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Cambridge Center for Adult Education Inc

 PO Box 9113, 42 Brattle Street
 Cambridge, MA 02238
[P] (617) 547-6789
[F] (617) 8762755
http://www.ccae.org
info@ccae.org
Terry Byrne
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1870
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2144159

LAST UPDATED: 01/30/2015
Organization DBA --
Former Names Cambridge Social Union (1937)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Since 1870, the Cambridge Center for Adult Education has been dedicated to providing the widest range of high-quality, low-cost learning opportunities for the diverse adults of greater Boston.
 
Our two historic buildings, both of which are on National Register of Historic Places, are an essential part of our success. The William Brattle House (1727) and the Dexter Pratt/Blacksmith House (1808), are home to our classes and special programs, including The Blacksmith House Poetry Series, which has featured both nationally known and emerging writers for 40 years; Community Supported Art, which connects local artists directly to shareholders, following the model of community supported agriculture; Home Run in Harvard Square, a series on the art, history and science of baseball; and free, accidental learning events, including New England's largest Ukulele Jam.

Mission Statement

Since 1870, the Cambridge Center for Adult Education has been dedicated to providing the widest range of high-quality, low-cost learning opportunities for the diverse adults of greater Boston.
 
Our two historic buildings, both of which are on National Register of Historic Places, are an essential part of our success. The William Brattle House (1727) and the Dexter Pratt/Blacksmith House (1808), are home to our classes and special programs, including The Blacksmith House Poetry Series, which has featured both nationally known and emerging writers for 40 years; Community Supported Art, which connects local artists directly to shareholders, following the model of community supported agriculture; Home Run in Harvard Square, a series on the art, history and science of baseball; and free, accidental learning events, including New England's largest Ukulele Jam.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Aug 01, 2011 to July 31, 2012
Projected Income $3,044,048.00
Projected Expense $2,602,842.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • CCAE Classes and Events

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Since 1870, the Cambridge Center for Adult Education has been dedicated to providing the widest range of high-quality, low-cost learning opportunities for the diverse adults of greater Boston.
 
Our two historic buildings, both of which are on National Register of Historic Places, are an essential part of our success. The William Brattle House (1727) and the Dexter Pratt/Blacksmith House (1808), are home to our classes and special programs, including The Blacksmith House Poetry Series, which has featured both nationally known and emerging writers for 40 years; Community Supported Art, which connects local artists directly to shareholders, following the model of community supported agriculture; Home Run in Harvard Square, a series on the art, history and science of baseball; and free, accidental learning events, including New England's largest Ukulele Jam.

Background Statement

Founded in 1870 as the Cambridge Social Union, we officially became the Cambridge Center for Adult Education in 1938. In 1889, the Cambridge Social Union purchased and moved into the home of Loyalist William Brattle at 42 Brattle St., which was built in 1727 and served as headquarters for the quartermaster of the Continental Army from 1775-76. From 1831-33 it was also the home of feminist and author Margaret Fuller. CCAE operates this extraordinary building for the full enjoyment of the general public through its classes and special events, using all the rooms year round for classrooms and performances.
 
After making 42 Brattle Street its home for 83 years, CCAE accommodated increased enrollment with the purchase of the Blacksmith House at 56 Brattle St. and the three-story house at 5 Story St. The Blacksmith House is the location where poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow observed the blacksmith at work under the "spreading chestnut tree," a scene immortalized in his famous poem in 1839. It later became the home of escaped slave Mary Walker and her family, and in the mid-20th century was the location of The Window Shop, a cafe and educational center for recent refugees from Eastern Europe. The building now houses several classrooms, an auditorium, and art studios in both the original structure and a 1973 addition.
 
In 2009, CCAE appointed Susan Hartnett the first new executive director in 23 years, and the organization began significantly increasing fundraising efforts, retiring an operating debt, building reserves, streamlining the online registration system, improving both instructor evaluations, and programming. A property inspection report and an Historic Structures report revealed significant deterioration of the facilities, and after consultation with an engineer and historic preservationist, CCAE developed a capital budget to address urgent historic preservation, energy efficiency, and classroom use, which we hope to accomplish by the end of 2013.

