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North Shore Community Development Coalition Inc.

 96 Lafayette Street
 Salem, MA 01970
[P] (978) 745-8071
[F] (978) 745-4345
http://northshorecdc.org/
[email protected]
Machel Piper
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INCORPORATED: 2011
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2686893

LAST UPDATED: 05/24/2017
Organization DBA North Shore CDC
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

North Shore CDC invests in neighborhoods to create thriving communities. We envision a North Shore where every neighborhood is one of choice and opportunity.

Mission Statement

North Shore CDC invests in neighborhoods to create thriving communities. We envision a North Shore where every neighborhood is one of choice and opportunity.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $2,403,855.00
Projected Expense $2,205,359.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Engagement
  • Family Resource Center
  • Housing Development
  • YouthBuild North Shore

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

North Shore CDC invests in neighborhoods to create thriving communities. We envision a North Shore where every neighborhood is one of choice and opportunity.

Background Statement

 

North Shore Community Development Coalition invests in neighborhoods to create thriving communities. We envision a North Shore where every neighborhood is one of choice and opportunity. As the predominant community development organization serving the North Shore, North Shore CDC is positioned to bring our neighborhood development model to communities throughout our region. Focusing on low-income and distressed neighborhoods, we’ve committed to transformational, sustainable revitalization. 

North Shore Community Development Coalition (North Shore CDC) was founded in 2011 as the result of a merger of two smaller community development organizations serving Salem and Beverly. By regionalizing services, we have been able to provide an efficient and effective use of each city’s resources and a unified voice for its residents. In 2012 the organization geographically expanded into Peabody and now carries forward 40 years of collective experience and successful community investment on the North Shore.

North Shore CDC uses our neighborhood development model to invest social, human and economic capital into predominantly low-income or distressed neighborhoods within the communities on the North Shore to improve quality of life. We do this by investing strategically in real estate, in community and civic engagement and in quality, neighborhood-based programming that brings opportunity to low-income residents.


Impact Statement

North Shore CDC is located in the heart of North Shore region in Essex County, north of Boston. North Shore CDC is positioned to bring our neighborhood development model to communities throughout the region by focusing on historically low-income and distressed neighborhoods in need of revitalization in the next three years. North Shore CDC is the only certified regional CDC in the North Shore region. We currently work in Salem, Beverly and Peabody and over time plan to expand into more communities to bring community development capacity throughout the region.

North Shore CDC has created 399 units of affordable housing, including a transformational neighborhood revitalization project that created 108 units of affordable housing in Beverly during one of the worst economic downturns in U.S. history in a community that had not seen any rental housing development in over 20 years.

North Shore CDC launched YouthBuild-North Shore as a dynamic new youth program based in Salem in 2012. We have been able to create a highly successful YouthBuild program, the first new such program to launch in 10 years in Massachusetts. Our unique model has been recognized as innovative and efficient use of public/private resources.

North Shore CDC led the Salem Point Vision and Action Plan, a collaborative 7-year plan neighborhood improvement plan that engaged over 300 residents in various focus groups, public meetings, and social media. The plan is now being implemented as a Working Cities Challenge Grant recipient and has leveraged over $900,000 in resources to date.

North Shore CDC’s dynamic internship and fellowship programs have created long-term partnerships with local universities that allow North Shore CDC to rely on qualified interns and faculty to support existing projects, pilot new programs, and provide valuable evaluations.

In the last three years, North Shore CDC has doubled our organizational size and budget. In the next three years we plan to double our organizational impact once more by focusing on our strategic plan goals:

• Pursue strategic partnerships that improve scale, efficiency, and innovation to maximize our impact and improve our sustainability. 

• Invest in the development of leaders amongst our communities, board, and staff. 

• Build and operate a sustainable organizational platform well-suited for growth. 

• Create dynamic, community-driven investments in the neighborhoods we serve.
 

Needs Statement

Massachusetts is the third most expensive state in the nation for housing and low-income Essex County residents face some of the most misaligned housing costs relative to income. 58% of poverty on the North Shore is concentrated in North Shore CDC’s three target cities- Salem, Peabody, and Beverly. With the support of our donors, North Shore CDC can invest in these distressed, low-income communities to create transformational revitalization that impacts our residents.

