Share |

Alzheimer's Association, Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter (Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association Inc.)

 480 Pleasant Street
 Watertown, MA 02472
[P] (617) 868-6718
[F] (617) 868-6720
http://www.alz.org/manh
[email protected]
Jayne Paragona
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1980
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 13-3039601

LAST UPDATED: 09/12/2016
Organization DBA Alzheimer's Association MA/NH Chapter
Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association Inc.
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of the Alzheimer’s Association is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.  

 

Mission Statement

The mission of the Alzheimer’s Association is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.  

 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $9,175,863.00
Projected Expense $9,473,207.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • 24/7 Helpline, Care Consultations, and Support Groups
  • Education for Families and Professionals
  • Outreach to Diverse Communities
  • Power + Purpose
  • Public Policy

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of the Alzheimer’s Association is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.  

 


Background Statement

The Alzheimer’s Association is a world leader in Alzheimer’s disease research and support, and the first and largest non-profit health organization dedicated to finding prevention methods, treatments and an eventual cure for Alzheimer’s. The Association consists of a network of 80 local chapters through which they help families dealing with Alzheimer’s disease.

Incorporated in Massachusetts in 1980, we are a founding chapter of the national Alzheimer’s Association. In 2007, we merged with the New Hampshire chapter to become the Massachusetts/New Hampshire chapter. With headquarters in Watertown, MA, we have three regional offices in Massachusetts (Springfield, Worcester, and Raynham), and two in New Hampshire (Bedford and Lebanon).
 
The Alzheimer’s Association has a broad and ambitious vision of a world without Alzheimer’s. Until the day our vision is realized, we are dedicated to ensuring that all families, regardless of their financial abilities, have the information and education they need to successfully navigate the course of Alzheimer’s or a related disorder.

We help maintain the health of people with Alzheimer’s, support caregivers, and aid families grappling with all aspects of Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, we strive to provide health care workers with access to specialized Alzheimer’s education and training. Influencing public policy by collaborating with state and local agencies to raise the issue of Alzheimer's disease to a higher priority is a major component of our mission.  
 

Impact Statement

Accomplishments:

1. CARE:

  • We serve as a lifeline to families through our 24/7 Helpline, which responded to 11,975 calls in FY14, providing information, referrals, and compassionate listening; and Care Consultations which provided in-depth counseling to 1,535 families in FY14.
  • We educate the community with programs that promote early detection, teach essential skills for caregivers, and more. Education Programs for professionals include grand rounds and conferences.
  • We have 225 support groups, including a Children of Younger Onset Dementia (COYOD) program.
  • All family programs are free of charge.

2. CURE
  • In 2013, MA scientists shared more than  $1 million in Alzheimer’s Association grants for innovative projects.
  • The annual Simons Symposium and a Research Forum offer the latest knowledge on Alzheimer’s. We also co-sponsor Harvard Medical School’s annual dementia conference.
  • We have provided information about clinical trials to thousands of families through our TrialMatch service.

3. CAUSE:
  • An Act Relative to Dementia Special Care Units was passed and signed by Governor Patrick July 2012.
  • Our chapter played a crucial role in the development and now implementation of the MA Alzheimer's State Plan.
  • We experienced a significant increase in media coverage of Alzheimer’s, including a ground-breaking series by The Boston Globe.

 Goals for FY15:
(1) To enhance care and support for all families in MA and NH, to ensure that they have the information needed  to navigate the course of the disease. This includes increasing our reach to diverse communities and to physicians. 
(2) To increase concern and awareness of Alzheimer's disease among the general public.  
(3) To advance public policy in order to elevate Alzheimer's disease to a higher priority and ensure quality care.
(4)  To accelerate research in Alzheimer's disease and related dementia.
(5) To grow revenue in support of our mission, primarily through our largest public awareness and fundraising event, the Walk to End Alzheimer's.   

