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Organization DBA --
Former Names Jobs For Youth-Boston, Inc. (2001)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

JFYNetWorks is a Boston-based nonprofit organization with the mission of providing increased opportunity to disadvantaged urban youth and adults. For nearly 40 years, JFYNetWorks has served high-need populations in Massachusetts by developing and delivering education and job training programs that equip young people with the skills needed to succeed in our changing economy. JFYNetWorks brings student-centered and data-driven instructional resources and assessments into classrooms, supports teachers in using these tools effectively, and ultimately helps students both graduate from high school and enter college at the credit-earning level.

Mission Statement

JFYNetWorks is a Boston-based nonprofit organization with the mission of providing increased opportunity to disadvantaged urban youth and adults. For nearly 40 years, JFYNetWorks has served high-need populations in Massachusetts by developing and delivering education and job training programs that equip young people with the skills needed to succeed in our changing economy. JFYNetWorks brings student-centered and data-driven instructional resources and assessments into classrooms, supports teachers in using these tools effectively, and ultimately helps students both graduate from high school and enter college at the credit-earning level.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $1,281,832.00
Projected Expense $1,247,792.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • JFYNet College Readiness
  • JFYNetWorks Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) Preparation

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

JFYNetWorks is a Boston-based nonprofit organization with the mission of providing increased opportunity to disadvantaged urban youth and adults. For nearly 40 years, JFYNetWorks has served high-need populations in Massachusetts by developing and delivering education and job training programs that equip young people with the skills needed to succeed in our changing economy. JFYNetWorks brings student-centered and data-driven instructional resources and assessments into classrooms, supports teachers in using these tools effectively, and ultimately helps students both graduate from high school and enter college at the credit-earning level.


Background Statement

 

JFYNetWorks has a mission and a four-decade history of conceiving, developing, and conducting programs to enhance the academic and economic success of low-income urban youth and young adults. Our programs have utilized various education and training strategies over the years as the labor market has evolved, from competency-based GED instruction to biotechnology lab training to online college preparation. Our strategy throughout our history has been to recognize changes in the economy and adjust our programs accordingly.

Five years ago, in response to the rising skill demands signaled by the new national goal of “College and Career Readiness,” JFYNetWorks’ board adopted a new strategic plan concentrating entirely on online education programs with the goal of preparing high school students with the skills necessary for college entry at the credit-earning level. Because of the crucial importance of college-level skills, whether certified by a degree or not, we considered this fundamental goal the single most important contribution JFY could make to our mission of increasing economic and social opportunity. Since we began implementing this Accuplacer-based blended learning program, we have helped students eliminate 2039 remedial courses they would have been required to take, a cumulative 50% reduction, representing $1,099,423 in saved tuition and fees. After four years of development, we consider JFYNet College Readiness the most scalable and sustainable program we have ever mounted or encountered, because it operates by infusing low-cost technology-based interventions into the existing infrastructure of schools and other institutions. By minimizing expenses and producing clearly measurable outcomes with socially significant value, the program offers a scalable and sustainable model that has the potential to produce a significant impact on our most intractable current economic problem: the widening income and opportunity gap.

JFYNetWorks has a proven history of working with high schools to implement supplemental programs. Working in concert with high schools is the most effective way to achieve the necessary scale to make an impact on a large-scale problem like college readiness. We also have deep competency in blended learning. We have been employing blended learning since 1998, and bringing it into schools since 2000.


Impact Statement

 

JFYNetWorks addresses the need for developing college-level skills in high school. An associate’s degree is worth $330,000 more in lifetime earnings than a high school diploma; a bachelor’s degree $840,000. However, fewer than half of our high school graduates complete any level of post-secondary degree or certificate. In community colleges, 63% of incoming high school graduates are assigned to remedial courses because they do not have the requisite skills to perform at the college level. Remedial courses cost students full tuition and fees but give no degree credit, causing a drain on students’ limited financial resources and valuable time that could otherwise be spent earning college credit. A staggering 90% of remedial students drop out of community college without a degree.

