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City Life/Vida Urbana (Urban Revival, Inc.)

 PO Box 300107
 Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
[P] (617) 524-3541
[F] (617) 524-3555
www.clvu.org
[email protected]
Lisa Owens
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INCORPORATED: 1973
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2660311

LAST UPDATED: 11/12/2017
Organization DBA City Life/Vida Urbana
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

City Life/Vida Urbana is a grassroots community organization committed to fighting for racial, social, and economic justice and gender equality by building working-class power. We promote individual empowerment, develop community leaders and build collective power to effect systemic change and transform society. Throughout its 44-year history, City Life has largely expressed its mission through organizing Boston residents in order to prevent displacement and promote tenants' rights and affordable housing throughout Boston and beyond.

Mission Statement

City Life/Vida Urbana is a grassroots community organization committed to fighting for racial, social, and economic justice and gender equality by building working-class power. We promote individual empowerment, develop community leaders and build collective power to effect systemic change and transform society. Throughout its 44-year history, City Life has largely expressed its mission through organizing Boston residents in order to prevent displacement and promote tenants' rights and affordable housing throughout Boston and beyond.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $805,957.00
Projected Expense $750,046.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Boston Anti-Displacement Organizing
  • Brockton Anti-Foreclosure Organizing

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

City Life/Vida Urbana is a grassroots community organization committed to fighting for racial, social, and economic justice and gender equality by building working-class power. We promote individual empowerment, develop community leaders and build collective power to effect systemic change and transform society. Throughout its 44-year history, City Life has largely expressed its mission through organizing Boston residents in order to prevent displacement and promote tenants' rights and affordable housing throughout Boston and beyond.


Background Statement

City Live/Vida Urbana (CL/VU or City Life) organizes low-income and working-class people of diverse race and nationality, serving a long-term commitment to organizing a mass movement for social justice. Among our core values is a belief that affordable housing is a basic human right, and our roots are in protecting tenants and small homeowners from displacement due to eviction.
 
CL/VU is best known for our long history of successful campaigns to protect the homes of low-income tenants. We use an unusual combination of grassroots organizing and legal defense with a focus on Boston neighborhoods, but have also provided CL/VU training and assistance to replicate our model regionally and nationally.
 
Our work began in 1973, when a group of residents and activists with roots in the civil rights, feminist, and anti-Vietnam War movements founded what was then called the Jamaica Plain Tenants Action Group. Early on, members identified affordable housing as a core issue around which people could organize to build power and gain control over their communities.

For example, responding to the foreclosure crisis of 2007, which disproportionately impacted communities of color, CL/VU ran a campaign to combat the resulting rampant displacement. We galvanized more than 2,000 tenants and homeowners, and between 2011 and 2014, made it possible for more than 850 families in Greater Boston to repurchase their homes, overturn wrongful foreclosures, and negotiate stabilizing rental agreements.

Since late 2012, the foreclosure crisis has evolved into a renters’ state of emergency, as corporate speculators have been purchasing large numbers of properties in areas where home values are starting to appreciate. Buyers are exorbitantly raising rents and clearing out buildings to turn a fast profit. CL/VU is working with residents across the city to form new Tenant Associations and build strong neighborhood leadership in the battle to protect our communities.


Impact Statement

Recent Accomplishments

Passed New Tenant Protection Law: Played a core role in passage of a municipal law in October 2017 that will buffer low-income tenants from no-fault evictions. More than 20 rallies, hearings, and phone mobilizations over three years persuaded Boston City Council to vote 10-3 to approve this new law—the Jim Brooks Stabilization Act—which is now headed to the state legislature for approval.

Stabilized At-Risk Families and Communities: Organized tenants against a notorious slumlord in Dorchester and Mattapan. This organizing, combined with legal defense and community development, won nonprofit purchase and long-term affordability for 59 tenants’ homes.

Worked with City to Secure Affordable Housing: City Life has been instrumental in making the City of Boston’s new housing stabilization program a success. We organized tenants to win nonprofit purchase of nearly 100 homes procured with subsidies from the new program. The new owners have converted these into long-term affordable homes for the current tenants.