How far can your donation reach? 
$25,000 funds a community room for programs, workshops, and events.
$2,000 supports a YouthBuild North Shore young adult’s for a quarter of the school year.
$1,000 provides one family with Energy Star Appliances, helping our tenants cut costs on energy, year after year.
$500 supports books and materials for an entire class of students in our Community English Program.
$100 pays for a low-flow faucet, reducing water consumption in a unit by up to 35%.
$50 initiates a neighborhood crime watch meeting.
$25 sponsors one 5th grader to learn about and support affordable housing in their community.

CEO Statement

"North Shore CDC's innovative model of community investment is focused on lasting benefits for entire neighborhoods. We bring together residents, community organizations, and key stakeholders in a way that utilizes the strengths of different groups to best address community issues. Together, this neighborhood revitalization model has transformed long-neglected communities into safe, vibrant neighborhoods."

Board Chair Statement

"North Shore CDC's commitment to creating sustainable economic development impacts in the neighborhoods they work is largely why I am so involved and supportive of the organization. Their innovative solutions to improving distressed neighborhoods and increasing the self-sufficiency of its residents is commendable."

Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

North Shore CDC is located in the heart of the North Shore region in Essex County, north of Boston. We currently focus our housing and community development efforts in Salem, Beverly, Peabody, Gloucester and Merrimac however, our work impacts the entire North Shore region. We look forward to working in additional North Shore communities in the future.

Organization Categories

  1. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community Coalitions
  2. Housing, Shelter - Housing Development, Construction & Management
  3. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Community Engagement

NSCDC’s community development activities and programs provide united, networked opportunities for the social, civic, and economic empowerment of residents in the communities we serve, so that they may further the goals of neighborhood revitalization in their own communities. Our staff works with residents to implement an annual set of community-based activities and classes. Our community engagement outreach includes quarterly resident meetings, intentional one-on-one meetings between our community engagement staff and residents, weekly coffee hours between community engagement staff and residents, focus groups around current city or neighborhood issues, and monthly resident newsletters.

In addition to our outreach, North Shore CDC hosts a number of annual community events- from holiday celebrations, like Beverly’s annual tree lighting in the Gloucester Crossing community to city-wide community service days, like Youth Get to the Point that being over 100 youth together to give back to the Point neighborhood. These community events provide an opportunity to build relationships with residents, inform them of other services, and engage them further as leaders in their community. All formal and informal resident feedback is gathered, evaluated, and reported back to the neighborhood at community meetings and through CDC print and web-based communications.
 
Budget  $160,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other Neighborhood Revitalization
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Program Short-Term Success  Our community engagement strategies have led to greater community involvement, better parks and infrastructure, and millions of leveraged funding support.  To ensure our short-term success is resident drive, North Shore CDC works with residents to develop a Neighborhood Master Plan tailored to the priorities of the resident stakeholders that will serve as a road map for comprehensive community improvement for the coming years. Progress on the master plans are assessed through annual neighborhood surveys that measure progress on key revitalization measures in target neighborhoods, and feed North Shore CDC program planning for the coming years. All neighborhood master plans and surveys are available on our website.
Program Long-Term Success 

Our long-term community engagement goal is to have increased our 2014 resident engagement by 51% by 2016. Long-term goals for community engagement include:

1. To increase continual civic and community participation by strengthening relationships with neighborhood organizations and social service providers. 

2. To ensure that all residents and visitors feel safe and secure in this neighborhood of choice by supporting better communication between police and the neighborhood, in addition to increasing public safety investments.

3. To ensure people are better informed and have better access to resources, by enhancing our community building initiatives to better connect residents to resources and strengthen relationships with stakeholders through relationship building and community development workshops.

Program Success Monitored By 

For our Community Development programs, North Shore CDC has surveys already in place to evaluate the impacts of the program participants and the program as it relates to the greater community. These evaluations are based off state and national models, including but not limited to the Workforce Investment Board, Neighborworks America, and YouthBuild USA.

