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Organization DBA MAC
Former Names Massachusetts Advocacy Center (2002)
Task Force on Children Out of School (1969)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Massachusetts Advocates for Children is a child advocacy organization whose mission is to be an independent and effective voice for children who face significant barriers to equal educational and life opportunities. MAC works to overcome these barriers by changing conditions for many children, while also helping one child at a time.

For over 45 years, MAC has responded to the needs of children who are vulnerable because of poverty, race, limited English or disability.

MAC’s vision is that all children in the Commonwealth, especially the most vulnerable, have the opportunity to reach their fullest potential. Central to this vision is that all children receive the high quality education to which they are entitled and which will enable them to succeed.

MAC does not seek or accept public government funding that would compromise our ability to advocate most effectively with public agencies which create the barriers we are

Mission Statement

Massachusetts Advocates for Children is a child advocacy organization whose mission is to be an independent and effective voice for children who face significant barriers to equal educational and life opportunities. MAC works to overcome these barriers by changing conditions for many children, while also helping one child at a time.

For over 45 years, MAC has responded to the needs of children who are vulnerable because of poverty, race, limited English or disability.

MAC’s vision is that all children in the Commonwealth, especially the most vulnerable, have the opportunity to reach their fullest potential. Central to this vision is that all children receive the high quality education to which they are entitled and which will enable them to succeed.

MAC does not seek or accept public government funding that would compromise our ability to advocate most effectively with public agencies which create the barriers we are


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $1,549,396.00
Projected Expense $1,541,943.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Autism Special Education Legal Support Center
  • Boston School Reform Project
  • Boston Special Education Transition (B-SET) Project
  • Children's Law Support Project (CLSP)
  • Statewide Special Education
  • Trauma and Learning Policy Initiative

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Massachusetts Advocates for Children is a child advocacy organization whose mission is to be an independent and effective voice for children who face significant barriers to equal educational and life opportunities. MAC works to overcome these barriers by changing conditions for many children, while also helping one child at a time.

For over 45 years, MAC has responded to the needs of children who are vulnerable because of poverty, race, limited English or disability.

MAC’s vision is that all children in the Commonwealth, especially the most vulnerable, have the opportunity to reach their fullest potential. Central to this vision is that all children receive the high quality education to which they are entitled and which will enable them to succeed.

MAC does not seek or accept public government funding that would compromise our ability to advocate most effectively with public agencies which create the barriers we are


Background Statement

Founded by Hubie Jones in 1969 as the Task Force on Children Out of School, MAC’s first investigative report in 1970 on the exclusion of children from public schools in Boston led to the 1972 enactment of Chapter 766, Massachusetts’ ground-breaking law guaranteeing education for children with disabilities.   It also led to the Bilingual Education Act, the first such law in the nation. During the next two decades, MAC’s legislative and administrative advocacy led to reforms in child mental health, vocational education, lead paint, student retention policies and child nutrition. MAC sued successfully to force the Boston Public Schools to live up to its special education obligations.

    

In 1992, MAC became part of the network of civil legal aid agencies in Massachusetts, and through that network, began the Children’s Law Support Project, identifying emerging children’s needs and providing back-up legal support to legal service agencies around the state. During the 1990s, MAC added community outreach and coalition-building components to work with parent and community organizations for educational equity in Boston and to protect Chapter 766 statewide. 

MAC’s constituency has always been those children who face the greatest barriers to educational success, due to disability, race/ethnicity, language and/or poverty.

MAC uses a broad range of strategies to get results and change the conditions that limit children’s opportunities. These strategies include building coalitions, helping empower parents and community leaders, providing technical assistance and training, conducting case advocacy, advocating at the administrative and legislative levels, writing reports and, when necessary, litigating.

MAC acts to hold public institutions accountable and prioritizes systems change in order to have the greatest impact affecting the most children. But through its intake, case advocacy and trainings, MAC also works to assure that the needs of individual children are met.

Today MAC continues its strong and effective advocacy for children and families. MAC is an integral part of a statewide network of civil legal aid organizations and a web of child advocacy organizations. MAC is a leader in statewide special education advocacy, the autism community, and education reform in the Boston Public School system. MAC has pioneered an innovative approach to education reform through its groundbreaking policy analysis and advocacy to help traumatized children learn.