Current Goals

Win New Protections Against Tenant & Small Owner Displacement: As a leader within the Jim Brooks Act coalition, win state legislative approval for the recently passed Boston law that will buffer tenants and owners from evictions for profit by corporate owners.

Develop Resident Leadership in Boston Neighborhoods: Further develop and expand a group of 80 leaders (low- to moderate-income residents) who will coordinate Tenant Associations covering 50 buildings in 6 Boston neighborhoods. Train leaders to tell their stories to the public, media, and elected officials, increasing these leaders' public engagement by 25%.

Gain Community Control Over Housing and Land: Through organizing and community development, win nonprofit purchase of 100 occupied, privately owned multifamily homes for conversion into long-term affordable homes.

 


Needs Statement

City Life seeks funding to expand our organizing capability in some of Boston’s high-need neighborhoods through additional staff and translation services. Because our community leadership model creates a ripple effect of resident activism, a small increase in core staffing will allow us to amplify our impact many times over.

CL/VU’s Top Needs

1. 1 full-time Organizer position to expand tenant organizing in Roxbury and Mattapan-$53,000 (salary+fringe)

Increased real estate speculation is accelerating the pace of displacement in each of these neighborhoods. An increased organizing response is needed to build the power of tenants to fight to save their homes and communities.

2. Popular Education Coordinator Position-$68,000 (salary+fringe)

This new staffperson will structure and implement a new Leadership Training Academy in order to deepen the social movement leadership of City Life members who are already experienced volunteer organizers.

3. 1 additional set of simultaneous translation equipment for multi-lingual tenant meetings-$4,000

4. Haitian Kreyol translation services for weekly resident meetings-$6,760

Growing numbers of Kreyol-speakers are attending CL/VU meetings, requiring both translation and additional equipment to accommodate increased use.


CEO Statement

In Spring 2016, City Life canvassers learned that low-income tenants living on Waldeck St. (Dorchester) and Orlando St. (Mattapan) were being subject to vindictive utility shut-offs, safety code violations and landlord intimidation. As a result, many were now at risk of homelessness.

 

One of these tenants, Darcell, soon found herself with clipboard in hand, organizing her neighbors, undeterred by a foot injury caused by bad building conditions. Supported by a City Life volunteer organizer, Darcell and her neighbors organized four building rallies between August and October, which generated community support for their struggle to remain in their homes.

When they learned that the landlord was, in fact, in bankruptcy, our legal services partner, Greater Boston Legal Services (GBLS), recruited two private law firms to represent the tenants’ interests in Bankruptcy Court pro bono, while GBLS handled the eviction cases. Concurrently, City Life coordinated closely with the City’s Housing Chief, who advocated for nonprofit purchase of these homes.

The climactic scene played out in Bankruptcy Court, where 35 tenants and supporters in neon “We Shall Not Be Moved” shirts asserted their claims.

It was ultimately the collective tenants’ voice and the impact of the $3.5 million in legal claims which they had documented—claims which they agreed to waive if a nonprofit purchased their homes—which swayed the Judge to accept Codman Square Neighborhood Development Corporation’s (CSNDC) bid over the higher cash bid of a for-profit. As CSNDC converts these apartments into long-term affordable homes, the tenants get to remain, and the community gains 59 affordable homes for 50+ years.

For nearly 20 years, City Life and our legal services partners have been refining a seamless, collaboration between community organizing “offense” community legal “defense”, which we have shared with organizers and lawyers across the country who wish to replicate it. While we also have a history of collaborating with community developers, this campaign has raised this collaboration to a new level.

Last Fall, people from many walks of life, races and neighborhood gathered at a City Life tenant meeting to celebrate the Waldeck-Orlando victory. All of the stakeholders in that room acknowledged the critical role the tenants’ leadership had played.

It takes an unusual organization to develop such strong, grassroots leadership, and at the same time, to develop the kind of authentic, diverse partnerships that amplify grassroots power in order to win. City Life is that organization.


