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Dorchester Youth Collaborative Inc.

 1514A Dorchester Avenue
 Dorchester, MA 02122
[P] (617) 288-1748
[F] (617) 288-2136
http://dorchesteryouthcollaborative.org
dorchesterdyc@aol.com
Judith McGuire
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INCORPORATED: 1982
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2743166

LAST UPDATED: 06/14/2016
Organization DBA DYC
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative is to help low-income and at-risk urban youth who live in areas of high crime and unemployment to succeed through education, positive youth development, arts, sports, and mentoring. 

Mission Statement

The mission of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative is to help low-income and at-risk urban youth who live in areas of high crime and unemployment to succeed through education, positive youth development, arts, sports, and mentoring. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $724,000.00
Projected Expense $720,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Center for Urban Expression
  • Democracy Club
  • Quantum Program
  • Safe City Academy
  • Sports Mentoring Programs

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative is to help low-income and at-risk urban youth who live in areas of high crime and unemployment to succeed through education, positive youth development, arts, sports, and mentoring. 

Background Statement

DYC has operated in the Fields Corner area for over 30 years. Many teens in the area know DYC and have had some involvement with its programs and mentoring services. DYC manages Safe City Academy, an alternative education and work-study program for truant and court referred youth. DYC also runs the Center for Urban Expression, offering mentoring, sports, and arts. The Center is a safe haven drop-in center, providing meals, counseling, recreational activities, jobs, media arts, creative fun, and challenging opportunities to promote youth development, self worth, and a sense of belonging. DYC distinguishes itself from other youth programs in Boston through its philosophy and approach to serving youth, with a priority on serving teens who have a high failure rate in other youth programs. DYC employs bilingual staff members who regularly reach out to Asian, Cape Verdean, and Latino youth in the community. With a strong and deep history in the neighborhood, DYC has established a level of trust with the target populations. In addition to the center on Dorchester Avenue, DYC operates programs at Dorchester House, seven Boston Public Middle Schools, the Burke High School, and two city parks. In total, DYC serves approximately 2,000 youth ages 12 to 20. DYC has a multicultural/multilingual staff and its participants reflect the population of the Dorchester area.

Impact Statement

The Dorchester Youth Collaborative was founded in 1982 in response to the need for programs to serve the most at risk youth of Boston – teens who live in neighborhoods with high rates of violence, unemployment, and social instability, and who are more likely to become involved in the criminal justice and social service systems without interventions and support. DYC engages high-risk young people in relationships and projects that promote their psycho-social development, as well as the health and safety of the community. DYC introduces teens to education, enrichment, health, sports, performance arts, and employment opportunities. Through their participation, DYC teens achieve socially valued roles at home, with their friends, and in the community. DYC has realized striking results. A recent evaluation of youth indicated that more than 60 percent believed their participation in the Teen Drop-In Center definitely helped them to feel better about their future (66 percent), feel that they were better able to handle whatever comes their way (65 percent), feel better about themselves (64 percent), and helped them realize they could do things they did not think they could do before (64 percent). The majority of participants reported that involvement in the program helped them to stay away from tobacco (72 percent), alcohol (75 percent), and drugs (83 percent). More than 90 percent of participants responded positively when asked if program participation had helped them to be better at getting along better with other people, setting goals, making friends, planning ahead, and solving problems. DYC seeks to continue to support the education, achievement, and well being of young people and improve their future prospects for employment and civic participation.


Needs Statement

Dorchester Youth Collaborative is located in the Fields Corner area of Dorchester, an area the Boston Police Department has labelled a violent hot spot. The community is home to approximately 26,000 residents, including 10,000 school age youth, of whom 90 percent are low income, as defined by their eligibility for the federal free and reduced price school lunch program. The population is among the most diverse in the city, and includes African Americans, Asians, Latinos, and whites. The area also is home to a population that is younger than the citywide average, and one half of the households have children under age 18. DYC works directly with the area’s young people; 45 percent of DYC program participants are ages 11 to 15 years and 55 percent are 16 to 20 years of age. The area struggles with higher than average rates of violence and substance abuse, as compared to the rest of the city. In 2006, 2007, and 2008 combined, homicide rates in North Dorchester was 18.2 and South Dorchester 21.1 per 100,000, compared to the Boston rate of 8.5.DYC’s primary target area is Dorchester with secondary service areas of Mattapan and Roxbury, neighborhoods where many young people struggle to find safe places to engage in healthy activities with positive adult role models.