Moreover, North Shore CDC utilizes a Community Engagement Framework based on the International Institute of Public Participation to evaluate the level of leadership within a community, ranging from minimal involvement in North Shore CDC community work, to an empowerment model in which community members are driving change in their community.

 
Examples of Program Success 

In Beverly specifically, police calls have dropped up to 90% on the highest crime streets in the neighborhood. In the 2013 survey, 89% of residents reported they felt safe in Holcroft Park revealing a 30% increase in safety at the park from 2010. Involvement in community building activities has doubled during this time, with between 50-70 attendees at a time participating in events sponsored by NSCDC. These activities have led to community driven improvement projects such as revitalizing parks, organizing neighborhood clean ups, and successfully advocating for increased lighting and police patrols in the community.



Family Resource Center

Together with our partners, North Shore CDC is expanding our existing family stability program to incorporate a “one-stop-shop” service model dedicated to improving quality of life in Salem's Point Neighborhood. North Shore CDC is partnering with multiple service providers and city departments to provide services to the low-income and minority population of Salem through an integrated "Family Resource Center."
 
The Family Resource Center is a hub of activity and programming in a central, community based setting which is accessible, organized and aimed at increasing the economic mobility of low-income residents. The approach is modeled after existing Financial Opportunity Centers, in which human and social service agencies collaborate to "bundle" services offered to clients. The model, pioneered by LISC and United Way, demonstrates that a bundling of services - meaning that an individual or family is accessing multiple referrals at once - improves a family's chance to increase their income by 30%.
 
The Family Resource Center allows families to access multiple services and organizations within one location, but also provides greater opportunities for service providers to collaborate, share data, and identify ways to jointly serve clients. North Shore CDC's Family Resource Center works with key organizational partners to provide employment services, financial education, and public benefits screening to the community. Providers of all these services have been identified and have expressed interest in partnering. Currently operating in partnership with North Shore CDC are Catholic Charities' English language classes, NS WIB's Access Point for Career Readiness, Community Credit Union's bilingual financial literacy counseling and classes, Enterprise Center's bilingual small business services, and NSCAP's free tax preparation. Working with these different organizations, North Shore CDC is providing program space, outreach, and data management capacity in exchange for offering services directly in the neighborhood from North Shore CDC's classroom and office space.
Budget  $100,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

We estimate that 125 unduplicated persons will be served through workshops and one-on-one counseling in North Shore CDC’s Family Stability program for FY2016. Of this number, we estimate that approximately 60% will be Salem residents for approximately 75 persons. Furthermore, of these Salem residents, we estimate that 73% will be designated eligible as very low or low income for a total of 55 persons.

Program Long-Term Success 
Currently 30% of clients that come to NSCDC access more than one referral as a result of our programming. The program serves low, and very-low income, and moderate-income households living in Salem, many of which are foreign born Salem residents. Participants are low-income adults aged 17 to 70, with most between the ages of 25 and 55.
 
We feel strongly that bringing this model to Salem will improve quality of life for Point Neighborhood residents and low-income families across Salem with the anticipated outcome of connecting 150 residents per year to multiple social, economic, and cultural services of Salem – allowing for a more self sufficient, engaged, and informed community.
Program Success Monitored By  Clients from each program will be entered into a central salesforce database to track the multiple services used, impact on household income or benefits of programs, and ensure that each program participant is being directed to and informed about services that meet their specific family's needs.
Examples of Program Success  Our Family Stability program began in 2012 and has helped over 125 Salem households annually gain access to further financial resources and access opportunities by offering educational workshops and one-on-one case management. For example, in 2014 our Earned Income tax preparation refunded $49,567 to low-income households.

Housing Development

North Shore CDC invests strategically in real estate to create comprehensive community and economic development. The cornerstone of our investment strategy is the creation of quality, housing that families and individuals can afford.
 
North Shore CDC developments are deeply affordable — meaning that for many of our units we go beyond the threshold of providing housing affordable to households earning 80% of the area median income (AMI) by also offering homes to eligible households at 60% and 30% AMI and other targeted populations in need.
 
