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Junior League of Boston Incorporated

 117 Newbury Street
 Boston, MA 02116
[P] (617) 5369640
[F] (617) 5366853
www.JLBoston.org
[email protected]
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INCORPORATED: 1938
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2104362

LAST UPDATED: 01/30/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Junior League of Boston is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Its purpose is exclusively educational and charitable.

Mission Statement

The Junior League of Boston is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Its purpose is exclusively educational and charitable.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2011 to June 30, 2012
Projected Income $656,632.00
Projected Expense $535,799.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Amiga Program at Germaine Lawrence/Youth Villages
  • JL Boston Arts
  • Kids in the Kitchen

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Junior League of Boston is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Its purpose is exclusively educational and charitable.

Background Statement

The Junior League of Boston debuted in 1906. In 1906, a young woman named Sarah Lawrence gathered together several sewing circles to form a group based on the model of the Junior League of the City of New York to interest young women in the social problems and needs of the greater Boston Metro community.

An annual lecture series was initiated which included such distinguished speakers as Booker T. Washington, Jane Addams of Hull House, and the Honorable William Taft.  In addition to the lecture series, members divided themselves into committees, and began placing volunteers in social service agencies.

In the early summer of 1908, the Sewing Circle gave its first charitable contribution of $100 to the Instructive District Nursing Association (IDNA). On October 25, 1916, by formal vote, the Sewing Circle League became the Junior League of Boston, and by spring of 1917, the JL Boston had contributed $1,800 to five different charities, including IDNA, Boston Children's Aid Society and the Social Service Department of the Boston City Hospital.

Key accomplishments of JL Boston through the decades include:
  • Great Depression: raised money for relief funds and unemployment assistance.
  • World War II: members assisted with the war efforts.
  • 1960s: produced a film nationally recognized for its contributions to public understanding of the mentally challenged and the Guide to Boston for the Handicapped.
  • 1970s: founded and ran a child abuse center for the Massachusetts Welfare Department.
  • 1980s and 1990s: launched the Good Grief program, assisting children to cope with death, eventually was turned over to the Boston University School of Medicine. Also founded WIRE, the Women's Informational Referral and Educational Service which included a van that toured neighborhoods distributing educational materials on area services to women all over the city.

JL Boston is now part of the Association of Junior Leagues International (AJLI), an organization of 294 Junior League chapters in four countries. This organization is composed of more than 170,000 dedicated and creative women members from varying backgrounds and interests, who share a commitment to volunteering. JL Boston's trained volunteers began as a progressive, motivated and dedicated collection of trained female volunteers, and today, we honor these roots, and continue their legacy.


Impact Statement

Founded in 1906, the Junior League of Boston (JL Boston) has close to 1000 members and is one of Boston’s leading charitable organizations with over 16,000 volunteer hours donated annually to causes in the community supporting girls programs.

JL Boston believes that focusing on wellness and nutrition of girls develops tomorrow’s healthy and confident women and leaders. Our community programs address the issues girls of all ages face on a daily basis, including low self-esteem, poor body image, obesity, food insecurity, and poor nutrition.  Roughly 84% of the girls we work with are African-American, Hispanic/Latino, or Asian and between the ages of 9 and 12. They primarily reside in Charlestown, Dorchester and East Boston. The majority of them participate in their school’s public lunch program. 

In 2012, JL Boston took the Kids In The Kitchen (KITK) program into its second year, expanding the scope, programming, and number of participants.  This program is poised to have a wide reaching impact in providing nutrition, fitness, and wellness education and opportunities in economically disadvantaged populations.  One of JL Boston's goals is to continue to develop the curriculum and number of participants.
 
Also in 2012, JL Boston launched a new project in partnership with Healthworks Foundation to provide trained volunteers to assist economically disadvantaged women and children who may not have access to high-quality fitness opportunities.  A goal for 2013 is to deepen that partnership and support Healthworks Foundation as they grow the number of women and children who use the facilities.
 
 Last year was the first full-year of managing the Board-approved strategic plan.  One top goal of the plan for 2013 is to develop an organization impact statement.
 