Needs Statement

  Do A LITTLE BIG THING to end Alzheimer's:

  1. Donate
  2. Participate in an Event
  3. Learn the Facts
  4. Become an Advocate
  5. Get the Help You Need 
The five most pressing needs our work addresses:
1) Core programs for families (which include the 24/7 Helpline, Care Consultations, Education programs and Support Groups) 
2) Programs serving individuals with Early Stage Alzheimer’s disease
3) Outreach to underserved populations including minorities, people with disabilities and low income communities
4) Professional training, education, and conferences
5) Public awareness and advocacy 
 
Funding for Alzheimer's care, support, advocacy and research comes from individual donors and from sponsorships. Our collaborative partners include government agencies, corporations, foundations and membership organizations.
 
Your gift helps us to accelerate our mission to eliminate Alzheimer's disease and to provide the best care and support to those living with Alzheimer's.
 
We help families navigate the course of the disease, we fund cutting-edge research on Alzheimer’s disease, recruit and train volunteers to lead support groups, advocate for legislative changes and speak up for the needs of those facing Alzheimer’s disease. Our yearly Walk to End Alzheimer’s also benefits these programs.

CEO Statement

by President & CEO James Wessler

My entire career has been spent working in the nonprofit sector and I feel quite fortunate to have served as the President and CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association, MA/NH Chapter for over 14 years. Along my journey with the Alzheimer’s Association, my father was diagnosed with this disease. We experienced Alzheimer’s directly like millions of American families. The Alzheimer’s Association plays a critical role in so many aspects of this disease; we are the movement to put an end to Alzheimer’s.

This is a time of great hope in our collective battle against Alzheimer’s but it is also a time to acknowledge the sobering task ahead of us. We are dealing with such a challenging disease and we are confronting an unprecedented demographic urgency. The time is now -- to mobilize our local communities, our state, and our nation.  

Many families tell us a familiar story revolving around the challenge of both securing a diagnosis and then receiving a referral to the Association. We are working with large health care systems to change this model and I am pleased to share that we have just launched two innovative pilot projects. The first is with Tufts Health Plan, the largest Medicare HMO in Massachusetts. The second is a multi-year collaboration with Boston Medical Center, Brigham & Women’s Hospital, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In both these partnership models, participating physicians are proactively referring families to the Association so that we can offer them our full array of programs and services.

To accomplish all our goals in serving families and advancing research into effective treatments and eventually a cure for Alzheimer’s disease, we need financial support. We do not receive any significant government funding and we do not receive third party reimbursement for any of our programs and services; all available at no charge to families. We are grateful for resources such as Giving Common which help us build our community of supporters and move us toward our vision of A World without Alzheimer’s.

As you look over our profile, I hope you are moved to make a contribution or to visit our website to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and how the Alzheimer’s Association helps families. I also invite you to participate in our largest fundraising and awareness event, the Walk to End Alzheimer’s. With 11 walks across both Massachusetts and New Hampshire this September, we hope to raise $2.8 million to advance our cause. The time is now for all of us to change the future of Alzheimer’s and end this epidemic.


Board Chair Statement

Statement by Joe McCafferty, Board Chair, Alzheimer's Association, MA/NH Chapter

In 1996 my wife, Jan, and I began raising money to support the Alzheimer’s Association. At the time, what struck us about Alzheimer’s was that there were no survivors and few, if any, current people with Alzheimer’s who could speak out to raise awareness or build support.  With no hope for a cure, families had no alternative other than standing by and watching their loved ones slowly slip away.
 
In the last 16 years, we have lost several family members to Alzheimer’s disease.  We still don’t have a cure. We still have no survivors to advocate or build awareness. Families are still faced with the tragedy of watching their loved ones slip away. However, the Alzheimer’s Association has become a strong national presence that is committed to realizing a world without Alzheimer’s disease. 
 
The Alzheimer’s Association is now the largest voluntary health organization in the country committed to supporting families, raising awareness, and finding a cure for Alzheimer’s disease. I am proud to be a part of this tremendous organization, and honored to be a member of the board for the Massachusetts and New Hampshire chapter.
 
