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New Communities Services, Inc.

 116 Norfolk Street
 Cambridge, MA 02139
[P] (617) 491-1815
[F] (617) 491-1823
www.windsorhouse.org
lolson@windsorhouse.org
Liz Olson
INCORPORATED: 1973
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2525978

LAST UPDATED: 12/21/2016
Organization DBA New Community Services Inc.
Sancta Maria's Windsor House
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

New Communities Services maintains adults in their communities by providing high quality supportive services and dignified housing to adults whose special needs place them at high risk.
In accomplishing this mission, New Communities Services operates a creative housing program focused on development and management of innovative housing projects, two active adult day health programs, and a caregiver support program.
New Communities Services, Inc. strives to offer services designed to maintain independence and enhance participants’ sense of self-worth and improve the quality of life for participants and their families.

Mission Statement

New Communities Services maintains adults in their communities by providing high quality supportive services and dignified housing to adults whose special needs place them at high risk.
In accomplishing this mission, New Communities Services operates a creative housing program focused on development and management of innovative housing projects, two active adult day health programs, and a caregiver support program.
New Communities Services, Inc. strives to offer services designed to maintain independence and enhance participants’ sense of self-worth and improve the quality of life for participants and their families.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year June 01, 2015 to May 31, 2016
Projected Income $2,111,777.00
Projected Expense $2,112,765.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Norfolk St Congregate Housing
  • Windsor House Adult Day Health

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

New Communities Services maintains adults in their communities by providing high quality supportive services and dignified housing to adults whose special needs place them at high risk.
In accomplishing this mission, New Communities Services operates a creative housing program focused on development and management of innovative housing projects, two active adult day health programs, and a caregiver support program.
New Communities Services, Inc. strives to offer services designed to maintain independence and enhance participants’ sense of self-worth and improve the quality of life for participants and their families.

Background Statement

New Communities Services, Inc. (NCS), founded in 1973, is a community based non-profit organization that oversees quality affordable housing for low-income seniors, families, homeless adults, and adults with mental health issues, including a congregate housing site.
Our congregate housing site is unique in model and is designed to allow residents independent living with services to age in place safely and remain in their own home longer.  Many clients have been pushed to the margins of our society and are at high risk for homelessness and institutionalization.  Services are designed to maintain independence and enhance residents' sense of self worth. The goal of all of the programs under New Communities Services is to keep low income, frail individuals in their communities and NCS facilitates connections between residents and appropriate neighborhood services and supports.
NCS also manages the two Windsor House Adult Day Health sites.  Since its inception as the geriatric division of New Communities Services, Inc. in 1977, Windsor House has been a national leader setting quality standards for adult day health programs. One of Massachusetts’s first adult day health centers, Windsor House opened in a basement of a Cambridge clinic; it grew to include four adult day health programs operating in Cambridge, Somerville, and Framingham, but now serves the two centers in Cambridge. 

Windsor House Adult Day Health programs are staffed with trained activity assistants, social workers, program directors, and nurses who all contribute to a safe, structured program for elders and adults with disabilities; participants are not spending time isolated at home, but in an enriched environment with engaging activities, nutritional and health care benefits which enhance self-esteem, socialization, and healthy living.

 

 


Impact Statement

New Communities Services provided housing and social service coordination to 39 adults ranging from age 38 to 90 and living with aging, physical health, and/or mental health issues in the Norfolk Street Congregate Housing program.  Our site has full occupancy and maintains an active waitlist; the congregate housing program hopes to maintain full occupancy and raise the number of elders served.
The two Windsor House Adult Day Health programs served hundreds through successful day programming and outreach to families.  Despite financial challenges and new regulations, trained staff continued to engage elders and adults with disabilities in daily appropriate activities stimulating enjoyment, dignity and self-worth.  The goals at Sancta Maria's Windsor House are to implement memory boxes to encourage conversation with sensory items, involve educational speakers and music therapy in the programming.  Sancta Maria's Windsor House also aims to provide the opportunity for individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias and their caregivers to shelve their “roles” in the disease process and enjoy the company of one another in a nonjudgmental space of its new Saturday Memory Cafe.

