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Massachusetts Public Health Association

 50 Federal Street, 8th Floor
 Boston, MA 02110
[P] (857) 263-7072
[F] (857) 263-7068
www.mapublichealth.org
[email protected]
Carlene Pavlos
Facebook Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1879
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2326503

LAST UPDATED: 03/14/2019
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

The Massachusetts Public Health Association (MPHA) is the champion for public health in the Commonwealth. We are a catalyst for change, eliminating health inequities and creating healthy communities for all.

Mission Statement

The Massachusetts Public Health Association (MPHA) is the champion for public health in the Commonwealth. We are a catalyst for change, eliminating health inequities and creating healthy communities for all.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year Apr 01, 2018 to Mar 31, 2019
Projected Income $927,190.00
Projected Expense $927,100.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Addressing Social Determinants of Health
  • Community Health Integration
  • Public Health Infrastructure and Support

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2018 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The Massachusetts Public Health Association (MPHA) is the champion for public health in the Commonwealth. We are a catalyst for change, eliminating health inequities and creating healthy communities for all.


Background Statement

MPHA was founded in 1879, as the nation’s first public health association. We are a private, non-profit 501c3, statewide membership organization that promotes a healthy Massachusetts.

For most of our history, we were a professional trade association focused on education and development for workers in the field of public health. As the twentieth century progressed, MPHA found itself an increasingly central voice in calling for public policies that improve health – from immunization to clean air to fluoridation. We have evolved into the state’s premier voice for policy solutions to critical public health problems.

 
MPHA’s work focuses "upstream," addressing the social and environmental conditions that determine health. MPHA is committed to health and racial equity and utilizes health equity framing in identifying our policy goals. We have built a network of activists, including local leaders, policy experts, community-based organizations, and students from across the state. We engage these individuals and groups in a collaborative process to identify important issues and set policy priorities, and then lead them in taking action to educate policy makers. MPHA is not a single issue organization; rather it is an organization that utilizes its strengths at coalition-building and organizing individuals and organizations to effect policy change to improve the health of all Massachusetts residents.

Impact Statement

Over the past several years, MPHA has:

  • Passed legislation for the Massachusetts Food Trust Program (2016) and, in 2018, secured funding in the state budget and release of $1M in capital dollars for the Program to provide loans to local businesses to sell healthy and affordable food in communities that need it most.
  • Organized the Regional Transit Authority (RTA) Advocacy Coalition, crucial in getting increased funding in the 2019 state budget to maintain routes for public transportation in cities across the state.
  • Increased attention to the social determinants of health (SDOH) and community needs in the Attorney General Community Benefit Guidelines governing hospitals.
  • Brought the voice of public health and consumer advocates to the table with MassHealth and others through the Alliance for Community Health Integration.
  • Passed legislation to create a Special Commission on Local Public Health (2016).
  • Passed the Active Streets Bill as part of the Transportation Bond Bill (2014), and secured commitment of $20M from MassDOT to implement the Complete Streets Program (2014).
  • Established the $60M Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund (PWTF) in healthcare cost containment legislation.

MPHA’s priorities are chosen to have maximum impact on improving health, strengthening the organized constituency for public health, and markedly reducing health inequities. Our 2019-2020 policy agenda includes:

  • Addressing core social determinants of health: healthy affordable food, transportation equity, and access to quality, affordable housing.
  • Leveraging changes in health care to impact the social determinants of health through work with Accountable Care Organizations and hospitals, and reauthorization of the Prevention & Wellness Trust Fund.
  • Strengthening municipal and state public health infrastructure.

 

This agenda will advance three cross-cutting goals: combatting structural racism, reducing poverty, and integrating health into all policies.


Needs Statement

  1.      Stable financial support through multi-year grants and contracts that will allow us to expand our staff in order to build advocacy and organizing capacity.
  2.      Resources to support strategic planning and ongoing work to deepen our capacity to address structural racism and implement health equity strategies internally and in our programmatic efforts.
  3.      Data analytics and evaluation support to inform our priorities and track the success of our policy victories.
  4.      Graphic design support for fact sheets, reports, and website.

 


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement



Geographic Area Served

STATEWIDE

MPHA serves all of Massachusetts, with a special focus on communities most impacted by structural racism and poverty.