Over the past year, the Alzheimer’s Association MA/NH Chapter has had several successes in all areas of our mission: increasing concern and awareness about Alzheimer’s disease; advancing public policy; enhancing care and support for affected families; accelerating research; reaching diverse communities; and growing revenue. While we are proud of our accomplishments, there is still so much more than needs to be done.

We are at a critical juncture in our quest to combat Alzheimer’s disease. As the first of the baby boomers meet retirement age, we are going to see the numbers of people in Massachusetts living with Alzheimer’s skyrocket. 

We are committed to making significant progress on a number of fronts including advancing the science to develop diagnostic biomarkers and bring disease-modifying treatments to market; transforming the practice of medicine so that patients can more easily secure a clear diagnosis and referral for vital support services; moving our elected leaders so that Alzheimer’s becomes a major bipartisan policy issue our leadership supports; expanding the impact of the Alzheimer’s Association so that we reach and support the hundreds of thousands of families in Massachusetts and New Hampshire grappling with this disease; and leading the way by doubling the number of participants in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s.
 
We often say that you can’t do Alzheimer’s alone; that you need to reach out and accept help. We also know that we can’t beat this disease alone. We are confident that together we will realize our dream of a world without Alzheimer’s.

Geographic Area Served

STATEWIDE
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- West Roxbury
BERKSHIRE REGION, MA
CAPE &ISLANDS REGION, MA
CENTRAL REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
PIONEER VALLEY REGION, MA
SOUTHEAST REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End

We serve all of Massachusetts and New Hampshire. With headquarters in Watertown, MA, we have three regional Massachusetts offices (Springfield, Worcester and Raynham) and two in New Hampshire.

Organization Categories

  1. Diseases Disorders & Medical Disciplines - Alzheimer's Disease
  2. Health Care - Patient & Family Support
  3. Human Services - Family Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

24/7 Helpline, Care Consultations, and Support Groups

The 24/7 Helpline provides expert advice and referral to local services such as assisted living, long-term care, adult day health centers and support groups. Our helpline is also online and translation service is available in over 140 languages. Helpline counselors keep in touch with callers and provide them with ongoing support.
 
Care Consultation is an invaluable service for individuals and families dealing with Alzheimer's disease and provides in-depth, person to person assessment. Our Care Consultants help individuals and families develop a plan for care throughout the disease process, educate them about the disease, provide coping strategies for day to day living, connect them with community resources and empower them by providing the tools to support informed decision-making.
 
Support groups are crucial for families to connect to others. We maintain over 225 support groups, including groups for Spanish speakers, African-Americans, and people with early-stage Alzheimer's.  
Budget  n/a
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Alzheimer Disease
Population Served People/Families of People with Health Conditions Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
1. One hundred percent of the people calling our 24/7 Helpline will receive immediate benefit by increasing their knowledge of both the disease and the community resources available to them.
 
2. One hundred percent of people receiving care consultations will receive a comprehensive care plan which will allow them and their families to navigate a the variety of resources available to them throughout the course of the disease.
 
3. One hundred percent of people attending support groups reduce their social isolation and build their peer support network. 
 
Program Long-Term Success 

We expect families receiving 24/7 Helpline and Care Consultation services to experience (1) improved quality of life for the individual with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers (2) improved relationship between families and healthcare providers (3) increased knowledge of appropriate services (4) reduction of anxiety and depression in people with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers  (5) reduction in unnecessary healthcare utilization and costs, (6) reduction of social isolation (7) improvement in self-esteem as people with Early Stage Alzheimer’s assume a greater level of control and participation in their decision-making and lives (8) improved safety for families including reduction in accidents or wandering incidents. 

Participation in support groups reduces social isolation, and provides caregivers with additional support network in addition to the other resources at the Alzheimer's Association. 
 