Board Chair Statement

City Life/Vida Urbana has been an effective force for racial, social and economic justice in Boston for nearly 45 years, organizing tenants, parents, workers and in recent years, small homeowners alongside tenants. The small, skilled and highly committed staff is supported by many volunteers: lawyers and law students, artists and advocates, and community activists. The extraordinary presence and impact of City Life is greatly enhanced through the empowerment and leadership development of the members and the commitment of the many well-trained volunteer activists.

Some of these activists and leaders from the base of people directly impacted by displacement also choose to volunteer their time as members of the Board, and serve on various Board and member leadership bodies: Finance, Fundraising, Arts, Good Jobs, and the Tenant Organizing Committee.

While City Life has been successful at implementing its organizing model in response to the foreclosure crisis, in recent years, tenant rights have been threatened by bulk purchase of homes in Boston’s historic neighborhoods of color by large real estate corporations. This has led to exorbitant rent hikes and development of luxury condominiums, with an accompanying loss of affordable housing, and is changing the landscape of Boston.

This renters’ crisis presents the organization with an opportunity to build a movement that is changing policy in order to protect tenants, owners, small businesses and communities, but also brings many challenges. There is an organizational need to coordinate hundreds of potential volunteers in order to raise capacity to the level needed to win these reforms. The Board works at multiple levels to build this capacity. Along with its work to develop resources, two Board members have stepped up to lend hands-on support to the critical and consuming task of volunteer coordination. I’m proud to be part of such a committed working Board that leads by example.

It is an exciting and challenging time, and City Life continues to work to develop a movement for racial, social and economic change and community stabilization while building capacity to maintain its effectiveness for another 45 years and beyond.


Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-Dorchester Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-East Boston Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Hyde Park Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Jamaica Plain Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Mattapan Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Roslindale Neighborhood
Greater Boston Region-Roxbury Neighborhood
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA

CL/VU organizes throughout Boston and beyond, especially in low-income neighborhoods with emphasis in the neighborhoods listed above plus a satellite site located in Brockton, MA. The organization offers trainings and technical assistance regionally and nationally, as well as locally, for other housing organizing groups, community development nonprofits, lawyers and law students, faith communities and others wishing to learn about our organizing methods and campaigns.

Organization Categories

  1. Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy - Civil Rights, Social Action, & Advocacy N.E.C.
  2. Housing, Shelter - Homeowners & Tenants Associations
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Alliances & Advocacy

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Boston Anti-Displacement Organizing

Boston Anti-Displacement Organizing

CL/VU’s affordable housing and anti-displacement work integrates tenant and owner organizing with direct casework. The program primarily addresses Boston’s accelerating renters’ crisis – organizing to prevent no-fault evictions of low- and moderate income residents by corporate landlords and stabilize communities. The project also serves foreclosed tenants and owners still facing the fallout of the foreclosure crisis.

Budget  $498,703.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Other Economic Level Blacks, African Heritage Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 
  • Over 90% of families facing displacement who actively participate in City Life's organizing and legal advocacy will remain in their homes for six months or more past their date of intake, enabling them to negotiate longer term stabilization outcomes.
  • The Massachusetts State Legislature will approve the Jim Brooks Stabilization Act--the home rule petition recently passed by the Boston City Council--to buffer tenants and owners from evictions for profit by corporate landlords
  • This year, win nonprofit purchase of 100 occupied, privately-owned multifamily homes for conversion to long-term affordable homes
  • A total of 70 grassroots leaders will serve on City Life leadership bodies, including 6 who will run for/serve in elected seats.
  • Member-led Tenant Organizing Committee will coordinate Tenant Associations covering 50 buildings in 6 Boston neighborhoods
  • Increase number of member leaders engaged in public storytelling by 25%
Program Long-Term Success 
  • Low- to moderate-income residents living in Boston’s communities of color will remain in their homes and neighborhoods long-term/permanently