CEO Statement

"Dorchester Youth Collaborative responds to the needs of low income urban youth with innovative programs that celebrate their creativity and unique value to the community."
 
In April of 2012, the White House recognized Dorchester Youth Collaoborative Emmett Folgert as a Champion of Change as part of the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention. (http://www.whitehouse.gov/champions/youth-violence-prevention/emmett-folgert-m.ed.-) Folgert is a founder and executive director of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative (DYC), a 40-year-old front line, community-based agency that serves high and proven risk teens and their families. Emmett is a program developer, gang peace negotiator, public policy advocate, and social media producer. His experience includes creating workforce training programs for youth with criminal records, as well as direct service to street gangs, runaway and homeless youth, and substance abusers. He helped create several violence prevention initiatives including: Safe Haven Teen Centers, street worker outreach programs, the Massachusetts Statewide Violence Prevention Program, the Mayor’s Clean Team, and Safe City Academy, a work/study GED program. Emmett created the Center for Urban Expression (CUE), a program where adults and youth form partnerships to create high impact, pro-social media products that address the problems urban youth face. Emmett is a writer and producer of such media, including the Miramax Film “Squeeze.” He is a commentator on local and national print, radio, and television programs. Emmett is a guest lecturer in the Boston area and was one of many architects of the Boston Miracle, a highly effective community and police partnership that reduced violence in Boston.

Board Chair Statement

Dorchester Youth Collaborative is one of the longest running organizations that meets the needs of the Boston youth.
Oree Rawls, Board President

Geographic Area Served

City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain

The Dorchester, Roxbury, Mattapan and Jamaica Plain neighborhoods which are all located within the City of Boston, Massachusetts

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Single Organization Support
  2. Education -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Center for Urban Expression

DYC runs the Center for Urban Expression, offering mentoring, sports, recreation, and media, visual, and performing arts. The Center is a safe haven drop-in center, providing meals, counseling, recreational activities, jobs, media arts, creative fun, and challenging opportunities to promote youth development, self worth, and a sense of belonging. DYC distinguishes itself from other youth programs in Boston through its philosophy and approach to serving youth, with a priority on serving teens who have a high failure rate in other youth programs. DYC employs bilingual staff members who regularly reach out to the Asian, Cape Verdean, and Latino youth who live in the community.
Budget  $300,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

More than 60 percent of the youth indicated that participation in the Teen Drop-In Center definitely helped them to feel better about their future (66 percent), feel that they were better able to handle whatever comes their way (65 percent), feel better about themselves (64 percent), and helped them realize they could do things they did not think they could do before (64 percent). The majority of participants reported that involvement in the program helped them to stay away from tobacco (72 percent), alcohol (75 percent), and drugs (83 percent). More than 90 percent of participants responded either “yes” or “kind of” when asked if program participation had helped them to be better at getting along better with other people, setting goals, making friends, planning ahead, and solving problems.

Program Long-Term Success  As a drop-in center that provides a safe and supportive environment, DYC is able to help reduce the likelihood that a youth will participate in high risk activities, as well as the risk of becoming a perpetrator or victim in neighborhood violence. DYC staff have an extensive network of resources and referrals to serve youth within the community.
Program Success Monitored By  Dorchester Youth Collaborative has a history of engaging high-risk youth in effective programming and conducts both qualitative and quantitative evaluations to measure outcomes. DYC uses the DotWell Safe City Youth Survey to evaluate the Teen Drop-In Center. The Safe City Survey is a research tool used to gauge youth development that is based upon the Colorado Trust Youth Participant Survey and supported by Efforts to Outcomes. The instrument reviews 46 items addressing six dimensions: sense of self, positive core values, positive life choices, life skills, cultural competency, and community involvement. DYC participants complete pre- and post-program survey.
Examples of Program Success  DYC’s recreation programs reduce fear, increase hope, and support youths’ options for achievement and success.

