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Straight Ahead Ministries, Inc.

 791 Main Street
 Worcester, MA 01610
[P] (508) 753-8700 x 102
[F] (508) 438-0182
http://www.straightahead.org/
[email protected]
Scott Larson
Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1987
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-3103694

LAST UPDATED: 03/10/2016
Organization DBA SAM, Straight Ahead
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Headquartered in Worcester, MA, Straight Ahead Ministries is a national non-profit that reduces recidivism among juvenile and young adult offenders through programs in correctional facilities and in the community.  Since 1987, SAM has served more than 75,000 youth in over 400 secure facilities across the nation.  We have worked closely with the MA Department of Youth Services for more than 28 years to serve high-risk juvenile offenders.

Mission Statement

Headquartered in Worcester, MA, Straight Ahead Ministries is a national non-profit that reduces recidivism among juvenile and young adult offenders through programs in correctional facilities and in the community.  Since 1987, SAM has served more than 75,000 youth in over 400 secure facilities across the nation.  We have worked closely with the MA Department of Youth Services for more than 28 years to serve high-risk juvenile offenders.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Apr 01, 2015 to Mar 31, 2016
Projected Income $2,219,000.00
Projected Expense $2,219,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 1. Ready4Life
  • 2. Youth Re-entry Project
  • 3. Education and Employment Advancement (Straigh2Work)
  • 4. Gang Reconciliation
  • 5. Social Ventures

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Headquartered in Worcester, MA, Straight Ahead Ministries is a national non-profit that reduces recidivism among juvenile and young adult offenders through programs in correctional facilities and in the community.  Since 1987, SAM has served more than 75,000 youth in over 400 secure facilities across the nation.  We have worked closely with the MA Department of Youth Services for more than 28 years to serve high-risk juvenile offenders.


Background Statement

  • Straight Ahead Ministries (SAM) began running youth discussion and support groups in juvenile detention facilities in 1987 and has worked with the MA Department of Youth Services in various ways ever since.
  • In 1990, SAM opened its first aftercare home for up to seven boys transitioning out of lock-up in MA. The recidivism rate for those who lived there is just 6%.
  • In 1992, SAM developed the Boston Urban Church Network to mobilize and support churches to engage in outreach and support for juvenile offenders.
  • In 1995, SAM formed its first affiliate, in Georgia. We now have affiliates in 15 states and 5 countries.
  • In 2004, Public/Private Ventures, Inc. chose our Boston/Lynn program as a national demonstration for best practices in juvenile re-entry, as part of an initiative funded by the US Department of Justice and the Casey and Ford Foundations. The recidivism rate for 210 youth after three years was just 14.8%.
  • From 2005-07, SAM operated Straight Ahead Academy, an innovative reentry residential facility for youth transitioning out of juvenile facilities. 26 students attended the Academy; 19 graduated, 12 attained their GED’s, and six went on to college.
  • In 2006, the Lynn Police Department selected SAM as its Shannon Grant partner to create the first youth street worker program for gang involved youth.
  • In 2008, with a grant secured by Congressman James McGovern, the Worcester Youth Re-entry Project was launched as the first replication model of our Lynn Youth Re-entry Project.
  • In 2008, SAM launched a Master’s degree in Juvenile Justice Ministries through Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary’s Center for Urban Ministerial Education; and a bachelor’s degree through Gordon College. Students enrolled in these programs come from 29 states and three countries.
  • In late 2011, we purchased a 3-story building at 1 Munroe Street, Lynn to house our re-entry program there, and finished renovations of the building in early 2012.
  • In 2012 we moved the organization's headquarters to Main South area of Worcester and opened three social venture businesses to employ youth coming out of lock-up and back into Worcester.
  • In 2015, we opened an office in Lawrence, MA to bring needed resources to youth exiting the correctional facilities. We're in the process of staffing this new Youth Re-entry Site. 