  • Boston's historic communities of color will gain control over land and housing, for example, through community land trusts, gaining formal, substantive representation in the City's planning and development process
  • Tenants and small owners will increasingly assume leadership and ownership of City Life and semi-autonomously organize in their own neighborhoods, children's schools, workplaces and faith communities
Program Success Monitored By 
  • Cases progress is tracked via case notes in Quickbase and reviewed regularly by the Boston organizers and organizing coordinator, who are in regular contact with program participants
  • Numbers of people taking on leadership roles are tracked via headcounts and sign-in sheets
  • When the State Legislature holds a hearing, votes on, and approves Boston City Council's home rule petition protecting tenants and owners from evictions for profit by corporate landlords. City Life staff will personally be present at these events
  • Public announcements/media reporting of finalized nonprofit purchases of occupied homes in Boston's communities of color
  • Reported changes in government or corporate policy/practice which will stabilize the housing of significant numbers of people
  • Members’ feedback on programs and organization policies is elicited at monthly leadership team meetings and at annual board/staff/member leadership team retreat
  • Staff and Board respectively each hold retreats 2X per year to evaluate programmatic and organizational results.
Examples of Program Success 
These organizational achievements also represent achievements of Boston Anti-Displacement Organizing
 
 
Recent Accomplishments

Passed New Tenant Protection Law: Played a core role in passage of a municipal law in October 2017 that will buffer low-income tenants from no-fault evictions. More than 20 rallies, hearings, and phone mobilizations over three years persuaded Boston City Council to vote 10-3 to approve this new law—the Jim Brooks Stabilization Act—which is now headed to the state legislature for approval.

Stabilized At-Risk Families and Communities: Organized tenants against a notorious slumlord in Dorchester and Mattapan. This organizing, combined with legal defense and community development, won nonprofit purchase and long-term affordability for 59 tenants’ homes.

Worked with City to Secure Affordable Housing: City Life has been instrumental in making the City of Boston’s new housing stabilization program a success. We organized tenants to win nonprofit purchase of nearly 100 homes procured with subsidies from the new program. The new owners have converted these into long-term affordable homes for the current tenants.

Current Goals

Win New Protections Against Tenant & Small Owner Displacement: As a leader within the Jim Brooks Act coalition, win state legislative approval for the recently passed Boston law that will buffer tenants and owners from evictions for profit by corporate owners.

Develop Resident Leadership in Boston Neighborhoods: Further develop and expand a group of 80 leaders (low- to moderate-income residents) who will coordinate Tenant Associations covering 50 buildings in 6 Boston neighborhoods. Train leaders to tell their stories to the public, media, and elected officials, increasing public engagement by 25%.

Gain Community Control Over Housing and Land: Through organizing and community development, win nonprofit purchase of 100 occupied, privately owned multifamily homes for conversion into long-term affordable homes.


Brockton Anti-Foreclosure Organizing

 Brockton Anti-Foreclosure Organizing

 Because Brockton, MA was among the cities/towns hardest hit by the foreclosure crisis, City Life collaborated with two local groups in order to replicate our foreclosure organizing model response here in 2012. Soon after, members of the newly-formed Brockton Bank Tenant Association (BTA) decided to become part of City Life. Brockton BTA engages in door-to-door canvass of foreclosed owners and tenants, peer-group support and rights training, direct action, and public policy advocacy.
Budget  $4,000.00
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Other Economic Level
Program Short-Term Success 
  • 75% of participants will remain in their homes 6 months or more past date of intake, enabling them at minimum to secure a stable housing transition on their own terms, and in most cases, gain the ability to remain long-term or permanently or obtain a satisfactory moveout settlement.
Program Long-Term Success 
  • Owners and tenants will retain their affordable housing long-term/repurchase their homes.
  •  Over the next 3-5 years, residents will gain local control over land and housing through vehicles such as nonprofit purchases or community land trusts
  • By the end of 2018, with co-leadership from the Brockton BTA, Brockton City Council will pass a "Just Cause Eviction" ordinance, buffering law-abiding tenants from evictions for profit.
Program Success Monitored By  Case progress is tracked in Quickbase and reviewed on a weekly basis by the Brockton Organizer and Organizing Coordinator, who are in regular contact with program participants and with legal advocates who work closely with residents.
Examples of Program Success 
  • In 2013, with active organizing involvement from the Brockton BTA, Brockton's City Council became the first in the country to launch a formal study of eminent domain as a strategy to stop displacement due to foreclosure
  • In 2015, with Brockton BTA members playing an intensive role in outreach, public storytelling and educating their neighbors and public officials, Brockton City Council passed a local ordinance which would protect foreclosed owners from bank evictions, allowing them instead to pay rent.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Lisa Owens
CEO Term Start Nov 2014
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

