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Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

Founded in 1932, the Community Art Center is a neighborhood institution committed to our mission: to cultivate an engaged community of youth whose powerful artistic voices transform their lives, their neighborhoods, and their worlds.

Mission Statement

Founded in 1932, the Community Art Center is a neighborhood institution committed to our mission: to cultivate an engaged community of youth whose powerful artistic voices transform their lives, their neighborhoods, and their worlds.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $709,929.00
Projected Expense $704,102.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Community Programs
  • School Age Child Care Program (SACC)
  • Teen Media Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Founded in 1932, the Community Art Center is a neighborhood institution committed to our mission: to cultivate an engaged community of youth whose powerful artistic voices transform their lives, their neighborhoods, and their worlds.


Background Statement

Since 1932, the Community Art Center has provided a second home for children through culturally relevant after school arts and media programs. Our programs capture the creative spirit of children who without us would be “at home bored, doing nothing” or “on the streets.” Now, we are boosting traditional art forms with 21stcentury technology in our computer lab and design studios.

 In its first years, the Community Art Center offered informal arts classes to a handful of children in the low-income Area 4 neighborhood to supplement the arts education they were lacking in school. In 1972, the agency incorporated as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and for the next two decades, the Art Center provided arts classes to thousands of children from the Washington Elms/Newtowne Court public housing complexes.

 In the early 1990s, a philosophical shift at the agency resulted in new hiring strategies that emphasized finding staff who were trained artists as well as cultural role models for the children. At present, our staff is 70% people of color and staff linguistic capabilities are English, Haitian Creole and Spanish. We also have two program alumni working in the Center.

In recent years, the Community Art Center has received broad recognition for its high quality programs. In 2006, our Teen Media Program was honored with a Coming Up Taller award from the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities. The Art Center was one of five programs in Massachusetts selected as a finalist for the Social Innovation Forum youth arts track in 2008 and for the STEM education track in 2011. The Art Center also received a capital improvements grant in 2007 through the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. We used this funding to update our Media Lab and leveraged the remaining funds to launch a Capital Campaign to complete a full renovation of our facility. With grants from the Children’s Investment Fund, the Cambridge Housing Authority and the City of Cambridge, among others, the Community Art Center Facility Renovation was complete in April 2011. In order to fully leverage the impact of our facility renovation, the Art Center also launched a strategic planning process in September of 2010, which the organization is currently implementing.


Impact Statement

Since we opened our doors, the Community Art Center has served over 8000 youth with approximately 3000 program hours per year. In the past few years, we have built new key partnerships, grown our community programs, as well as the leadership and presentation opportunities for youth, and doubled our audience and event attendance.

 

· 2014: Enhanced programs sustained and grow

o Creative Approaches to Therapeutic Support initiative is funded by C.F. Adams Trust and implements teacher training in Art Therapy techniques and builds an arts therapy based behavioral response plan.

o Community Programs has a dedicated staff person and kicks of the Port Stories Public Art Project with the Change for Peace Art and Music Series presented by teens in Kendall Square and Newtowne Court Housing Development.

o TMP teens present art exhibits in Kendall Square, MIT Museum, Cambridge City Hall and VMWare.

o SACC youth create a mural installed in Tech Square and perform an interdisciplinary original play, REBEL, about the Haitian Revolution, at the Cambridge YMCA.

· 2013: Partnerships strengthened and awarded

o Alexandria Real Estate commissions a 160 foot mural on their East Cambridge construction site, which will be created by Teen Media Program Digital Arts Studio

o Boston Properties invites Teen Media Program students to curate a 130-foot digital screen mounted on the ceiling of the lobby space between Google’s new office spaces in Kendall Square.

o Executive Director, Eryn Johnson works with a group of ten social justice focused Cambridge-based non-profit leaders to form the new Cambridge Non-profit Coalition.

o The Community Art Center and Novartis are awarded the “Central in Motion Award” from the Central Square Business Association for “exemplifying community collaboration that adds to our culture, landscapes, enhances our neighborhoods, and makes Central Square unique.”

· 2012: New Community Programs launched :

o Executive Director Eryn Johnson receives Creative Activist Award from ArtCorps

o This is Where We Live, Work and Create Public Art Initiative is launched through a block long mural and gallery commissioned by Novartis Pharmaceuticals which will be on view for through 2016.

o One9TEEN After Dark offers first evening programs for teens in collaboration with Cambridge Boys and Girls Club and Tutoring Plus

· 2011: Organizational structure strengthened

o Comprehensive Strategic Plan is completed. Implementation of newly evolved program structure begins.

o 2011: Capital campaign a success, resulting in complete facility renovation.

Our strategic plan has established four programmatic strategic goals to guide our work over the next three years. Each goal is connected to a set of core strategies and measures of success.

