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Organization DBA Framingham Day Hospital
Project Advance
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Programs For People offers day treatment and employment services to low-income MetroWest adults who are recovering from serious mental illness.  We believe that a diagnosis of mental illness does not define a person's identity, and that those recovering should be given every opportunity to move beyond the illness to the fullest possible extent. Thus our agency is designed to help clients with both their psychological needs and their ability to engage successfully in all aspects of life- such as the workplace, home and family, or social and civic activities. It was the first agency to combine psychiatric day treatment with employment services "all under one roof," and a primary focus of our work is to assist those served to prepare for, obtain, and maintain employment. In the face of a growing trend toward large healthcare systems, we have remained true to our motto, "Small Enough to Care." Those we serve are "like family" to us.  There is no other agency like it in MetroWest. 

Mission Statement

Programs For People offers day treatment and employment services to low-income MetroWest adults who are recovering from serious mental illness.  We believe that a diagnosis of mental illness does not define a person's identity, and that those recovering should be given every opportunity to move beyond the illness to the fullest possible extent. Thus our agency is designed to help clients with both their psychological needs and their ability to engage successfully in all aspects of life- such as the workplace, home and family, or social and civic activities. It was the first agency to combine psychiatric day treatment with employment services "all under one roof," and a primary focus of our work is to assist those served to prepare for, obtain, and maintain employment. In the face of a growing trend toward large healthcare systems, we have remained true to our motto, "Small Enough to Care." Those we serve are "like family" to us.  There is no other agency like it in MetroWest. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income $653,210.00
Projected Expense $653,210.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Day Treatment Program (Framingham Day Hospital)
  • Project Advance
  • The Lunch Box

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Programs For People offers day treatment and employment services to low-income MetroWest adults who are recovering from serious mental illness.  We believe that a diagnosis of mental illness does not define a person's identity, and that those recovering should be given every opportunity to move beyond the illness to the fullest possible extent. Thus our agency is designed to help clients with both their psychological needs and their ability to engage successfully in all aspects of life- such as the workplace, home and family, or social and civic activities. It was the first agency to combine psychiatric day treatment with employment services "all under one roof," and a primary focus of our work is to assist those served to prepare for, obtain, and maintain employment. In the face of a growing trend toward large healthcare systems, we have remained true to our motto, "Small Enough to Care." Those we serve are "like family" to us.  There is no other agency like it in MetroWest. 

Background Statement

Our agency started in 1974 with a 3-year federal grant from the National Institute of Mental Health and matching state funds from the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health.The founder’s vision was to create a treatment program in which clients would feel accepted and retain their sense of dignity that would focus not only on problems but on strengths and abilities. It would be characterized by an atmosphere of openness, reducing the feeling of secrecy and stigma so often associated with mental illness.

Originally, our mission was to help patients in Westborough State Hospital transition into the community, but shortly after the agency’s inception Framingham Union Hospital opened a psychiatric unit, and from that time forward PFP served people from the MetroWest community-at-large. Employment services were added in response to client need.

DMH funds had been promised to replace our grant upon its completion, but budget cuts at that time threatened the very life of the agency. It was only thorough the extraordinary help of a host of community supporters that PFP was able to keep its doors open. Finally in 1990, having barely survived a total loss of 85% of its DMH funds, staff and Board members took a bold step and embarked upon a plan to incorporate as a nonprofit, operating independently without DMH funds. Against all odds, PFP was gradually able to attain viability while maintaining its commitment to low-income clients, and remains self-supporting to this day. (Refer towww.programsforpeople.org“Our Story.”)

Our day treatment program provides full days of treatment for adults who need more than weekly therapy but less than hospitalization. Clients can attend the program and return to their homes at night instead of being hospitalized. Those hospitalized can leave the hospital earlier by transitioning from the hospital directly into this program as a stepping stone back to the community. It can also be used to increase an individual's ability to make constructive changes in his/her life. In addition to addressing psychological issues, the program also includes groups focused on maintaining sobriety and wellness, and family therapy is offered. 

Our employment placement service  (Project Advance) helps clients to transition to community placements through further education, volunteer placement, or employment with follow-up support. It is the only Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission approved program of its kind in the region for this population and does not duplicate services.