Impact Statement

2015 Accomplishments:

  1. We opened our fifth social venture business to employ youth coming out of lock-up, a furniture reupholstery business (www.freedupholstery.com). This is in addition to a café (www.straightup-worcester.com), catering business, re-sale store (www.thenewyou-worcester.org), and silkscreen business (www.straightaheadsilkscreen.org). 
  2. We expanded into Lawrence, MA for community-based re-entry, making it the third such site, in addition to Worcester and Lynn, MA.
  3. We divided Executive Director responsibilities into a Director of Programs, and a Director of Operations, both under the President of the organization.
  4. We built an aftercare home for youth coming out of prison in Ukraine, which will hold up to 12 youth.

Goals for 2016:

  1. We are moving to a "hub and spoke" model of re-entry, beginning with a full-time staff to be hired in Southeastern MA who will cover New Bedford, Fall River, Brockton, and Taunton. 
  2. The second "hub and spoke" re-entry model we will open is in South Portland, ME, which will over youth going back to Lewiston, ME, and all points south.
  3. To launch our "Every Youth, Every Facility" initiative which will partner with others across the U.S. to provide effective juvenile justice ministry to all youth in the 1,985 juvenile facilities in the U.S.

Needs Statement

1. Making each of our social enterprises self-sustaining for cost of goods and labor, and facility utility costs.

2. To locate and hire a national director to oversee the establishment of the Every Youth, Every Facility Initiative.

3. To expand into seven urban areas in New England through our Hub and Spoke model within three years.

4. To establish an Institute of Juvenile Justice Ministries where best practice models can be disseminated to influence the direction of juvenile justice nationally toward more strength-based, positive youth development.

 5. To refine and expand our youth internship program to serve more youth and better equip them for full-time employment with juvenile offenders. 

CEO Statement

SAM uniquely blends two approaches: a relationship model, with peer and adult mentoring provided by volunteers and other community resources, and a professional case management and counseling model.

Our founder and president, Dr. Scott Larson, has written 13 books on reaching high-risk youth, and is a national trainer for the Department of Justice to provide training to other organizations on strength-based, positive youth development models. More than 5,000 organizations and individuals have either attended those training seminars or acquired curriculum materials from Straight Ahead Ministries over the past 28 years.

Board Chair Statement

Straight Ahead is governed by a small, but diverse board.  Board members are all financial contributors and are also all personally involved in the organization. We oversee all program operations, provide financial fiduciary oversight, and assist staff in outreach to affiliates and potential new partners, and help develop other resources. SAM’s work is broad, including both programs that it directly operates—like the Worcester and Lynn Youth Re-entry Projects—and initiatives that are carried out by affiliates across the US and abroad, with SAM training, technical assistance, and other resources. 

Geographic Area Served

CENTRAL REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
STATEWIDE
NATIONAL
INTERNATIONAL
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

SAM operates re-entry programs in Lynn, Worcester and Lawrence, MA.
 
Lynn is a city of 90,000, with large Cambodian and Latino populations and ultra-high rates of drop-out, crime, substance abuse, and teen pregnancy. Lynn ranks as one of the most violent city in MA.
 
Worcester is a city of 183,000, New England’s second largest. It has large Latino and African-American populations. Worcester is the fifth most violent city in Massachusetts. SAM is based in Main South, the city’s neediest neighborhood.
 
Lawrence is a city of 78,000, with a third of the population who are immigrants. It's considered the poorest city in Massachusetts with the highest crime and unemployment rates.

Organization Categories

  1. Employment - Employment Preparation & Procurement
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Education - Educational Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Under Development

Programs

1. Ready4Life

SAM staff and volunteers lead R4L education and mutual support groups for youth and young adults in juvenile and adult corrections facilities in Massachusetts and elsewhere.  This includes the Worcester House of Correction, Essex County Correctional Facility, and many facilities run by the Mass. Department of Youth Services.

R4L is offered in various lengths and focuses, but most often as an intense, three-day seminar.  It engages inmates in exercises and discussion that reveal how their thinking works, how it has led them to where they are now, and how they can change their mindset, make proactive decisions, and transform their lives.  So often, young inmates tell us of their desire for change and their weariness of violence and gang life.

R4L is often an entry point into our Youth Re-entry Projects once young return to community life in Lynn or Worcester, but it has proven valuable for hundreds of participants, regardless of whether they get further support from SAM.

