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Organization DBA Boston Area Rape Crisis Center
BARCC
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Founded in 1973, The Boston Area Rape Crisis Center (BARCC) is the only rape crisis center in the Greater Boston area and the oldest and largest center in Massachusetts. Our mission is to end sexual violence through healing and social change. 

Mission Statement

Founded in 1973, The Boston Area Rape Crisis Center (BARCC) is the only rape crisis center in the Greater Boston area and the oldest and largest center in Massachusetts. Our mission is to end sexual violence through healing and social change. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $3,110,500.00
Projected Expense $3,063,919.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Case Management and Legal Advocacy
  • Community Awareness and Prevention Services
  • Counseling
  • Hotline
  • Medical Advocacy

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Founded in 1973, The Boston Area Rape Crisis Center (BARCC) is the only rape crisis center in the Greater Boston area and the oldest and largest center in Massachusetts. Our mission is to end sexual violence through healing and social change. 

Background Statement

The Boston Area Rape Crisis Center was founded in March of 1973 by a small group of women, several of whom were survivors of sexual violence. Started at the Women’s Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts, BARCC began in a room just big enough to hold a desk, a telephone, and a single mattress. The center’s main focus at this time was its 24-hour-a-day hotline—they even called the family whose phone number was 492-RAPE and persuaded them to give it up! The founders (all volunteers) would take turns sleeping in the room to ensure that someone was there to pick up the phone or help a survivor who came in at any time of the day or night. At the time, it was a huge risk and quite revolutionary to speak out and take action against sexual violence, which was never discussed openly and remained shrouded in myth, blame, and silence.  

The Boston Area Rape Crisis Center was the first rape crisis center in Massachusetts and the second in the United States. Over the years, rape crisis centers across the country have used BARCC’s successful programs and services as models for their own communities. Today, BARCC provides free, confidential support and services to survivors of sexual violence ages 12 and up and their families and friends. We work with survivors of all genders regardless of when the violence occurred, and our goal is to empower survivors to heal and seek justice in ways that are meaningful to them. We meet the needs of survivors in crisis and long after, and we assist survivors as they navigate the health-care, criminal justice, social service, and school systems.

We also work with a wide range of organizations and communities, including high schools, colleges, police, health-care providers, and businesses, to advocate for change. We provide training in how to respond to survivors and create cultures that prevent sexual violence in the first place. Our response and prevention programs are based on research and more than 40 years of direct service experience. We are frequently asked to provide expert testimony about potential policy and legislative solutions to preventing and responding to sexual violence. We also provide expert commentary in the media on these issues. We are powered by a great staff and by more than 190 volunteers from our communities.

Impact Statement

While it will always be the individual stories of survivors, family members and communities that bring about so much satisfaction in our work, we are also proud to share these recent accomplishments:

· Since 2011 BARCC has been a recipient of grant funding from the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women to improve access to comprehensive rape crisis services for survivors with disabilities in collaboration with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), MBTA Transit Police and the Boston center for Independent Living.

· In April 2016, BARCC and its collaborative partners, Pathways for Change and the Center for Hope and healing received the Victim Service "Innovations Award" for serving adolescent survivors of sexual abuse from the MA Attorney General's Office.

· With continued investment by the MA Department of Public Health BARCC has continued to provide free access to a curriculum for early childhood providers on understanding and responding to children’s sexual behaviors and to develop new tools for working with parents of young children.

· BARCC was able to move its Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) program from the pilot stage into full implementation. The program provides medical accompaniment and hotline services to incarcerated survivors of sexual assault. BARCC has partnered with the MA Department of Corrections, Suffolk County Sheriff's Department and Norfolk Sheriff's Department.

The goals of the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center are:

· to provide free, expert care, counseling, guidance and advocacy to victims of sexual violence aged 12 and older and to their families, and

· to provide outreach, education, and training focused on increasing public health and safety in the short term and reducing and eventually eradicating sexual violence in the long term,

· to offer leadership and innovation in sexual violence prevention and intervention to the region and beyond.



Needs Statement

1. Funds for our child sexual abuse prevention work with child care programs - $50,000

2. Funds to provide direct  financial support ($50- $1000)   to BARCC clients needing small items such as new locks or windows,  to a few nights in a hotel for safety, or support for needed medications post-assault - $10,000 per year

3. People from in and around Boston interested in serving on our committed and active board of directors and/or as a direct service volunteer with our hotline, medical accompaniment program or community outreach program. 