PFP serves approximately 175-200 clients per year, most of whom receive full-days of treatment. In addition, PFP serves as an internship site  for students of social work, counseling psychology, occupational therapy, and rehabilitation counseling.


Impact Statement

ACCOMPLISHMENTS FY’12 

1)Vocational Resource Room: The majority of clients utilizing our employment placement service (Project Advance) do not have computers. With grants from Framingham Rotary and the Framingham Union Aid we were able to create a Vocational Resource Room and purchase computers and reference materials sso that clients can conduct online career exploration and effectively conduct job searches.

2)Quality Improvement, Employment Services: Project Advance staff participated in a retreat to determine how their expertise could more fully meet client needs. This resulted in reorganization of staff roles, facilitating a multi-disciplinary approach that led to improved and more comprehensive service delivery and outcomes.

3)“Choose Health” Continued and Expanded: Originally, a client-led task force in our day treatment program initiated a healthy lifestyles program in 2009 that focused on nutrition and exercise. Then in 2010 a small grant from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation enabled us to add a diabetes management and prevention program. In 2011, a grant from the Framingham Union Aid further enhanced the program. Last year, wellness became fully integrated into our day treatment program, with both staff and clients recording their daily workouts and food choices on a wall chart for all to see.

 

GOALS FY’13

 

1) Increased income from fundraising for operating expenses refurbishing the building, and plans for long-term sustainability.

2) Increased Board membership.

3) Capital campaign for paying off mortgage developed and implemented.

4) Day treatment program enhanced by means of consumer feedback methodologies. 


Needs Statement

1) Although Programs For People is totally self-supporting and operates successfully in an extremely cost-effective manner, each year we must raise sufficient funds to augment the modest rate of reimbursement that we receive for providing services to low-income clients. (Need up to $60,000) 

2) Our building is in need of refurbishment which we cannot currently afford.

3) Staff salaries are generally below market value, and due to lack of funds raises are not given. Although staff retention is good, exemplary staff members either take a second job or finally leave simply due to inability to meet their living expenses.

4) We need to expand Board membership with individuals who possess fundraising skills and connections to potential donors. 

5) We need to begin developing a plan to secure long-term sustainability through bequests, an endowment, or other means.

 


CEO Statement

We believe that mental illness does not define a person’s identity, and that those recovering should be given every opportunity to move beyond the illness to the fullest possible extent. For this reason PFP is unique, because in addition to providing treatment our agency is also designed to help clients engage successfully in all aspects of life - such as the workplace, home and family, or social and civic activities. PFP was the first agency to combine psychiatric day treatment with employment services “under one roof,” and thus a primary focus of our work has alwaysbeen to assist those served to prepare for, obtain, and maintain employment. There is no other agency like it in MetroWest.

As our ultimate goal for our clients is overall wellness, in recognition of that, we endeavor to treat the “whole person.” We have seen how the severity of their illness frequently causes our clients to neglect their physical health. Factors such as living in poverty, poor natural supports, smoking, high incidence of substance dependence, and poor diet and exercise habits led us to augment our services with groups focused upon health- maintaining sobriety, nutrition, smoking cessation, exercise, strength training, diabetes prevention and weight reduction.

Consider the following: If you had a family member who suffered from a mental illness wouldn’t you want to find a place where they could go to get assistance with their mental health issues as well as employment? Wouldn’t you prefer a client-centered day treatment program for your loved one over an inpatient situation that was not equipped to help them move to the next stage of their life and would cost taxpayers exponentially more? Most of all, our services are specifically designed to be provided within a compassionate “community,” deeply committed to ending the stigma of mental illness- both within and outside of its doors. Each person whom we serve receives individualized treatment, and is “like family” to us.  

These days most people are aware of someone whose life has been touched by mental illness in some way. We know all too well how the stigma associated with mental illness has adversely affected those lives, often even more than the illness, itself. Because of this, in celebration of our 25thyear anniversary we initiated a community education campaign in Framingham to reduce the stigma of mental illness.  The generous sponsorship of the TJX Companies and Avery Dennison enabled us to hold a town meeting forum which more than 200 people attended, and we gave free presentations to assist businesses and the community in gaining a better understanding of mental health issues.


Board Chair Statement

My name is Peter J. Cura. I am an attorney with offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts. I have served on the Board of PFP continuously for the past 18 years with pride and gratitude.