A final success from 2012 was forming a partnership with Strong Women, Strong Girls for 2013, through which Junior League members will be mentors to college-aged women who, in turn, mentor elementary-aged girls.
 

Needs Statement

  1. Renovation of the Headquarters building in the Back Bay.  The proposed plans will provide a much-needed update of building and life safety systems, in addition to making the building accessible and ADA-compliant.  The renovation also will allow JL Boston to use the facilities for projects like Kids In The Kitchen, and to invite other community groups to use the space for their meetings and events.
  2. Assistance designing data collection and impact assessment tools to quantify the positive impact of JL Boston's community programs, in support our strategic goal of developing a portfolio of impact measurement tools.
  3. Technology refresh.  The equipment and systems currently in place are outdated, and do not support knowledge sharing and data-transfer from year to year.  Annual leadership turnover requires these efficiencies to sustain and grow JL Boston's community impact.

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Our program participants primarily reside in Charlestown, Dorchester and East Boston.

Organization Categories

  1. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Women's Service Clubs
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Amiga Program at Germaine Lawrence/Youth Villages

The Amiga Program is a big sister program for troubled adolescent girls living in a residential community at Germaine Lawrence in Arlington, MA.  The goal of this project is to empower these girls to develop a sense of self-worth and achievement, develop conflict resolution abilities, and make a lasting contribution to the wellbeing of their community.  This is achieved through building relationships with JL Boston volunteers who act as role models through a combination of well-structured, fun monthly group activities and one-on-one mentoring at least once a month.
Budget  $3,759.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Females Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  Since 2000, JL Boston and Germaine Lawrence have collaborated to establish and grow The Amiga Program.  Within this program, JL Boston members serve as mentors to girls in residence at the Germaine Lawrence School.  The School's staff provides training that prepare volunteers to work effectively with girls.  Topics include talking to adolescents, understanding behaviors, saying "no", and setting and managing therapeutic boundaries.  This program fills a personal void that is not easily bridged by professional staff.  The volunteers provide stable friendships and help girls master life skills like budgeting, cooking, eating out, using public transportation, shopping for personal hygiene products, and decision-making.  Other activities include driving lessons, college searches, and recreational field trips.  The collaborative spirit of JL Boston and Germaine Lawrence ensures that the experience of each Amiga and her volunteer mentor is worthwhile and exciting.
Program Long-Term Success  Over time, the Junior League of Boston's collaboration with Germaine Lawrence has strengthened.  Program enhancements based on annual evaluations have included follow-up training for volunteers to improve the interaction with the girls after the initial relationship is established, and the institution of an off-campus protocol to govern activities that take place outside of the school.  In 2011, JL Boston established a task force focused on nutrition and wellness for girls.  Their research has had an impact on the program by expanding the volunteers' ability to provide nutrition education and to promote physical activity.  To date, the Amiga Program has changed the lives of more than 200 girls, helping them develop self-worth, teaching them life skills, and providing them with positive relationships.  Each year, JL Boston works with approximately 21% of the Germaine Lawrence girls, placing an average of 20 volunteers and delivering 9 group activities through more than 1,400 hours of volunteer time.
Program Success Monitored By  The Junior League of Boston conducts annual mid-year and end-of-year program review of every project to evaluate success and areas of opportunity for growth.
Examples of Program Success 
One example of success involves a JL Boston volunteer and girl who formed a very deep bond over multiple years through the Amiga program.  One of their outings together was to pay a visit to the campus of the college the volunteer attended, where the girl was given a tour and also had the opportunity to talk about potential career and educational opportunities.  Several years later, the volunteer was contacted by a member of the staff at Germaine Lawrence, who informed her that not only had the girl graduated from high school, but she had been accepted to that same college and wanted the volunteer to know.
 
JL Boston often does not know specifically the long-term outcome of every girl that the volunteers work with through the Amiga program, but stories like this demonstrate that there is a long-term, positive result from these relationships and the mentoring.

