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Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute Inc.

 656 Beacon Street, Suite 5
 Boston, MA 02215
[P] (617) 353-6571
[F] (617) 353-6575
www.caari.org
[email protected]
Dr. Andrew McCarthy
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INCORPORATED: 1980
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2697479

LAST UPDATED: 01/22/2016
Organization DBA Overseas research institute
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

 

CAARI, the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute, exists to promote the study of the archaeology, culture, and ecology of Cyprus and the eastern Mediterranean through its world-class library, gracious home, and staff members expert in facilitating the research of foreign scholars on Cyprus.  CAARI fosters dialogue between American and Cypriot scholars, provides services, facilities and lodging to researchers of all nations at work in the fields of the human, social, and natural sciences on Cyprus, and sponsors public and specialist lectures, symposia and workshops. 

Mission Statement

 

CAARI, the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute, exists to promote the study of the archaeology, culture, and ecology of Cyprus and the eastern Mediterranean through its world-class library, gracious home, and staff members expert in facilitating the research of foreign scholars on Cyprus.  CAARI fosters dialogue between American and Cypriot scholars, provides services, facilities and lodging to researchers of all nations at work in the fields of the human, social, and natural sciences on Cyprus, and sponsors public and specialist lectures, symposia and workshops. 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $50,000.00
Projected Expense $160,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • CAARI's library
  • CAARI's Fellowships
  • CAARI's Hostel
  • CAARI's Public Programs

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

 

CAARI, the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute, exists to promote the study of the archaeology, culture, and ecology of Cyprus and the eastern Mediterranean through its world-class library, gracious home, and staff members expert in facilitating the research of foreign scholars on Cyprus.  CAARI fosters dialogue between American and Cypriot scholars, provides services, facilities and lodging to researchers of all nations at work in the fields of the human, social, and natural sciences on Cyprus, and sponsors public and specialist lectures, symposia and workshops. 


Background Statement

 

CAARI was founded in 1978 under the aegis of the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) as a 501© 3 non-profit organization supporting scholarly study of archaeology and related disciplines in Cyprus and the eastern Mediterranean. Located in Nicosia, capital of the Republic of Cyprus, CAARI is the only research institute dedicated to facilitating the work of foreign scholars on the island. Its small staff, deeply conversant with the conditions and scholarship on Cyprus, are expert in facilitating access to museums, research libraries, governmental and ecclesiastical bodies, and archaeological sites. 

At the heart of CAARI’s history is its world class research library, built steadily through grants, private gifts, institutional exchanges, and opportunities in 1985, the 1990s, and 2006 to acquire the libraries of great scholars of Cyprus. CAARI’s research archive, its large map collection, and its study collection of over 14,000 catalogued artifacts and ecofacts from the Neolithic to the post-medieval period on Cyprus offer materials unique on the island. 

In 1990, CAARI acquired a gracious, early 20th-century historic home and garden near the Old City, the Cyprus Museum, the Department of Antiquities, and the Archaeological Research Unit of the University of Cyprus. It now houses CAARI’s library, laboratory, staff offices, and accommodation for twelve scholars.  Here CAARI’s community gathers for public lectures, for receptions in the garden, and for animated interchanges among researchers deep in the excitement of being immersed in their work. In 2014, excavation will begin on an underground extension to house the library’s holdings. It will provide some fifty years of space for expansion.

CAARI today is a nexus where scholars from around the world meet to share ideas, do research in its world class library, and participate with an engaged Cypriot public in cultural events. Researchers of many disciplines and nationalities use CAARI as their base of operations, making it a hub of research and cross-pollination of ideas. Cypriot students and scholars, too, make regular use of the library’s long hours and open stacks, and since the border opened in 2003, students from the northern part of the island have joined them.


Impact Statement

 

Accomplishments:

Following successful completion in 2012 of a $1,500,000 NEH Challenge Grant, CAARI has completed plans for a two-story underground expansion of its library in Nicosia, with state of the art storage space for its paper holdings adequate for at least 50 years’ expansion.