We serve low-income people who suffer from the most severe mental illnesses who would otherwise be at risk of being underserved or hospitalized. Mental health patients are often rejected, isolated and stigmatized by society, and paralyzed by their illness. Fortunately, with the help of a generous grant we were able to purchase a single-family house in order to provide a home-like, non-institutional atmosphere in which to locate our agency. Here, our clients are first accepted for themselves and their strengths. Only upon such acceptance can a sense of community and connection be restored to them. Only upon such restoration can their illness most effectively be treated. A physical illness does not normally overtake a patient’s identity, but rather is seen as an isolated ailment and treated so that the patient may resume his/or her daily life without profound interruption to it. However, in the case of a mental illness, a patient’s identity is diminished. At PFP, we see the individual first, and the mental illness as an ailment to be treated. This can result in startling, clinical successes- restoring dignity, self-confidence, employment, and a place in society for our clients. For me, the success we enjoy in restoring people to their lives is a job worth doing.

From the corporate governance perspective, the greatest challenges currently facing our organization are fundraising and board membership. Salaries are approximately 75% of our budget. We are honored to have a dedicated, creative, and professionally accomplished staff. Because of the nature of the services we provide, they are the essence of PFP. We excel due to the variety and quality of our clinical approach. We have created a milieu in which the staff provides clinical treatment and the clients, themselves, create a support system rarely found in more standard treatment programs. Our challenge is the fact that our staff accepts salaries which are 15% to 20% below market. They do this because they are drawn to our unique, professional environment. However, we have lost talented clinicians when they can no longer afford to remain with us. Increased funds, particularly with a view toward a capital campaign for long-term cash flow, would permit us to raise the salaries to at least market levels. We are currently seeking long-term partners with an interest in furthering our core mission to support our campaign.

Board membership development is a goal consistent with our fundraising challenge because the Board is charged with advancing the financial health of our organization. We have an extremely dedicated and competent Board. Of the 6 current members, 2 have sat continuously for over 15 years. A 3rdmember served for 6 years, left the board for 5 years to focus on professional matters, and rejoined us 2 years ago. We have also had talented and creative people who were able to join us only for shorter terms or specific projects. All have been dedicated to our mission and made important contributions. We are seeking additional members who are particularly interested in fundraising.


Geographic Area Served

METROWEST REGION, MA
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Organization Categories

  1. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Mental Health Treatment
  2. Employment - Employment Preparation & Procurement
  3. Human Services - Human Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Day Treatment Program (Framingham Day Hospital)

 

Our day treatment program (Framingham Day Hospital) serves adults who need more than weekly therapy appointments but less than full hospitalization. They can attend FDH daily and return to their homes at night instead of being hospitalized. Those already hospitalized can leave the hospital earlier by transitioning directly to FDH into the community. FDH can also be used to increase an individual's ability to make constructive changes in his/her life. Members of FDH form a close, supportive community.

FDH is staffed by a full range of psychiatric professionals and offers:

§ individual, group, family therapy

§ substance abuse services

§ assistance with self-management skills

§ prevocational services

§ assistance with maintaining general health and fitness

§ follow-up services available on a long-term basis, if necessary

§ active liaison/collaboration with other service providers

Services include daily groups that focus upon treatment and developing the skills necessary for optimal self-management of mental health and activities of daily life.

Budget  $449,104.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Mental Health Treatment
Population Served Adults Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success   

The short-term successes that will result from this program are the individual “triumphs” of each one of our clients as they courageously face their mental health challenges from day-to-day, week-to-week, and month-to-month, and incorporate new coping strategies into their lives.

Program Long-Term Success   

The ultimate change that results from this program is the increased capability of each of its clients to remain out of the hospital and lead fulfilling lives, according to their own, personal desires and goals.

Program Success Monitored By   

Day treatment clients participate in individual “Focus Meetings ” with staff monthly, during which their treatment goals and progress are reviewed, and consumer feedback elicited. At that time clients are also assessed utilizing the “Framingham Functional Assessment Scale,” developed by PFP and adopted by Mass Health for use in psychiatric day treatment programs across the state. 

