard-working staff at these sites, we realized that Hadrian indeed had a bleak future, and that his parents once again would have to educate and lead the efforts to keep him afloat in a challenging world.

 

I don’t think anyone could imagine the hopeful elation that greeted the notification that a new program was being established by an organization called Bridgewell that was actually designed around the complex and complicated needs of young autistic adults. The informational flyer described one-by–one how the program intended to address all the critical problem areas faced by autistic individuals – areas that parents had long been aware of, but remained an arcane science to others.

 

We couldn’t believe that a program was actually addressing what we knew to be the key issues for our son: computers (his favorite pastime), design and materials to fight the sensitivities of harsh light and sound, a “real” gym to work off the weight that comes with physical awkwardness and prescribed medicines for autism, a new hands-on kitchen to teach skills, day-trips for socialization, and a neatness and cleanliness that appeals to many autistic individuals.

 

My wife and I wondered what divine intervention brought this program to Hadrian and his peers who had heretofore faced the bleakest of futures. And when Hadrian entered the Bridgewell program, it was all true. The stuff in the informational flyer was actually there and the staff were enthusiastic, trained and eager to do what was needed to make a life for Hadrian.  I suppose this is why Hadrian is so eager to exit the car in the morning to start his day.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Robert S. Stearns M Ed
CEO Term Start Dec 2003
CEO Email BSTEARNS@BRIDGEWELL.ORG
CEO Experience

As President and Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Stearns has been leading the Bridgewell team since December 2003. He was formerly President and CEO of St. Coletta in Wisconsin, an organization similar to Bridgewell, which also provides services to individuals with disabilities.

Mr. Stearns has more than 30 years of experience in rehabilitation and health-care management, and more than 20 years providing consultation services throughout the United States to organizations serving individuals with disabilities.

Bob grew up in central Massachusetts and holds an undergraduate degree in psychology from Bridgewater State College and an advanced degree in human services from Antioch College in Ohio.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Kimberly J. Haley LMHC Director of Clinical Services and Director of Sovner Center

Ms. Haley is responsible for oversight of Bridgewell’s outpatient mental health clinics in Chelmsford, Danvers and Lowell, as well as Lowell Adult Day Treatment and START Clinical Support Services in Danvers. 

Ms. Haley began her work with Bridgewell in 1999 as a member of the START clinical team, later transitioning into other roles including Clinical Director at the Sovner Center.  Prior to Bridgewell, she was a manager for the May Institute in residential and vocational day services, primarily working with individuals with autism. 

Ms. Haley earned her B.A. in Psychology from McGill University in Montreal, Canada and her Masters of Education in Mental Health Counseling from UMASS Boston.  She is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) and has twenty years of experience working with individuals dually diagnosed with developmental disabilities and mental illness.

Mr. John Hyland Director of Information Technology

Mr. Hyland has more than 15 years of experience designing and implementing strategic technology solutions in a variety of academic, corporate and municipal settings. His most recent position was with the City of Chelsea as Director of Information Technology. There he oversaw IT for thousands of users across City Government, the Chelsea School System, the Police Department, Fire Department and Emergency 911 Services.

His job responsibilities include oversight of all technology-related issues including maintaining and maximizing current applications, providing the strategic vision for the design and implementation of new computer systems, applications and software, ensuring the highest level of data security, and the optimization of the TIER system.

Mr. Hyland earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Industrial Design from the University of Cincinnati.

Mr. Mark Kennard Executive Director, Project COPE, Inc. a Bridgewell affiliate

As the newest member of Bridgewell’s Leadership Team, Mr. Kennard is the Executive Director for Project COPE, a community-based human services organization that provides a continuum of substance abuse treatment and prevention services. Mr. Kennard oversees Project COPE programming, integrating addictive and prevention supports into Bridgewell services and identifying innovative opportunities in the communities served.

Mr. Kennard has held a variety of clinical, educational and executive roles in the substance abuse arenas since 1981. In addition, he has served as an Adjunct Faculty member of the Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Program at North Shore Community College and at the Salem State University Department of Social Work.

Mr. Kennard has a BA in Child Study from Tufts University and a Masters in Social Work from Columbia University. He is currently a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker in the State of MA and a nationally certified Substance Abuse Professional (SAP).