The expansion is now under construction; CAARI has fully renovated the existing reading room with new, more energy-efficient HVAC, lighting, and wiring, all compatible with the addition, and upgraded computer, telephone, and security technology.

In March 2013 CAARI sponsored an international symposium offering the first summative assessment of the career of Australian archaeologist of Cyprus, J.R.B. Stewart. The papers have just been published as J.R.B Stewart, An Archaeological Legacy, ed. A.B. Knapp, J. Webb, A. McCarthy (Uppsala: Aström Publications, 2013). 

Between March and December 2013, with shrewd financial management and some draconian economies, CAARI weathered the Cypriot financial crisis in stable condition with its building plans intact.

Goals:

The single most important goal for 2014 is to complete construction of the library addition.

The second most important goal for 2014 is to create a strategic plan for CAARI’s fund-raising needs as it negotiates the added costs of an expanded physical plant, the dwindling support available from the US government, and the higher cost of living in Cyprus. This must include the financial as well as the physical planning for the furnishing and implementation of the new library space once the building is done.

The third most important goal for the coming year is to enhance CAARI’s use of social media as a way of building a community of people aware of CAARI’s role in their lives, developing a broader community of donors to CAARI, and building enthusiasm and loyalty within the community of CAARI’s alumni/ae.

The fourth key goal is to begin to anticipate the retirement in some three years’ time of CAARI’s Administrator, who has “been” CAARI for 30 years. This will mean rethinking positions, administrative structure, and funds.


Needs Statement

 
  1. Endowment. The NEH Challenge Grant will double our current $500,000 endowment. But with a larger building to maintain, and recent escalation in costs in Cyprus, we need a $2,000,000 endowment. The need is intensified by the tenuousness of government funding. CAARI has relied upon $100,000 to $165,000 per annum from government grants. Their future is uncertain.

  2. Library resources: Rising journal subscription costs and CAARI’s commitment to maintain subscriptions to major on-line research tools—often available on Cyprus only at CAARI—consume $10,000 per year.

  3. Fellowships: CAARI sponsors three small fellowships for graduate student research. They draw new scholars to Cyprus, bring CAARI revenue (recipients live at CAARI), create future supporters of CAARI. Each has about $50,000; each needs that amount again.

  4. Laboratory: As a hub of archaeological work CAARI needs to maintain scientific equipment for geological, osteological, and artifactual analyses; a Geographical Information Systems laboratory, too, is becoming ever more necessary and does not exist on the island. CAARI needs $10,000 to acquire new equipment and maintain existing equipment.

  5. Basic maintenance: CAARI should set aside $15,000 per year for routine, steady upkeep of its building and garden.


CEO Statement

 

Cyprus occupies a central place in the Mediterranean and throughout history has served as a link between divergent communities, linking east and west, Europe and Asia and Africa. CAARI serves the same purpose, and our position both globally and in the academic community means that the Institute plays a vital role in linking disciplines, regions, and peoples and will continue to do so.

Cyprus today stands out among its Middle Eastern neighbors as a democratic country that is intellectually open and receptive to inquiry. It is not only among the richest countries of the region archaeologically; it is one in which research on the Eastern Mediterranean world can be pursued with full intellectual freedom. As the implications of the Arab Spring ricochet among its neighbors, Cyprus’ value as a site for research will only increase.

The research pursued at CAARI is as engaged with society’s interaction with the land, nature, and the environment as it is with the written record. Thus it draws together the humane, social, and natural sciences that are often separated, yielding a particularly stimulating environment.

With its steady stream of researchers immersed in their work and sharing thoughts over coffee, CAARI is a riveting place for graduate students. Since the 1980s, CAARI has offered research fellowships for students.  The collegial interchange between young and more established researchers is among CAARI’s most fertile gifts.

CAARI’s public programs are a stable of Nicosia’s cultural life. In the words of one Cypriot supporter, “As a non-specialist with only a general interest in archaeology, I've found it [CAARI] almost essential to life here.”