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
With the help of our professional staff and more than 100 dedicated volunteers, we provide direct services to the 29 cities of the greater Boston region from our offices in Cambridge and Boston.  We also offer statewide and national training and technical assistance.

Organization Categories

  1. Mental Health & Crisis Intervention - Sexual Assault Services
  2. Human Services - Victims' Services
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

Case Management and Legal Advocacy

We work directly with survivors and significant others to ensure that their immediate and longer-term health, housing, financial, and safety needs are being met. This includes providing information and comprehensive support to survivors in accessing health insurance, housing funds, emergency shelter, victim compensation, public benefits, and more. The program also advocates for policy changes that further economic justice for survivors.

Our legal team helps survivors understand their legal rights and options. We do not offer legal representation, but we assist survivors as they navigate the civil and criminal justice systems, including campus processes. Our lawyers and advocates also assist with ongoing harassment or stalking. They advocate for survivors’ privacy and safety in every aspect of their life. We also offer referrals to attorneys who have experience with sexual assault cases.

Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Sexual Assault Crisis Intervention
Population Served Victims
Program Short-Term Success  To come
Program Long-Term Success  To come
Program Success Monitored By  To come
Examples of Program Success  To come

Community Awareness and Prevention Services

We provide education and training to schools, college campuses, police, businesses, community-based organizations, and communities. Our trainings cover how to respond appropriately to survivors of sexual assault and how to create school and workplace cultures that reduce the occurrence of sexual assault in the first place. We also help develop the leadership of survivors, youth, and community members in ending sexual violence. For example, we offer trainings on how people can take action when they witness inappropriate comments or behaviors related to sexual violence. Another example is a workshop on consent for youth.)

Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Sexual Assault Crisis Intervention
Population Served Victims
Program Short-Term Success  To come
Program Long-Term Success  To come
Program Success Monitored By  To come
Examples of Program Success  To come

Counseling

We provide short-term individual, couples, family, and group counseling with trained counselors for survivors and their families and friends. We work with survivors and their loved ones to find their strengths, to understand the impact of trauma on their lives, to build and use coping skills, and to explore ways to heal and thrive.

Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Sexual Assault Crisis Intervention
Population Served Victims
Program Short-Term Success  To come
Program Long-Term Success  To come
Program Success Monitored By  To come
Examples of Program Success  To come

Hotline

Our highly trained and supervised volunteer counselors and staff are available 24-7 to talk with survivors, their families and friends, and providers about sexual violence. We take calls from people in all stages of their experience, from the immediate crisis after an assault to years and even decades into the healing process. Our counselors will provide referrals to services and explain the resources available, including accompaniment to the hospital for a sexual assault exam.

Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Sexual Assault Crisis Intervention
Population Served Victims
Program Short-Term Success  To come
Program Long-Term Success  To come
Program Success Monitored By  To come
Examples of Program Success  To come

Medical Advocacy

Our highly trained and supervised volunteer and staff advocates will meet survivors and their significant others at the hospital emergency room and intensive care unit 24-7. The advocate’s purpose is to provide comfort to the survivor by sharing knowledge, reinforcing the control the survivor has, facilitating communication as needed, and ensuring the survivor has next steps and referrals.

Budget  --
Category  Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Sexual Assault Crisis Intervention
Population Served Victims
Program Short-Term Success  It is the mission of the medical advocacy program at BARCC to ensure that all survivors are treated respectfully and fairly when being treated in an emergency room and that all survivors who want an advocate are able to have one by their side. It is proven that a positive ER experience can allow a survivor to begin the healing process faster, this is our goal for all survivors of sexual assault.
Program Long-Term Success 


Program Success Monitored By 

Through both qualitative and quantitative data collection, it has been shown that having an advocate with you in the ER after a sexual assault results in a better hospital experience and less chance of post-traumatic stress. Survivors are more likely to get follow-up care, seek counseling and are more likely to report the assault to the police. And the police respond to the case more seriously if an advocate is present.

Examples of Program Success 

Research has shown that survivors who have a rape crisis advocate present at the hospital are more likely to feel positive about the experience of going to the hospital. 