 
Program Success Monitored By 
 Call volume to our 24/7 Helpline, the number of care consultations provided, and number of support groups and attendees are ways we monitor the success of our programs--see above. We can also assess the impact of our services to families through the Core Services Quality Evaluation Initiative (CSQEI), which measures customer satisfaction, perceived increase in knowledge, usefulness of the information and demographic data of clients. The CSQEI, developed by the National Alzheimer’s Association, provides quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the 24/7 Helpline, Care Consultations, and Support Groups. Feedback from all evaluations will be used to maintain quality and improve future programs.We expect to maintain a 98% or higher satisfaction rating, maintaining our level as one of the highest rated Association chapters in the nation.
Examples of Program Success 
We have maintained a satisfaction rating of 98% to 99% each year for the 24/7 Helpline, Care Consultations, and Support Groups, making us one of the highest rated chapters in the nation. 
 
Here are quotes from people served by the 24/7 Helpline and Care Consultations: "Thank you for your compassion and insight into Alzheimer's;" "Helpline contact answered all my questions and provided additional information. Offers to send information by mail greatly appreciated;" "I was so impressed when someone called me about 5-6 weeks after the initial call--it came at the right time--I told them how helpful it was;" "Everyone I talked to has a very caring and concerned attitude and tone;" "[Staff] are so fabulous. I would be lost without them;" "The vast knowledge base of staff; caring and listening ears; unexpected but necessary follow-ups; quality of information and resources; quality of staff; prompt mailings of resource tools, has been the best--singularly--[service] experience in my life."

Education for Families and Professionals

Our education programs have three target audiences: 1) the general public; 2) individuals and family affected by Alzheimer's disease, and 3) healthcare professionals who serve people with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia.
 
For the general public, we have programs on the 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's and basic knowledge about the differences between normal memory changes and Alzheimer's disease. Educational programs for families further prepare caregivers to help their loved one cope with physical, emotional and psychological challenges of Alzheimer’s. These programs cover getting a diagnosis, legal and financial issues, skills training for caregivers, and advance planning for people with early stage Alzheimer's disease. Education for professionals such as the annual “Map Through the Maze” conference and our “Habilitation Train the Trainer” program help health care providers learn more about the disease and implement a person-centered, cross-cultural approach to Alzheimer’s care. Better educated and informed health care providers are current in their knowledge of dementia symptoms, screening tools and treatments. They are also better equipped to make appropriate referrals.
Budget  n/a
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Alzheimer Disease
Population Served People/Families of People with Health Conditions Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
Families who attend Alzheimer’s Association education programs will expand their knowledge of Alzheimer's disease and related dementia, improve the care they can offer or obtain for their loved one, and feel less isolated. Education programs can help improve symptom management, home safety and advanced legal and financial planning. These programs also enable the caregiver to better manage the daily activities for themselves and the people with Alzheimer's disease.   
 
Direct Care workers, after training, will expand their knowledge and familiarity with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia.
 
Primary care physicians and specialists through participation in Alzheimer’s Association professional education programs will improve their ability to detect, treat and manage Alzheimer's disease or related dementia. 
Program Long-Term Success 
For families: With support and education, caregivers are better able to assist their loved ones and personally cope with the physical, emotional and psychological challenges of Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias. This will ultimately reduce a caregiver's stress level and allow people with dementia to stay at home longer without requiring additional work for the caregiver.  The reduction of caregiver stress and depression should also result in a decrease in the severity of caregivers' own personal health conditions or problems.  We also expect to see reduction in unnecessary healthcare utilization.
For professionals: We expect primary care physicians and specialists to improve in their ability to diagnose, treat and manage Alzheimer's disease in their patients, including providing appropriate referrals to address the physical and emotional needs of their patients and the patients' families.
In the long-term, direct care workers who have received Alzheimer’s Association training will improve the quality of their interactions and ability to communicate with people with Alzheimer’s, leading to a higher quality of care. As a result of specialized dementia training, staff members at residential facilities, adult day programs, and other agencies will be better equipped to understand and react to the symptoms and behaviors presented by people with Alzheimer's disease or related dementia. 
Program Success Monitored By 
We assess the impact of our educational programs through the Core Services Quality Evaluation Initiative (CSQEI), which measures customer satisfaction, perceived increase in knowledge, usefulness of the information and demographic data of clients. The CSQEI, developed by the National Alzheimer’s Association, provides quantitative and qualitative evaluation of education programs. Feedback from all evaluations is used to maintain quality and improve future programs. 
Examples of Program Success 
In FY13 the Alzheimer's Association's program staff presented education programs to 14,899 individuals--an increase of 11% over the previous year.
 