Board Chair Statement

 

CAARI’s single greatest success is the enthusiasm it generates in those who stay there. My own experience is representative. When I first arrived, CAARI seemed modest, but as the Director introduced me to the library, I realized I was encountering not a few books, but an incomparable tool, crafted with deep seriousness for research of uncompromising quality. None of the other three residents was working on anything like my research, but it took only a few suppers to realize both that my own research was being indispensably deepened by their broader experience, and that without CAARI, I would not have gained that knowledge. I’ve been grateful ever since.  People look back on CAARI as a place of amazing warmth and stimulation.

CAARI’s single greatest challenge is that the scholarly world engaged with the island of Cyprus is small, strewn very thinly over most of the globe and across many disciplines, and composed largely of fairly impecunious academics and very impecunious graduate students. Thus, CAARI alumni/ae are enthusiastic but small donors, and even the more prominent among the established scholars are poorly equipped to propose donors and Board members of substance.

Challenging, too, is the fact that the generation of people for whom archaic and classical archaeology was a source of romantic fascination are aging. We need other avenues into the attitudes that make Cyprus and its island fascinating.

On an immediate basis, we have gathered e-mail addresses of people who have attended CAARI events, stayed at CAARI, or otherwise come to CAARI, and entered a list of 850 names in Constant Contact, a social media tool. We will send monthly news-flashes to this list, in the expectation of building awareness of CAARI and of luring a certain number of new and ongoing donors.

We are also working to build an alumni/ae group with annual donations.

To build outward, toward an altogether new audience, we are trying to arrange visits to CAARI of high-end interest groups who make specialized tours to Cyprus—for its amazing geology, for its birds, for its history of forestry and forest ecology, as well as for archaeology.


Geographic Area Served

INTERNATIONAL

As a home-away-from-home for American archaeological teams, which are heavily composed of faculty and students from many schools, CAARI serves almost all of Massachusetts' universities, and universities throughout the United States.


 

Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

CAARI's library

 

With 10,000 monographs, 132 serials, 4500 off-prints, map collection, document archive, and study collection of 14,000 catalogued artifacts, CAARI’s library is an unequalled research resource on Cyprus through Antiquity, strong thereafter, and unique in its range and concentration. It serves scholars from around the world and Cypriots from both communities. An NEH Challenge Grant has made possible an underground addition for book and document storage that will provide for 30-50 years of collection growth. Generous donors have permitted many extraordinary acquisitions, including three major scholars’ libraries. The library is at the core of CAARI’s mission, attracting scholars, fueling fresh research, drawing new people to the field.  Rising cost of books, rapidly escalating subscription rates to serials, and exploding needs for new on-line research tools make the library CAARI’s most important and demanding financial responsibility.   Funding the library adequately is central to CAARI’s very survival.

Budget  $100,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Cultural Heritage
Population Served US& International Adults European Heritage
Program Short-Term Success   

Short-term success will entail 1) slowly expanding monograph acquisitions, 2) maintaining the number of serial subscriptions—though not necessarily of the same titles, and 3) improving digital access.

Program Long-Term Success   

Long-term success  means being in 2064 a research instrument at least as impressive as—and preferably more impressive than—it is today in 1) content and resources, and 2) accessibility to its users, be they physically present (as now) or only virtually so (as may be the case in future). Steady, well-informed acquisition, good physical maintenance, and adroit adaptation to changes in technology are all important. The library should have an international reputation for its collections, staff, intellectual scope. and forward-looking policies of information management.

Program Success Monitored By   

Success is measured most visibly by the number of researchers using the library, physically or on-line. This will continue only if we 1) acquire the tools they need—the current publications, serials, study collection, digital tools—and 2) continue to maintain a profile distinctive from other libraries in Nicosia. So far, the numbers continue to rise.

Examples of Program Success 

Several hundred people use CAARI every month; exact statistics have only just begun to be compiled; the reading room is crowded on a regular basis.