Quality improvement and consumer feedback are fully integrated into the day treatment program through a weekly meeting with clients and staff during which input from clients is sought as to how the program and staff are meeting their treatment needs. Overall program evaluation and quality improvement is also accomplished through the use of intermittent consumer feedback questionnaires and staff meetings specifically for the purpose of identifying and addressing areas in which changes need to be made.

Site visits from insurance companies and Mass Health help to insure the program’s compliance with standards of care.

Examples of Program Success 

 

When "Barbara" came to PFP she was living with her parents and suffering from schizophrenia, socially withdrawn, isolated, and having a hard time getting up and doing anything.

Her goals were to make friends, improve her self-esteem, and eventually to get a job. She found it difficult to speak with her counselor and in groups. Slowly, with consistent attendance and team meetings that included her counselor and outside therapist, Barbara began to come out of her shell. She gradually became able to engage in conversations, even speaking up in groups. Eventually, she joined our intensive group therapy and was able to express herself even more openly. Her counselor listened as Barbara recounted the ups and downs of new friendships, good decisions and regrets, and hopes for the future. She lost 80 pounds and quit smoking.

Incredibly, Barbara decided to go back to work and applied at a local retail store, was hired, and has now been working for approximately 6 months. It had been 11 years since Barbara last worked. She still attends vocational support group when her work hours allow, and gets excellent reviews at work. She is often smiling and jovial, and offers advice and wisdom to her peers in the program.

 

 

 


Project Advance

 

Project Advance is PFP’s employment placement program. Candidates experience and education range from entry-level to college graduates. Services are provided in 3 Phases.

TheAssessment Phase- assesses work history, skills, and personal or situational barriers to employment. It helps clients to identify job or career options, enhance resume and interviewing skills, and develop a job search plan. Participants enroll in a weekly support group that continues throughout each phase.

TheJob Search Phase- includes coordination of job search efforts and plans with PA staff, interviewing, networking, and vocational counseling. Groups include Support Group, Job Development, and Interviewing.

ThePlacement Phase- begins with the first day of employment. PA staff actively helps clients address any problems they encounter during initial employment. When needed, support is extended. If clients disclose that they are receiving PA services, staff can consult with employers and facilitate any necessary accommodations. When employer and client are satisfied, PA services end. Staff remains available should any problems develop thereafter.

PA’sEmployment Advisory Board-  helps locate jobs for clients, conducts trial interviews, and sometimes hires clients.

Budget  $142,879.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Search & Placement
Population Served Adults Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 
 

Short-term achievements consist of the annual numbers of clients that have received the “benchmark” services that are included within the 3 Phases of Project Advance. They include (respectively) the numbers of Assessments, Skills Trainings, Job Placement Developments, Initial Ongoing Supports, and Ongoing Supports provided. 

Of the 31 clients served by PA in FY’12, 17 were placed in jobs, a Placement Rate of 55% that is more than 3 times the national average rate of 15% for this population.
Program Long-Term Success 
 

The ultimate goal of Project Advance is to enable those served to achieve the goal of sustained employment. Some have thought that to work would be impossible due to the severity of their illness. Others may have demonstrated the ability to get a job but were not able to keep it. Still others may have been fired or may have dropped out due to overwhelming psychiatric symptoms, inability to deal satisfactorily with supervisors or peers, on-the-job pressures, or job-related issues.

According to the “Commonwealth Corporation Study” of MRC services, every dollar invested in MRC employment services estimates a return of $5- $7 to the government in the form of increased taxes and reduced public assistance benefits. Returns to society based upon the projected increase in lifetime earnings for consumers returning to work range from $14-$18 for every dollar invested. When a client earns enough to no longer qualify for benefits, the study projects a $20,000 savings to tax payers, and employers earn tax credits when hiring people with disabilities. Investing in PA not only provides a valuable service to individuals, but creates a return on investment to the community.

Program Success Monitored By 

The following statistics are utilized to evaluate Project Advance effectiveness:  

           # of Assessments provided

           # of Skills Trainings provided

           # of Job Placement Developments provided

           # of Initial Ongoing Supports provided

           # of Ongoing Supports provided   

                 Overall Placement Rate (a percentage calculated by

                  dividing the number placed by the number served) 

Monitoring is also achieved through prior approval by the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission for each of the above services provided, on a per-client basis.