Organization Categories

  1. Health Care - Public Health
  2. -
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Addressing Social Determinants of Health

MPHA understand Social Determinants of Health as “the broad set of factors that influence health outcomes and that shape community environments. These factors reach beyond the healthcare system and include structural drivers and conditions of daily life” (adapted from The Prevention Institute). Through organizing and advocacy, MPHA works to shape policies that address three core social determinants of health:

  • Access to Healthy Affordable Food
  • Transportation Equity
  • Access to Quality, Affordable Housing

By addressing these social determinants of health, and integrating a focus on eliminating racism and reducing poverty, MPHA and our allies aim to reduce health inequities and improve health outcomes in the Commonwealth.

Budget  --
Category  Health Care, General/Other Public Health
Population Served General/Unspecified At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

  • Increase number of activist leaders across the state that have participated in key policy actions e.g., legislative advocacy, media advocacy, recruitment, event planning, and community organizing
  • Successful implementation of the Massachusetts Food Trust Program and expanded funding in the state capital budget
  • Funding and modernization of Regional Transportation Authorities
  • Identification of policy initiatives that address availability of affordable housing, prevent displacement and expand access to supportive services that prevent homelessness/assist in maintaining housing

 

Program Long-Term Success 
As a result of our work, the legislature, state agencies, and health care institutions will adopt multiple new policies and practices, and will allocate additional funding, to address the social determinants of health that drive health inequities and racial injustice. This will result in improvements in health equity and outcomes in the Commonwealth.
Program Success Monitored By 

As with the program areas described above, MPHA collects interim outcomes as part of our advocacy evaluation framework. These data give us information on whether we are making progress on the path toward achieving our policy goals, which are multi-year in nature. Based on our theory of change, meeting our interim outcomes goals will lead to long term impact.

We track both staff and campaign member advocacy activities, technical assistance provided to campaign partners, engagement of legislative allies, total number of campaign partners, and the quantity and regularity of social media, e-communications, and earned media. While these are not traditional “outputs,” this qualitative data provides valuable information and lessons about our progress and informs mid-course fine-tuning to maximize impact

Examples of Program Success 

  • Passing legislation for the Massachusetts Food Trust Program (2016) and, in 2018, securing funding in the state budget and release of $1M in capital dollars for the Program to provide loans to local businesses to sell healthy and affordable food in communities that need it most.
  • Organizing the Regional Transit Authority (RTA) Advocacy Coalition, a task force that was crucial in getting increased funding in the 2019 state budget in order to maintain current capacity and routes for public transportation in cities across the state.

Community Health Integration

MPHA is committed to ensuring that ongoing efforts at health system transformation recognize the importance of integrating community health needs into the work of the health care system. Our policy efforts prioritize integration of a social determinants of health framework into developing models for accountable care organizations and hospital community benefits, and we prioritize meaningful participation of community organizations and advocates in this work. Two major initiatives are included in this programmatic area:

MPHA has led the formation and work of the Alliance for Community Health Integration (ACHI), a coalition of public health, consumer advocacy, social service, and community organizations with a shared, strategic agenda to integrate SDOH into health care. Such alignment creates a greater imperative for policymakers and health care systems to more fully engage with our networks. ACHI includes three organizing teams: MassHealth & SDOH, Hospital Community Investments, and Housing Policy. MPHA leads ACHI, chairing meetings and staffing the organizing teams, coordinating input from coalition members, and engaging members in communications and policy actions.

Additionally, MPHA continues to advocate for the Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund (PWTF). PWTF connected clinical services and community-based interventions resulting in demonstrated improvements in health outcomes for those who participated. MPHA and its partners are working with legislative allies to create an ongoing and stable funding structure that will assure the availability of this program for years to come.

Budget  --
Category  Health Care, General/Other Public Health
Population Served General/Unspecified At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

  • Through the Alliance for Community Health Integration we will grow the capacity of health advocacy groups to understand and effectively engage in advocacy on health systems transformation.
  • Build strong visibility for Prevention and Wellness Trust success among local and state officials and media through meetings, events, outreach, and storytelling. Through this work, lay the foundation for a campaign to re-authorize funding for the Trust.
Program Long-Term Success 

As a result of our work, health care institutions, accountable care organizations, MassHealth, and other state agencies supporting health care reform efforts will adopt multiple new policies and practices, and will allocate additional funding, to incorporate the social determinants of health and health related social needs into clinical models. This will result in improvements in health equity and health outcomes in the Commonwealth.

Program Success Monitored By 

 MPHA collects data on interim outcomes on the path toward achieving our policy change goals. These metrics include: how well our policy platform aligns with our local partners’ priorities; our ability to mobilize partners for action; incremental wins in the policy process; and whether our local partners have increased their advocacy capacity. The data we collect gives us a strong indication that we are succeeding in meeting our interim outcome goals, and that we will succeed in winning significant policy changes and making the long-term impact that we are seeking.