Budget  $40,000.00
Category  Crime & Legal, General/Other Criminal Justice & Corrections
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program Short-Term Success 
Participants will increase their knowledge of mistakes they have made and patterns of thinking and behavior that they can use to avoid these mistakes in the future.
 
Participants will increase their motivation toward pro-social behavior.
 
Some participants will participate in the Youth Re-Entry Project once they return to the community from incarceration, though this is not required. 
Program Long-Term Success 
Participants will not be re-arrested in the three-year (and longer) period following incarceration.
 
Participants will avoid re-involvement in gangs, criminal activity, and drug and alcohol use.
Program Success Monitored By  Staff and Peer Leader observation and notes, participant feedback through short surveys, participant interviews.
Examples of Program Success  The recidivism rate for Lynn participants decreased to under 10%, even below its previous low rates over the past few years.  In addition, gang violence in Lynn has fallen by 60% over past two years and it is clear that the Youth Re-entry Project has contributed significantly to this reduction. The recidivism rate for Worcester participants was 16.5% this past year, compared with 60% for juvenile offenders not in the program.    

2. Youth Re-entry Project

YRP helps juveniles and young adults in Lynn, Worcester, and Lawrence, MA, transform their outlooks, set and pursue goals, and contribute to their communities.  YRP will serve about 500 formerly incarcerated youth in 2016. 

At its heart is a set of mentoring relationships for youth with strong, patient, and caring staff and volunteers.  These adults reach, guide, and find resources for each youth.

This is complemented by a positive peer environment, employing older participants as peer leaders and assistant streetworkers.

Built around these relationships are many activities.  A drop-in center, streetwork, and recreation help us reach and engage youth. Training,classes, andhands-on experiences build skills essential to self-esteem, educational and career success, and a positive future.  Leadership training, paid work, and community service build leadership skills and civic engagement.

YRP and its many partners help youth and families to access benefits, services, and opportunities.
Budget  $1,000,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders At-Risk Populations Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

Participants will engage in counseling, case management, mentoring, and other services provided directly by the YRP program or by a partner. 

Participants will increase their motivation toward pro-social behavior.
Program Long-Term Success 

Participants will not be re-arrested in the three-year (and longer) period following incarceration.

Participants will avoid re-involvement in gangs, criminal activity, and drug and alcohol use.

The program will reduce rates of subsequent criminal activity among program participants.
Program Success Monitored By 

We will measure the number and percent of collaborating partners who attend quarterly coordination meetings and the number and percent of participants who are served by each collaborating partner and who receive key services directly from YRP or from a partner.

We will use CORI data to measure the number of participants who are arrested for any crime.
Examples of Program Success 

The recidivism rate for Lynn participants decreased to under 10%, even below its previous low rates over the past few years.  In addition, gang violence in Lynn has fallen by 60% over past two years and it is clear that the Youth Re-entry Project has contributed significantly to this reduction. The recidivism rate for Worcester participants was 16.5% this past year, compared with 60% for juvenile offenders not in the program.

Other evaluation data, based on widely used surveys and other tools, shows significant gains in specific skills, attitudes, and engagement with peers, school, and community.

3. Education and Employment Advancement (Straigh2Work)

For youth returning from prison or detention, true transformation only takes hold when they can set and achieve educational and vocational goals.  That’s why we’ve developed and recently expanded programming in Lynn and Worcester.

Our Straight2Work initiative offers:

* Career and employability counseling plus a four-week pre-employment class. 

* Pre-vocational and vocational skills training.

* Supported work experience, using many local employers and stipends from a state grant.  Community service and social ventures offer additional options.

Educational support includes:

* Educational counseling, goal-setting, and ongoing support.

* Partnerships with public schools and other programs in each city to help youth re-enter school or pursue an alternative path to a diploma.

* GED classes in Lynn, run in partnership with Catholic Charities.

* Individual and family support to pursue college and other post-secondary opportunities, including partnerships with two local community colleges.
Budget  $250,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Youth Job Training & Employment
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders At-Risk Populations Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

Participants will engage in employment and education services provided directly by the YRP program or by a partner.