JL Boston Arts

JL Boston Arts is an arts-based group mentoring program run annually by JL Boston volunteers for 40-50 fifth-grade girls (ages 10-11).  The program currently runs at Excel Academy in East Boston and Boston Renaissance Charter School in Hyde Park.  The goal of JL Boston Arts is to expose girls to six artistic disciplines (fine arts, creative arts, performing arts, culinary arts, design, and visual arts) by providing classroom learning coupled with hands-on experience.  JL Boston Arts provides girls with opportunities for self-exploration and self-expression through art and exposure to cultural experiences they might not otherwise have access to.  The program also encourages positive relationships with adults and builds upon the girls' innate, through perhaps unexplored, creative and leadership strengths.  The program was launched in 2000 and features a proprietary curriculum developed by JL Boston volunteers.
Budget  $15,380.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Females Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
By end of the project, the participants:
  •  Take part in hands-on experiences both in class and via field trips within the Boston arts community.  They visit venues and hear speakers that are often outside their typical sphere of experience.
  • Experience first-hand how self-awareness, self-expression and reflection contribute to their personal confidence and help them discover their individual leadership abilities.
  • Build a respect and understanding for the talents, contributions and ideas of fellow team members.
  • Learn and appreciate how others express themselves through various art forms.
  • Gain exposure to positive female role models through their interaction with JL Boston volunteers.
Program Long-Term Success  Long-term success includes the expansion of the Junior League of Boston's programming around the positive development of adolescent girls through experiential arts programming throughout the Boston area.
Program Success Monitored By  The Junior League of Boston conducts annual mid-year and end-of-year program review of every project to evaluate success and areas of opportunity for growth.
Examples of Program Success 
All the girls in the JL Boston Arts program end the year with greater knowledge of the arts plus enhanced critical thinking, problem solving and team building skills.  They have greater self-confidence and self-discipline, and an expanded view of the career choices available to them, both in the arts and in other fields.
 
For example, one participant was particularly shy and hesitant to participate in group activities.  It was clear to the volunteers that she was very interested in art, as she often had uniquely creative and imaginative ideas for her projects.  However when it came to present her pieces to the group, she would often withdraw.  By the end of the program, she was demonstrably more confident in herself and in her work.  For the final module on "design" she created an outfit and modeled it herself, walking down a "runway" in front of her peers in the in-class fashion show, demonstrating not only her artistic abilities but also her increased confidence and leadership.

Kids in the Kitchen

The Kids in the Kitchen initiative, which is supported by The Association of Junior League International Inc. and its member Leagues, empowers youth to make healthy lifestyle choices and helps revers the growth of childhood obesity and its associated health issues.  The goal of the program is to engage kids in the preparation of healthy meals as a means to educate them and their parents regarding nutrition and healthy choices by providing lessons and demonstrations related to preparation of healthy meals and snacks in partnership with local community organizations, chefs and nutritionists.  Kids in the Kitchen employs a  physical wellness curriculum developed in consultation with adolescent nutrition, education, and physical fitness experts.  Kids in the Kitchen volunteers are trained to provide the curriculum without judgment in a manner that supports girls' self-esteem and pride in their diverse cultural background.
Budget  $13,680.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Nutrition
Population Served Females Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  Short-term successes for this program include documenting a change in the eating and fitness habits of the program participants from the beginning to the end of the course.  Increased levels of exercise, increased fruit and vegetable consumption, and decreased junk food consumption would indicate that the curriculum and activities were impactful in positively altering the girls' habits.
Program Long-Term Success  Long-term success for this program would include seeing reduced rates of obesity within the schools and communities where the program is located.  Additionally, one of the overarching goals of all Junior League community projects is to incubate and develop new programs to a point that the partner organization can sustain them independently, freeing the Junior League to start the process again with a new community or area of need.
Program Success Monitored By  The Junior League of Boston conducts annual mid-year and end-of-year program reviews of every project to evaluate success and areas of opportunity for growth.
Examples of Program Success  The program introduces the girls to Zumba classes, taught by certified instructors.  This is an extremely popular session for the girls, most of whom are experiencing Zumba for the first time, and end up enjoying it as a way to have fun while also exercising. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Key Challenges
The key challenge that the Junior League of Boston faces within our community  projects is that we have many projects and they take a lot of womanpower to manage. It is also a challenge to "sunset" (retire) projects, but we must do this in order to a) stay within our focus area and b) have the opportunity to develop new projects and work with new community partners. 

