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Cambridge Camping Association, Inc.

 99 Bishop Allen Drive
 Cambridge, MA 02139
[P] (617) 864-0960
[F] (617) 864-0920
www.cambridgecamping.org
s.zimmerman@cambridgecamping.org
Sharon Zimmerman
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INCORPORATED: 1893
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-6002073

LAST UPDATED: 09/11/2017
Organization DBA Cambridge Camping
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Cambridge Camping's mission is to provide meaningful experiences to under-resourced, urban children in supportive and inclusive camp communities through enriching and inspired programs. Every summer we provide quality, subsidized day and overnight camp opportunities for 400+ children in Cambridge and Greater Boston. Camp is where children laugh, play, join in, and make memories to last a lifetime.

Mission Statement

Cambridge Camping's mission is to provide meaningful experiences to under-resourced, urban children in supportive and inclusive camp communities through enriching and inspired programs. Every summer we provide quality, subsidized day and overnight camp opportunities for 400+ children in Cambridge and Greater Boston. Camp is where children laugh, play, join in, and make memories to last a lifetime.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $582,003.00
Projected Expense $582,003.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Cambridge Adventure Day Camp
  • Daybreak Day Camp
  • Department of Children and Families Placement
  • Overnight Camps

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Cambridge Camping's mission is to provide meaningful experiences to under-resourced, urban children in supportive and inclusive camp communities through enriching and inspired programs. Every summer we provide quality, subsidized day and overnight camp opportunities for 400+ children in Cambridge and Greater Boston. Camp is where children laugh, play, join in, and make memories to last a lifetime.


Background Statement

In 1893, a group of concerned citizens formed “Country Week,” an organization that provided a week in the country at a farm to a dozen impoverished city children. By 1903, Country Week was serving more than 90 children. In 1936, Cambridge Camping Association was incorporated as a nonprofit and continues to make summer camp a reality for hundreds of underserved youth each year.

In 1969, CCA founded Cambridge Adventure Day Camp (CADC), the only day camp specifically targeting under-resourced children in Cambridge. In 1990 Daybreak Day Camp was established to serve children whose social-emotional special needs prevented their success at most conventional camps. Our day camps are dedicated to making it possible for any child who wants to attend to do so regardless of the family's ability to pay. Each camp operates one 5-week session, Monday through Friday, and provides transportation to and from camp as well as nutritious meals and snacks. Our two day camps serve over 130 children each summer and have a strong multicultural focus which is reflected in the diversity of our campers, staff and programming.
 
In addition, Cambridge Camping operates: the Overnight Scholarship Program, which sponsors low- income children at residential partner camps; the Department of Children and Families Camper Referral Program, which makes camp placements for children in protective care of the state; the BB&N Scholarship Program, which provides camper-ships to summer camp options at the Buckingham, Brown, and Nichols School (BB&N); and the Counselor-in-Training Program, providing teens (many former campers) with training, job skills, and paid employment while providing positive connections with adults.

 


Impact Statement

 400+ children with limited or no access to summer opportunities actively participate in exciting, fun, and enriching camp programs each year.

Our camps offer content rich programming that help children become confident in their abilities, try new things, and make friends. Campers spend time outside each day, unplugged from technology, connecting to each other and the world around them.
 
The measurable results for our day camps are based on documentation provided from enrollment information, attendance records, camper evaluations, parent surveys, staff feedback and camp directors’ reports.
Year after year, the campers who attend Cambridge Adventure Day Camp are afforded the opportunity to spend five weeks of their summer in an environment that embraces them, challenges them, empowers them, and excites them to cultivate new skills.
 
Through activities designed to expose them to new concepts, campers grow beyond their current frame of reference and develop more complex ideas about the world around them. They are introduced to ideas that influence their personal narratives and to environments outside of the city. Thematic based activities deepen camper knowledge about the world around them. The CADC “curriculum” is educational, playful, and differentiated in ways that respect the developmental readiness of both younger and older campers. 
 
At Daybreak, children who would normally be turned away from typical camps found a community where they could thrive. The high staff to camper ratio at Daybreak allows each child to fully explore activities so that each camper can experience success and increase their confidence. Daybreak activities promote community building by requiring children to work collaboratively and respectfully with their peers. Campers are prompted to think about themselves as members of a group and to reflect on the impact their behavior has on those around them.
 
In all programming, both formal and informal, campers are encouraged to develop their personal skills through active participation, conflict resolution, self-control, and a willingness to try new things. Staff actively encourage and support the campers as they work toward meeting their goals.

 


Needs Statement

 Our core day camp programs draw from the many socio-economically marginalized school-age children in Cambridge. The families we serve represent the racial and ethnic diversity reflected in both our community’s immigrants and long-term residents. Our camp programs provide transportation to and from camp, nutritious meals and snacks during the day, and a myriad of new ways for children to grow, develop and learn.