Participants will attend high school, GED programs, or 2- or 4-year college.

Participants will obtain their diploma, GED, or college degree.

Participants will complete job skills training or internships.
Program Long-Term Success 

Participants will avoid re-involvement in gangs, criminal activity, and drug and alcohol use.

Following training and supported work experience, participants will achieve employment full- or part-time in unsubsidized jobs.

For Straight2Work program participants, benchmarks are 80% attaining unsubsidized employment and/or continued educational advancement and 90% improving life skills as measured by the Ansell-Casey index.  We will set somewhat lower benchmarks for the overall participant population, which receives slightly less intensive job and life skills training.
Program Success Monitored By 

We will measure the number and percent of participants who participate in and who complete each education and employment program component.

We will administer the Ansell-Casey index at different times to assess changes in life skills.
Examples of Program Success  In 2012, we had an 81% job placement rate for youth completing the Worcester Straight2Work program.

4. Gang Reconciliation

Gang activity and violence are rampant in both Lynn and Worcester, but SAM is fortunate to have strategies and links---to law enforcement and, most important, to gang members and ex-members---to stem the worst inter-gang violence and to steer many young gang members in alternative directions.

Staff and assistant streetworkers (hired from Youth Re-entry Project veterans) reach out regularly to participants and other high-risk youth.  We target gang members and gang ‘wannabees’ hanging out in the streets of Lynn.  Contacts are made on street corners, in city parks, and at other hot spots.  As streetworkers build rapport with gang members, they can direct individuals into more positive pursuits and also intervene to reduce gang conflict prior to an occurrence.

This outreach work, like the drop-in center, is separate from the more intense re-entry work with a defined set of Youth Re-entry Project participants, but these activities overlap and often strongly complement each other.
Budget  $100,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

Participants will engage in counseling, case management, activities, community services, mentoring, and other services provided directly by the YRP program or by a partner.

Participants will increase their motivation toward pro-social behavior.
Program Long-Term Success 

Participants will avoid re-involvement in gangs, criminal activity, and drug and alcohol use.

Participants will be employed full- or part-time or engaged in education or training.

Each city will experience reductions in gang violence and criminal activity.
Program Success Monitored By 

We will collect and anlyze staff and Peer Leader observation and notes, participant feedback through short surveys, and participant interviews, focused on assessing changes in pro-social orientation.

We will measure the number and percent of participants who participate in various YRP program component.

We will examine long-term city-wide changes in gang and criminal activity for each city.
Examples of Program Success  Gang violence in Lynn fell by 60% over the past two years and it is clear---to our staff and to the Lynn Police and other law enforcement agencies---that LYRP has contributed significantly to this reduction.

5. Social Ventures

To generate income for participants, teach them vocational and employability skills (complementing, and serve the community, we have created several enterprises.  In Lynn, Original Gear is a fully-equipped silkscreening, T-shirt, and graphic design business thatpays and trains youth in design, marketing, finance, and business management.  We will soon open a barber shop at our downtown facility, enabling participants to apprentice and become licensed barbers.

Budget  $300,000.00
Category  Community Development, General/Other Community Economic Development
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders At-Risk Populations Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 

Employees (i.e. program participants) will succeed in acquiring and maintaining positive work habits and skills.

Participants will engage in counseling, case management, training, and other services provided by the program.
Program Long-Term Success 

Participants will achieve stable employment in unsubsidized jobs, primarily related to their long-term career goals set during their program participation.

Each social venture will build revenue to become partially or fully self-sustaining.
Program Success Monitored By 

We will collect and anlyze Caseworker and work supervisor observation and notes and participant feedback through short surveys, all aimed at assessing changes in employability skills (e.g. punctuality, teamwork, appropriate behavior) and specific work skills.

We will count and assess participation in YRP counseling, case management, training, and other services.

We will determine the number of participants who successfully complete social venture employment and the number who go on to other significant employment.