Needs Statement

Sancta Maria's Windsor House is most in need of funding to support the program.  Government required renovations were made to the bathrooms and staffing needs (ie full time registered nursing) increased as per new rules.  On top of these operational costs was the loss of money from low reimbursements; in the last year, state funding for the reimbursement of services did not increase, further decreasing the income.  Funds are needed to maintain holistic care for the diverse population of participants, including a wide range of functional ability due to physical, cognitive, memory, and mental challenges.  Nursing services provide preventative, routine and rehabilitative care, nutritional benefits provide a continental breakfast, hot noon meal, and afternoon snack, full staff assistance maintain personal care (toileting, feeding and transporting), and social services assist clients with maintaining benefits, behavior management, and caregiver support. Activities boost self-esteem, cognitive function and physical strengths with respect to abilities of each client. Therapeutic recreation can include crafts, games, cooking, music (entertainers, singing and/or playing instruments), exercise, and story time and foster socialization and decrease the chance of isolation and depression.

 

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

Located in Cambridge, MA 02139 and gives priority to serving the city's homeless population, yet applications received from all over and residents have come from as far away as Florida and Texas.  Work in collaboration with Cambridge and neighboring cities' agencies.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Supportive Housing for Older Adults
  2. Human Services - Adult Day Care
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Norfolk St Congregate Housing

A unique home setting for elderly and adults with documented disability, Norfolk Street Congregate Housing allows independent living with services to keep residents at home and in their communities longer.  The social service coordinator and management is on hand five days a week to assist residents with bill paying, benefit maintenance, neighbor issues, unit hygiene, and other obstacles in order to sustain housing and health status.  Referrals are made to community providers to broaden support available to residents.  The building is federal subsidized housing offering affordable single units with shared kitchens and shower rooms on every floor; there is a congregate meal site providing a nutritious and low cost hot lunch Monday through Friday and cold supper on Thursdays.
With services available to help pay rent and bills, keep units clean, do laundry, home deliver food and prescriptions, or even help read mail, residents are able to maintain independence and live in the community.
Budget  2,112,765
Category  Housing, General/Other Affordable Housing
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success 
Providing housing is the first success.  Making sure each resident has the services needed begins at move in and continues over time.  Once a resident is housed, he or she can focus on health and financials.
Program Long-Term Success 
Norfolk Street will provide 38 units to elderly and disabled adults also serving a minimum of 8 (but not a limited number of) previously homeless persons.  Benefits involving health care, health insurance, finances, and/or personal services will be increased or maintained for all residence through oversight by the staff, especially social service coordinator.  Residents helped should find transition to housing easier and less stressful and feel safe, secure, independent, and confortable in their new homes.
Program Success Monitored By 
Qualitative reports from residents, monitoring by Social Service Coordinator, teamwork from Housing Director, Maintenance and all staff at Norfolk Street will show success.  All residents have service plans which are updated at least annually with monthly check-ins. 
Examples of Program Success 
A homeless man moved into congregate housing without income since his unemployment benefits ended. He had a diagnosis of depression, but his therapists believed it was under control. This man visited the social service coordinator almost daily displaying an inability to deal with situations that bothered him, increased anxiety, and high sensitivity to many routine situations. He was referred to additional case management and a new psychologist. After many applications and appeals, this man was able to get food stamps and disability benefits- an income he had not had for over two years. Adults under the age of 60 are not receiving Social Security, and applications for other services such as benefits from the Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA) or SSDI can be overwhelming, and budget cuts have limited the amount of services available. This resident now reports issues to management without escalating his anger and frustration at others and has an ability to fix issues himself.