Democracy Club

The most effective advocates for programs that support low income, urban youth are often the youth themselves. Through DYC's Democracy Club, youth learn public speaking and community organizing. DYC is a first call for many media outlets and its youth often are featured in print and television stories. Democracy Club youth speak at City Hall and the State House about issues that include: violence prevention, youth jobs, substance abuse, and mental health.
Budget  $30,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
Democracy Club youth provide public education about the issues that low income urban youth face and the value of youth development programs. They work with other youth and adults to gain support for these critical programs. Groups like DYC's Democracy Club have been credited with successful passage of millions of dollars of city and state funding that supports jobs and oppertunities for urban youth.
Program Long-Term Success 
The Democracy Club provides "at risk" youth the oppertunity to address issues of poverty, class, race and violence in their lives. In time they become articulate educators for public policies that improve the lives of low income, urban youth. They learn about how government and the media works. They become community leaders.
Program Success Monitored By 
We measure success by the success or failure of city and state programs that provide funding for positive youth development activities of urban youth. In 2012 significant funding was provided by the city and state for youth jobs, violence prevention and substance abuse prevention. Democracy Club youth worked on all of these issues. We also measure success by the number of high impact media products that Democracy Club youth are involved in. In 2012 several stories in Boston.com/Boston Globe, Bostonherald.com/Boston Herald and Dorchester Reporter featured our youth. 
Examples of Program Success 
A Sunday Boston Globe story featuring two DYC Democracy Club members was chosen as the second best story of the year by Globe editors. The video that accompanied the story was nominated for a regioinal award. Adrian Walker wrote a column about another Club member. Using Google.com people can access media featuring Dorchester Youth Collaborative.

Quantum Program

DYC operates the Quantum Program, a mentoring and academic support initiative, in partnership with the Burke High School, an underperforming, high poverty, public school in Dorchester. The program serves students with multiple risk factors for dropping out of school and engaging in dangerous behaviors. Teens enroll in ninth grade and continue through graduation. Young people establish trusting and consistent relationships with adults. The program includes individual and group mentoring. Mentors receive regular progress reports from teachers and tailor students’ tutoring and academic support services to address gaps. Mentors work with participants to develop future goals and plans and apply to college. They support teens with conflict resolution and mediation skills and address their exposure to violence, victimization, and gangs. Mentors provide counseling and referrals to other services, such as health and behavioral health services, family support, summer programs, and jobs.
Budget  $85,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Remedial Programs
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program Short-Term Success  The need for intensive, targeted services and the state’s mandate to increase the graduation rate significantly led the administration of the Burke to form a partnership with DYC to provide the Quantum Opportunities Program. Recognizing that DYC has a particular expertise working with the most disengaged youth in the neighborhood, the Burke supported the program as a means to reduce the school’s high drop out and truancy rates, as well as mitigate the social and economic indicators that impact its student population. Other goals include improving high school academic grades and test scores, providing positive alternatives to gang involvement, strengthening community safety, and reducing engagement with risky behaviors such as substance abuse and teen parenting.
Program Long-Term Success  The goals of the Quantum Opportunities program are to: increase high school graduation rates and enrollment in postsecondary education and training; improve high school academic grades and test scores; ensure students’ attendance and participation; prevent gang involvement and other criminal activity; decrease risk of victimization and strengthening community safety; and reduce substance abuse and teen parenting. Mentors work with students and their families to ensure they attend and participate in school and help them realize their future goals.
Program Success Monitored By  Program staff monitor students’ attendance, grades, and test scores. They receive regular progress reports from teachers and behavioral reports from school administrators. Participants also complete the Safe City Survey, a research based evaluation tool support by Efforts to Outcomes, which tracks for improved educational, behavioral, and social-emotional outcomes.
Examples of Program Success  Of the initial cohort of 22 students, 78 percent are on track to receive a high school diploma in June of 2013; their graduation rate is more than twice the school’s overall rate. The goals of the program are to improve and elevate the proficiency of the students up to their grade level in school subjects such as math and English, improve their grades, reduce truancy, reduce the dropout rate, reduce crime and other problem behaviors, enhance their leadership and media skills, and increase the likelihood that the participants will graduate from high school and enroll in post-secondary education.