We will assess income-expense statements for each venture to assess progress toward self-sustainability.
Examples of Program Success 

In 2012 in Worcester, Straight Up Café and Straight Up Community Center combined to employ 22 participants, young gang-involved men and women coming out of lock-up.  Most of them went on to obtain other jobs.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We believe nothing stops a bullet like a job, and so have made job readiness and placement a top priority in our community-based re-entry programs.  The communities we serve in Lynn, Lawrence, and Worcester already have extremely high unemployment rates, especially for the population we serve.  It is of course a challenge to get this population ready for gainful employment, so case management and creating positive community around these youth is especially important.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Scott J Larson
CEO Term Start May 1987
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Founded Straight Ahead Ministries in 1987. Serves as a national trainer and developer of innovative strength-based juvenile justice programs.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Jeffry Kiel Director of Strategic Initiatives --
Mr. Guy LeDuc Director of Operations


Mr. Thomas Slicklen Director of Development --
Mr. Jim Unis Director of MA Outreach --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2000
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

* Corrections and Law Enforcement - We work with the Mass. Dept. of Youth Services, local police and sheriff’s departments, the courts, and corrections facilities in both Lynn and Worcester.

* Safe and Successful Youth Initiative - We are active in both cities’ coalitions of city, social service, and law enforcement agencies plus churches, health providers, and schools.

* Education and Employment - We work with education, training, and support agencies in both cities.

* Family Health and Mental Health Services - We work in each city with the Mass. Dept. of Children and Families, nearly every local health provider, and several private clinicians.

* Churches and Temples - We work with local faith-based networks to involve volunteers, get donated items, and connect participants to grass-roots support.

* Regional Environmental Council - In Worcester, we partner with the REC to provide summer jobs in urban gardening projects.

* Catholic Charities in Lynn offers a five-day per week, on-site GED program.

* Children’s Law Center of Mass. provides legal services and program evaluation in Lynn.

* Other - We work with organizations meeting housing, recreation, culture, benefits, and material needs.  Our community service programs work with diverse agencies, including ones serving the homeless.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 31
Number of Part Time Staff 8
Number of Volunteers 246
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 85%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 3
Caucasian: 15
Hispanic/Latino: 8
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 10
Male: 21
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Exempt
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. David Quinones
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired Managing Partner, Accenture
Board Chair Term May 2009 -
Board Co-Chair Dr. Richard Pyle
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Retired Professor of Business Management
Board Co-Chair Term May 2011 -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Paul Hubley Retired Voting
Hanne Larson Social Worker Voting
Dr. Scott Larson Straight Ahead Ministries, Inc. Voting
Lisa Phellps Wealth Management Consultant Voting
Dr. Richard Pyle Retired Voting
David Quinones Retired Voting
Dr. Charles Slagan Psychologist Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 86%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

    --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Board of Directors meets every two months, and is actively involved in long term strategic planning as well as the governance and financial oversight of the organization.

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Apr 01, 2015 to Mar 31, 2016
Projected Income $2,219,000.00
Projected Expense $2,219,000.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

2011 Form 990

2010 Form 990

Audit Documents

2015 Audit

2014 Audit

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $2,274,011 $2,378,541 $2,053,380
Total Expenses $2,390,947 $2,329,516 $1,955,129

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- $484,699
Government Contributions $402,242 $452,323 $362,719
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- $67,717
    Local -- -- $274,501
    Unspecified $402,242 $452,323 $20,501
Individual Contributions $1,712,621 $1,734,541 $1,035,645
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $152,682 $178,339 $116,824
Investment Income, Net of Losses $6,466 $13,338 $53,493
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $1,686,149 $1,737,804 $1,421,937
Administration Expense $477,144 $424,622 $388,934
Fundraising Expense $227,654 $167,090 $144,258
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.95 1.02 1.05
Program Expense/Total Expenses 71% 75% 73%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 11% 8% 8%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $2,241,399 $2,409,179 $2,391,877
Current Assets $743,167 $1,550,321 $1,608,453
Long-Term Liabilities $6,000 $6,000 $6,000
Current Liabilities $38,901 $89,745 $97,610
Total Net Assets $2,196,498 $2,313,434 $2,288,267

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 4.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 19.10 17.27 16.48

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s. 

Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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