MPHA also assesses informal and qualitative data, such as attendance of coalition partners at meetings, informal feedback we receive from partners and stakeholders, and the responsiveness of policy targets. In relation to our ACHI work, we’ve learned:

  • Policy makers are interested and want to engage in this area of work. Furthermore, they and are looking for leadership from our field.
  • Implementation is key. As health systems and policymakers embrace the concept of SDOH, we see the language incorporated into communication materials and policy documents more often.
  • There is a need to partner with, learn from, and build capacity together with local social service providers and community organizations. We have received this feedback regularly from multiple stakeholders. There is a tremendous capacity challenge to reach so many impacted stakeholders, as well as a need to adapt models of capacity building with local organizations. We are employing strategies to address these challenges and we are continuing to seek resources to expand community organizing and capacity building.
  • The concept of SDOH cannot be limited to health-related social needs. MPHA and ACHI continue to clarify the distinction between providing health-related social needs and altering the SDOH in order to eliminate the source of inequities in the first place.

 

Examples of Program Success 

  • ACHI has become an important voice for state policy makers a they seek input from a range of community and statewide advocacy organizations.
  • MPHA led a coalition of organizations in the campaign to create the $60 Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund as part of the 2012 healthcare cost containment legislation. The independent evaluation of the resulting community-clinical partnerships showed improved health outcomes.

 

 


Public Health Infrastructure and Support

To support vibrant, connected communities on which the health of Massachusetts residents’ depends, MPHA works to assure that there is vital and sufficient public health infrastructure at both the state and local levels. At the state level MPHA works with stakeholders to assure sufficient funding and resources for critical public health functions. At the local level, MPHA coordinates the Coalition on Local Public Health (CLPH), consisting of five public health organizations dedicated to advocating for the resources needed to promote healthy communities in Massachusetts through strong Boards of Health and Health Departments. These organizations include: Massachusetts Association of Health Boards, Massachusetts Association of Public Health Nurses, Massachusetts Environmental Health Association, Massachusetts Health Officers Association and Massachusetts Public Health Association. Massachusetts has 351 boards of health at the municipal level that provide many of the core public health protections that we all rely on to stay safe and healthy. The local health system as it is currently structured and financed faces significant challenges meeting statutory responsibilities and providing essential safeguards. MPHA, working with CLPH, was able to create a statutory Special Commission on Local Public Health’s in 2016. This Commission is charged with assessing “the effectiveness and efficiency of municipal and regional public health systems and to make recommendations regarding how to strengthen the delivery of public health services.” In 2019 the Commission will issue its report and MPHA is working with stakeholders to assure that its recommendations will be addressed and implemented.

Budget  90,000
Category  Health Care, General/Other Public Health
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Filing of the State Action for Public Health Excellence (SAPHE) legislation to provide a vehicle for implementation of the Special Commission on Local Public Health’s recommendations.
Program Long-Term Success 

Achieve goals identified by the Special Commission on Local Public Health including:

  • Ensuring that all members of the local public health workforce have access to education on core functions.
  • Create incentive grant program to support more effective and efficient delivery of service and increase regional collaboration.
  • Move Massachusetts toward national standards for 21st Century public health system.
Program Success Monitored By 

As with the program areas described above, MPHA collects interim outcomes as part of our advocacy evaluation framework. These data give us information on whether we are making progress on the path toward achieving our policy goals, which are multi-year in nature. Based on our theory of change, meeting our interim outcomes goals will lead to long term impact.

We track both staff and campaign member advocacy activities, technical assistance provided to campaign partners, engagement of legislative allies, total number of campaign partners, and the quantity and regularity of social media, e-communications, and earned media. While these are not traditional “outputs,” this qualitative data provides valuable information and lessons about our progress and informs mid-course fine-tuning to maximize impact

 

Examples of Program Success 
  • Passing legislation to create a Special Commission on Local Public Health, which will allow the Commonwealth to strengthen the local public health system which provides essential protections for communities throughout the Commonwealth (2016).
  • Additional funding for Bureau of Environmental Health in the 2018 state budget.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Carlene Pavlos
CEO Term Start Apr 2018
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Rebekah Gewirtz Jan 2014 Apr 2017
Mr. Toby Fisher Sept 2012 Sept 2013

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Andrea Freeman Field Director --
Mr. Maddie Ribble Director of Public Policy and Campaign Strategy --
Mr. Nopalzin Torres Director of Operations --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
American Public Health Association (APHA) --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association N/A