 


Impact Statement


1. Special Education Legislative Activity: Passage of a new law - the Autism Omnibus Act - that enables thousands of low-income children with autism to be covered by MassHealth for behavioral services, similar to those covered by private insurance.

2. Special Education Transition: Expansion of Inclusive Concurrent Enrollment Initiative to 13 public colleges across the state; and developing action plan with 70 organizations to improve access to post-secondary opportunities for Boston youth with disabilities.

2. Trauma and Learning Policy Initiative: a) Leadership role on the state's Safe and Supportive Schools Commission; b) Active website – www.traumasensitiveschools.org – to provide information about creating and advocating for trauma-sensitive schools and to form a learning community of educators. c) Publication of the second volume of Helping Traumatized Children Learn, titled Creating and Advocating for Trauma-Sensitive Schools, and using it to evaluate in five schools.   

3. School Discipline Reform: Leadership in coalition to monitor the implementation of the state law, c. 222, resulting in 10,000 fewer school exclusions. Leads coalition negotiating with BPS that resulted in extensive revisions to the Boston Code of Conduct that are aligned with new state school discipline law.

5. Helpline and training: MAC responded to nearly 1,000 calls from parents and professionals, offering advice, technical assistance, referral and/or full legal representation. Focus on low-income parents facing language
barriers in Lawrence and East Boston.

2016 goals

**Monitoring and follow up of Omnibus Autism Act and Safe and Supportive Schools legislation.

**Implementation of Action Plan of the Boston Special Education Transition Project to provide more pathways to prepare, connect and employ Boston youth with disabilities.

**Monitoring of implementation of school discipline law statewide and in Boston.

**Completion independent evaluation of creating trauma-sensitive schools. 


 


Needs Statement

1. In order to provide more low-income families with needed advocacy, we need to expand the number of pro bono advocates and attorneys. 

2. Working with communities that face cultural and language barriers requires intensive commitment of resources. 

3. While MAC has the advantage of many funders such that the largest grant is less than 15% of our overall budget, our individual programs do sometimes rely on large grants. Thus all of our programs need to expand and diversify their funding bases. Our Autism Center and Statewide Special Education project needs more funding to expand its legal and management capacity.  The Children’s Law Support Project and Boston School Reform Project need to diversify their funding to reduce reliance on one major source. 

4. We need board members who bring strong corporate and/or fundraising capacity.

5. In order to grow programmatically, we will need to enhance our visibility and build capacity to conduct more unrestricted fundraising- holding events and cultivating individual donors – as well as increase our management infrastructure


CEO Statement

MAC is a very special organization; it is a privilege and an honor for me to be its executive director. When planning for our 40th anniversary celebration in 2009, we wrote a more poetic way to convey our signature multi-strategic approach.

 

MAC conducts its child advocacy through the…

Eyes of a child: It is the child first and foremost who suffers the pain of exclusion and the loss of his or her potential. MAC’s individual case advocacy puts the child at the center of our systemic advocacy to change conditions for many. Individual cases inform MAC, helping us to understand how systems are impacting individual children and their families, and grounding our ability to bring the child’s voice to the administration, the legislature, and the courts.  

 

Heart of a parent: Parents, the primary advocates of their child, have a unique ability to see the world through their child’s eyes. It is the parents who will move heaven and earth to get the right supports their child needs to succeed. It is from their hearts that all advocacy begins, that communities are mobilized and that laws are enacted. MAC empowers parents with skills and support through training, technical assistance and legal advice and representation to be strong and passionate advocates for their children’s rights.

 

Caring of community: We must support all children in the community as our own. MAC’s coalition building and leadership development is designed to mobilize communities to advocate on behalf of the children and families we serve. Schools are one example of a community to nurture children and help them thrive. MAC supports inclusive and trauma-sensitive schools as such models. MAC works closely with coalitions, parent groups, and professionals to help schools become supportive, connected communities where ALL children can focus, behave appropriately and achieve at their highest potential. 

 

Laws of the land: MAC uses the legal process to help establish, expand and protect educational and other rights for vulnerable children, like the thousands of children who were excluded from Boston schools in the 1960s and the thousands more who are still excluded from educational opportunity statewide today. 



Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Massachusetts-All Regions

MAC conducts statewide legislative and administrative advocacy.  Our Helpline is called on behalf of children by parents and others from all over the state.  We provide training to parents and professionals throughout the state. MAC has a historic and on-going advocacy focus with the Boston Public Schools.  We also have specific projects in certain locales, currently in Lawrence, Brockton, Plymouth County and Somerville. 

Organization Categories

  1. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Children's Rights
  2. Education - Elementary & Secondary Schools
  3. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Disabled Persons' Rights

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Autism Special Education Legal Support Center

The Autism Center provides training, technical assistance and advocacy services to ensure that children with autism spectrum disorder (“ASD”) overcome lowered expectations and receive equal educational opportunities. School systems in MA continue to face large increases of children diagnosed with ASD.  Most recent studies from the CDC indicate that the prevalence of ASD is now as high as 1 per every 110 children. Children on the spectrum face tremendous obstacles in the public schools, which frequently limit service options based on erroneous presumptions about limited competence and educational potential of children with autism. The Center follows MAC’s multi-strategic approach of individual case advocacy, education and training to parents and professionals, research and reports, and advocacy for systemic change at the school district level (e.g., Lawrence and Boston) and at the statewide policy level (i.e., legislative and administrative).

 

Budget  $225,460.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Disabled Persons' Rights
Population Served People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Boston School Reform Project

The goals of the project are to: assure that the Boston Public Schools will provide equity and excellence in education to all children; significantly reduce racial/ethnic and program achievement gaps; and develop parent and community leadership from Boston’s diverse communities on education reform matters, including policy improvements for children who are English Language Learners. The project informs parents, students and community leaders about changes taking place in the schools, trains them in advocacy and leadership skills, and mobilizes them to address issues related to new policies. This project has enabled parents of color and non-English speaking members of the community to be involved in their children’s education more actively, and has helped them form their own networks with other community members and organizations. Currently, the project is playing a leadership role to inject a parent, student and community voice into the teacher’s union contract negotiation process.

Budget  $201,341.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Children's Rights
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Boston Special Education Transition (B-SET) Project

 

The Boston Special Education Transition (B-SET) Project is an initiative of Massachusetts Advocates for Children (MAC). B-SET’s goal is to increase employment, career, and independent living opportunities for Boston’s youth with disabilities. The objectives of the project are three-fold:

  1. Increase community awareness and knowledge – among youth, parents and community organizations – of transition rights and strategies for students under the special education law and of ways to empower parents and youth to participate in the transition process.

  2. Improve transition planning and services for Boston students with disabilities age 14-22 so they will stay in school and exit special education prepared for further education, employment, and independent living.

  3. Provide opportunities for Boston students with disabilities to more fully integrate into the mainstream of career and workforce development opportunities. 

 
Budget  $100,000.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Disabled Persons' Rights
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated College Aged (18-26 years) People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 

 All 4,300+ transition-age students in Boston Public Schools and charter schools will have legally required transition assessments, plans and placements in pre-employment and employment activities, such as career exploration and immersion.

Programs in Boston serving young people, including job developer and apprenticeship programs, will be trained to become more  inclusive and aware of how to best serve young people with hidden disabilities (e.g., learning disabilities, autism, ADHD, emotional disorder).

A resource guide will be available in Boston to enable youth, families and service providers to better navigate the multiple systems (education, disability, workforce, e.g.) that provide services to help young people with disabilities attain jobs.
 
Boston students with disabilities will access disability services in college, increasing their chances of graduating.
 
More employers will be trained to create inclusive workplaces with accommodations as needed to enable young people with disabilities to be hired and retained. 
Program Long-Term Success  Employment rate for Boston young people with disabilities will increase from the current rate of 25%-33%, resulting in reduced poverty for adults with disabilities (currently 3-4 times greater than people without disabilities.  Young people with disabilities will have greater access to career choice and greater life satisfaction.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 

The planning phase of the workforce development task force has been completed and an Action Plan will be forthcoming.  Over 70 organizations participated.

Advocacy directly with the school department has resulted in better services for individual students and in improved system wide procedures to potentially benefit all students.
 