To date, our portfolio includes 399 units throughout Salem and Beverly.
Budget  --
Category  Housing, General/Other Affordable Housing
Population Served Females Hispanic, Latino Heritage At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  North Shore Community Development Coalition is expanding their affordable housing portfolio in Salem, now totaling 247 units. The organization acquired 10 buildings, comprising 84 housing units in 2014, completing the final two acquisitions during the month of December. 

77 of these units are currently being renovated in a scattered site renovation on Peabody, Ward, and Harbor Street that is infusing $7 million into the neighborhood, which is scheduled to be completed this February. Between 2016 and 2020, North Shore CDC will renovate an additional 151 units (one 27 unit development, one 63 unit development, and finally 61 units). North Shore CDC is also in the planning process of one mixed-use development site on Peabody Street to serve as both office and programming space for the community.

Program Long-Term Success  Our housing portfolio includes a very active pipeline that our real estate development team expends significant organizational resources on to identifying new projects throughout the North Shore. Our long-term goals within our strategic plan for our housing development are as follows:

1. Maintain a robust affordable housing development pipeline, creating regional economic impact and providing critically-needed quality housing opportunities for low-income people.

2. Produce impactful real estate development projects which have a catalytic economic development impact on the communities in which we work. 

3. Expand our real estate development strategy to include non-­‐residential development opportunities to create jobs and bring further revitalization and economic impact to North Shore communities.

Program Success Monitored By  Our real estate committee, comprised of members of our board of directors and committee members monitor our housing development program on a monthly basis. When determining which projects and neighborhoods to purse, the evaluative process focuses on the following principles:

· Demographics and community need

· Local funding availability

· Status of the city/town insofar as Chapter 40B is concerned

· Revitalization 

· Full model vs. housing 

· Partnerships

· Placed-based work 

· Geography 

Examples of Program Success 

Beverly’s Holcroft Park Homes is a two-phase development that was completed and occupied in June 2013. The project transformed the Gloucester Crossing neighborhood with six new-construction apartments, totaling 58 one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments, ideally suited for families. Several apartments in the development were set aside for families that are designated as, or at risk of becoming, homeless.

These family apartments provide affordable, safe, and attractive housing, maintain an appropriate scale consistent with the neighborhood, enhance the streetscape, improve pedestrian and vehicular circulation, provide additional off-street parking, and incorporate “green” building practices.
 
Since our involvement in the neighborhood, police calls have dropped up to 90% on the highest crime streets in the neighborhood. 

YouthBuild North Shore

YouthBuild North Shore empowers young adults in Salem and Lynn with the competency and desire to transform their lives and improve their communities through education, employment, and leadership development.

As an affiliate of the national YouthBuild USA program model, our model focuses on low-income young people ages 16 to 24 working toward their GEDs or high school diplomas while learning job skills by building affordable housing in their communities. Emphasis is placed on leadership development, education, counseling, community service projects with tangible impacts, and future pursuits in college, careers, or both.

YouthBuild North Shore is the only YouthBuild in the region and the only new Massachusetts program to be approved in the last 7 years.
Budget  $700,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served At-Risk Populations Homeless Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers
Program Short-Term Success 

In 2014, YouthBuild North Shore received $81,818 in sustainable state funding from DESE and $1.1 million in federal funding from DOL over 3 years. YouthBuild North Shore also received sustainable AmeriCorpos positions to fund program youth.

Due to this funding, YouthBuild North Shore added Lynn catchment area, to serve 64 Salem & Lynn youth in 2 years. 

 

In Salem and Lynn, the unemployment rate for youth ages 16-24 is 21.8%, the poverty rate for this age is 15.5%, and the graduation rate is only 73% (2009 ACS Census Data). Additionally, there is a significant need for affordable housing, with 22% of low-income households in Salem and Lynn spending more than 50% of their earnings on housing costs (2010 US Census). 

We chose to bring the YouthBuild model to Salem and Lynn, because of the programs success rate in other communities. Based on data submitted to YouthBuild USA from 131 affiliates, 78 percent of enrollees completed the program; 63 percent of these obtained their GED or diploma; 60 percent went on to postsecondary education or jobs averaging $9.20 an hour; 25 percent enrolled in postsecondary education. Recidivism rates for court-involved YouthBuild students are 40 percentage points lower than the national average. Independent research from 2007 shows a return on investment of at least $10.80 and up to $43.90 for every dollar spent on any court-involved YouthBuild participant, and $7.80 to $11.70 for every participant, based on the percentage who achieve GEDs or diplomas.