CAARI's Fellowships

 

Fellowships are crucial to CAARI: they bring scholars, and since fellowship-holders usually stay at CAARI, they bring income. CAARI’s 3 graduate research fellowships are central to its goal of developing people knowledgeable about Cyprus and the Eastern Mediterranean. They provide a period of intense, collegial interaction with the best scholars at work on Cyprus. CAARI is a ceaseless crossroads of scholarly activity. Major scholars immersed in their work and eager to talk; experienced hands ready to help; other graduate students to share experiences; all the books: a month with these can be the flame that kindles a project, a dissertation, a book…even a career. Former CAARI fellows now hold teaching positions, foreign service and NGO posts, and research jobs around the world.

Our passion for the graduate fellowships is great, but, funding lags behind soaring airfares and dwindling university budgets. The CAARI fellowships are among our very dearest fund-raising goals.

Budget  $210,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Cultural & Ethnic Awareness
Population Served US& International European Heritage College Aged (18-26 years)
Program Short-Term Success   

Short-term success will allow CAARI to raise the capital in each of the fellowship funds to $70,000, affording a fellowship of $2500 each year: that is, enough for round-trip transportation to and from Cyprus, and residence at CAARI for four weeks.

Program Long-Term Success   

Long-term success will allow CAARI to offer at least three graduate student fellowships a year that cover the cost of round-trip transportation to and from Cyprus, the associated insurance, residence at CAARI for a month’s duration, a cost-of-living stipend to cover food and transport on the island, and e stipend for research expenses.

Program Success Monitored By  We watch application ratios to the fellowships:  they range between three and six applicants per fellowship granted.  The applicant pool is there, and the ratio is selective.
Examples of Program Success   Former CAARI fellows hold university, foreign service, NGO, and research administration jobs that mobilize their knowledge of the complex Eastern Mediterranean world, rooted in their experience on Cyprus; Cyprus is figuring college courses taught by CAARI fellows.   

CAARI's Hostel

 CAARI’s historic, early-20th-century home, housing library, laboratory, garden, and hostel accommodations for up to 12 researchers,  is vital to its services and its welcoming, friendly atmosphere. Conveniently located, CAARI is ideal for meetings among foreign and Cypriot scholars, and its airy, gracious foyer is in regular use. Its reading room seats 80 for lectures, followed by hospitality in foyer or garden. Foyer and seminar room accommodate conferences and workshops. The 2nd floor, devoted to the hostel, is a cherished home-away-from-home for scholars, who share its roomy kitchen and verandas, 24/7/365 access to the library, internet, laundry facilities, parking, and a steady stream of interesting newcomers. In any one year, people from as many as 40 countries may use CAARI’s facilities. Maintaining house and garden in the simple but welcoming, well-maintained way on which CAARI’s reputation and appeal depend is critical and costly. New demands lie ahead: furnishing the library addition, restoring the garden ravaged during construction, enhancing library security as use expands.
Budget  $80,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Cultural & Ethnic Awareness
Population Served US& International European Heritage Europe & Newly Independent States
Program Short-Term Success   

Short-term success means the effective solution of presently perceptible problems: the restoration of the garden, destroyed during construction of the new library extension; the furnishing of the extension itself; the steady repairs to walls, shutters, windows, roof; the regular refitting of bath and toilet facilities; the full implementation of EU regulations regarding accessibility.

Program Long-Term Success   

Long-term success means having the building in beautiful condition in 2080 when it is 150 years old. Will it have weathered hard use of library and hostel; will it have had the steady upkeep it has needed; will adjustments to sharply changing ways of using electricity, fossil and other fuels, and water have been made with due care and foresight; will its garden be a delight; will its antique furnishings be well cared-for, its quotidian furnishings be frequently enough upgraded? 

Program Success Monitored By   

Success is measured most simply by the number of researchers who choose to use CAARI’s hostel and facilities. Though plummeting funding by universities for research travel has affected the hostel’s winter residency rate, it has been jammed during the summers when academics travel if they possibly can.