Children's Law Support Project (CLSP)

CLSP has three components: a) Helpline- Over 900 parents and others call annually to assist a child who is being denied their rights under the special education law or who needs assistance for a school exclusion issue. MAC provides advice, intensive technical assistance or legal case representation; b) Statewide legal services advocacy and support- MAC coordinates a statewide legal and legislative agenda on behalf of vulnerable low income children, including those who are homeless, at risk of school expulsion, or have mental illness. The priority legislative agenda item is to keep kids in school by reducing the impact of zero tolerance policies that expel or suspend students; and c) Pro-bono network. MAC has a pro bono partnership with the law firm, DLA Piper, which takes numerous individual cases and assists on systemic advocacy projects. MAC also recruits other attorneys from the private bar and provides all pro bono attorneys and others with training and technical assistance. 

Budget  $107,126.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Children's Rights
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Statewide Special Education

MAC has become the leading advocate in the state protecting the rights of students with disabilities, conducting effective legislative and administrative advocacy, developing training curricula to empower parents, convening a statewide coalition, and mobilizing parents and advocates to defend special education. MAC’s legislative successes over the years resulted in many new provisions in the law, for example: requiring school districts to establish special education PACs (Parent Advisory Councils); strengthening parents’ independent evaluation rights; establishing an MCAS appeals process for students with disabilities; and establishing rights of parents and their experts to observe their child’s classroom. MAC currently convenes and staffs a Collaborative of the major special education stakeholders in the state who have agreed to work together on a number of priorities, including improving transition planning, services and opportunities for youth with disabilities, age 14-22.  

Budget  $105,780.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Disabled Persons' Rights
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Trauma and Learning Policy Initiative

TLPI is a partnership between MAC and Harvard Law School. Its mission is to ensure that all children traumatized by exposure to family violence and other adverse childhood experiences succeed in school. To reach this goal, TLPI advocates for trauma-sensitive school environments with individual supports. This groundbreaking initiative works at three levels. First, through the Harvard Law Clinic, it provides individual case advocacy for children who have had traumatic experiences. Second, it works with individual schools to help them become trauma-sensitive environments where children impacted by trauma can focus, behave, and learn. Finally, the project mobilizes parents and educators to bring the voice of traumatized children to the legislative and executive branches where policy is being made. For example, TLPI played a leadership role in a state report and currently to support legislation that recommends all schools adopt a "safe and supportive schools" framework by 2017. 

Budget  $286,318.00
Category  Education, General/Other Education Policy Programs
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 
1. # of schools that receive training in becoming trauma-sensitive.
2. Passage of legislation for schools to adopt a framework to enable them to become a safe and supportive school.
Program Long-Term Success 
The long-term goal of this project is to enable children impacted by traumatic experiences to become successful in school.  This will be accomplished by schools developing whole school change processes to become a safe and supportive environment that is inclusive and trauma-sensitive so that all children in the school can learn, behave and achieve academic success.  The whole school change process involves incorporating an organizational framework that includes six elements: leadership and school culture; professional development for all staff, not just teachers; effective linkages to mental health services; academic and non-academic success; policies and procedures; and family engagement.  This framework will also allow schools to weave together multiple student support initiatives - e.g., anti-bullying, social-emotional learning, school discipline - into a coordinated whole. 
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success 
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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Jerry Mogul
CEO Term Start Jan 2003
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Jerry Mogul has been the executive director of Massachusetts Advocates for Children since January 2003, growing the organization by over 75%, increasing its visibility and stabilizing and strengthening its finances, organization and programs. Prior to his hiring, he had a background of 25 years in the public and non-profit sector in Massachusetts as a community leader engaged in advocacy, planning, development and community education for children and youth. He initiated citywide projects in Boston and Springfield that received national recognition.  In Springfield during the 1980s, he conducted an assessment of the public health department, initiated one of the first peer education program for teenagers in the state, initiated an innovative citywide community education program for children and youth focusing on substance abuse and child abuse, headed up a citywide coalition to prevent teen pregnancy and infant mortality, and chaired the local office of the state Office for Children, also serving as the vice-chair of its statewide advisory council. In Boston, he initiated and managed the citywide, neighborhood-based Healthy Boston project; led successful writing teams that secured multi-million federal grants on infant mortality, substance abuse treatment and violence prevention; headed the interagency Citywide Strategy for Youth Development to improve youth status and services through, among other activities, the first annual survey of Boston youth, two symposia bringing together academicians, practitioners and youth, and a public education campaign to improve parent-teen communication; and served as the deputy director of the Mayor’s Office of Community Partnership. He published articles in the field of community coalition-building and has extensive public speaking experience. He received a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Brandeis University in 1970 and a master’s degree in public health from the University of Massachusetts in 1979.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Susan Cole Esq. Director of the Trauma and Learning Policy Initiative --
Ms. Kim Janey Director of the Boston School Reform Project --
Ms. Julia Landau Esq. Director of the Disability Education Justice Initiative --
Ms. Janine Solomon Esq. -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
United Way Member Agency --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