To give just one example of program success, nine of our Train-the-Trainer sessions in 2011 were evaluated by two researchers from UMass Medical School Commonwealth Medicine, Disability and Community Services. Among their findings were that:
·         In self-assessing confidence in their ability to work with people who have Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder, there was 169% positive percent change.
·         After the training, there was 172% percentage change of respondents who felt “A great deal” of confidence in training others to work with people who have Alzheimer’s disease.

Outreach to Diverse Communities

We seek to ensure underserved populations dealing with the disease get the treatment and support they need. Because African-American and Latino communities face a higher prevalence of Alzheimer's disease, we have staff members who run specific support groups for these populations as well as providing education programs in the community and working with other local nonprofits to reach the community. We also work with healthcare providers to increase their awareness of health disparities related to Alzheimer's disease detection and treatment. We also address the needs of Portuguese-speaking communities, Vietnamese communities, people with disabilities, and people in rural/isolated communities.
Budget  n/a
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Alzheimer Disease
Population Served Minorities People/Families of People with Health Conditions Elderly and/or Disabled
Program Short-Term Success 
1. 100% of people from diverse communities who access our core services will receive immediate benefit by receiving knowledge on the specific concerns, such as increasing their knowledge of the disease or the community resources available to them.  

2.100% of individuals preferring to receive materials or counseling from a Spanish-speaking staff member will be provided with Spanish-language materials on print and online, as well as access to our Coordinator for Community Education and Outreach who serves the Latino community. 
Program Long-Term Success  In the long term, we expect our outreach programs to contribute to a reduction in health disparities for minorities in the areas of Alzheimer’s detection and coordinated care. We expect that African-American, Latino and low-income families throughout Massachusetts who receive any of our services (24/7 Helpline, Care Consultations, Education programs and Support Groups) will experience the same long-term benefits listed previously:  (1) improved quality of life for the individual with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers (2) improved relationship between families and healthcare providers (3) increased knowledge of appropriate services (4) reduction of anxiety and depression in people with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers (5) reduction of social isolation (6) improvement in self-esteem as people with Early Stage Alzheimer’s assume a greater level of control and participation in their decision-making and lives (7) improved safety for families including reduction in accidents or wandering incidents.
Program Success Monitored By  We assess the impact of our services to families in diverse communities through the Core Services Quality Evaluation Initiative (CSQEI), which measures customer satisfaction, perceived increase in knowledge, usefulness of the information and demographic data of clients. The CSQEI, developed by the National Alzheimer’s Association, provides quantitative and qualitative evaluation of our core services. Feedback from all evaluations is used to maintain quality and improve future programs.
Examples of Program Success 

Last year, our chapter established the position of Director of Diversity Initiatives. She has created Diversity Advisory Committees in Western MA, Southeastern MA, and Central MA. We are partnering with a number of African-American churches in Boston and Springfield. Our chapter organized a successful Latino Caregivers Conference in Lawrence in collaboration with several community groups in Merrimack Valley. We have made connections with community organizations that serve the Portuguese-speaking and Vietnamese-speaking communities in MA to ensure they receive culturally-sensitive information and support. 