 

 

Examples of Program Success 
 

"Megan" was sexually abused from the age of 8 to 18. She came to PFP because she was unable to work. She suffered from severe flashbacks of her abuse and bouts of anger during which she would cut herself and punch walls. She hoped to recover enough to work again. In Women’s Group she learned that she was not alone, that others had been abused. In Counseling she talked about what happened to her. In Anger Management, she learned how to deal with her anger, especially toward herself. She says that the support of the PFP “community” was healing. She transitioned to PA. There she received help with her resume, interviewing skills, job search, and self-esteem.

After a 4-hr. interview at a major corporation she was hired on-the-spot. After 90 days she got a raise, and later “Employee of the Month,” a plaque and bonus. She says, “I really enjoy my job and don’t plan to leave any time soon!” Grateful, Meagan “gives back,” and recently received an award for her outstanding work as a Peer Counselor.


The Lunch Box

 

FDH includes a component called “The Lunch Box,” an onsite prevocational food service program. It is just one of the employment services available at PFP. With the supervision, guidance, and support of TLB Manager, clients are given a “real” paid work opportunity in which they can identify their strengths, recognize problems, and develop the skills they need for future employment in the community. 

The application process for clients includes completing a job application, taking a Skills and Barriers Inventory, and participating in a Transition Meeting with staff to establish their goals for use of The Lunch Box. Roles include customer service, food preparation, cooking, cashiering, and cleaning, and the possibility of "moving up" to assume the role of "Assistant Manager."

TLB has been operating for over 25 years as a rehabilitation modality. Currently, it provides breakfast and lunch for clients and staff to buy at PFP, and employs about 10 people who work a maximum of 10 hours per week, utilizing the other services of FDH when not scheduled to work.

Budget  $73,008.00
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Mental Health Treatment
Population Served Adults Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 
 

Short-term success is measured on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis as clients first become comfortable with their role and responsibilities in The Lunch Box and then become increasingly able to perform their “job” as required. Short-term successes also include gradually becoming able to assume more demanding roles, and the possibility of "moving up" to assume the role of "Assistant Manager.”

Program Long-Term Success 
 

The Lunch Box is a prevocational program for clients whose ultimate, long-term goal is employment. It offers them the opportunity to develop, under the guidance of the Lunch Box Manager, the skills necessary to work successfully in the community. It should be noted that because PFP’s client population is people who have been diagnosed with serious mental illness, for some of our clients preparation for eventual employment may take years.

Program Success Monitored By 
 

Success is monitored on a per-client basis through monthly “Performance Reviews” during which each client participates in a meeting with the Lunch Box Manager, his/her day treatment counselor, and vocational staff in order to identify gains, areas in need of improvement, and goals going forward. 

The success of the Lunch Box program as a whole and issues in need of quality improvement are addressed at sessions designated for that purpose, held by vocational staff. In addition, The Lunch Box is licensed by the Town of Framingham and inspected regularly, as required by the Board of Health.

Examples of Program Success 
 
Depressed since age 17, "Carl" had given up on life. The future looked bleak  and he believed that he could never work again. He was hospitalized numerous times. Following a serious suicide attempt, he was referred to PFP for day treatment. A talented artist, he had lost interest in his artwork, he was isolated, and spent much of his time sleeping. He was living in a DMH residence. 
Attending PFP was a daily struggle. He had given up hope of ever overcoming his illness, but gradually began to feel accepted and valued as a member of the  “community.” He started to resume his artwork and tried employment in the The Lunch Box, where he was able to develop a feeling of camaraderie with his co-workers, gain work skills and a sense of accomplishment. He slowly acquired self-confidence and a sense of self-reliance. 

Building on this success, he made new friends, joined a gym, and started taking courses at a local college. He then transitioned into our employment placement program, Project Advance, and started working in the Deli department of a local supermarket. It took 4 years, but Carl now has hope for the future, plans to continue his education, and become a teacher- a second chance on life.

 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 

"John" came to our day treatment program because he was depressed, couldn’t concentrate, and couldn’t get motivated to look for a job even though he said he wanted to work. John was seeing a therapist, had been hospitalized a few times after going off his medications and becoming suicidal, and had turned to drugs and alcohol to cope with overwhelming feelings of hopelessness and self-doubt. His family was at a loss as to how to help him. John had few friends and hung around the house all day watching TV. His father pressured him to go out and get a job, but this only made John feel angry and misunderstood.