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

  • Action for Boston Community Development
  • Alliance of Massachusetts YMCAs
  • American Heart/Stroke Association
  • Berkshire Interfaith Organizing
  • Boston Alliance for Community Health
  • Boston Children's Hospital
  • Boston Public Health Commission
  • CHAPA
  • Children’s Health Watch
  • Coalition for Local Public Health
  • Conservation Law Foundation
  • Enhance Asian Community Health
  • Franklin Regional Council of Governments
  • Greater Lowell Health Alliance
  • Groundwork Lawrence
  • Health Care for All
  • Health Resources in Action
  • Justice Resource Institute
  • John Snow Institute
  • Latino Health Insurance Program
  • Local Enterprise Assistance Fund
  • Massachusetts Association of CDCs
  • Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers
  • Massachusetts Association of Health Boards
  • MassBudget
  • Massachusetts Councils on Aging
  • Massachusetts Dietetic Association
  • Massachusetts Food System Collaborative
  • Metropolitan Area Planning Council
  • MLPB
  • Massachusetts Law Reform Institute
  • Pioneer Valley Planning Commission
  • Public Health Institute of Western Massachusetts
  • Revere on the Move
  • Transportation for Massachusetts
  • Western Massachusetts Health Equity Network
  • Worcester County Food Bank
  • Worcester Food Policy Council

 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

During its Executive Director search, MPHA extended its strategic plan for an additional year.  We will be initiating a new planning process in the spring of 2019. When that plan has been completed, we will enter the "Charting Impact" section of Giving Commons.

Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 8
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 2
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Exempt

Risk Management Provisions

Risk Management Provisions
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Jodie Silverman
Board Chair Company Affiliation Unaffiliated
Board Chair Term Nov 2018 - Nov 2020
Board Co-Chair Ms. Anne McHugh
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Boston Public Health Commission
Board Co-Chair Term Nov 2017 - Nov 2019

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Clara Chan Farnsworth Wellington Management Company Voting
Ms. Linda Chan Flynn Lowell Community Health Center Voting
Ms. Jessica Collins Public Health Institute of Western Massachusetts Voting
Mr. Soloe Dennis Springfield Health and Human Services Voting
Mr. Claude-Alix Jacob Cambridge Public Health Dept, Cambridge Health Alliance Voting
Mr. Stewart Landers John Snow, Inc. Voting
Mr. Keith Mahoney The Boston Foundation Voting
Mr. Neil Maniar Northeastern University Bouve College of Health Sciences Voting
Ms. Anne McHugh Boston Public Health Commission Voting
Ms. Heather McMann Groundwork Lawrence Voting
Ms. Roeshanna Moore-Evans Broad Institute at MIT Voting
Ms. Jasmine Naylor Caring Health Center Voting
Ms. Tavinder Phull Partners HealthCare Voting
Mr. Steven Ridini Health Resources in Action Voting
Mr. Vinay Seth Mohta Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Jodie Silverman Community Volunteer Voting
Mr. Kent Siri SHYFT Analytics Voting
Ms. Aswita Tan-McGrory The Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 7
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 1
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 10
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 80%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Public Policy/Advocacy

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

In addition to the Committees noted above, MPHA also has a standing board committee on Racial Equity and Health. Further, MPHA's Policy Council (the policy committee referenced above) that makes recommendations to the Board regarding our policy priorities, is comprised of members of the Board as well as members representing community based organizations, advocacy organizations, education institutions, and healthcare.  It is comprised of more than 50% people of color and there are representatives from all regions of the Commonwealth.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2018 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Total Revenue $955,391 $1,112,763 $846,143
Total Expenses $962,232 $927,331 $733,955

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $640,469 $820,818 $576,072
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $4,327 $4,303 $2,753
Membership Dues $66,285 $65,582 $49,377
Special Events $164,903 $159,825 $168,461
Revenue In-Kind $45,229 $35,029 $25,470
Other $34,178 $27,206 $24,010

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Program Expense $681,520 $658,522 $576,615
Administration Expense $99,337 $97,236 $52,907
Fundraising Expense $181,375 $171,573 $104,433
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.99 1.20 1.15
Program Expense/Total Expenses 71% 71% 79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 23% 17% 14%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Total Assets $660,001 $695,187 $496,616
Current Assets $650,919 $682,309 $479,942
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- --
Current Liabilities $27,657 $56,002 $42,863
Total Net Assets $632,344 $639,185 $453,753

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 23.54 12.18 11.20

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials. Contributions from individuals and government sources are  listed under foundations & corporations when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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