JFYNetWorks addresses this college readiness problem by providing focused blended learning programs in high school to help students build the academic skills they need to enter college or technical training earning academic credit. We administer the state-mandated Accuplacer college placement exam and enroll students in an online curriculum tailored to their individual needs. By integrating our instruction with regular math and English classes, we maximize classroom time and teacher expertise to focus on the particular skills needed for college success. At the conclusion of instruction, we re-administer the Accuplacer test. We send passing scores directly to colleges, exempting students from corresponding remedial courses. Our use of the Accuplacer, integration into the school curriculum, and direct conversion of program results into remedial exemptions are unique among college-focused services. The JFYNetWorks blended program model -- infusing specialized online content into the regular curriculum -- also facilitates scalability, as the low cost of the online platform can easily be expanded to entire schools.


Needs Statement

 

Large numbers of young people, 40% according to the U.S. Department of Education, are leaving our high schools without the basic academic skills needed to qualify for college entrance at the credit-earning level—the definition of “College and Career Readiness.” This skill deficit severely limits long-term career prospects.

A college degree is now the minimum credential required for meaningful participation in the workforce. In addition to higher lifetime earnings potential for college graduates, the unemployment rate for workers without a college degree is double that of those with a degree. Yet 63% of Massachusetts high school graduates who enter community colleges must take remedial courses, 6000 students each year. Nine out of ten of these students drop out before completing a degree. Rates of remedial placement correlate directly to income and demographics, so the penalty of being unprepared falls heaviest on those who need college the most— low-income, minority, and underperforming community college entrants whose hopes for a sustainable future depend entirely on their ability to get a two-year degree, the first step up the economic ladder. Remedial courses cost students their financial resources and time, and their futures.


CEO Statement

The following elements distinguish JFYNet from other college readiness programs:

· Focusing on academic skills needed for college-level work.

· Targeting students generally not served by other programs – GPA below 2.5, low MCAS scores.

· Focusing on community college as the most viable pathway for low-income students

· Focusing on the Accuplacer – the gateway community college standard -- rather than the SAT.

· Community colleges accept Accuplacer score reports from JFY. Students do not have to take the tests again.

· Students benefit from individualized instruction targeted to their learning needs. Blended learning enables JFY to scale the program.

· Working with teachers and students in their regular academic classes ensures the program’s alignment with the regular curriculum.

· Working as a classroom partner with public school teachers in a collaborative model.

· JFYNet is the only program of its kind in Massachusetts, and the largest college readiness program in Greater Boston.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

CENTRAL REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
NATIONAL
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

JFYNetWorks serves youth in schools primarily throughout the state of Massachusetts, as well as Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD. Last year, we worked directly with 13 schools.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Secondary & High Schools
  2. Youth Development -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

JFYNet College Readiness

We administer the state-mandated Accuplacer college placement exam and enroll students in an online curriculum tailored to their individual needs. By integrating our instruction with regular math and English classes, we maximize classroom time and teacher expertise to focus on the particular skills needed for college success. At the conclusion of instruction, we re-administer the Accuplacer test. We send passing scores directly to colleges, exempting students from corresponding remedial courses. Our use of the Accuplacer, integration into the school curriculum, and direct conversion of program results into remedial exemptions are unique among college-focused services. The JFYNetWorks blended program model -- infusing specialized online content into the regular curriculum -- also facilitates scalability, as the low cost of the online platform can easily be expanded to entire schools.
Budget  $495,596.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Four standard Accuplacer tests are used by most institutions: Arithmetic, Algebra, Reading Comprehension and Sentence Skills. Pre-test scores for JFYNet’s population typically range low enough to place a student in three or more developmental courses. The task of JFYNet is to increase those scores and eliminate remedial courses. In school year 2014-15, the average gain of 20 points was enough to test out of 449 remedial courses.

Program Long-Term Success 

Ultimately, our goal is to make JFYNet available to every high school student who needs help reaching college and career-ready standards. We quantify this target population in Massachusetts at 7500—the annual total of high school graduates enrolled in remedial courses in our state higher education system. We will reach that goal over the next three years.