A long time Boston resident, Lisa Owens has supported a number of local grassroots social justice organizations in a variety of capacities, including: Executive Director, Board member, donor, and volunteer. She served as Executive Director of award-winning award winning youth leadership program mytown, where she doubled the number of youth served and increased revenues by 23%. She has assisted organizations such as The City School and Boston Mobilization to increase capacity through fundraising and programmatic and staff development. Lisa served on the CLVU Board, and was elected President in 2012, and transitioned in June 2014 into the Interim Executive Director role at CL/VU before becoming the agency’s permanent ED in November 2014.

As a seasoned educator and trainer, she served as an adjunct faculty member at the Boston Campus of Springfield College's School of Human Services for many years and a Senior Fellow at Boston University’s Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership-Community Fellows program. She teaches courses on structural racism and US social welfare policy, participatory action research, designing community projects, and nonprofit management and leadership.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Curdina J. Hill Dec 2009 June 2014
Ms. Roxann McKinnon Nov 2007 Aug 2009

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Denise Matthews-Turner HR/Office Manager --
Mr. Stephen Meacham Coordinator of Organizing --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Letelier-Moffitt Human Rights Award Institute for Policy Studies 2013
The Salem Award for Human Rights and Social Justice The Salem Award for Human Rights and Social Justice 2012
Annual Award (Awarded to the Bank Tenant Association) Massachusetts Jobs With Justice 2010
James Rouse Award for Outstanding Work by an Urban Non-profit National Community Reinvestment Coalition 2009
Legal Worker Award (Awarded to the Bank Tenant Association) National Lawyers Guild, Massachusetts Chapter 2009
Outside the Box Award (Awarded to the Bank Tenant Association) Chinese Progressive Association 2009
Salt of the Earth Award (Awarded to the Bank Tenant Association) Community Labor United 2008

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 8
Number of Part Time Staff 6
Number of Volunteers 160
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Ricardo Henry
Board Chair Company Affiliation Massachusetts Communities Action Network
Board Chair Term Nov 2016 - Oct 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Dawn Belkin-Martinez Simmons College Voting
Ms. Laura Foner Community volunteer Voting
Ms. Heather Gordon Community volunteer Voting
Mr. Mike Leyba United for a Fair Economy Voting
Ms. Carolyn Lomax Self-employed Cosmetologist Voting
Ms. Debbie Lubarr Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Wil Renderos Audio Chemists, LLC Voting
Ms. Maura Russell Massachusetts Board of Education Voting
Ms. Edna Willrich Section 8 Tenants, Inc. Voting
Mr. Mike Wolfson Harvard School of Public Health Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 42%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Personnel

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,144,763 $1,201,088 $1,242,175
Total Expenses $1,228,445 $919,613 $1,163,870

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$432,721 $659,498 $375,501
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $266,163 $174,226 $204,916
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $59,335 $87,477 $376,511
Investment Income, Net of Losses $298 $118 $304
Membership Dues $1,280 $12,838 --
Special Events -- -- $2,725
Revenue In-Kind $383,324 $265,665 $271,137
Other $1,642 $1,266 $11,081

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,037,203 $760,157 $948,699
Administration Expense $111,764 $103,989 $114,244
Fundraising Expense $79,478 $55,467 $100,927
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.93 1.31 1.07
Program Expense/Total Expenses 84% 83% 82%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 11% 7% 17%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $674,343 $742,586 $467,585
Current Assets $660,703 $731,181 $458,374
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $50,707 $35,268 $41,742
Total Net Assets $623,636 $707,318 $425,843

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 13.03 20.73 10.98

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

At the end of FY2015, City Life received two temporarily restricted grants. While the revenue was recognized in FY2015 for accounting purposes, giving the appearance of a large net surplus, both grants were, in fact, released from restriction in FY2016. Since these funds had already been counted as revenue the prior year, the FY2016 audit shows a net loss which does not reflect the organization's current strong financial position.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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