Program Long-Term Success 

The primary goal of the program is to help disengaged youth obtain and retain a job or post-secondary education that leads to a future career path. 

Youth enrolled in YouthBuild North Shore have either previously dropped out of conventional high school or are performing below the 9th grade level in literacy or numeracy. These youth have not been successful in traditional academic models for a number of reasons ranging from experiencing homelessness, to substance or mental health disorders, criminal backgrounds, or being young parents. Without a high school credential, these young adults are not able to earn jobs that pay a living wage. There is great opportunity for jobs in this region, as construction is one of the top four critical industry sectors for growth in the region. YouthBuild North Shore equips these youth with the leadership development and workforce skills to advance in both the workforce and post secondary education.

The program provides youth with the opportunity to earn a high school diploma or GED while also gaining tangible skills in the construction industry. Our overall model focuses on employability, goal setting, and leadership development, so even youth not interested in pursuing a career in construction will walk away with transferable skills for any employment setting. By achieving academic and employment competencies, the earning potential of young people graduating from YouthBuild is significantly higher than prior to their enrollment.

Our model is tailored to meet the needs of youth where conventional educational settings did not work for them. Unlike conventional high schools, we provide additional support services such as counseling, financial literacy training, and mentoring to ensure that youth are able to manage their lives inside and outside of the classroom. We also provide transitional services for youth completing the program, to ensure their success in further academic or job settings. These additional services address the complex needs of our students, providing them with the individualized support needed to be successful where they have struggled before.

Program Success Monitored By 

YouthBuild North Shore maintains quarterly reports to review the progress and effectiveness of our program. Specific methods for evaluation include mid-quarter, evaluations for youth to complete, ongoing competency benchmarks for academic, construction, and leadership development, and regularly TABE testing to measure academic gains. We also look at metrics during the program such as degree or construction training certificate attainment and literacy or numeracy gains for students. YouthBuild North Shore also follows up with youth for one year after completion of the program and track job placement or post-secondary placement through signed letters from employees or class schedules.

Competency benchmarks are specific to each component: academic, construction, and leadership. Examples of these benchmarks include using math for construction measurements, being able to properly use safety equipment and tools, and public speaking. Case management staff meet with youth individually on a regular basis and coordinate with academic teachers and construction staff to ensure that benchmarks are being hit through instruction.

YouthBuild North Shore documents outcomes using a database called Management Information System (MIS). This system stores all demographic information, services received, and outcomes attained. This system allows us to manage complex and long-term evaluation of the program and how successful it is for the young people we serve. Information is inputted into the system at least once per quarter. Additionally, we maintain back up documentation as evidence of the outcomes and evaluations tracked in the system.

Examples of Program Success 

· 100% of YouthBuild North Shore graduates have been placed in full-time employment or enrolled in post-secondary education. YouthBuild North Shore worked closely with each of these youth to identify job opportunities and provide support once enrolled in school.

· Three Habitat for Humanity homes built by YouthBuild North Shore. YouthBuild North Shore students went to the housing site on a weekly basis and worked side by side with the lead contractors to learn skills while contributing to the development of the units.

· 83% of students that enrolled in YouthBuild North Shore have been successful in their academic track and are in the final stages of earning their high school credential. They are expected to graduate in 2015.

· YouthBuild students maintained an 87% attendance rate, compared to the 60% attendance rate at other local alternative school programs for similar, but non-YouthBuild students.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Mickey Northcutt
CEO Term Start Aug 2010
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Previously, Mickey Northcutt served for four years as the Executive Director for the Beverly Affordable Housing Coalition, one of the North Shore CDC’s founding organizations.
Mickey began his career in housing in low-income housing property management with Maloney Properties, Inc., and later in asset management at MMA Financial, LLC. He received his B.S. in urban affairs at Boston University, his M.S. in public affairs at the University of Massachusetts-Boston’s McCormack Graduate School of Policy Studies, and his J.D. from Suffolk University Law School.
 