MAC does virtually all its advocacy in collaboration with others. Among our  key partners are:

 Advocates for Autism of Massachusetts

Autism Center Advisory Committee                 

Boston School Committee ELL Task Force

Boston Special Education Parent Advisory Council

Brockton Public Schools 

Brockton Trauma Advisory Board

B-SET for Career Network 

Chapter 222 School Discipline Coalition
 
Children’s Law Support Project Advisory Committee
 
Coalition to Defend Special Education

Coalition to Restore Special Education Funding

Code of Conduct Advisory Committee- Boston 

DLA Piper

East Boston Ecumenical Community Council

Education Law Task Force

Federation for Children with Special Needs

Institute for Community Inclusion, UMass Boston

Harvard Law School

Kotin, Crabtree and Strong LLP 

Lesley University Center for Special Education

Massachusetts Appleseed Center
 
MLAC/Legal Services Project Directors
 
NAACP- Boston Chapter 

Safe and Supportive Schools Coalition 

Safe and Supportive Schools Commission 
 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 10
Number of Part Time Staff 7
Number of Volunteers 30
Number of Contract Staff 7
Staff Retention Rate % 88%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 13
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 16
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 4
Management Succession Plan Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

Disability Insurance
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Medical Health Insurance
Life Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Crime Coverage

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? N/A
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Matthew Iverson Esq.
Board Chair Company Affiliation DLA Piper LLP (US)
Board Chair Term Sept 2016 - Aug 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. David Barone Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Jacquelynne Bowman Esq. Greater Boston Legal Services Voting
Mr. Einer Elhauge Esq. Harvard Law School Voting
Ms. Christal Fenton Esq. Bingham McCutcheon LLP Voting
Mr. Michael Fleischer Esq. Seyfarth & Shaw Voting
Ms. Ann Guay Esq. Parent Voting
Ms. Eileen Hagerty Esq. Kotin, Crabtree & Strong LLP Voting
Ms. Sharon Hamel Atlantic Trust Voting
Mr. Richard Howard Esq. Attorney Voting
Mr. Matthew Iverson esq. DLA Piper (US) LLP Voting
Ms. Tanya Jones Aya Global Voting
Mr. Carlos Rojas Youth member Voting
Mr. Robert Shusterman Ally Financial Voting
Ms. Margareth Frayne Sodre Parent Voting
Ms. Meghan Streff Spring Esq. Spring & Spring Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Brazilian
Gender Female: 8
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 86%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 29%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Human Resources / Personnel
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2016 to Dec 31, 2016
Projected Income $1,549,396.00
Projected Expense $1,541,943.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

2008 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $1,692,096 $988,301 $1,542,540
Total Expenses $1,255,112 $1,251,583 $1,176,578

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$753,985 $690,803 $1,134,991
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $685,670 $156,908 $173,739
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $139,053 $90,734 $98,197
Investment Income, Net of Losses $119 $110 $91
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $113,269 $49,746 $135,522
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $997,576 $949,492 $891,664
Administration Expense $181,685 $193,510 $199,319
Fundraising Expense $75,851 $108,581 $85,595
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.35 0.79 1.31
Program Expense/Total Expenses 79% 76% 76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 5% 12% 6%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $1,165,405 $724,604 $965,423
Current Assets $1,153,018 $696,561 $951,687
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $65,120 $57,774 $35,311
Total Net Assets $1,100,285 $666,830 $930,112

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 2.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 17.71 12.06 26.95

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Foundation & Corporation funding detail is per the Schedule B 990 files for FY14, FY13 and FY12.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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