1. Youth are powerful expressive artists and media users.

2. Youth are part of a creative network and value the arts and media as a viable profession.

3. Youth are leaders who make safe and healthy choices.

4. Youth have an expansive world-view and are an integral part of transforming communities across classes, cultures and professional sectors.


 


Needs Statement

1. Additional Funding for Mental Health Consultant: $15,000

Financial support is needed to increase the hours for the Youth Advocate. This position is a crucial part of our Circle of Support: a set of comprehensive wrap-around services that helps to ensure that youth in crisis have their basic needs met, and are able to thrive. With funding, we can increase our Youth Advocate’s hours to support more children and families in obtaining much needed referrals and mental health support.

2. Funding for part-time staff member to assist our Community Programs Coordinator FY15: $5,000

More than 1700 audience members take part in the Community Art Center’s year-round, youth-led arts events. Current events and activities in the program include our public art initiative and the National Youth Film Festival. Additional funds would allow us to hire a part-time program assistant to support the program coordinator allowing us to reach more constituents. 

3. Kitchen Renovation: $10,000.00

When our facility was renovated in 2011, the kitchen was not included in the renovation. The School Age Child Care program provides dinner daily during the school year and three meals a day during the summer. All appliances, cabinets, walls, floor, and ceiling are in need of repair or replacement.

 


CEO Statement

In April 2011 we completed a renovation our facility for the first time in 14 years – allowing us to expand our reach and improve our current programs. Our facility is fully renovated, equipped with the most up to date technology and attracting more attention from new youth and families than ever before.
 
At the end of March 2011, we completed our strategic planning process funded by the Boston Foundation. Our new strategic plan has given us a road map to success that is directly connected to the needs of our youth and our community. We are well poised to achieve our vision of “well-rounded artists and media users with healthy relationships and the ability to make safe choices” and “a Cambridge community that is welcoming to all youth and connected across classes, cultures and professional sectors.” Our biggest challenge is attracting attention and support to our cause. We need to tell the story of our transformation while also continuing to maintain the attention to quality and commitment to each individual youth that has made the Community Art Center a trusted neighborhood institution.

Board Chair Statement

Statement Dan Anderson, Former Board President

 I’ve been a member of the board of directors for the Community Art Center for coming up on seven years. I was recruited to the board through my professional organization the Boston Society of Architects. The Art Center had recently received a HUD grant and was reaching out to the design community for volunteers in anticipation of a capital improvement project for its facilities. I had also moved my firm back to Cambridge and was looking for opportunities to connect with the community. From my first visit to the Art Center and meeting the staff and students, I was struck by the energy and enthusiasm I found there. Although the spaces and equipment were worse for wear you could immediately sense the passion and impact the programs and activities had on kids and their families. I was inspired to give my time and energy to the Art Center and found myself increasingly involved in fundraising and work related to a capital project. We have now successfully completed a renovation project and have spaces that reflect the creative potential of our kids and community. We successfully faced fundraising challenges, the difficulties of operating a program off-site during construction, and the logistics and unforeseen obstacles of every construction project. I feel extraordinarily fortunate to be part of this organization, its mission and the everyday work it does. I’m reminded of this every time I walk through the door and see the same vitality I recall from my first visit.


Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

 

Community Art Center participants live primarily in the Newtowne Court and Washington Elms public housing developments and the surrounding ‘Area IV’ neighborhood in Cambridge. 30% of total households in Area IV are occupied by single women with children . Approximately 80% percent of housing development families live below the poverty level, with many receiving public assistance. The majority of youth served low-income, high needs and are of African-American, Puerto Rican and Haitian descent. 

 

Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts Education
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. -

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

Community Programs

Community members of all ages participate in the Art Center’s year-round Community Programs. The Art Center’s Community Programs use arts based activities to connect divided spaces and a divided community and grow the level of civic engagement of Cambridge’s most isolated residents. All Community Programs either provide a platform for the stories and artwork of our youth, are organized by our youth, and/or work to strengthen the communities and families our youth are a part of. Current Community Programs include: year-round art events for community members to come together, explore, learn and celebrate and include the outdoor summer events, our public art initiative, This Is Where We Live, Work and Create, as well as family engagement activities that include Art Therapy based classes for families and cultural outings.

Budget  $105,998.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Cultural & Ethnic Awareness
Population Served Families Adults Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Art Events – Our year-round arts events for community members to come together, explore, learn and celebrate and include the outdoor summer events Arts Interactive and Hear/Hear Art and Music Series, SACC Family Night, TMP Teen Night, and our Do It Your Damn Self!! National Youth Film Festival.

Public Art - The centerpiece of our public art work is the This Is Where We Live, Work and Create Public Art Initiative. We will combine neighborhood history with current stories to create three large scale murals in Area Four and Kendall Square. This year we will develop a business plan that will help us manage current corporate requests for murals and build public art as an earned revenue stream.

Family Engagement –We will combine our current family engagement work into one cohesive effort that will include Art Therapy based classes for families, Family Art Outings and family participation in the Port Arts Council.