When John first came to our program he said that it helped him to meet other people who were “in the same boat,” seeking to gain a greater understanding of their illness, working hard to learn how to deal with debilitating symptoms of mental illness, and turn their lives around. John attended daily, which got him out of the house, and participated in a number of groups and activities, some of which focused specifically on work. He assumed responsibilities and tasks within the program to help develop work skills, and then was hired to work in “The Lunch Box,” the program’s onsite business, all in preparation for the day when he would start looking for his own job in the community. Along the way, with the help of the program’s nurse, John came to realize the importance of taking medication. He agreed to attend the Substance Abuse gGoup and went to AA meetings on a regular basis, where he made new friends. With our Family Therapist, John and his family were able to share previously unexpressed feelings and concerns and became more supportive of each other.

Today, John is working part-time in a supermarket. This is not the job that he intends to have for the rest of his life, but it’s a start, and he has also enrolled in a local college where he is taking one course at a time. His depression has lifted and he is drug free. He is using our “aftercare” services, attending 2 groups a week for continuing support while he prepares for a long-term career. John and his family are proud of the gains that he has made. It was by no means “smooth sailing” for John – he suffered setbacks, ups and downs along the way. His problems are not all over, but he’s learned a lot about how to overcome his illness and he’s determined not to let it get the best of him. He has made slow but steady progress in learning how to manage difficult symptoms and feelings that interfere with employment, and that’s what we call success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms Iris Carroll
CEO Term Start July 1973
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience  

Iris Carroll, MPH, is the Director and founder of Programs For People, and is responsible for the clinical and administrative operation of the agency. She holds a Master's Degree in Public Health from Harvard School of Public Health, is a licensed Occupational Therapist, and has had extensive experience in the field of psychiatry, both in the private and public sectors. Prior to founding Programs For People she worked in New York state hospitals, Langley Porter Institute of the University of California Medical Center, and McLean Hospital in Massachusetts. She developed an interest in community mental health while working as Coordinator of the partial hospitalization program at Tufts New England Medical Center. Iris has had a long-standing concern for the issues of stigma and consumer rights, and was a recipient of the "Massachusetts Department of Mental Health Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Human Rights of Individuals with Mental Disabilities." She initiated and implemented a community-wide public forum on "Dispelling the Myths of Mental Illness" for the Town of Framingham.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
To Iris Carroll in Recognition of Outstanding Contribution to the Human Rights of Individuals with Mental Disabilities Massachusetts Department of Mental Health 1987

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

 

PFP collaborates clinically on an ongoing basis with the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health, The Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission, Mass Health, hospitals, outpatient clinics, and other providers of mental health services in the provision of its services to its clients. PFP also collaborates administratively with other area agencies through participation in the area’s Advocacy Group. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 

“Jim” arrived at our day treatment program with 2 problems; a diagnosis of mental illness, and an addiction to alcohol. Fortunately at PFP he found help with both of those issues as, in our commitment to treating the “whole person,” we had previously added substance abuse services to our program in response to client need. It was very difficult for Jim to accept the fact that he was mentally ill. He would stop taking his medication and turn to alcohol for relief, instead. He had no desire to stop drinking, and was living in a shelter. Delusional, he thought that a radio was “doing a hate call-in show on me,” and was hospitalized. 

Jim says that PFP changed his life. It began when his addiction was confronted by other clients in our Substance Abuse groups and staff required him to go to 90 meetings (AA) in 90 days, which he did. He said, “Listening to other people helped. I could see where I didn’t want to go and which lifestyles I wanted to emulate.” Where he did want to go, was back to work. Because of his mental health and alcohol issues he had not been able to work for years.

First, at PFP and at AA he learned to maintain his sobriety and then, with the help of our PFP nurse, he finally came to terms with the value of medication. His next goal was to be able to do volunteer work, which he found with the help of our Vocational Counselor. He volunteered consistently, 3-4 times a week. Building upon that success, we found Jim a job with a local employer with whom we collaborate. Jim says, “PFP was very instrumental in getting that job. My prospective employer was impressed with my consistent participation at PFP. He was very interested and counted my volunteer job as work experience.” Five years later, Jim received a “5 year pin” for his years of dedicated service to his employer.