Mr. James F. Low MBA, CPA Chief Financial Officer

As Bridgewell’s Chief Financial Officer, Mr. Low oversees the financial operations of the entire organization, as well as the operations of the Financial Services, Purchasing and Information Technology Departments.

Mr. Low joined the Bridgewell team in 2005 after a 25-year career in health care financial management and consulting.

Mr. Low holds a BA degree from Dartmouth College, a MBA from Columbia University Graduate School of Business and he is a certified public accountant.

Ms. Kelly J. Martin MBA Chief Operations Officer

Ms. Johnson is the Chief Operations Officer for Bridgewell. Ms. Johnson is responsible for the administration of all residential, day habilitation, employment and education and homeless programs and services. Ms. Johnson also provides leadership to quality assurance, the vehicle fleet management, transportation services and adult education and recreational services departments. She provides leadership to a highly skilled management team who carry out day to day services.

Ms. Johnson has been a member of the Bridgewell team for more than 25 years beginning as a direct support professional and moving on to a variety of managerial positions. She has extensive experience in program operations and quality improvement systems.

Ms. Johnson earned an MBA from Salem State College and a BA in social work from Suffolk University in Boston. She is a surveyor for the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) traveling internationally to human service organizations to provide accreditation and consultation services.

Ms. Laura K. McNamara LICSW, ACSW Director of Program Operations

Ms. McNamara is responsible for the overall operations of Bridgewell’s mental health, homeless and developmental disabilities day and residential services.

Ms. McNamara came to Bridgewell in 2004 with more than 30 years of experience in the field of developmental disabilities. Prior to coming to Bridgewell, she was the Vice President of Program Operations at the Barry L. Price Rehabilitation Center in West Newton for seven years. Prior to that, she worked for the Mass. Department of Developmental Services in a number of executive management positions.

Ms. McNamara received her MSW from Simmons College School of Social Work in Boston and her BA in Psychology from Boston University. She is a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker (LICSW) and is certified by the Academy of Certified Social Workers (ACSW).

Ms. Inge Peters SPHR Director of Human Resources

Ms. Peters joined Bridgewell as Director of Human Resources in 2008. Ms. Peters came to Bridgewell from CLASS, Inc., a non-profit in Lawrence, MA, supporting people with disabilities as Director of Human Resources for nine years. Before entering the non-profit field, she began her career in human resources at a Fortune 200 manufacturing company, where she held a number of human resource roles for 15 years, her last role managing and supporting the Human Resources needs of facilities throughout the United States.

Ms. Peters brings an abundance of experience to the agency as she manages Bridgewell’s human resources, payroll and training departments. She earned her BA at Eastern Nazarene College and completed graduate work in Communication at Emerson College in Boston.

Ms. Elaine White Director of Housing

As Director of Housing, Ms. White manages Bridgewell’s Facilities and Housing Departments and chairs the Safety Committee. Ms. White also oversees the administration of Bridgewell’s Mainstream Housing Choice Voucher Program and other subsidy programs for the homeless that are funded through the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

Ms. White has been with Bridgewell for more than 25 years. She began her career as a Direct Support Professional, and she has held various management positions within the company related to operations and housing.

Ms. White earned her bachelor’s degree from Fitchburg State College, and holds Housing Specialist Certifications for HUD funded programs in Section 8 Rent Calculation and Eligibility.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Director Support Professional, Northeast Region award to Bridgewell staff member Linda Conley Association of Developmental Disabilities Providers 2013
The 2013 Self-Determination Award to Elmer "Skip" Marshall (an individual served by Bridgewell) Association of Developmental Disabilities Providers 2013
Honorary mentions for Self-Determination Award to Dianna Lopilato and Elmer "Skip" Marshall (individuals served by Bridgewell) Association of Developmental Disabilities Providers 2012
Richard J. Bond Supervisor Award of Excellence to Bridgewell staff member Kelli Hyland Providers' Council 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
-- --
Association of Developmental Disabilities Providers --
Massachusetts Council of Human Service Providers --
Massachusetts Nonprofit Network --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
CARF International: Community Employment Services: Job Development- 3 year --
CARF International: Community Employment Services: Job Supports- 3 year --
CARF International: Community Employment Services: Job-Site Training- 3 year --
CARF International: Community Services: Community Housing- 3 year --
CARF International: Community Services: Community Integration- 3 year --
CARF International: Community Services: Respite Services- 3 year --
CARF International: Community Services: Supported Living- 3 year --
CARF International: Crisis Intervention: Integrated DD/Mental Health (Adults)- 3 year --
CARF International: Crisis Intervention: Integrated DD/Mental Health (Adults)- 3 year --
CARF International: Day Treatment: Mental Health (Adults)- 3 year --
CARF International: Employment Services: Employment Planning Services- 3 year --
CARF International: Employment Services: Employment Services Coordination- 3 year --