The children and families served by Cambridge Camping’s two core day camps consist of several traditionally under-resourced groups: 73% of campers are low-income; 87% represent non-white ethnic/racial groups; 37% come from single family households; and 100% of Daybreak campers have social, emotional, and/or behavioral special needs.
For the majority of families we serve, cost is the primary barrier keeping their children from having a summer camp experience. Cambridge Camping continues to respond to our community’s needs by offering financial support and a sliding fee scale. We are the only day camp in Cambridge specifically targeting and serving under-resourced children.

 


CEO Statement

There is a summer opportunity gap for children from under resourced families. Each year the lack of affordable and effective respite and recreation programs prevents hundreds of children in our community from experiencing exciting opportunities. The situation is worse for parents of children with special social and emotional needs, given the prohibitive cost of therapeutic camps designed to serve them.

Camp provides a powerful experience for children. Children who struggle in school or have limited success in interactions with others discover they can connect and make friends, practice new skills, and learn to value themselves.

And camp inoculates kids all year long, through stressful times and long, dark winters.  Happy memories of camp keep summer alive with thoughts of outdoor adventures and dreams of new possibilities.

How many times this year has 9 year old Ary thought about his first mountain hike?  He spent a beautiful, sunny afternoon climbing a trail alongside a dozen lively, excited campers. Upon reaching the top, his counselor noticed Ary gazing out in awe and silence as he stood on the highest rock. “I wish I could stay up here forever,” he told her. Later, as they made their way down the trail, he talked about building a house on a mountain, and how he would need to make a pulley to transport his food and water.

Our goal is to close the summer opportunity gap for children without access to camp experiences. We want children like Ary to have “a mountaintop moment” that impacts the way they envision their summer and their world.


Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
Cambridge Adventure Day Camp serves youth in Cambridge. Daybreak Day Camp serves children in Cambridge and Somerville. The Overnight Scholarship and the Department of Children and Families programs serve the Greater Boston area.

Organization Categories

  1. Recreation & Sports - Camps
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Cambridge Adventure Day Camp

In 1969 Cambridge Camping founded CADC which brings together children ages 5-11 from all neighborhoods of Cambridge. The camp serves 100 children from under resourced families and has a strong multicultural focus which is reflected in the diversity of its campers, staff and program. Camp operates for one 5-week session, and provides daily transportation, lunch, and snacks.

 
The goal of CADC is to provide a dynamic, engaging, and enriching summer that allows children to stretch beyond their current boundaries and develop their leadership potential. One day each week all campers spend the day at a state beach. Camp provides weekly swim lessons, tennis lessons, and pool visits. Additional field trips include nature centers, farms, and museums.
Budget  $160,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  To involve Cambridge youth in active summer programming and build cross-neighborhood friendships. Our summer programming allows youth a chance to try out new activities and programs in a safe, nurturing environment.
Program Long-Term Success  To encourage youth to try new things and to participate actively in the camp community. Campers take leadership, teamwork, and social skills they learn at camp into adulthood.
Program Success Monitored By 

Camper, parent, and staff evaluations. It's also measured by the yearly retention rate of campers.

Examples of Program Success 

We have a retention rate of over 75% of campers from summer to summer. The feedback from campers, parents, and staff have shown the success of the program. Campers say yearly how they wish the program was longer.

At the end of the summer, parents evaluated their child's camp experience on a scale of 1 to 4 (not satisfied to very satisfied) in areas for daily transportation, camp communication, activities, etc. This year's results indicated that the highest satisfaction was with camp staff (3.9) and overall camp experience (3.9) and the lowest was the food program (3.2).

Example of community member feedback:

“It is wonderful to see all the campers engaged in such a variety of activities and to know that CADC is narrowing the summer opportunity gap for so many under-resourced children in our community.”

- Cambridge Mayor David Maher on a visit to camp in July 2014


Daybreak Day Camp

Daybreak Day Camp: Daybreak Day Camp is a supportive camp for 30 children Camp operates for one 5-week session, and provides daily transportation, lunch, and snacks.

 
Daybreak provides the support necessary for our campers to participate in activities, connect with peers, engage in new experiences, and enjoy the kind of summer experiences easily accessed by their neuro-typical peers. Regular attendance is essential as the children we serve need time to build trust. Campers learn to better cope with frustration, accept adult help, take turns, join in activities, and make friends.

Daybreak creates an environment that children want to be a part of. Campers participate in swim lessons, arts and crafts, cooking, movement and games, canoeing and field trips to lakes and farms. Visitors to camp include Curious Creatures, Knucklebones (noncompetitive games), Brazilian martial arts-dance-music, and Metro Lacrosse.

Budget  $115,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Campers have a safe and productive summer at Daybreak Day Camp where they are able to share adventures with other campers.

Program Long-Term Success 

Campers are empowered by their summer at Daybreak and are able to find a caring, safe community where they can see other campers who are just like them. The campers continue on and use valuable social skills that they learned at Daybreak as productive members of society.