Power + Purpose

The goal of the Power + Purpose program (also known as the Early Stage Empowerment Program) is to improve the quality of life for people with mild Alzheimer’s by providing opportunities for social interaction, engagement through volunteerism and advocacy.  This initiative will allow our organization to reach an unprecedented number of people with Alzheimer’s while they are in the early stages of the disease. It will also promote positive messages about living with Alzheimer’s and improve the public conversation about Alzheimer’s disease so that it is no longer missing the voices of people living with the disease.

The four primary elements of Power + Purpose are:  (1) A public awareness campaign created for, and in part by, people with mild Alzheimer’s;  (2) Intensive recruitment of participants; (3) A year-round calendar of social/cultural activities and a supportive environment for volunteering in the community. (4) Creation of a new community of trained advocates with mild Alzheimer’s.
Budget  $300,000.00
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Alzheimer Disease
Population Served People/Families of People with Health Conditions Adults Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success 

The short-term benefit of our program would be that families dealing with mild Alzheimer’s will receive services that increase their knowledge of the disease and of support available; individuals with Alzheimer’s will engage in meaningful social/cultural/civic activities.

We plan to increase the number of families coping with mild Alzheimer’s we serve overall by 15 percent.  In addition, we would like to recruit, train, and support 10 people with Alzheimer’s as Active Advocates, 20 as Super Advocates/Spokesperson, and one person as an Alzheimer’s Ambassador.

To increase public awareness, we plan to secure 25 million media impressions for public awareness and recruitment, leading to a 6% increase in calls to our 24/7 Helpline.

Program Long-Term Success 

The long term success of our program would be achieved by:

(1) 95% of persons participating in the program will report reduced social isolation or enhanced connection to their peers, family, and community. This would also be measured through a quality of life improvement.

(2) Improvement in our Chapter’s ability to promote public policies advancing Alzheimer’s research and care through the inclusion of the voices of people with Alzheimer’s.

(3) Increased awareness of the Alzheimer’s Association in general and of the message that individuals with mild Alzheimer’s can be vital, active members of their community.

(4) Improved ability of people living with the disease and their families to cope with the disease. 

(5) An improvement in the ability of people with the disease to manage the stigma associated with dementia.

Program Success Monitored By 
Evaluation of the program each year will be via our Core Services Quality Evaluation Initiative CSQEI). We assess the impact of all our programs through the Core Services Quality Evaluation Initiative (CSQEI), which measures customer satisfaction, usefulness of group participation, and demographic data of clients. The CSQEI, developed by the National Alzheimer’s Association, will provide quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the Early Stage Empowerment Program.
 
(CSQEI)  measures satisfaction with services and increased knowledge. In addition, a select group of participants (approximately 40 per year) will also complete the QoL-AD, or Quality of Life–AD scale (Logsdon 2002), an evaluation tool that has been strongly validated, including multicultural
usage.
Examples of Program Success 
We do not yet have examples of program success because our program is in its initial phase. However, the social/cultural activities component of the program is based on a program we successfully piloted the past two summers called the Summer Social Program. Participants--those with mild Alzheimer's as well as their care partners--were very positive about the program, and their request for year-round programming as well as volunteer opportunities led us to establish a permanent program.

Public Policy

The mission of the public policy and advocacy program of the Alzheimer’s Association is to influence public policy by collaborating with federal, state and local agencies to raise the issue of Alzheimer's disease to a higher priority. In Massachusetts, the Alzheimer's Association is currently working to secure quality care for everyone with Alzheimer's and related dementia in every care setting, to preserve access to Adult Day programs in Massachusetts and to continue to ensure that Alzheimer's is a priority for the legislatures and Governor of Massachusetts. We have hundreds of volunteer advocates and ambassadors, including individuals with Early Stage Alzheimer’s, who work together to promote legislation and government planning which will improve dementia care and services, improve access to community-based care, improve quality care in residential settings and expand funding for research and public programs serving people with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia. 