He serves on the Boards of Directors of the Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations, on the North Shore Workforce Investment Board and on the City of Salem's Community Preservation Committee. He is actively involved in Salem Rotary and with the American Bar Association’s Forum on Affordable Housing and Community Development. He is also an adjunct professor at Boston University in their Urban Affairs and City Planning graduate program.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Abbie Alleson Marketing Manager --
Mr. David Keene CFO --
Ms. Felicia Pierce Youth Build Director --
Jason Pina Chief Operating Officer Jason Pina has been employed with North Shore CDC, since December 2006 and is responsible for the management of six developments that includes 27 buildings and a property management team of seven staff members. He brings 15 years of property management experience in a variety of programs including Low-Income Housing Tax Credits and Section 8. His portfolio experience has included work with non-profit and for-profit owners, family, and elderly as well as condos and limited-equity co-ops. Jason is a distinguished Certified Property Manager (CPM) with the Institute of Real Estate Management (IREM). This designation is awarded to highly skilled and experienced property management and asset management professionals. Jason also holds several other designations with the National Center for Housing Management, which include the COS, CMH, ERS, SBS, TCS, and CMM, he is a C10P Certified Credit Compliance Professional with Spectrum Enterprises and a certified National Affordable Housing Professional Executive (NAHPe) with the National Affordable Housing Management Association (NAHMA). Recently, Jason was recognized by NEAHMA as the Property Management Professional of the Year in 2012. Jason also oversees Human Resources, IT and Asset Management for the organization. While majoring in psychology at Fitchburg State College, Jason worked as an Upward Bound counselor for three years, facilitating various educational and recreational programs, for high school students as they transitioned into college. He is passionate about serving as a role model and mentor for youth.
Ms. Machel Piper External Relations Manager --
Ms. Rosario Ubiera-Minaya Chief of Community Engagement --
Mr. David Valecillos Senior Project Manager --
Ms. Ilene Vogel Senior Project Manager --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Historic Preservation Award Historic Salem Inc 2017
Community Enhancement North Shore Association of Realtors 2015
Social Advocacy Award American Planning Association: Massachusetts Chapter 2015
Bedrock of Support Award Amelia Peabody Foundation 2014
Social Service Award Salem Chamber of Commerce 2014
Social Advocacy and Public Engagement Award Massachusetts Planning Association 2013
Community Police Partnership Award Beverly Police Department 2011
Green Building Enterprise Green Communities 2011

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Executive and senior staff meet monthly, followed by all staff monthly meetings. All departments interact on a daily basis.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 18
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 73%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 4
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Chinese
Gender Female: 11
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration No

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Adria Leach
Board Chair Company Affiliation Salem State University
Board Chair Term June 2016 - June 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term June - June

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mrs. Linda Anderson-Mercier River House Inc. Voting
Mr. Steve Britton Beverly Bank Voting
Mrs. Elizabeth Duclos-Orsello Salem State University Voting
Ms. Diana Kerry Retired Voting
Mr. Doug Lanois Tremont Capital Voting
Ms. Adria Leach Salem State University Voting
Mr. Gary Leach Eastern Bank Voting
Mr David Pabich Salem Renewal LLC Voting
Mr. Milan Patel Patel Group --
Mr. Nick Sarantopoulos Community Credit Union Voting
Ms. Leonette Strout Keller Williams Voting
Ms. Mikki Wilson Cabot Wealth Management --
Ms. Lesli Woodruff Nuance Communications Voting
Ms. Judith Zolla Greater Salem Employees Federal Credit Union Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 12
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Indian
Gender Female: 8
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 78%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Real Estate

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

In 2010 North Shore CDC decided to become a Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO), a designation requiring that all our board members serve as unpaid, volunteers and that thirty-three percent of board members represent the low-income neighborhoods that North Shore CDC serves.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $2,403,855.00
Projected Expense $2,205,359.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $4,692,277 $1,664,686 $1,272,697
Total Expenses $3,080,252 $1,844,364 $1,174,278