Impact Statement

Accomplishments: 1) Financial stability: Within the last two years, CCAE eliminated a long standing operating deficit and established an operating reserve through aggressive cost controls, increased tuition revenue (for the first time in more than a decade) and expanded contributed income. We are now able to cover annual operating costs and allocate approximately $100,000 to our capital budget each year. 2) Improved student and teacher interaction: Over the past year, CCAE has streamlined the on-line registration process, and improved the student and teacher evaluation process, working toward assisting teachers with some training and responding to student needs with both new and modified course offerings, including more weekend workshops, intensives and shorter term offerings. 3) In 2011, CCAE launched Community Supported Art, an opportunity to connect artists directly to shareholders in a program modeled on community supported agriculture. With seed funding from the Mass. Cultural Council, CSArt generated lots of publicity and goodwill for the artists, CCAE and our partners – the Cambridge and Somerville Arts Councils, Cambridge and Somerville Local Firsts – and the program will be repeated and expanded in 2012. Goals: Continue to work toward the right size for the organization with regard to fundraising, program development, and marketing.

Needs Statement

1) During 2011, CCAE developed a $1.5 million capital plan to address accessibility, historic preservation, energy efficiency and building system upgrades in our two historic buildings. As of Dec. 1, we have raised $400,000. Our goal is to raise the remainder of the funds and complete the work by 2013. 2) Since 1973, The Cambridge Center for Adult Education (CCAE)’s Blacksmith House Poetry Series has been connecting audiences to poets and novelists. To celebrate the 40th anniversary of the series, CCAE is working to raise $40,000 to allow us to add a new element – weekend residencies for three nationally recognized poets. 3) In the fall of 2010, CCAE consolidated and its daytime lecture series to serve our older students more effectively. We offer 60 lectures each year on topics relating to health, arts and ideas at a cost of $10,000. With local partners in the health care and academic fields we engage our audiences socially and intellectually, which studies show have a critical health impact as we age. 4) We are taking a holistic approach to teaching both foreign languages and English as a Second Language with a new series of immersion days that allow participants to experience language through movement, music, theater, and task-oriented exercises, such as cooking and art-making.

CEO Statement

Letter from Executive Director Susan Hartnett, September, 2011: I am delighted to report on the Center's core work: our public programming - specifically the extraordinary work that goes on in our classrooms every day of the week. This past year, we offered over 2,000 classes that were taught by 400 professionals and reached 14,000 people. Many of these students returned for multiple classes, for a total of more than 17,000 registrations. Another 3000 people attended our lectures, exhibitions, and performances. We are listening very closely to what our students have to say about their experience with our teachers, staff, and facilities. We hear a strong request for more weekend classes and intensive workshops - designed to support our students' increasingly busy lives. We are learning about important distinctions among our students - the manner in which cooking students interact with us and what they want is very different from visual arts students, who are in turn quite unlike writing students or language students. These differences manifest in the classes they desire, the times they attend classes, and their patterns of engagement. One of the most powerful results of our strategic planning work is the decision to organize our education program in a new way. We are creating Centers of Learning that will help us: * Develop a clearer sense of each program area's strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities for growth. * Foster a shared understanding of professional standards, best practices, and technology across all program areas. * Experiment with new ways of convening our teachers, sharing wisdom, and supporting outstanding teaching. * Allocate our limited resources (time, money, and people) to support the most valuable programs. We expect it will take the next three years to fully construct our Centers of Learning, but already we can feel new energy and expanding imaginations as we move ahead. I look forward to sharing our progress with you in the coming months. Best Wishes, Susan Hartnett

Board Chair Statement

From the board chair, Bill Polk, September, 2011: The fall marks the beginning of another year of adults learning and growing at the Cambridge Center for Adult Education - a tradition begun over 140 years ago. Important things happen here every day: some among us learn new skills like using Excel or keeping bees or - in my case - singing! Others write books, develop new ideas, create art, or learn to speak a new language. Our students, faculty, and staff at the Center are hard at work on the new academic year. Our annual report represents an opportunity to share our work from the recent past and to acknowledge the many people who have helped us. Most striking perhaps is our strategic plan, which will help us align our great ambitions with our resources, both those we have and those we will need to capture. We have reaffirmed our shared vision for the Center, while articulating our plan for retaining and increasing the Center's preeminence as the leader in informal adult learning. The Board has set two goals to drive this effort: to deliver excellent programming in the classroom; and to ensure the strength of our finances, our facilities, and increasingly, our use of technology. Early response to our plans for achieving these goals - from teachers, students, and staff - has been very positive. I will share a few more highlights from the past year, an extraordinary one for the Center: * We witnessed an 8% increase in registrations from the previous year, the first increase in more than a decade. * We cut operating costs by reducing utility costs, securing pro bono legal help, and increasing our use of technology * We increased contributions across all segments: individuals, foundations, corporations, and governmental agencies. I am very proud of all that we have done to prepare CCAE for the future. I thank our supporters including our donors, the Board of Directors, our teachers, students, and staff. Everyone has been an important part of this progress. We still have much to do, and with your help, we will succeed. Kind Regards, Bill Polk

Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
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Organization Categories

  1. Education - Adult Education
  2. Arts,Culture & Humanities -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

CCAE Classes and Events

CCAE offers classes in our six centers of expertise -- Visual Arts, Performing Arts, Poetry and Creative Writing, Science and the Humanities, Cultural Studies and Languages, and Technology/New Media – as well as producing 50 live performances (music, theater, dance), 45 poetry readings, 110+ lectures and 12 visual art exhibits annually. CCAE places a premium on keeping classes affordable and accessible, encouraging low- and fixed-income citizens to participate in cultural events and classes. Nearly 20% of our students are on scholarships (including 18% of our ESL students), while another 900 students took advantage of our 30% senior discount.
 