Examples of Program Success 

In 2006-2012 CAARI successfully completed an NEH Challenge Grant intended for refurbishment and enlargement of its building.  The grant drew an unprecedented level of contribution from its supporters, a testimony to their affection for the site.


CAARI's Public Programs

 

CAARI’s public programs forge a critical bond with its host country. The culturally engaged Cypriot public is as significant a beneficiary of CAARI’s work as the research community.   CAARI’s biggest event, the Summer Archaeological Workshop, gathers all teams excavating in Cyprus to share the results of their current season. It attracts an audience of 200, and is a staple of the cultural calendar. CAARI sponsors 6 to 8 public lectures a year in its reading room, which can seat up to 80. These are followed by refreshments and conversation in the garden or foyer. Several seminars on specific topics occur annually, drawing on both Cypriot and visiting scholars.   Specialized workshops to brain-storm pressing issues are organized on an occasional basis, often leading to more formal seminars or publications. Every two years, CAARI organizes an international symposium with participants from around the globe. Seven of these have been published as CAARI Monographs. These public events keep the research at CAARI in constant dialogue with Nicosia’s culturally keenly attuned public. They have forged an attitude of respect for CAARI that is vital. Maintaining fine public programs is essential.

Budget  $5,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Cultural & Ethnic Awareness
Population Served US& International Europe & Newly Independent States European Heritage
Program Short-Term Success   

Short-term success will entail the creation of a fund for public presentations. It might be set aside to fund color images in the CAARI Monographs, it might be dedicated to lectures, but it would give formal recognition to the fact that a program maintained on rubber bands and chewing gum has a larger role in CAARI’s mission.

Program Long-Term Success   

Long-term success will entail 1) regularizing the biannual publication and upgrading the printing of the CAARI Monographs to give them full-color reproductions and a wider audience; and 2) giving CAARI’s public lecture series greater regularity and profile. CAARI draws on distinguished people when they happen to be in town. Useful in producing interesting speakers, it wreaks havoc with scheduling and advertising. To give Cypriot studies a stronger voice in the academic community, speakers should be invited in a timely way, and their presentations made available on the Web. 

Program Success Monitored By  Success will be measured in the number of hits on the CAARI Web site, the number of book reviews of CAARI Monographs, and the number of citations on-line and in print to events at CAARI
Examples of Program Success  Excellent book reviews of CAARI's Monographs; steady high attendance at lectures; SRO attendance at this June's Summer Archaeology Workshop.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

CAARI has significant financial needs. Half its funding has in the past come from the US government; it has relied heavily for the rest on the contributions of its Board of Trustees and small community of loyal supporters. Recent financial jolts—reduced government funding for overseas research centers and the escalation in the cost of services and utilities in wake of Cyprus’ financial crisis—to say nothing of the prospect of having a larger physical plant to maintain all make it clear that CAARI must develop an endowment substantial enough to enable it to support itself independently. 

In all other senses—and this is the thing to stress—CAARI is flourishing. It has a well-recognized role among the institutions most responsible for Cyprus’ rich cultural heritage. It is respected by the United States Embassy in Cyprus, which values its cultural diplomacy and has drawn upon its expertise. It is a major thoroughfare for scholarship on the island, and is bound to become—if anything—even busier as the Arab Spring takes its toll on archaeological work in other Mediterranean countries. 

Among CAARI’s important recent developments is the increased diversity of its Board of Trustees. Gender diversity it has always had. Over the past six years. it has added to its otherwise all-American Board seven members who live in Cyprus. These include five Cypriots who are major civic, commercial, and government leaders, and two senior scholars who are of British nationality but live in Cyprus. Thus the Board is more representative of the communities that CAARI serves, and more closely attuned to Cypriot affairs. The Board members who live in Cyprus are rarely able to attend Board meetings held in the United States, but most U.S. members expect to attend the upcoming spring meeting, which will be held in Nicosia.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ambassador Raymond C. Ewing
CEO Term Start Nov 2010
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience  Raymond C. Ewing served as United States ambassador to Cyprus from 1981 to 1984 and to Ghana from 1989 to 1992.