Windsor House Adult Day Health

Windsor House Adult Day Health programs specialize to improve the quality of life for older adults, adults with physical and/or cognitive limitations, and their caregivers with quality day programs including medical, recreational, and social services.  Caring, skilled staff tailor activities to meet the unique health and emotional needs and abilities of each individual.  Nurses monitor vital signs, administer medications and coordinate with clients' physicians; all staff are critical observers for behavior changes which can be symptoms of a larger medical issue, especially urinary tract infections.  Each client is served a continental breakfast, hot lunch and snack, providing nutrition and dietary needs.  Partnerships with transportation companies ensure safe rides to and from the facility. Windsor House ADH fosters independence and self-esteem of participants and in turn provides needed respite to caregivers who are also offered a library of information and support groups. 
Budget  1,000,000
Category  Health Care, General/Other Patient & Family Enrichment
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success 
A more immediate response from enrolling a family member in Windsor House Adult Day Health centers is caregiver respite.  The time given to an elder spouse, or an adult child can be greatly appreciated.  For example, an adult child may have children who need attention or any caregiver needs time to take care of his or her own health.
Most often, an elder will enjoy the day, have a nice lunch out, and meet new people and be happier and ready for a good night's rest at the end of the day.
Program Long-Term Success 
Participants will be able to remain in their own homes in the community for a longer period of time, avioding the cost and move to a nursing home or assisted living.  Participants levels of self-esteem and independence will fourish and their caregivers will gain from the support and respite.  With nurses and trained staff, behavioral changes are more often noted and medical diagnoses caught and dealt with sooner, especially in clients with Alzheimer's dementia.
Program Success Monitored By 
Client attendance for the most part confirms client interest (with some exception with inclement weather).  Families will often give feedback on what is working or not working, often shared through the social worker or program director.  Nurses and staff often noted behavior changes through observation and this can help catch medical needs or note successes.  Clients will also share their experiences with staff.
Examples of Program Success 
One center offers a music program with guest entertainers once a month and clients have added a day each week to participate in this program.
 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The proliferation of internet based communications has significantly intensified over the last year: A website now should be connected to a Facebook page.  Is it appropriate to use Twitter?  Should we have an online newsletter..a blog?  I view this electronic age as a challenge.  It is a challenge to meet the needs of current clients, who are elders but may or may not be able to use computers.  Further, it is an opportunity for us to share our expertise with future clients; an opportunity to meet the needs of a generation of mature adults who are raising children and facing the needs of their aging parents who are living longer than ever before.
The rapid change to electronic communication forces our not-for-profit corporation to reach out for guidance to community partners and funders.  Advisors who can assist us to bring our accomplished and highly dedicated staff to the next level of productivity by communicating with our current and future clients via internet based programs.
Current accomplished and highly dedicated staff persons must be supported in doing business electronically.  Training time is important, yet is time away from direct client service.  Individual staff persons will need support throughout this transition.  Best practices, including client confidentiality, will be reviewed and updated to provide a comfort level for staff as they move toward improved productivity through appropriate use of internet based programs. 
Since 1973, New Communities Services has toiled to keep elders and adult disabled persons in their community as they age in place.  Today, there are so many options that it can foster confusion; caregivers are easily overwhelmed.  Our programs of supported housing and adult day health programs may be the answer, but we need to use all available tools to share our success stories.  Stories like a developmentally delayed adult moves into his own housing unit in a facility with a licensed social worker available for support.  A World War II veteran with short-term memory loss spends three days a week in a secure and supportive environment with other veterans.  A 62 year old homeless person who lost his job four years ago and lived in a shelter moves into a congregate unit.  A gentleman without employment finally secures disability income after two years with none.  These are just a few of our stories... is it any wonder that we love what we do?

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Elizabeth Pavoni LSW, CDP
CEO Term Start Mar 2016
CEO Email epavoni@windsorhouse.org
CEO Experience
Elizabeth (Beth) Pavoni has been with New Communities Services, Inc for over ten years and has served at Sancta Maria's Windsor House as Executive Director prior to her new placement as CEO.
Co-CEO Ms. Ashley Thibault
Co-CEO Term Start Mar 2016
Co-CEO Email athibault@windsorhouse.org
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mrs. Alice O McCarter LICSW Jan 2004 Mar 2016
Ms. Pamela Shea MSW June 1973 Dec 2003

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

As a non-profit agency, we are constantly networking with area Cambridge agencies to enhance the lives of all of our clients.  We work with area transportation companies such as SCM/Door to Door to safely transport most Windsor House Adult Day Health clients, Somerville-Cambridge Elder Services and other ASAPs (Aging Service Access Points) to refer or service residents over 60 and coordinate the congregate meal site.  Local agencies such as the Multi-Service Center, homeless agencies such as HomeStart or Heading Home, and Paine Senior Services are referred to regularly for services or who provide prospective applicants.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The proliferation of internet based communications has significantly intensified over the last year.  A website now should be connected to a Facebook page!  Is it appropriate to use Twitter?  Should we have an online newsletter...a blog?  I view this electronic age as a challenge.  It is a challenge to meet the needs of current clients, who are elders, but may or may not be able to use computers.  Further it is an opportunity to share our expertise with future clients... an opportunity for us to meet the needs of a generation of mature adults who are raising children and facing the needs of their aging parents who are living longer than ever before.
 