•             “The advocate met me at the hospital and, I have to say, I don’t think I could have gone through it without her. She seemed to know when I needed to talk and when I just needed to have someone there. She explained everything that was happening and made me feel like there was someone who was just there for me – someone who was on my side... I will never forget the way [she] cared for me, the way [she] dropped everything to be there for me, the way [she] helped me through the worst nightmare of my life.”

•             “When my head was full of ‘taking action and control,’ BARCC helped me realize that I could best help my daughter by letting her be in control because that’s what she lost when she was assaulted. I know my daughter wouldn't be the wonderful, healthy person she is today without BARCC's help.”


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Gina Scaramella
CEO Term Start Aug 2002
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Gina Scaramella is the executive director of the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center, Massachusetts' largest and oldest provider of services for sexual assault survivors and public education programs for the community. Before assuming her current role, Gina led the development of the Center's enormously successful medical advocacy program, in which highly-trained volunteers meet and support rape survivors at hospital emergency departments. This, along with other work of the Center, has contributed to a remarkable 700 percent increase in reporting of sexual assault crimes. She has worked with the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center for over eight years, and before that she worked with the Center as a volunteer counselor for two years. Gina serves on the Governor's Commission on Sexual and Domestic Violence, as well as numerous other boards and committees dedicated to the issue. She earned her Master of Social Work from Boston University, and her Bachelor of Science in Child and Family Studies from the University of New Hampshire. She lives in Newton, Massachusetts with her partner and two sons.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Kristy Cullivan Sierra Development Director --
Stephanie DeCandia -- --
Peter Fernandes Director of Finance and Operations --
Stephanie Trilling Director of Community Awareness and Prevention Services --
Shelley Yen-Ewert Director of Organizational Development and Learning --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Innovations Award Massachusetts Office for Victim Assistance 2016
National Crime Victim Service Award United States Department of Justice 2009
Non-Profit of the Year Cambridge Chamber of Commerce 2006

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 24
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 130
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 91%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 18
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 23
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms Beth Molnar
Board Chair Company Affiliation Northeastern University
Board Chair Term July 2014 - June 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Toyin Ajayi Commonwealth Care Alliance Voting
Laura Brelsford MBTA Voting
Stephanie Brown Community volunteer Voting
Duane de Four MIT Voting
Lynn Eikenberry Community Volunteer Voting
April Evans Monitor Clipper Partners Voting
Karen Kupferberg Community volunteer Exofficio
Beth Molnar Community volunteer Voting
Shavonne Moore Justice Resource Institute Voting
Kathryn Murtagh Harvard Management Company Voting
Laura Nielsen Community Volunteer Voting
Taneesha Peoples EMC Voting
Cliff Pollan CEO, Sococo Voting
Leslie Pucker Social Worker Voting
Ed Reiss Deutsche Bank Voting
Craig Stelmach Century 21 Northshore Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 3
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 4
Not Specified 4

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 85%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 75%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $3,110,500.00
Projected Expense $3,063,919.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2016 BARCC Audit

2015 BARCC Audit

2014 BARCC Audit

2013 BARCC Audit

2012 BARCC Audit

2011 BARCC Audit

2010 BARCC Audit

2009 BARCC Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $2,840,204 $2,454,461 $2,320,273
Total Expenses $2,601,654 $2,360,665 $2,246,614

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $1,972,051 $1,665,887 $1,458,198
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $1,972,051 $1,665,887 $1,458,198
Individual Contributions $462,266 $311,394 $458,041
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $3,574
Earned Revenue -- $0 $0
Investment Income, Net of Losses $275 $167 $580
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events $379,735 $432,204 $351,823
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $25,877 $44,809 $48,057

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $1,904,684 $1,736,864 $1,656,708
Administration Expense $255,395 $241,340 $213,405
Fundraising Expense $441,575 $382,461 $376,501
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.09 1.04 1.03
Program Expense/Total Expenses 73% 74% 74%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 16% 16% 17%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $1,366,003 $1,109,676 $970,983
Current Assets $1,325,170 $1,045,144 $944,611
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $264,978 $247,201 $202,304
Total Net Assets $1,101,025 $862,475 $768,679

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.00 4.23 4.67

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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