Ambassador Ewing's other assignments during a 36 year career in the Foreign Service were in Tokyo, Japan; Vienna, Austria, with the U.S. Mission to the International Atomic Energy Agency; Lahore, Pakistan; Rome, Italy; Bern, Switzerland as Counselor for Economic and Commercial Affairs; and in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania as Charge D'Affaires, ad interim. In the Department of State in Washington, D.C., he served in the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs; the Bureau of European and Canadian Affairs, as Director of the Office of Southern European Affairs (Cyprus, Greece and Turkey) and as Deputy Assistant Secretary; the Foreign Service Institute, as Dean of the School of Language Studies; and the Bureau of Human Resources, as Director of the Office of Foreign Service Career Development and Assignments. Ambassador Ewing retired from the Department of State on September 30, 1993.

Since July 1, 1994, he has been managing editor of Mediterranean Quarterly, a journal of global issues, published by Duke University Press and with an editorial office at the National Press Building in Washington.

Raymond C. Ewing received a B.A. from Occidental College in 1957 and an M.P.A. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in 1970.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Gustav Feissel Nov 2005 Nov
David Detrich Nov 2002 Nov

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

CAARI is one of three overseas research instituted founded under the aegis of the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR).

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

CAARI has an Advisory Committee of five Cypriot members.  All are prominent civic leaders in Nicosia.  They give us advice and counsel on governmental, legal, financial, civic, and real estate and construction matters, and before the financial crisis of 2013 were also instrumental in developing a Cypriot community of donors to CAARI.   

Along with the Albright Institute of Archaeological Research in Jerusalem and the American Center of Oriental Research in Amman, CAARI is one of the three constituents of the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR), and many of its policies are those of ASOR, in particular its statement of professional ethics in archaeology.  Thus we have an affiliation, just not one listed in the pull-down menu.

Similarly, we have a number of standing committees--just not committees named in the pull-down list:  Executive Committee, Audit Committee, By-laws Committee, Development Committee, Fellowships Committee, House Committee, Information Technology Committee, Investments Committee, Library Committee, Library Expansion Committee, Newsletter Committee, Nominating Committee, and Website Committee.
 

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 2 Cypriot
Gender Female: 2
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? No
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Bi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ambassador Raymond C. Ewing
Board Chair Company Affiliation U.S. Foreign Service (Retired)
Board Chair Term Nov 2010 - Nov 2015
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Professor Susan Ackerman Dartmouth College Exofficio
William S. Andreas IBM Voting
Professor Erin Walcek Averett Creighton University Voting
Professor Celia Bergoffen Fashion Institute of Technology Voting
Professor Annemarie Weyl Carr Southern Methodist University (Emerita) Voting
Chris Christodoulou N.K. Shakolas Group of Companies Voting
Ambassador Clay Constantinou Attorney at Law Voting
Professor Derek B. Counts University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee Voting
Achilleas Demetriades Law Offices of Lellos Demetriades Voting
Ambassador Raymond C. Ewing U.S. Foreign Service (retired) Voting
Professor Steven Falconer La Trobe University Voting
Dr. Joseph A. Greene Semitic Museum, Harvard University Voting
Dr. Ioanna Kakoulli UCLA, Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Voting
Professor Bernard A. Knapp University of Glasgow (emeritus) Voting
Professor Ann-Marie Knoblauch Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University Voting
Maria Kyriakou Law Firm Andreas Neocleous & Co LLC Voting
Constantinou St. Loizides Piraeus Bank (Cyprus) Ltd. Voting
Professor Sturt W. Manning Cornell University Voting
Manthos Mavrommatis Cyprus Chamber of Commerce and Industry Voting
Professor Scott R. Moore Indiana University of Pennsylvania Voting
Eftyvoulos Paraskevaides Joannou & Paraskevaides Group of Companies Voting
Charles L. Perry United Nations (Retired) Voting
Brian Shelburne University of Massachusetts Amherst Library Voting
Professor Alan H. Simmons University of Nevada - Las Vegas Voting
Allison South CAARI, Honorary Research Fellow Voting
Professor Michael Toumazou Davidson College Voting
F. Bryan Wilkins Newspaper reporter (retired) Voting
Dr. Frederick A. Winter F. A. Winter Associates Voting
Professor Birgitta Lindros Wohl California State University at Northridge (emerita) Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 29
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 5 Cypriot, 2 British
Gender Female: 9
Male: 20
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 47%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 95%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 5%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