Program Success Monitored By 

· Student attendance/enrollment data

· By-weekly (minimum) meetings with teachers/administrators at each school

· Weekly time-on-task student data

· Benchmark mastery quiz data

· Post-test results

· Teacher/administrator satisfaction surveys

· Student interviews

· Final statistical and narrative reports for each school

Examples of Program Success 

Four standard Accuplacer tests are used by most institutions: Arithmetic, Algebra, Reading Comprehension and Sentence Skills. Pre-test scores for JFYNet’s population typically range low enough to place a student in three or more developmental courses. The task of JFYNet is to increase those scores and eliminate remedial courses. In school year 2014-15, the average gain of 20 points was enough to test out of 449 remedial courses.

In AY 2014-2015, 1723 students were enrolled in JFYNet Accuplacer Competency. 82% of those who pre and post-tested gained points; the average was 20 points. The gains reduced the number of remedial courses by 44% of the pre-test total. At average community college tuition and fees these students saved $246,000 — money that would have been wasted on non-credit remedial courses, that could instead be invested in courses leading to a degree.

JFYNetWorks Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) Preparation

The JFYNetWorks MCAS Preparation program is designed to help 9th and 10th grade students reach Common Core-aligned standards with the goal of on-time grade progression and ultimately successful graduation from high school and success in college. 
Budget  $242,498.00
Category  Education, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  In Academic Year 2014-15 JFYNet prepared 1121 students in 2 high schools for the 10th grade MCAS.
Program Long-Term Success 

In 2015-16 we intend to bring on up to four new schools, all predominantly high needs, low-income and minority, to increase our enrollment from 3000 to 4000. Our performance goal is to eliminate 50% of remedial courses and save students $250,000 in tuition and fees. We will measure our success by (1) point gains on the Accuplacer college placement test, (2) number of remedial college courses eliminated, (3) dollar value of remedial tuitions and fees saved to students, (4) improved MCAS scores, (5) teacher and administrator satisfaction surveys, and (6) testimonies and stories from students and teachers about the impact of the program on their lives.

Program Success Monitored By 

· Student attendance/enrollment data

· By-weekly (minimum) meetings with teachers/administrators at each school

· Weekly time-on-task student data

· Benchmark mastery quiz data

· Post-test results

· Teacher/administrator satisfaction surveys

· Student interviews

· Final statistical and narrative reports for each school

Examples of Program Success  Schools customarily assign their lowest-performing students because those are the students whose performance impacts school ranking. Last academic year, one partner school’s MCAS scores improved by 9 percentage points in English and 7 points in math.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Gary Kaplan
CEO Term Start July 1985
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Gary Kaplan has been executive director of JFYNetWorks since 1985. During his tenure, JFYNetWorks has addressed the issues of literacy and job skills among youth and adults with a series of innovative programs in competency-based GED curricula, entrepreneurship training, the alternative high school diploma, industry-based skill training in biotechnology, health care, financial services, environmental technology and green jobs, and the JFYNet e-learning program which creates and supports technology-based academic instruction programs in schools throughout Massachusetts.

Mr. Kaplan’s career in education and training began in the 1960s with the Upward Bound program, where he counseled and taught urban youth. He served on Governor Patrick’s Workforce Development transition team and on the Workforce Accountability Task Force. He is a current member of the Governor’s Advisory Commission on STEM and the UMass Lowell Clean Energy Career Workgroup. He is also a member of the National Commission on Energy Policy’s Task Force on America’s Future Energy Jobs. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University and master’s degree from the University of Chicago.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Frederick Jungmann July 1976 June 1985

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Paula Paris Deputy Director Paula Paris joined JFY in 1995 as the director of development, where she has contributed to the growth and diversification of the funding portfolio. She was named Deputy Director in 2003 and has since led the organization through outcomes measurement, social enterprise development and other strategic initiatives. Paula has prior experience in commercial banking, fundraising in education and the arts, public policy research in workforce development. She has been an adjunct faculty member of Southern New Hampshire University’s School of Community Economic Development. Ms. Paris earned a Master of Management degree from the Heller School of Management and Social Policy at Brandeis University, where she is a member of the Board of Overseers, and a Bachelor of Music from the University of Hartford’s Hartt School.
Patricia Parisella Fiscal Director