Safe City Academy

Safe City Academy is a comprehensive alternative education program for court and gang involved youth who have dropped out of school prior to obtaining a diploma. SCA provides academic assessment and individual educational plans for each student. The program includes workforce development through transitional employment and job skills training, case management, and mentoring. SCA provides small scholarships to ensure students, particularly those without family support, can meet their basic needs for food and transportation to the program and works sites. Students learn basic job skills, including resume writing and interviewing, invest in the neighborhood, and gain workplace experience. The program has realized significant positive results for a select population of vulnerable, disengaged youth, reducing violence and supporting educational advancement. Safe City Academy’s participants start as unemployed school dropouts and they become students, workers, and community builders.
Budget  $120,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Dropout Programs
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program Short-Term Success  Safe City Academy enrolls 30 disconnected youth ages 16 to 19 who are out of school and unemployed at any time. Over the course of the year, 50 young people participate in the program, with 70 percent obtaining a GED.
Program Long-Term Success  The goal of Safe City Academy is to engage high school drop outs, provide individualized, alternative education, and support them to obtain a diploma or credential. Youth, ages 16 to 20, who participate, will gain academic and other skills that will enable them to continue their education and obtain meaningful employment opportunities.
Program Success Monitored By  Dorchester Youth Collaborative measures the success of Safe City Academy through math and literacy scores, GED test participation and completion rates, employment, and enrollment in post-secondary education and vocational training programs.
Examples of Program Success  The most recent evaluation measured outcomes for 51 youth who participated in Safe City Academy. The participants identified a number of significant barriers to educational attainment: 45% reported substance abuse; 14% were pregnant or parenting; 41% were court involved; and 33% were gang involved. Of the participants, 71% remained in the program long enough to increase their grade level, obtain a GED, or enter a post secondary program. Of those, 10 obtained a GED, 58% improved two grade levels, and an additional 22% improved one grade level. The program measured other youth development indicators and found that 75% of participants reported increased sense of personal responsibility, increased sense of self, reduced threat of violence in school or at home, and increased knowledge, since enrolling in the program. In addition, participants noted decreased risk factors, with 74% reporting they were able to stay away from violence all or most of the time since joining DYC.

Sports Mentoring Programs

Offering sports instruction, positive youth development activities, and caring relationships with experienced staff, DYC’s basketball-mentoring, bicycle-mentoring, and soccer-mentoring programs provide at risk and vulnerable teens with opportunities for physical activity and positive interactions with peers and adult coaches. DYC’s recreation programs reduce fear, increase hope, and support youths’ options for achievement and success.

Budget  $175,000.00
Category  Recreation & Sports, General/Other Athletics & Sports
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

The bicycling, basketball, and soccer programs provide opportunities for high-risk young people to sustain meaningful relationships with others, develop a positive self-image, and engage in healthy physical activity. DYC mixes teams and emphasizes the importance of friendships through mentoring and guest speakers. DYC even removes the team colors that are associated with gangs and gives everyone the same high quality reversible black and white jerseys. Along with the continuum of DYC programming, the sports mentoring programs create: 1)  a safe environment; 2) connections for young people to both adults and their peers; 3) increased competencies by building skills and giving youth the opportunity to participate in program decisions; 4)  the confidence youth need for positive identity development.

Program Long-Term Success 

DYC recruits middle school youth ages 12 to 15 and other high and proven risk teens ages 15 to 19 into its sports mentoring programs. DYC runs sports leagues in the summer and during the school year from 3:00 until 6:00 in the afternoon and 6:00 until 10:00 in the evening, the hours when teens are most vulnerable to criminal activity and victimization and other high risk behaviors. DYC operates both culturally competent and gender specific programs in soccer and basketball. Participants are involved in all aspects of the program development and implementation, with planning focus groups, surveys, and the hiring of older teens to serve as coaches and role models for younger participants.

Program Success Monitored By 

DYC uses the DotWell Safe City Youth Survey to evaluate the impact of its programs. The Safe City Survey is a research tool used to gauge youth development that is based upon the Colorado Trust Youth Participant Survey and supported by Efforts to Outcomes. The instrument reviews 46 items addressing six dimensions: sense of self, positive core values, positive life choices, life skills, cultural competency, and community involvement. DYC participants complete both pre and post-program versions of the survey and historically, the results were striking and overwhelmingly positive.

Examples of Program Success 

Competitive sports are the easiest way to recruit the most youth at the lowest cost. The overwhelming choice for teens from these violent crime hot spots is basketball. The problem with traditional basketball programs is that coaches use rivalries to motivate youth to play hard. This aggravates conflicts between youth from rival gang neighborhoods where many of their older relatives are fighting. DYC provides youth with a completely different experience. DYC’s program provides food, high-quality team shirts, and a safe environment. Staff work hard to recruit and retain youth and young people want to be included.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Safe City Academy has realized significant positive results for a select population of vulnerable, disengaged and court-involved youth. Over its 30 year history, DYC has gained an understanding of the needs of drop-outs, particularly the importance of combining paid employment, mentoring, and education.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Emmett Folgert
CEO Term Start Jan 1982
CEO Email emmett.folgert@gmail.com
CEO Experience