Now sober, employed, and living in his own apartment, when asked what he would say to others considering PFP he said, “If you want to work on your substance abuse issues, mental health issues, and personal achievement, you may find it as helpful as I have…There is a good relationship between staff and clients- not like an iron wall between them- good fellowship.”

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 7
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 4
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 16
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 8
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Peter J Cura PC
Board Chair Company Affiliation Independent Attorney
Board Chair Term Feb 1996 -
Board Co-Chair Mr. Robert Bonnevie Psy. D.
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation The Palmer Group, Inc.
Board Co-Chair Term Sept 2001 -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Robert Ganley PC Ganley, PC, CPA Voting
Mr. James Gordon Gordon Real Estate Voting
Mr. Glen Ransden MBA Group Voting
Mr. Daniel Schiappa Frank Schiappa, CPA Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Joseph Curtin Roche Brothers & Sudbury Farms NonVoting
Mr. Kevin Fandel Transition Solutions NonVoting
Ms. Virginia Rettie Department of Defense/Natick Labs NonVoting
Ms. Maureen Schumacher Massachusetts Career One-Step Centers NonVoting
Ms. Deborah White Massachusetts Career One-Step Centers NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 6
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 0
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 

“Ariel” came to PFP when she was 32 years old. While in college she had begun to experience severe mood swings ranging from hyperactivity to deep lethargy, and her self-esteem was extremely low. As a result, she had developed a habit of using drugs and alcohol to deal with her feelings instead of expressing them, which led to even more serious problems. Eventually hospitalized, there she learned that she shared the same bipolar mental illness as her grandmother, as well as with her highly accomplished father who committed suicide. Ariel had been studying to become a teacher. Bright, artistic, and ambitious, she left college because of her illness, could not hold a job, became quite dependent upon her mother, and spent the next 10 years adrift.

At PFP, Ariel had to start by learning how to overcome her addiction through our Substance Abuse Services, specifically designed for people suffering from both mental illness and addiction. In sessions with her Counselor, in Writing Group, and in other groups she learned how to both express herself and deal with her illness. She remarked, “Even though I’ve been through the gamut, I learned something new every time.” Although initially phobic of work-related activity, our skills development program provided her with opportunities to exercise her strengths, build confidence, and act independently. She said that at PFP she learned it was, “OK to be taken care of, with being pushed to question my own sense of ineptness.” Family Therapy at PFP with Ariel and her mother helped them both to see that less involvement on the part of her mother could free Ariel to assume more responsibility for her own life, as by working.  

In time, Ariel transitioned to our employment placement program, "Project Advance," and after completing it was actually able to obtain a cashier job at Starbuck’s which she maintain with the ongoing support of our Vocational Counselor. There, she did so well that (as a promotion) she was trained to be certified to mix Starbuck’s “specialties.” She became certified but then, while still working, she inquired about doing volunteer work at a nearby Montessori school. When she went there for an interview, she was offered a position as a Teacher’s Aide, instead! 

You should know that Ariel’s journey took many months and, yes, there were some setbacks along the way. But now her life is more stable, she no longer relies upon drugs and alcohol to cope with her feelings, and she is moving closer to achieving her dream of becoming a teacher.

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Projected Income $653,210.00
Projected Expense $653,210.00
Form 990s

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $678,000 $686,829 $663,562
Total Expenses $676,455 $733,076 $685,351

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- $21,264 $34,094
Government Contributions $485,046 $542,933 $512,567
    Federal $395,149 $420,839 $400,036
    State $89,897 $122,094 $112,531
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $82,103 $9,245 $18,932
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $96,951 $79,432 $73,349
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,360 $3,608 $3,595
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $11,534 $11,528 $20,392
Other $6 $18,819 $633

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $645,680 $684,299 $647,705
Administration Expense $30,023 $48,421 $37,496
Fundraising Expense $752 $356 $150
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 0.94 0.97
Program Expense/Total Expenses 95% 93% 95%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $698,621 $725,477 $790,712
Current Assets $190,122 $143,079 $222,206
Long-Term Liabilities $43,552 $62,513 $79,812
Current Liabilities $122,083 $131,523 $133,212
Total Net Assets $532,986 $531,441 $577,688

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Purpose Eliminate the mortgage on our building
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.56 1.09 1.67

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 6% 9% 10%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials.  

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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