CCAE’s ESL programs have become the largest offered outside a university setting, serving more than 1,200 students from 33 different countries.
 
In the fall of 2010, as a community service, CCAE launched To Your Health, a free, daytime lecture series focused on aging gracefully, programmed with local health care providers and research centers.
Budget  2,800,000
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Adults Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  Inspiring and educating people from all walks of life.
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Susan Hartnett
CEO Term Start Sept 2009
CEO Email susan.hartnett@ccae.org
CEO Experience Susan Hartnett has been the Executive Director at the Cambridge Center for Adult Education since September 2009. She has been active in the local cultural scene for nearly three decades, including a ten-year stint as the Director of the Boston Center for the Arts and five years in Boston City Hall, as Director of Economic Development for the Boston Redevelopment and then as Director of the Mayor's Office of Arts, Tourism and Special Events.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
James H. Smith 1986 Aug 2009
Alida J. O'Loughlin 1971 Sept 1986

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 19
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 1
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 80%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 12
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit --
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? No
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. William Polk
Board Chair Company Affiliation retired
Board Chair Term Sept 2009 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Sharman Altshuler veterinarian Voting
Ms. Hilary Burling retired --
Ms. Iris Chandler retired --
Ms. Patricia P. Chappell retired --
Ms. Mary H. Coolidge retired --
Ms. Elizabeth Coxe retired --
Mr. S. Donald Gonson attorney Voting
Mr. John Herron Jr. consultant Voting
Ms. Patricia Jacoby retired Voting
Ms. Jane Katims university professor Voting
Ms. Kelly Begg Lawrence U.S. Assistant District Attorney --
Ms. Lindsay Leard-Coolidge Community Volunteer --
Ms. Susan Eldredge Mead consultant --
Ms. Kate Champion Murphy consultant Voting
Mr. Christian Nolen consultant Voting
Ms. Patricia Alvarado Nunez WGBH Voting
Mr. Jonathan H. Poorvu Property Management Group Voting
Ms. Natalie Wigotsky Reed consultant Voting
Ms. Jean M. Smith retired Voting
Ms. Frederika Stephenson retired Voting
Mr. David G. Strahan, Jr. Cambridge Trust Co. Voting
Ms. Patricia L. Strauss retired Voting
Ms. Sandra B. Walker Associate Dean for Academic and Administrative Affairs in the Graduate School of Arts and Social Sciences at Lesley University Voting
Ms. Rachel Levy Wexler M/C Communications Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 26
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 20
Male: 10
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 95%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Fiscal Year Aug 01, 2011 to July 31, 2012
Projected Income $3,044,048.00
Projected Expense $2,602,842.00
Form 990s

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2011 Audited financial statement

2010 Audited financial statement

2009 Audited financial statement

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Revenue $3,116,390 $2,899,655 $2,890,089
Total Expenses $2,783,116 $2,753,491 $3,086,885

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $17,000 $16,100 $15,600
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $17,000 $16,100 $15,600
Individual Contributions $326,503 $276,436 $138,189
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $2,500,015 $2,431,611 $2,587,458
Investment Income, Net of Losses $378 $22,932 $-27,242
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $158,031 $54,532 $61,328
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $114,463 $98,044 $114,756

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Program Expense $2,455,494 $2,508,488 $2,785,988
Administration Expense $179,221 $185,957 $205,720
Fundraising Expense $148,401 $59,046 $95,177
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.12 1.05 0.94
Program Expense/Total Expenses 88% 91% 90%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 30% 17% 44%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Total Assets $2,109,954 $1,867,141 $1,641,112
Current Assets $779,891 $591,766 $214,627
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $265,629 $356,090 $276,225
Total Net Assets $1,844,325 $1,511,051 $1,364,887

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.94 1.66 0.78

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2011 2010 2009
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

The Cambridge Center for Adult Education hopes to inspire individuals to learn new skills, explore their talents, and connect to the community and to each other.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

We offer affordable classes and programs. We provide an encouraging, supportive, non-judgmental environment. We make our programs convenient times and in a convenient, accessible location.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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