Patricia Parisella is responsible for all financial management, forecasting and reporting, as well as for personnel and benefits administration. She has been with JFY since 1994, and the organization has enjoyed an unblemished record of unqualified audit opinions under her expert guidance. Ms. Parisella holds a bachelor’s degree from Emerson College and a Master’s in Public Administration from Suffolk University.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
College Opportunity Summit White House --
Environmental Merit Award EPA --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

JFYNetWorks has established relationships with many public and private partners who help support an expanded college readiness program with resources and access. These partners include the College Board, the publisher of the Accuplacer; the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education; the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education; the Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents; the Massachusetts Association of Secondary School Administrators; the Massachusetts Association of Vocational Administrators; the state legislature; Boston Public Schools; Revere Public Schools; our other partner school districts; our individual partner community colleges; the Massachusetts Competitive Partnership, the leading business advocacy group in the state; the Boston Municipal Research Bureau, the leading business/education group in the city; the Community College Research Center at Columbia University, our prospective evaluator; many foundation and corporate funders. Our inclusion in the White House College Opportunity initiative demonstrates that our work continues to gain recognition.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 14
Number of Contract Staff 4
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 4
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Otis A. Gates
Board Chair Company Affiliation United Housing Management
Board Chair Term Jan 1998 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Susan T. Dunnigan Middlesex Bank Voting
Vicki Ann Frawley Consultant Voting
Otis A. Gates United Housing Management Voting
Kevin J. McDonald Baumann and Baumann CPAs Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
John Hodgman Tufts Gordon Institute (Retired) NonVoting
Walter R. Jennings Consultant (Retired) NonVoting
Alicia Knoff William H. Taft Middle School (Retired) NonVoting
Ann Koufman-Frederick Ph.D. Learning Innovation NonVoting
Anthony Principe LearnLaunch NonVoting
Kevin F. Smith Winchester Hospital (Retired) NonVoting
Stacey P. Townsend The Property and Casualty Initiative NonVoting
Nick Zeckets QuadWrangle NonVoting
Isa Zimmerman IKZ Advisors NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 83%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $1,281,832.00
Projected Expense $1,247,792.00
Form 990s

2014 JFYNetWorks - FY14 990

2013 JFYNetWorks - FY13 990

2012 JFYNetWorks - FY12 990

Audit Documents

2015 JFYNetWorks - FY15 Audit

2014 JFYNetworks - FY14 Audit

2013 JFYNetWorks - FY13 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $1,094,455 $869,722 $1,246,454
Total Expenses $1,020,411 $991,009 $1,194,492

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$403,916 $355,306 $634,921
Government Contributions $448,339 $200,000 $200,000
    Federal -- -- --
    State $448,339 $200,000 $200,000
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $38,500 $22,300 $19,700
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $203,699 $292,116 $391,665
Investment Income, Net of Losses $1 -- $168
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $737,994 $701,438 $839,176
Administration Expense $177,086 $177,254 $232,541
Fundraising Expense $105,331 $112,317 $122,775
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.07 0.88 1.04
Program Expense/Total Expenses 72% 71% 70%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 19% 14%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $223,282 $182,089 $384,402
Current Assets $171,096 $170,513 $367,786
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- --
Current Liabilities $115,380 $146,778 $227,804
Total Net Assets $107,902 $35,311 $156,598

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) MA DESE $448,339.00
MA DESE $200,000.00
MA DESE $200,000.00
2nd (Source and Amount) Amelia Peabody Charitable Fund $75,000.00
NB Ottaway Foundation $50,000.00
NB Ottaway Foundation $83,000.00
3rd (Source and Amount) NB Ottaway Foundation $50,000.00
The Philanthropic Initiative $50,000.00
Nellie Mae Education Foundation $75,000.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.48 1.16 1.61

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials. Further revenue breakdown is per the nonprofit.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

The overall goal of JFYNetWorks is to ensure that all high school graduates are college and career ready. We accomplish our goal by building statewide networks of college readiness programs in high schools designed to eliminate the need for remedial courses in college.