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $757,155 $478,809 $160,893
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $757,155 $478,809 $160,893
Individual Contributions $470,874 $268,367 $159,087
Indirect Public Support $39,634 $22,109 $7,500
Earned Revenue $3,293,850 $810,258 $894,535
Investment Income, Net of Losses $70 $43 $509
Membership Dues $0 $0 --
Special Events $44,248 $59,205 $32,345
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $126,080 $25,895 $17,828

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $2,485,024 $1,137,221 $812,356
Administration Expense $595,228 $707,143 $361,922
Fundraising Expense $0 $0 --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.52 0.90 1.08
Program Expense/Total Expenses 81% 62% 69%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $17,713,455 $15,062,101 $7,748,891
Current Assets $5,510,779 $2,775,770 $1,907,243
Long-Term Liabilities $13,440,335 $12,968,970 $5,597,752
Current Liabilities $1,075,339 $507,375 $385,705
Total Net Assets $3,197,781 $1,585,756 $1,765,434

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
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3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 4.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose Community Investment Tax Credit- a state-wide program for certified community development organizations that benefits donors by giving 50% of their qualifiable donation back in the form a state tax credit.
Campaign Goal $300,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates Jan 2017 - Dec 2017
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.12 5.47 4.94

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 76% 86% 72%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Lacking resources and capacity to rebuild and reposition, smaller Massachusetts cities such as Salem and Peabody, both Gateway cities, and Beverly have been slow to draw new economic investment, particularly investment in historically low-income neighborhoods. The North Shore region is anchored by these midsize urban centers, and the regional economy very much depends upon their economic revitalization and progress. Our greatest strengths are our partnerships with communities in jointly addressing community and economic development challenges.

Over the next three years, North Shore CDC will use our community-driven strategic plan to transform low-income neighborhoods on the North Shore to improve quality of life and create catalytic economic development. Our strategic direction is North Shore CDC’s response to what our communities value most, and are guided by our vision of a region where every neighborhood is one of choice and opportunity.

Successful implementation of our strategic plan will result in a stronger regional community development organization with an integrated and enhanced neighborhood development model well positioned to expand throughout the North Shore.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

North Shore CDC’s Community Investment Plan is focused on sustainable, regional growth.

Pursue strategic partnerships that improve scale, efficiency, and innovation to maximize our impact and improve our sustainability. For example, YouthBuild North Shore currently provides 64 at-risk youth annually with the competency and desire to transform their communities through education, employment, and leadership development. Using our model, NSCDC will develop a program business plan that allows us to offer the same service in multiple cities by developing a diverse revenue stream and engaging new community-based partners. The impact will be doubling the amount of  youth getting access to employment opportunities in the region by 2019.

Invest in the development of leaders among our communities, board, and staff. For example, throughout the community engagement and strategic planning process, residents and stakeholders in our core communities emphasized a need for a stronger leadership strategy. North Shore CDC will develop an institute to bring best practices in leadership development to all core communities we serve –more effectively engaging neighborhood change.

Build and operate a sustainable organizational platform well-suited for growth. North Shore CDC will expand our financial capacity to support diversification of our revenue streams by increasing our philanthropic giving through the Community Investment Tax Credit program, increasing state and federal funding for our YouthBuild program and by pursuing an aggressive real estate development pipeline that will increase our liquidity, net worth, and reserves.

Create dynamic, community-driven investments in the neighborhoods we serve. We plan to produce impactful real estate development projects that have a more immediate and direct impact on our residents through the production of transformational development in distressed neighborhoods and downtowns. We will also include commercial development within our pipeline, pursuing development opportunities to create jobs and bring further revitalization and economic impact to North Shore communities.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

North Shore CDC has a culture of collaboration and planning that is rooted in the vision and voice of neighborhood residents and stakeholders. At a governance level this is reflected in North Shore CDC’s board member composition. Thirty-three percent of board members represent the low-income neighborhoods that North Shore CDC serves. In 2010 North Shore CDC decided to become a CHDO, a designation requiring this representation, although its board composition pre-dated this formal designation. 