CAARI has significant financial needs. Half its funding has in the past come from the US government; it has relied heavily for the rest on the contributions of its Board of Trustees and small community of loyal supporters. Recent financial jolts—reduced government funding for overseas research centers and the escalation in the cost of services and utilities in wake of Cyprus’ financial crisis—to say nothing of the prospect of having a larger physical plant to maintain all make it clear that CAARI must develop an endowment substantial enough to enable it to support itself independently. 

In all other senses—and this is the thing to stress—CAARI is flourishing. It has a well-recognized role among the institutions most responsible for Cyprus’ rich cultural heritage. It is respected by the United States Embassy in Cyprus, which values its cultural diplomacy and has drawn upon its expertise. It is a major thoroughfare for scholarship on the island, and is bound to become—if anything—even busier as the Arab Spring takes its toll on archaeological work in other Mediterranean countries. 

Among CAARI’s important recent developments is the increased diversity of its Board of Trustees. Gender diversity it has always had. Over the past six years. it has added to its otherwise all-American Board seven members who live in Cyprus. These include five Cypriots who are major civic, commercial, and government leaders, and two senior scholars who are of British nationality but live in Cyprus. Thus the Board is more representative of the communities that CAARI serves, and more closely attuned to Cypriot affairs. The Board members who live in Cyprus are rarely able to attend Board meetings held in the United States, but most U.S. members expect to attend the upcoming spring meeting, which will be held in Nicosia.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $50,000.00
Projected Expense $160,000.00
Form 990s

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

Audit Documents

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $247,520 $312,040 $535,443
Total Expenses $310,869 $411,363 $282,498

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $80,000 $100,000
    Federal -- $80,000 $100,000
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $108,730 $75,973 $270,784
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $43,209 $50,857 $54,608
Investment Income, Net of Losses $103,544 $103,919 $106,270
Membership Dues $1,500 $1,500 $3,500
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $-9,463 $-209 $281

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $167,863 $96,376 $103,261
Administration Expense $139,879 $314,067 $177,898
Fundraising Expense $3,127 $920 $1,339
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.80 0.76 1.90
Program Expense/Total Expenses 54% 23% 37%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 3% 1% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $2,908,552 $2,693,200 $2,821,508
Current Assets $76,577 $68,600 $240,217
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $15,121 $20,376 $84,225
Total Net Assets $2,893,431 $2,672,824 $2,737,283

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
U.S. Department of State $80,000.00
U.S. Department of State $100,000.00
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
Individual Donor $8,000.00
Malcolm Wiener Foundation $10,000.00
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
Individual Donor $5,000.00
Individual Donor $8,000.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $1,800,000.00
Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Purpose The Capital Campaign must double our endowment
Campaign Goal $1,500,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.06 3.37 2.85

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The challenges faced by CAARI are 1) a small and amateur group of officers able to devote the amount of time needed to maintain its financial work; 2) a small constituency thinly distributed across the globe, operating in many currencies; 3) its library and hostel are located in a country recently beset by financial crisis.

CAARI's opportunities are the other side of the mirror:  1) a dedicated core group of officers who work with dedication; 2) a small but devoted constituency world-wide; 3) a welcoming host country in which major civic leaders have offered expert help with financial, legal, governmental, and other matters.
 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 
Please note, the combined audited financial files posted above also reflect The Institute, a nonprofit organization engaged in archaeological research on the Island of Cyprus. Per the audit files, prepared in Cyprus, The Institute operates in Cyprus as a branch of the parent organization, the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute Inc. Please review the audits for further information.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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