The official state definition of college and career readiness is “Successful achievement of specified levels of competence in English Language Arts/Literacy and Mathematics … to be placed into entry-level courses in college or … certificate or workplace training programs without the need for remediation. “

The “specified levels of competence” are defined by cutoff scores on the Accuplacer college placement tests, a suite of assessments adopted in 1998 by the Board of Higher Education as the Massachusetts statewide standard. JFYNetWorks administers the Accuplacer tests in high school, uses the results to place students in the appropriate level of our online curriculum, monitors each student’s progress through the curriculum, and administers the Accuplacer again at the end of the course. If the final scores meet college cutoff scores, the test report is sent to the college and the student is exempted from the corresponding remedial courses.

Ultimately, our goal is to make JFYNet available to every high school student who needs help reaching college and career-ready standards. We quantify this target population in Massachusetts at 7500—the annual total of high school graduates enrolled in remedial courses in our state higher education system. We will reach that goal over the next three years.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

JFYNetWorks provides blended learning that combines online and teacher-led instruction in the classroom. Combining online resources with teacher direction gives students a wide range of materials to learn from and teachers a wide range of teaching tools to select from.

Each JFYNetWorks partner school has an assigned Blended Learning Specialist who performs a range of supportive functions: orienting students to the program and to college placement tests, administering assessments, enrolling students in the online curriculum, providing teachers with ongoing support, and professional development to master the blended learning method and use real-time student performance data to differentiate instruction.

The program structure is abbreviated as AIM2: Assess, Instruct, Measure, Manage.

Assessment of student needs is the first step. In 11th and 12th grade this means administering the four Accuplacer Diagnostic tests in English and math. These assessments determine where the student is placed in the online curriculum. At the 9th and 10th grade MCAS level, assessment is performed with Common Core-aligned tests.

Instruction is the core of the program. JFYNetWorks curates a high-quality library of software to meet varied student needs. Online instruction offers flexibility in choice and utilization of materials. It is also by nature self-paced. No other form of instruction allows as much control of content and pace. The power to individualize instruction is a necessary capability when dealing with the diversity of student skills, learning styles, languages and cultural backgrounds that characterize urban schools.

Measurement means tracking student activity online by following individual progress through the curriculum and performance on embedded mastery quizzes. JFYNet software allows for monitoring progress and addressing problems in real time.

Management is onsite and online oversight and support using online student activity data to make reports and recommendations to teachers and administrators that keep students on track. JFY staff visit each school regularly throughout the year to confer on student performance and instructional strategies. Hands-on professional development with teachers builds skill and confidence in the blended methodology, gradually transforming teaching practice so that all instruction becomes student-centered.

JFYNet served 3000 students in 2014-15 and plans for 4000 in school year 2015-16. Participation is 1-2 hours per week with 34 weeks available for instruction.


3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

JFYNetWorks has provided support to high school students and young adults for nearly 40 years, and has a proven track record of making a measurable difference on high school graduation, college entrance, and college success performance metrics. Through strong leadership and the keen ability to pivot organizational priorities to fit changing academic and economic demands, JFYNetWorks has solidified its ability to support low-income students in the skills they need most to succeed. Our combination of deep expertise, efficient cost structure, a solid funding base, and organizational capacity provides a foundation uniquely suited to eliminating the college preparation gap, particularly for low-income students. JFYNetWorks has been recognized for our successes from the White House College Opportunity Summit to the state, local, and individual school levels.

Financially, JFYNetWorks successfully achieved a dedicated line item in the Massachusetts state budget for the first time in FY 2016, providing a solid foundation for continued, sustained impact as we work to meet our goals. The fact that JFYNetWorks is named in the line item as the implementer of the statewide college and career readiness program confirms that the organization has established itself as a reliable, consistent, trusted producer of student achievement gains. Additionally, our cost structure is highly efficient, with our per student cost covered via state appropriations, school district fees, and private philanthropy. In fundraising terms, every dollar raised is tripled in impact thanks to this tripartite model.

We have saved students over $1M in tuition and fees thanks to the success of the JFYNet College Readiness program. This is only the immediate financial return on better preparation for success in post-secondary education and in life.