North Shore CDC ensures routine engagement with community members through our investment in community engagement staff positions. In each of the communities in which we work, community engagement staff works with residents to develop a Neighborhood Master Plan tailored to the priorities of the resident stakeholders that will serve as a road map for comprehensive community improvement for the coming years. Progress on the master plans are assessed through annual neighborhood surveys that measure progress on key revitalization measures in target neighborhoods, and feed North Shore CDC program planning for the coming years. 

Our work is guided by thorough planning efforts in each of our core communities. Various public processes have led to clear visions laid out by municipal officials and other key stakeholders which prioritize particular areas for growth. In each case, North Shore CDC has been centrally involved in the planning and outreach process. Our priorities have been to ensure that local residents have a genuine opportunity for their voices to be heard and for the various plans to position the communities, along with our organization, to implement action items and create dynamic change in the communities in which we work. 

NSCDC’s community development activities and programs provide united, networked opportunities for the social, civic, and economic empowerment of residents in the communities we serve, so that they may further the goals of neighborhood revitalization in their own communities. Our staff works with residents to implement an annual set of community-based activities and classes. Our community engagement outreach includes quarterly resident meetings, intentional one-on-one meetings between our community engagement staff and residents, weekly coffee hours between community engagement staff and residents, focus groups around current city or neighborhood issues, and monthly resident newsletters. In addition to our outreach, North Shore CDC hosts a number of annual community events. These community events provide an opportunity to build relationships with residents, inform them of other services, and engage them further as leaders in their community. All formal and informal resident feedback is gathered, evaluated, and reported back to the neighborhood at community meetings and through CDC print and web-based communications.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Success will be measured on our ability to have a greater impact in the region and also to offer more opportunities to low-income residents. Using our neighborhood investment approach, North Shore CDC aims to achieve a number of benchmarks to indicate success in meeting our mission to create thriving communities of choice.  

Evaluation Goals

1) Expanding programming through strategic partnerships and new housing development opportunities will provide a greater number of low-income individuals and families an opportunity to have access to quality, affordable housing and to improve their economic mobility. Benchmarks for success include greater community involvement in North Shore CDC programs and increased housing opportunities, which is expected to grow in new communities with additional capacity.

We will evaluate the success of our real estate development pipeline and partners chiefly by comparing the units produced or in production with our stated development goals. We will also measure success by evaluating the economic impact in the communities in which we work, through real estate tax comparisons before and after development, taking into consideration market fluctuations. Key accomplishments within this goal include the development of affordable housing and meeting growth projections for community involvement in programming.
For our Community Development programs, North Shore CDC has surveys already in place to evaluate the impacts of the program participants and the program as it relates to the greater community. These evaluations are based off state and national models, including but not limited to the Workforce Investment Board, Neighborworks America, and YouthBuild USA.

2) Investing in leadership development is an essential goal in creating sustainable transformation among the communities we serve. Low-income residents will be more active in their community and have greater opportunities for decision making, creating a sustainable platform for neighborhood change and long-term community improvement. Benchmarks for success include increased civic engagement among the residents served, measured by voter participation, involvement of low-income residents on community boards and committees, and involvement in community activities and meetings. In the City of Salem, North Shore CDC and partners plan to work towards equal representation of low-income and minority populations on boards and commissions (10%). Currently there are less than 3% of Point neighborhood residents or minorities serving on these boards, while the neighborhood represents 10% of the total population.

3) Strengthening the financial and operational systems to build a platform for growth will allow for greater sustainability in the work of North Shore CDC as well as position the organization to expand our model additional North Shore communities beyond 2017. We will be a sufficiently capitalized organization to execute mid to large-scale housing and commercial development opportunities of a growing scale by the end of 2017. Additionally, increased funding will be used to assess and implement appropriate data management to measure the success of our program performance. Great reporting capacity will provide us with a comprehensive overview of the impact of our revitalization efforts to be used for strategic planning and for reporting to key stakeholders, residents and funders.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

North Shore CDC’s strategic plan outlines the expected impact of our activities on the previously identified goals and the communities and constituencies to be served. Our business plan tracks our accomplishments and future endeavors. In order to give our stakeholders the most up to date information, please contact our offices for a copy of our strategic plan, business plan, and our annual report.