Emmett Folgert, LCSW, is a co-founder and serves as executive director of the Dorchester Youth Collaborative. He has a masters’ degree in human social services and advanced clinical supervision and has worked with high-risk adolescents for over 30 years. He often acts as the lead Asian gang truce negotiator following major crimes in the Dorchester neighborhood. On April 4, 2012 as part of the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention, the White House honored Emmett Folgert as one of twelve leaders nationally who is working effectively to prevent youth violence within the community. Emmett is a writer and producer of high impact positive media that features urban youth.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Greg Hill Program Manager
Greg has 5 years of experience as a program manager and mentor of "at risk" youth at DYC. He worked for 4 years as the lead mentor for youth from the Burke High School and Harbor Middle School. Greg grew up in the Castlegate area of Dorchester. He is a graduate of Boston Public Middle and High Schools.
Maria Goncalves Knight Girls Program Coordinator
Maria is a graduate of Boston Public Middle and High Schools. She has a BA from UMass Boston. Her major was criminal justice.  Maria speaks Cape Verde Creole, Spanish and English.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Champions of Change The White House, President Barack Obama 2012

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Massachusetts Council of Human Service Providers 2010
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

DYC is part of the Safe City Collaboration with Catholic Charities Teen Center at St. Peters and DotWell. DYC also collaborates with Viet Aid and Vietnamese American Civic Association VACA. DYC participates in the Boston Foundations's My Summer in the City and Boston ROCKS. DYC has collaborations and school based programs at the Burke High School, Tech Boston Academy, Harbor School, and the BTU School, as well as collaborations and community programs at the Hyde Park YMCA, the Cleveland, Holland, and Tobin Community Centers, and Dorchester House. DYC also operates programs at Malcom X, Ronan, and Town Field city parks.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Dorchester Youth Collaborative has experienced great results, as well as significant challenges over the past few years. DYC is recognized as a leader in the work of engaging the high-risk, disconnected, and gang involved youth that other youth development programs cannot reach. In the spring of 2012, The White House honored DYC's executive director as one of twelve leaders in the country recognized for their work to prevent youth violence within their communities as part of the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention. The City of Boston has partnered with DYC to provide prevention, intervention, and employment opportunities for gang involved and other high risk youth. State agencies call upon the executive director and other staff for their knowledge and expertise engaging court involved youth. The media has provided DYC with critical attention over the past year, which has lead to an increase in individual donations. However, DYC's greatest challenge remains the ability to ensure a sustainable, diversified funding stream that will support its capacity to reach every local youth who needs its services.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 12
Number of Volunteers 11
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 10
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 3
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 3
Male: 13
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit No
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Oree Rawls
Board Chair Company Affiliation Small business owner
Board Chair Term July 2012 - June 2013
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Adalberto Arroyo Boston Water and Sewer Commission Voting
Mr. Joseph Burnika Carney Hospital Voting
Mr. John J. Doherty Jr. Painters Union, IUPAT DC 35 Voting
Ms. Rita Haney Massachusetts General Hospital Voting
Ms. Rose E. King Maloney, Kenney & King Voting
Ms. Catia Pina Boston Police Department --
Mr. Oree Rawls small business owner and resident Voting
Ms. Tram Tran MSW Boston Police Department Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Joseph Burnieika Carney Hospital/Steward Health Care Systems NonVoting
Mr. Lew Finfer Massachusetts Community Action Network NonVoting
Mr. Larry Mayes Catholic Charities NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 4
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 75%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 50%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

DYC prioritizes serving at-risk youth from high crime, low income areas. The difficult economy increases demand for our programs, but the same economy makes it more difficult to raise funds. The political problems in Washington DC have reduced opportunities for federal funds and the state and local budgets have not fully recovered from the recent economic recession. However the need continues to grow for skilled, trained staff and high quality programs for the most vulnerable youth in the city.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $724,000.00
Projected Expense $720,000.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2014 Audited Financials

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Revenue $753,129 $825,097 $936,104
Total Expenses $788,233 $859,232 $929,493

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$349,321 $480,843 $603,622
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $224,516 $200,894 $251,032
Investment Income, Net of Losses $12 $27 $17
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $179,280 $143,333 $77,200
Other -- -- $4,233

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Program Expense $633,643 $714,703 $781,000
Administration Expense $93,944 $86,957 $87,376
Fundraising Expense $60,646 $57,572 $61,117
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.96 0.96 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 83% 84%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 17% 12% 10%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Total Assets $311,052 $337,978 $383,093
Current Assets $272,063 $294,586 $354,219
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $55,950 $47,772 $58,752
Total Net Assets $255,102 $290,206 $324,341

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.86 6.17 6.03

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2014 2013 2012
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials. Contributions from individuals are listed under foundations and corporations when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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