Staff members include Executive Director Gary Kaplan as project manager and four outstanding professional blended learning specialists. In addition, Deputy Director Paula Paris provides grant management, program compliance, and fund cultivation, and Fiscal Director Patricia Parisella provides financial management and fiscal accountability. Gary has provided visionary leadership to JFYNetWorks since 1985. During his tenure, JFYNetWorks has addressed the issues of literacy and job skills among youth and adults with a series of innovative programs. Gary’s career in education and training began in the 1960s with the Upward Bound program, where he counseled and taught urban youth. He served on Governor Patrick’s Workforce Development transition team, the Workforce Accountability Task Force, the Governor’s Advisory Commission on STEM, and the National Commission on Jobs and the Economy. Gary earned a Bachelor of Arts from Northwestern University and a Master of Arts from the University of Chicago. Additional staff details may be found here: https://jfynet.org/jfy-staff/.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

JFYNet conducts two programs: JFYNet College Readiness and Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) Preparation. Each has its own metrics.

College Readiness Metrics

The success measurement in College Readiness is increased points on the Accuplacer tests after participation in the JFYNet blending learning program. The benchmarks are point gains and remedial courses eliminated.

Accuplacer is the suite of College Board skill assessments that all Massachusetts community colleges and state universities and many other colleges use to place students into either credit-bearing courses or non-credit remedial courses.

Four standard Accuplacer tests are used by most institutions: Arithmetic, Algebra, Reading Comprehension and Sentence Skills. Pre-test scores for JFYNet’s population typically range low enough to place a student in three or more developmental courses. The task of JFYNet is to increase those scores and eliminate remedial courses. In school year 2014-15, the average gain of 20 points was enough to test out of 449 remedial courses.

In AY 2014-2015, 1723 students were enrolled in JFYNet Accuplacer Competency. 82% of those who pre and post-tested gained points; the average was 20 points. The gains reduced the number of remedial courses by 44% of the pre-test total. At average community college tuition and fees these students saved $246,000 — money that would have been wasted on non-credit remedial courses, that could instead be invested in courses leading to a degree.

MCAS: In Academic Year 2014-15 JFYNet prepared 1121 students in 2 high schools for the 10th grade MCAS.

Schools customarily assign their lowest-performing students because those are the students whose performance impacts school ranking. One school’s MCAS scores improved by 9 percentage points in English and 7 points in math.

In 2015-16 we intend to bring on up to four new schools, all predominantly high needs, low-income and minority, to increase our enrollment from 3000 to 4000. Our performance goal is to eliminate 50% of remedial courses and save students $250,000 in tuition and fees. We will measure our success by (1) point gains on the Accuplacer college placement test, (2) number of remedial college courses eliminated, (3) dollar value of remedial tuitions and fees saved to students, (4) improved MCAS scores, (5) teacher and administrator satisfaction surveys, and (6) testimonies and stories from students and teachers about the impact of the program on their lives.


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

The business community and the legislature recognize that the skilled worker gap can be closed by reducing the number of high school graduates lost to remedial college courses. The number lost at the community colleges alone, 6000, would fill the gap. This is why both the state and private funding community have empowered JFYNetWorks to establish a statewide college and career readiness program. In FY 2015, JFYNetWorks operated programs in eleven schools in Massachusetts and one outside the state. Our total enrollment was 3,192. Enrollment is projected to exceed 4,000 in FY 2016.

Our three-year growth plan will reach an annual capacity in excess of 7,500 students, the total annual number of high school graduates in remedial college courses statewide. The scale of the college readiness issue is manageable. JFYNetWorks is equipped to reach that scale. Workforce needs will increasingly drive education policy as economic growth and changing demographics produce more and more critical shortages of skilled workers. JFYNetWorks’ unique position at the nexus of education and workforce development–College and Career Readiness—and our documented ability to raise student/worker skill levels provide a powerful platform for future growth in Massachusetts and nationally. On December 10, 2015, the Every Student Succeeds Act was signed into law. This new federal education law reaffirms the goal of College and Career Readiness, identifies blended learning and digital learning as approved methodologies, and specifically authorizes funding for the programmatic components of JFYNet. This federal action completes the spectrum of local, state and federal support for the mission and methods of JFYNetWorks.