Collaborations

Bridgewell actively partners with numerous organizations, businesses and institutions.

Just a few examples include:

Alzheimer’s Association, MA/NH Chapter: Bridgewell collaborates closely with the Alzheimer’s Association, MA/NH, which looks to Bridgewell as an expert in addressing Alzheimer’s among individuals with developmental disabilities.

Lynn PACT: This coalition of over 25 community agencies in Lynn has been working together for over ten years to develop an effective Continuum of Care strategy to benefit the city's homeless population.

Special Olympics Massachusetts: Bridgewell-sponsored Olympians participate in summer and winter games and have won medals in track and field, bowling, basketball and other events.

UMass Lowell, Electrical Engineering Dept.: Bridgewell works with UMass interns to create adaptive technology, including exercise equipment designed specifically for those with developmental disabilities.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 658
Number of Part Time Staff 701
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 83%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 53
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 35
Hispanic/Latino: 8
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 3
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 63
Male: 37
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 6
Management Succession Plan Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Jeffrey Roy
Board Chair Company Affiliation Boston University
Board Chair Term Jan 2014 - Dec 2016
Board Co-Chair Mrs. Robin Sutherland
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation EPOCH
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2015 - Dec 2018

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Korey Antonelli Ph.D. Account Representative, Primary Care Systems, New England Div. American Cancer Society Voting
Mr. Robert Boudrow Principal, Strategy & Business Design Practice, PriceWaterhouse Coopers Advisory LLC Voting
Mr. Michael Flammia Esq. Eckert, Seamans, Cherin & Mellott Voting
Mr. Karl-Henry Francois VP, Corporate Banking, Citizens Bank Voting
Ms. Angelika Fretzen Catabasis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Voting
Mrs. Cathy Johnson Parent Voting
Mr. Gordon R. Massey Senior Vice President, Salem Five Voting
Mrs. Jane Puffer Dreamaker Consulting Group Voting
Mr. Mark Robbins Territory Manager, Beaulieu of America Voting
Mr. Jeffrey Roy Senior Financial & Business Analyst, Boston University Voting
Mr. Nicolas Sarantopolous PhD. Community Credit Union --
Mr. Peter Sheckman M.D. North Shore Physicians Group - Lynn Voting
Mrs. Robin Sutherland HR Consultant, EPOCH Voting
Mr. Christopher Vaccaro Esq. Dalton & Finegold, L.L.P. Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 9
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 88%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Patient Care
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Real Estate

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Importantly, three Human Rights Committees also monitor Bridgewell’s programming. Bridgewell’s Human Rights Committees were established to promote, safeguard and protect the human dignity and legal rights of persons served by reviewing, monitoring, and investigating the activities of Bridgewell programs.

Human Rights Committee Membership consists of: 

·      Persons served

·      Advocates for persons served

·      Professionals, including physicians, nurses, psychologists and master’s level health professionals, and attorneys, paralegals and law students

 

 

 

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $69,424,217.00
Projected Expense $69,700,972.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $62,897,397 $55,742,232 $48,916,446
Total Expenses $62,773,656 $54,327,363 $48,280,936

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $652,488
    Federal -- -- $652,488
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $471,155 $427,643 $331,814
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $61,844,211 $52,767,643 $47,594,908
Investment Income, Net of Losses $127,527 $35,897 $-6,980
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $454,594 $2,511,049 $344,216

