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United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley

 51 Sleeper Street
 Boston, MA 02210
[P] (617) 624-8000
[F] (617) 624-9114
http://www.supportunitedway.org
info@supportunitedway.org
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INCORPORATED: 1935
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2382233

LAST UPDATED: 11/18/2015
Organization DBA United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley
United Way
Former Names United Way of Greater Seacoast (2009)
United Way of Massachusetts Bay (2006)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

We unite people to create change that lasts.

Mission Statement

We unite people to create change that lasts.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income --
Projected Expense --

ProgramsMORE »

  • Family Financial Stability
  • Healthy Child Development
  • Increasing Youth Opportunities

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

We unite people to create change that lasts.

Background Statement

There are thousands of nonprofits and foundations working to target the problems that affect our region. United Way was built on the idea that if we are to make meaningful, lasting change, we have to make it easier for these efforts to come together. To make the greatest impact possible, United Way aligns a network of more than 200 independent health and human service agencies under the same set of community goals.
 
Children enter school ready to learn.
 
Youth have positive options for the future.
 
Families have safe permanent homes, and the skills and opportunities to build better futures.
 
To ensure that it is truly a unified effort, United Way also draws on its history and reputation to forge groundbreaking partnerships with government, business and other foundations.
 
Working with key partners, we facilitate the mutual exchange of research and best practices, so that proven strategies shape our work and the work of all nonprofits in the region.
 
This is how lasting change happens. 

Impact Statement

We work everyday to achieve our vision and mission by focusing on the three core building blocks of a strong, vibrant community:

Ensuring that all families have the resources and opportunities to lift themselves out of poverty;

Preparing children to enter school ready to learn and succeed;

Inspiring and supporting youth to stay in school and realize positive options for the future
 

Needs Statement

You make change that lasts.
 
You are the key to making this shared vision a reality. Your gifts become critical funding for ground-breaking initiatives and best-in-class partnerships with nonprofit agencies throughout our region, your time and talents fuel the engine for change; your friends, family and colleagues are the army of difference-makers who positively impact lives.
That’s what it means to LIVE UNITED.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.

Greater Boston
Merrimack Valley 
North Shore
South Shore 
Seacoast Region, NH
Greater Rochester, NH 

Organization Categories

  1. Public & Societal Benefit - Public & Societal Benefit NEC
  2. Philanthropy,Voluntarism & Grantmaking Foundations - Philanthropy,Voluntarism & Grantmaking Foundations NEC
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Family Financial Stability

When parents have sustainable income and stable housing, their children have a greater chance to thrive from an early age, go on to succeed in school, graduate and become productive engaged citizens. Yet today, too many families are struggling to break out of a crippling cycle of poverty, hunger and homelessness.

Throughout our region, United Way brings together the latest research, innovative practices and a network of more than 70 best-in-class partner agencies to help families achieve financial stability and create a brighter future for their children. 
 
United Way's investments yielded the following results: 15,950 families prevented from becoming homeless and 10,000 individuals able to gain employment.
 
Budget  $10,483,574
Category  Human Services, General/Other
Population Served Families At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 
More families in our region will be financially stable, have quality employment, and stable housing.
Program Long-Term Success 
A few of our yearly Goals for Family Financial Stability: 
  • Number of individuals who obtained or retained affordable housing
  • Number of individuals who gained the skills needed to get a job
  • Number of individuals who gained or retained employment 
Program Success Monitored By  We benchmark outcomes bi-yearly to ensure we're on track and meeting our goals.
Examples of Program Success 
Number of individuals who obtained or retained affordable housing, preventing them from becoming homeless. Goal: 13,520 Achieved: 16, 113
 
Number of individuals who gained the skills needed to get a job, from learning English and basic adult education to vocational and occupational training. Goal: 15,061 Achieved: 16,778
 
Number of individuals who gained or retained employment, moving their families toward financial stability and self-reliance. Goal: 9,061 Achieved: 10,815 

Healthy Child Development

Research shows that children who enter kindergarten with the foundation for academic success are more likely to stay on track, read proficiently by third grade, and graduate ready to compete. Investing early yields big returns. In fact, every dollar spent on quality early childhood interventions returns $14-17 dollars later on.
 
Throughout our region, United Way brings together the latest research, innovative practices and a network of 50 best-in-class partner agencies to put our youngest children on the path to success.
 
Through United Way's investment 66,380 children received high-quality early education and care. In addition, 36,500 children were screened for developmental delays that would otherwise go undetected. 
 