Another challenge that we face in the greater Boston-area is working within a metro area where the non-profit and volunteer worlds are very saturated. This makes it challenging to narrow down and find the area where we can have the most impact.  We have two internal committees, the  Nutrition and Wellness Task Force and Community R&D, that focus on these issues and will continue to do research and make recommendations moving forward. 

Key Opportunities
As the Junior League of Boston continue to move in the direction of our focus area, and has more research and data on where we can truly have an impact, we have a huge opportunity to make a real and lasting difference in the lives of the girls we work through in our projects.  We believe that the Junior League of Boston is poised to become known for our work with girls around issues of nutrition and wellness, and to be known as the go-to group for volunteers in these areas. 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Cindy Reuter
CEO Term Start July 2012
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Cindy Reuter currently serves as President for the Junior League of Boston. She has also serviced as Secretary, Director of Nominating, Member at Large and Co-Chair of JL Boston Arts. Mrs. Reuter is employed full time as Research Analyst at a Financial Services firm. She holds an undergraduate degree in business administration from Villanova University and a graduate degree in management from Boston University.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Wendy Cobb July 2011 June 2012
Beth Llewellyn July 2010 June 2011

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mikael Bristow Operations Manager Mikael Agrusa Bristow is employed as the Operations Manager for the Junior League of Boston, having joined the League as the senior staff member in 2008. Ms. Bristow has over 10 years of experience in marketing, consulting, legal, academic and non-profit industries. Prior to joining JL Boston, she worked for a pharmaceutical strategy consulting firm. Ms. Bristow oversees the staff, facilities, and daily operations of the Junior League of Boston. She holds an MBA in International Management from Boston University.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
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Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Association of Junior Leagues International --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 970
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 50%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): Other
Gender Female: 3
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 8
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Cindy Reuter
Board Chair Company Affiliation Fidelity
Board Chair Term July 2012 - June 2013
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Kirsten Alexander Community Volunteer Voting
Mikael Bristow Junior League of Boston Exofficio
Anna Guerin Community Volunteer Voting
Laurel Lagatta Community Volunteer Voting
Teresa Lisek Community Volunteer Voting
Tracey Manzi Community Volunteer Voting
Chanz McManus Community Volunteer Voting
Carrie Murphy Community Volunteer Voting
Laura O'Connell Community Volunteer Voting
Koren Phillips Community Volunteer Voting
Natalie Ralston Community Volunteer Voting
Elizabeth Tyminski The Engineering Center Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 12
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 13
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Community Outreach / Community Relations
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Education
  • Finance
  • Human Resources / Personnel
  • Membership
  • Nominating
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
  • Technology

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2011 to June 30, 2012
Projected Income $656,632.00
Projected Expense $535,799.00
Form 990s

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Revenue $754,827 $872,709 $866,461
Total Expenses $539,784 $498,776 $551,254

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $243,203 $270,274 $271,056
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $236,950 $225,973 $225,587
Investment Income, Net of Losses $42,351 $171,913 $102,518
Membership Dues $220,218 $197,418 $198,635
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $12,105 $7,131 $68,665

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Program Expense $262,988 $234,997 $258,206
Administration Expense $153,844 $158,236 $178,783
Fundraising Expense $122,952 $105,543 $114,265
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.40 1.75 1.57
Program Expense/Total Expenses 49% 47% 47%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 51% 39% 42%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Total Assets $2,569,664 $2,346,958 $1,974,357
Current Assets $1,113,823 $1,011,733 $881,265
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $236,497 $228,834 $230,166
Total Net Assets $2,333,167 $2,118,124 $1,744,191

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
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Financial Planning

Endowment Value $22,407.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Purpose To service the debt association with a major renovation to Headquarters building in the Back Bay. The proposed plans will provide a much-needed update of building systems, in addition to making the building accessible and ADA-compliant. The renovation also will allow JL Boston to use the facilities for its projects like Kids In The Kitchen and to invite other community groups to use the space for their meetings and events.
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 4.71 4.42 3.83

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2012 2011 2010
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

While the Junior League of Boston does not maintain a separate reserve fund, we currently have adequate reserves to sustain operations should our income be reduced or eliminated.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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