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $54,482,346 $46,768,919 $42,595,966
Administration Expense $7,847,040 $7,046,261 $5,173,624
Fundraising Expense $444,270 $512,183 $511,346
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.03 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 87% 86% 88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 94% 120% 52%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $45,566,490 $44,182,736 $38,210,650
Current Assets $9,335,607 $9,624,961 $6,650,306
Long-Term Liabilities $33,201,476 $31,180,955 $29,030,384
Current Liabilities $5,076,272 $5,944,512 $3,537,866
Total Net Assets $7,288,742 $7,057,269 $5,642,400

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.84 1.62 1.88

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 73% 71% 76%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

BRIDGEWELL SUBSIDIARIES (included in the audit):

  • Bridgewell Danvers Housing Corp.
  • Bridgewell Lynn Housing Corp.
  • Bridgewell Merrimac Housing Corp.
  • Center for Professional Innovation
  • Forthill Avenue, Inc.
  • Middlesex North Resource Center
  • Project COPE

Bridgewell Subsidiaries’ 990’s are filed separately.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available. The nonprofit provided a breakout of funding from Individuals and Government for fiscal years 2012 and 2013.
 
The 2013 net asset data is per the 2014 audit document, as that data was restated. 
 
In addition to other revenues, the "Other" revenue category above includes loss on impairment of goodwill for fiscal year 2012. For fiscal year 2014, the Other revenue category includes loss on refinancing, excess of net assets acquired and gain on involuntary conversion.
 
Please note, per the organization, the fiscal year 2014 Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue percent includes advancement efforts.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Bridgewell strives to be the provider of choice for services to individuals with disabilities and other special needs, and to be trusted and recognized by all stakeholders for our leadership, innovation, professional expertise, quality of service, accountability and integrity. For nearly 60 years, we have been providing support through Bridgewell’s continuum of care which includes residential services, day programs, behavioral health services, employment training, homeless services, substance abuse and addiction services, and affordable housing. Bridgewell’s core purpose is to help everyone we serve live as fully and independently as possible while achieving their own goals.

At Bridgewell, we constantly assess and respond to emerging needs in the disability community. For example, we were among the first providers in Massachusetts to address head on the surge of young people with autism aging out of school and entering adulthood. Our day habilitation centers, Rosewood Drive I & II, are specialized day programs to meet the unique needs of younger adults who are experiencing this transition. Building upon a collaboration between the Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services and success at our Rosewood Drive Day Habilitation Centers, Bridgewell opened several new homes for young adults with autism. Our comfortable, single-family homes offer highly supportive environments where individuals can build productive, independent adult lives in the community. To date, Bridgewell has opened six new homes.

Bridgewell provides a variety of residential services that provide support to individuals with developmental and physical disabilities and individuals who are dually diagnosed with psychiatric disabilities. Specialty services are provided for individuals with probable Alzheimer’s disease, those who are hearing impaired, individuals with extensive medical health challenges, those who are forensically involved and those who have significant behavioral challenges. Our core purpose is assisting people to lead and direct their own lives. We are dedicated to ensuring that homes create the conditions for developing, sustaining and strengthening relationships among housemates, in the community and with family members and friends. Bridgewell’s residential services include permanent staff-supported housing, supported living, and respite housing for emergency and planned stays. All services are provided based on individual choice, preference and need emphasizing a holistic approach to service delivery. We have more than 70 residences and supported living sites in 20 communities north of Boston.

The Day Habilitation programs at Bridgewell offer a variety of services to individuals with developmental disabilities, who range in age from 18 years old to the elderly. Participants may have other disabilities such as visual and/or hearing impairments, physical limitations, medical and/or behavioral challenges. The Day Habilitation program promotes community experience and addresses self-care, nutrition, household skills, communication, and sensory, motor, behavioral and social development. Services are provided both on-site as well as in the community to offer a variety of learning environments. Ability levels and groupings range from mild to intensive special needs. Individuals are assessed by our highly qualified Clinical Team, and support services are established based on each individual’s needs. Direct support staff are trained by the Clinical Team, and Bridgewell’s nursing staff ensures quality medical care.

The longevity of Bridgewell indicates how successful our programming has been and we continue to add services as needs arise. Our staff continues to develop new projects to enhance the lives of those we serve – connecting people with possibilities.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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