Program Success Monitored By  Camper, staff, and parent evaluations of both the campers and the program. The high retention rate between summers is also characteristic of a successful program.
Examples of Program Success 

Children with diagnosis including Mood Disorders/Bipolar; Depression; ADHD; Anxiety; Autism Spectrum (PDD, Developmental Delays); language, motor, sensory processing issues; and histories of trauma experienced a summer filled with fun and success.

 
Daybreak activities promote community building by requiring children to work collaboratively and respectfully with their peers. In all programming, both formal and informal, campers are encouraged to develop their personal skills through active participation, conflict resolution, self-control, and a willingness to try new things. Staff actively encourage and support campers as they work toward meeting their goals. Campers carry these new social skills with them at the end of summer.

Examples of feedback are:

“Daybreak has been a Godsend for [our daughter], and we cannot thank you enough for what you have done for her. Your program and your personal intervention changed her life.” - Parent of Daybreak Camper


Department of Children and Families Placement

As a delegate agency for the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families, Cambridge Camping places over 200 children in day and overnight camps throughout eastern Massachusetts.
Budget  $104,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success  Campers are able to spend time away from the stresses of home life while learning new skills. The time spent away from the family is instrumental for campers to gain self-confidence and have fun in a safe, caring environment.
Program Long-Term Success  Camp provides children in the care of the Department of Children and Families with a stable summer. Children enjoy a caring, safe, environment.
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is measured by social workers, camp staff, and youth in the program.
Examples of Program Success  Social workers have informed us that the camp experience is paramount for the child doing well in the Dept. of Children and Families system.

Overnight Camps

The Overnight Scholarship Program (OSP) partners with residential camps in New England. OSP serves roughly 50 children, ages 8 – 16, throughout Greater Boston. Funding for camp limits family expense from $100 to $300 per camp session.
Budget  $23,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  Campers are able to spend most of each day outdoors, which is a huge change from daily life in the city. They are exposed to new experiences and challenges while enjoying independence and discovering a sense of self outside of their school- or family-identities.
Program Long-Term Success  Campers find a new sense of autonomy, confidence, and leadership at overnight camp.
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is measured by evaluations of the camp counselors and parents.
Examples of Program Success 

Alyssa learned to swim, fish and canoe at camp. Her mom has seen increased confidence in Alyssa. She is grateful to her daughter’s counselors for supporting her shy and quiet daughter in her efforts to make new friends.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The economic situation continues to negatively impact our families and the systems on which they rely. An increase in the number of families with shrinking incomes coincides with a period of diminishing resources to support them. There remains a lack of affordable and effective respite, education, and recreation programs for the families we serve. Additionally, parents of children with special social and emotional needs face increased scarcity for summer programs as their child’s behavioral demands make them ineligible for “typical” camps and private therapeutic programs are cost prohibitive.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms Sharon Zimmerman
CEO Term Start June 2016
CEO Email s.zimmerman@cambridgecamping.org
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 50
Number of Volunteers 11
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 60%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 16
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 37
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 35
Male: 20
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Lee Swislow
Board Chair Company Affiliation Consultant
Board Chair Term Jan 2016 - Jan 2019
Board Co-Chair Ms. Hillary Wodlinger
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2016 - Jan 2019

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Karina Barrozo Community Member Voting
Michael Callaghan IT Consultant Voting
Matthew Curtis Restaurant Owner Cambridge and Boston Voting
Shakeela Darden Crossroads Family Center Voting
Melissa Frost Community Volunteer Voting
Joan Fund Attorney Voting
Linda Grace Cambridge Voting
David Hannon Partner Craig & Macaully Law Firm Voting
Susanna Jacobus Medical Research Analyst Voting
Elza Mathieu Assistant Principal Edward Brooke Charter School Voting
Neil Olken Retired Voting
Ariadna Adames Rojas Attorney Voting
Carol Sexton Cambridge Savings Bank Voting
Lee Swislow GLAD Voting
Sonia Turek Community Cooks Voting
Hilary Wodlinger Graphic Designer Voting
Dave Wood Coldwell Banker Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 14
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 12
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 90%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Income $582,003.00
Projected Expense $582,003.00
Form 990s

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2016 Audited Financial Statement

2015 Audited Financial Statement

2014 Audited Financial Statement

2013 Review

2012 Review

2011 Review

2010 Review

2009 Review

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $517,656 $602,938 $582,115
Total Expenses $548,220 $561,185 $564,108

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$132,585 $274,935 $233,540
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $40,791 $33,732 $36,992
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $190,690 $195,654 $158,394
Investment Income, Net of Losses $27,378 $996 $26,216
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $126,212 $97,621 $126,973
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $451,409 $430,433 $429,661
Administration Expense $60,122 $83,733 $72,063
Fundraising Expense $36,689 $47,019 $62,384
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.94 1.07 1.03
Program Expense/Total Expenses 82% 77% 76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 12% 16%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $404,570 $448,594 $402,082
Current Assets $103,576 $134,750 $401,403
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $15,671 $29,131 $24,372
Total Net Assets $388,899 $419,463 $377,710

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 5.00

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 6.61 4.63 16.47

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.

Documents


Impact

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1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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