 
Budget  $11,940,172
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Families At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
A few of our yearly goals for Healthy Child Development:
  • Number of children (infants to age 5) assessed for developmental or behavioral concerns or delays
  • Number of children that received intervention and treatment
  • Number of caregivers who benefitted from family support programs 
Program Long-Term Success  Young children (0-5) will enter school ready for school without developmental delays and early childhood education will have a stronger focus in our region. 
Program Success Monitored By  We benchmark outcomes bi-yearly to ensure we're on track and meeting our goals.
Examples of Program Success 

Number of children (infants to age 5) assessed for developmental or behavioral concerns or delays, so that they receive appropriate help as soon as possible, at a time of rapid brain development. Goal: 16,437 Achieved: 17,314

 
Number of children that received intervention and treatment, an approach proven to prevent much costlier services later on. Goal: 9,815 Achieved: 12,435
 
Number of caregivers benefitting from family support programs, fostering strong parent-child relationship and enhanced home environments that promote healthy development. Goal: 4,382 Achieved: 6,242 

Increasing Youth Opportunities

Statistics prove that high school graduation is crucial to both individual success and our region's economic prosperity. Years earlier, successful grade-to-grade promotion is an indicator of whether a student is likely to graduate and stay on the path toward productive, engaged citizenship.
 
Throughout our region, United Way brings together the latest research, innovative practices and a network of more than 100 best-in-class partners to give more young people the help they need to succeed. 
 
Because of United Way, 252,018 youth were served, with 7,600 matched with mentors and 33,000 students prepared to succeed in college and achieve work-readiness.
 
 
 
Budget  $11,773,287
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) College Aged (18-26 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
A few of our yearly goals for Increasing Youth Opportunities:
  • Numbers of youth engaged in mentoring relationships
  • Numbers of youth in positive behavior programs
  • Number of youth receiving academic support fo college readiness
  • Number of youth in work-readiness programs 
Program Long-Term Success  That more young people graduate high school successfully and live productive and engaged lives.
Program Success Monitored By  We benchmark outcomes bi-yearly to ensure we're on track and meeting our goals.
Examples of Program Success 
Numbers of youth engaged in mentoring relationships, making them less likely to engage in risky behaviors. Goal: 7,026 Achieved: 6,896 (90% felt supported by their mentor.)
 
Number of youth in positive behavior programs that specifically target youth at risk or in crisis. Goal: 13,787 Achieved: 15,483
 
Number of youth receiving academic support for college readiness, increasing opportunities for success. Goal: 21,044 Achieved: 25,355 (97% progressed to the next grade.)
 
Number of youth in work-readiness programs, gaining valuable experience. Goal: 2,585 Achieved: 3,452 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Michael K. Durkin
CEO Term Start Jan 2008
CEO Email Info@supportunitedway.org
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Brigid Boyd Vice President, Communications and Social Marketing --
John Feudo Chief Development Officer --
Jane Grady Vice President, Human Resources & Ethics --
Jeffery Hayward Chief of External Affairs --
Patricia Latimore Chief Financial Officer & Senior Vice President Finance & Administration --
Peg Sprague SVP, Community Impact --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 107
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 1,432
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 81%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 14
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 3
Caucasian: 77
Hispanic/Latino: 5
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 3
Other (if specified): Two Races
Gender Female: 80
Male: 27
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Susan Esper
Board Chair Company Affiliation Deloitte & Touche LLP
Board Chair Term June 2015 - June 2016
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dewey J. Awad Bain Capital/Brookside Capital --
William K. Bacic Deloitte & Touche USA LLP Voting
Phyllis Barajas Barajas & Associates --
Robert L. Beal Related Beal --
Taylor S. Bodman Brown Brothers Harriman --
Ivy Brown UPS Voting
Polly Bryson Tera Nova Partners Voting
Jacques Carter Harvard Medical School Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center --
Amy Case Case Strategy Voting
Phil Catchings No Affliliation Voting
Timothy Connelly Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. Voting
Janet Cooper Resource Development Committee --
Krissy Davis Deloitte & Touche LLP --
Michael Doughty John Hancock Financial Services --
Andrew Dreyfus Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Voting
Michael K. Durkin United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley --
William T. Eaton Detwiler Fenton Investment Management --
Susan Esper Deloitte --
Diane Exter Retired Voting
Lynnette C. Fallon Axcelis Technologies --
Matthew E. Fishman Community Health, Partners Healthcare --
James B. Fitzgerald Eastern Bank --
Colby T. Gamester Gamester Law Office --
Lourdes German Community Volunteer --
Matthew Goulding Weil, Goshal & Manges LLP --
Matthew Goulding Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP --
David E. Johnson Bain & Company Voting
James J. Judge NSTAR --
Joseph M. Kelley Stop and Shop Voting
Ellen King Community Volunteer --
Patricia Kraft New England Patriots Football Club --
Steven D. Krichmar Putnam Investments --
Patricia Latimore United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley --
Mary Kay Leonard Retired --
Joshua A. Lutzker Berkshire Partners Voting
John Mang Gillette Voting
Terry Metzger Boston Financial Data Services, Inc. --
Michael Mooney Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP --
George Neble Ernst & Young LLP Voting
Diane B. Patrick Esq. Ropes & Gray Voting
Bill Piombino Community Volunteer Voting
Scott Powers State Street Global Advisors --
Scott Powers Community Volunteer --
Dorothy Puhy Dana-Farber Cancer Institute --
Eric Rosengren Federal Reserve Bank of Boston --
Andrew Smith University of New Hampshire Survey Center Voting
Tim Sullivan Massachusetts AFL-CIO Voting
Carol Valianti Unitil Voting
James Westra Esq. Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Voting
Mark Whitney Exeter Health Resources Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 39
Hispanic/Latino: 4
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 14
Male: 35
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 98%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $45,030,111 $44,246,800 $46,902,158
Total Expenses $47,819,380 $45,275,289 $47,471,834