Budget  n/a
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Alzheimer Disease
Population Served People/Families of People with Health Conditions Adults Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success 
Our advocacy and public policy efforts will communicate the urgency about the Alzheimer’s disease epidemic, as well as increase public awareness of the prevalence of the disease, and its emotional and financial impact on families. We will reach the public, state legislators, our state's Executive branch and other decision makers with our message, which includes the voices of people living with Alzheimer’s themselves. 
Program Long-Term Success 
People with Alzheimer's and their families will experience higher quality of care from home care agencies, nursing homes, day programs and assisted living as a result of legislation we are advocating for.  Administrators and staff will be required to comply with more dementia-specific regulations and receive better training as a result of these efforts. As a result of our the legislation to create a statewide Silver Alert program in Massachusetts, families of people with Alzheimer's disease or related dementia will experience a decrease in wandering episodes and/or faster response from law enforcement and the public in locating wandering adults.
Program Success Monitored By 
The number of people attending our advocacy events or taking an advocacy action such as contacting their representative or publicly speaking on our behalf of our cause are several ways of measuring our success. We currently have 900 registered advocates per congressional district. Another measure is the number of state legislators who vote to pass bills developed by the Alzheimer’s Association such as Silver Alert and the bill regarding regulations of Special Care Units for dementia patients in nursing homes, or who attend events such as our legislative breakfast. We also track successful collaborations with state Executive Office of Elder Affairs and other agencies.
Examples of Program Success 

As a result of our work over the last two years, both the Alzheimer's Association and the Massachusetts Executive Office of Elder Affairs recently created the Massachusetts State Alzheimer’s Plan to guide policy and program development related to Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. The state plan establishes recommendations, goals and strategies to be implemented over the next 5 years by the state and the Alzheimer's Association in conjunction with other stakeholders. Another bill, An Act Relative to Dementia Special Care Units, passed and was signed by the Governor in July 2012. This act will improve the quality of care provided to individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. James H. Wessler
CEO Term Start July 1998
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience James H. Wessler, CEO and President of the Alzheimer's Association, MA/NH Chapter, graduated from Harvard in 1977 with honors and received his MBA (high honors) in 1990 from Boston University with a concentration in Health Care Management. Prior to joining the Alzheimer's Association in 1998, Jim, among other activities, founded and directed the Massachusetts Senior Action Council (1981-1992) and was the Director of Resident Initiatives for the Metropolitan Boston Housing Partnership (1992-1998).
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mr. Dan O'Leary Mar 1992 Mar 1998
Ms. Nancy King July 1987 June 1991