This rapid change to electronic communication forces our not-for-profit corporation to reach out for guidance to community partners and funders.  Advisors who can assist us to bring our accomplished and highly dedicated staff to the next level of productivity by communicating with our current and future clients via internet based programs.
 
Current accomplished and dedicated staff persons must by supported in doing business electronically.  Training time is important, yet is time away from direct client service.  Individual staff persons will need support throughout this transition.  Best practices, such as client confidentiality, will be reviewed and updated to provide a comfort level for staff as they move toward improved productivity with appropriate use of much that the internet can offer.
 
Since 1973, New Communities Services has toiled to keep elders and adult disabled persons in their community, as they age in place.  Today, there are so many options that it can foster confusion.  Caregivers can be easily overwhelmed by a maze of paperwork and options.  Our programs of supported housing and adult day health centers may be the answer and we need to use all available tools to share our success stories.  Stories like a developmentally delayed adult moves to their own housing unit in a facility with a licensed social worker available for support.  A World War II veteran with short-term memory loss spends three days a week in a secure and supportive environment with other veterans.  A 62 year old homeless person who lost his job four years ago and his housing two years ago and lived in a shelter program for the last year moves into a congregate unit, that he can furnish with his stored furniture and make a fresh start.  These are just a few of our stories...is it any wonder that we love what we do?

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 15
Number of Part Time Staff 15
Number of Volunteers 1
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 7
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 20
Hispanic/Latino: 6
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 34
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? No
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A Quarterly
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mrs. Myra Musicant
Board Chair Company Affiliation President of the Board
Board Chair Term July 2010 - June 2013
Board Co-Chair Ms. Alice O. McCarter LICSW
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation member
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Honorable Helen Bryant Board --
Thomas Chatellier Treasurer Voting
Judith Katz Clerk Voting
Eileen Liss member Voting
Alice O. McCarter LICSW Vice President Voting
Myra Musicant President Voting
Stephen Roger Board --
Pamela Shea Founder Voting
Lorraine Thompson Secretary Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Marc Hofner Community Volunteer NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 10
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 63%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 63%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

There are several areas of corporate governance to be addressed in the coming months.  As the responsibilities of frontline housing management are transferred to a recently trained staff person the Vice President will be free to meet with members of the board of directors to develop a transition plan to be invoked over the next five to six years.  Currently, mid-level managers have or are on track to be credentialed in their areas of expertise.  Managers are encouraged to take on a level of responsibility that will prepare them for ever increasing involvement in the management of the company.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year June 01, 2015 to May 31, 2016
Projected Income $2,111,777.00
Projected Expense $2,112,765.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audited Financials

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,551,067 $1,632,497 $2,044,630
Total Expenses $1,544,133 $1,589,228 $1,993,361

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- $0 --
Individual Contributions $10,171 $13,505 $16,297
Indirect Public Support -- $0 --
Earned Revenue $1,539,894 $1,618,263 $2,027,828
Investment Income, Net of Losses $1,002 $729 $505
Membership Dues -- $0 --
Special Events -- $0 --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- $0 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,352,871 $1,406,860 $1,775,326
Administration Expense $191,262 $182,368 $218,035
Fundraising Expense -- $0 --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.03 1.03
Program Expense/Total Expenses 88% 89% 89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $577,525 $508,580 $482,625
Current Assets $530,726 $498,365 $468,074
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $4,487 $4,487
Current Liabilities $74,317 $37,819 $55,133
Total Net Assets $503,208 $466,274 $423,005

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 7.14 13.18 8.49

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 1% 1%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audit for FY16 and per the IRS Form 990s for FY15 and FY14. Contributions from Foundations and Corporations are listed under Individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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