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $3,519,106 $623,815 $1,644,789
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $3,519,106 $623,815 $1,644,789
Individual Contributions $35,935,282 $37,774,078 $39,310,661
Indirect Public Support $84,444 $93,914 $146,013
Earned Revenue $220,858 $166,856 $219,104
Investment Income, Net of Losses $1,076,200 $2,102,950 $731,316
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $2,650,333 $2,705,402 $2,466,353
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $1,543,888 $779,785 $2,383,922

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $40,729,638 $37,120,828 $40,144,696
Administration Expense $2,342,498 $2,250,582 $1,595,070
Fundraising Expense $4,747,244 $5,903,879 $5,732,068
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.94 0.98 0.99
Program Expense/Total Expenses 85% 82% 85%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 11% 14% 13%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $75,615,463 $71,058,470 $72,909,175
Current Assets $67,575,672 $62,872,979 $63,817,669
Long-Term Liabilities $1,710,879 $1,927,485 $2,128,267
Current Liabilities $11,952,326 $8,832,912 $10,997,364
Total Net Assets $61,952,258 $60,298,073 $59,783,544

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $5,585,953.00
Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 3.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates July - June
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.65 7.12 5.80

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 2% 3% 3%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s with asset and liability data per the audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley is taking on some of the biggest challenges of our region: reducing homelessness, preventing high school dropout, giving every child a chance for school success and empowering families to lift themselves out of poverty. Each area presents an opportunity for philanthropic investment that will produce a significant social return.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Utilizing innovative approaches and the latest research, we invest when, where and how every dollar can do the most good. By seeding successful new models and leveraging a performance-based funding strategy, we have actually improved how public and private dollars are spent.

 

United Way supports the work of more than 200 innovative partner agencies. Some are household names. Many are lesser-known community-based organizations such as food banks, early education centers, job training and youth programs. We unite a powerful network of best-in-class partners around a unified vision for children, youth and families.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

No other organization brings together the passion, know-how and resources of thousands of individuals, organizations, businesses and government around a unified vision for our region’s children, youth and families. Our funding strategy is rooted in researching best practices, vetting partner organizations, developing organizations’ capacity to deliver the most effective programs, aligning partner organizations to scale the impact that individual organizations can achieve and developing strategies for lasting change.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Our staff consistently and constantly tracks measures from agencies. Those that receive allocations are required to submit reports twice a year to show they are hitting their targets, measures that fit into United Way's larger community investment strategy. The results will show the progress we are making; we owe nothing less to our donors, our partners and those in the communities we serve.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

The numbers speak for themselves:

4,000 CHILDREN will enter kindergarten more ready to learn and grow.
 
24,000 YOUTH will be more likely to graduate high school and succeed.
 
9,400 FAMILIES are successfully housed and avoided being homeless.

What hasn't been accomplished? Admittedly, much, but that's because United Way aims for nothing less than seeing everyone achieve self-sustaining success. As we develop more intricate and far-reaching strategies like collective impact, we hope to see whole communities come together (with us as the catalyst) working towards a common vision. Our work will continue as long as there is need.