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Susan Antkowiak VP Programs and Services --
Ms. Heather MacFarlane VP Communications and Public Affairs --
Ms. Nicole McGurin Director of Operations, Clinical Services --
Ms. Marcia McKenzie Director, Diversity Initiatives and Western MA Region --
Ms. Jayne Paragona VP Development --
Ms. Elizabeth Prins VP Finance and Administration --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Lamplighters award for (1) A Love Story, profile of Rob Epp and Jordan Lassoff (2) Fade To Darkness, WBUR series (3) Untold Story, Boston Globe series on younger-onset Alzheimer's New England Society of Health Care Communications (NESHCO) 2011
Book of the Year for the co-authored "Dementia and Wandering Behavior" (Springer Publishing) by Gerald Flaherty, former VP of Medical & Scientific Programs American Journal of Nursing 2002
Recognition of the work of Dr. Paul Raia, Vice President of Clinical Programs Massachusetts Homecare Association (Mass Home Care) --
Recognition of the work of Paul Raia, Vice President of Clinical Programs Massachusetts Gerontology Association --
Recognition of the work of Paul Raia, Vice President of Clinical Programs Massachusetts State Legislature --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization (i.e. Girl Scouts of the USA, American Red Cross, etc.) - Affiliate/chapter 1980
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 57
Number of Part Time Staff 8
Number of Volunteers 1,500
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 91%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 60
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 54
Male: 12
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Thomas Croswell
Board Chair Company Affiliation President and CEO, Tufts Health Plan
Board Chair Term July 2015 - June 2018
Board Co-Chair Ms. Faith Parker
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Community volunteer
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Mike Belleville Person living with Alzheimer’s, former telecommunications technician for Verizon Voting
Ms. Patty Blake President of Senior Products, Tufts Health Plan Voting
Ms. Brenda Bouchard Family Caregiver, Alzheimer’s Association Advocate Voting
Mr. Andrew Budson MD Associate Chief of Staff for Education, VA Boston Healthcare System; Associate Dir., BU Alzheimer’s Disease Center Voting
Mr. Thomas Croswell Chair President and CEO, Tufts Health Plan Voting
Mr. Brad Dickerson MD Neurologist, MGH Voting
Mr. Mitch Evitch Writer, person living with Alzheimer’s disease Voting
Ms. Beth Fentin Former pharmacist, Helpline volunteer Voting
Ms. Sue FitzPatrick Accountant Voting
Mr. Jim Garrett Chairman, Volta Oil Voting
Ms. Shirley Gordon Caregiver, Retired Claims Examiner Voting
Mr. Mike Henry Treasurer Chief Compliance Officer, New Generation Advisors, LLC Voting
Mr. Richard (Dick) Hiersteiner Partner, Sullivan and Worcester Voting
Mr. Stephen Hume Psy. D. Retired, Clinical Psychologist Voting
Ms. Judy Johanson Former daycare center director Voting
Ms. Surya Kolluri Managing Dir. Of Policy and Market Planning, Bank of America/Merrill Lynch Global Wealth and Retirement Solutions Voting
Ms. Margie Levin National Retail Account Executive, Coca-Cola Voting
Mr. Desmond Mac Intyre Chairman and CEO, Standish Mellon Asset Management Company Voting
Ms. Maureen Meletis Clerk North Shore Bank, Peabody Voting
Mr. Chris Meyer Managing Member, Centre Street Enterprises Voting
Ms. Margaret O'Connor PhD Dir. Of Neuropsychology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Voting
Ms. Bernice Osborne-Pollard Options Counselor, Boston Senior Home Care; Realtor Voting
Ms. Faith Parker Vice Chair Community volunteer Voting
Mr. Chris Romito Senior Manager of Global Services & Support Operations, Akamai Technologies, Inc. Voting
Mr. Jim Ross Executive Vice President, State Street Global Advisors Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 22
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 11
Male: 14
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Public Policy/Advocacy
  • Scientific Advisory

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

<

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $11,574,482 $10,178,533 $8,320,117
Total Expenses $10,637,034 $9,420,431 $8,200,120

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $65,132
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- $65,132
Individual Contributions $5,444,111 $4,834,756 $3,725,377
Indirect Public Support $47,211 $18,378 $17,392
Earned Revenue $337,395 $291,129 $175,960
Investment Income, Net of Losses $24,086 $29,819 $38,696
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $5,657,997 $5,004,451 $4,297,560
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $63,682 -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $8,750,690 $7,773,630 $6,796,081
Administration Expense $568,398 $421,228 $384,932
Fundraising Expense $1,317,946 $1,225,573 $1,019,107
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.09 1.08 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 82% 83% 83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 12% 13%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $7,407,646 $6,033,971 $5,056,200
Current Assets $7,039,901 $5,697,205 $4,698,508
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $1,886,269 $1,450,042 $1,230,373
Total Net Assets $5,521,377 $4,583,929 $3,825,827

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 6.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 3.73 3.93 3.82

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

As of July 1, 2016, and as noted in the above posted Group Affiliate Inclusion Letter, the Alzheimer's Association, Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter is covered under the group IRS exemption of the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association Inc. (EIN# 13-3039601).
 
Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's IRS 990s.  Please note, the above posted Form 990s and audits are that of the Alzheimer's Association, Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter's previous nonprofit status (EIN#: 04-2731194). Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.
 

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

--

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

--

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

--

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

--

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

--