All of these activities will further reach more constituents.
Program Long-Term Success 

· 2014: Enhanced programs sustained and grow

o Community Programs has a dedicated staff person and kicks of the Port Stories Public Art Project with the Change for Peace Art and Music Series presented by teens in Kendall Square and Newtowne Court Housing Development.

o SACC youth create a mural installed in Tech Square

· 2013: Partnerships strengthened and awarded

o Alexandria Real Estate commissions a 160 foot mural on their East Cambridge construction site, which will be created by Teen Media Program Digital Arts Studio

· 2012: New Community Programs launched :

o This is Where We Live, Work and Create Public Art Initiative is launched through a block long mural and gallery commissioned by Novartis Pharmaceuticals which will be on view for through 2016.

o One9TEEN After Dark offers first evening programs for teens in collaboration with Cambridge Boys and Girls Club and Tutoring Plus

Program Success Monitored By 

Youth are powerful expressive artists and media users.
% of youth who identify as artists in end of year evaluations
% of youth who create art/media projects with an intended community impact
% of youth who have access to advancement in their art form

2. Youth are part of a creative network and value the arts and media as a viable profession.
% of youth who feel connected to arts/technology resources in end of year evaluation
% of youth interested in pursuing art or media as adults

3. Youth are leaders who make safe and healthy choices.
# of youth who participate in leadership opportunities (ongoing & one-time)
% of youth who identify as successful and healthy

4. Youth have an expansive world-view and help to transform their communities across classes, cultures and professional sectors.
% of youth who can identify with at least 3 communities
% of youth who participate in actions with an intended community impact
% of youth who feel connected across class, culture, sector

Examples of Program Success 

1. This is Where we Live Work and Create Public Art Initiative helped youth to create two murals installed in Kendall Square and presented four mural opening and unveiling events in connection to those murals. The new Port Stories Public Art Project was launched during the summer of 2014.

2. One9TEEN After Dark, a drop-in evening program for teens, was presented in collaboration with the Cambridge Boys and Girls Club.

3. Events and classes were offered for the general public including the Do It Your Damn Self!! National Youth Film Festival, the Central Squared Technology Design Challenge, the Kids Saturday Art Studios and the Arts Interactive.


School Age Child Care Program (SACC)

Youth ages 5-12 participate in The School Age Child Care (SACC) Program where they become creative problem solvers through a hands-on arts curriculum. SACC uses an arts based approach to address the difficulties our youth face that are brought on by trauma, special needs, poverty, immigration, racism and lack of access to key resources. Each activity that the students are involved in allows them time for self-exploration through the arts and the ability to work towards leadership roles. Our youth are inspired artistically in Focus classes and Choice classes covering disciplines including the visual arts, dance, theater and media arts. Junior Leadership Groups and intermediate level arts classes prepare pre-teens for success in high school and beyond. SACC activities sequence up to a final, interdisciplinary performance at the end of the school year, and an outdoor community event during the summer.

Budget  $227,243.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other General Arts Education
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

1. Creative Approaches to Therapeutic Supports Initiative with support from the C.F. Adams Trust

a. A new behavior management system is now aligned with our community agreements

b. All staff and interns have received training in art therapy techniques

c. A new pedagogy has been created to implement an art therapy approach in our age-specific and boys and girls groups.

2. SACC Youth Advisory Board became artistic leaders

a. Youth Advisory Board members were commissioned by Boston Properties to create a mural about their community that was installed in Kendall Square.

3. Our program increased exposure for youth to local resources

a. SACC youth participated in classes led by the BOSTnet Literacy initiative, Jean Appolon Expressions and the Citi Performing Arts Center.

b. The 1st off-site spring performance of an original play about the Haitian Revolution. All classes were involved in the production for 300+ audience members from the digital set designs, props, acting and dancing.

Program Long-Term Success 

1. Y1. Youth are powerful expressive artists and media users. 
% of youth who identify as artists in end of year evaluations
% of youth who create art/media projects with an intended community impact
% of youth who have access to advancement in their art form


2. Youth are part of a creative network and value the arts and media as a viable profession.
% of youth who feel connected to arts/technology resources in end of year evaluation
% of youth interested in pursuing art or media as adults

3. Youth are leaders who make safe and healthy choices.
# of youth who participate in leadership opportunities (ongoing & one-time)
% of youth who identify as successful and healthy

4. Youth have an expansive world-view and help to transform their communities across classes, cultures and professional sectors.
% of youth who can identify with at least 3 communities
% of youth who participate in actions with an intended community impact
% of youth who feel connected across class, culture, sector

Program Success Monitored By 

The Community Art Center has a documented history of encouraging artistic and academic excellence in youth. In bi-annual student satisfaction surveys administered by the City of Cambridge 21st Century Learning Partnership, the Community Art Center regularly scored higher than the 5 other Cambridge after school programs surveyed. Students who attend the Art Center say that they feel challenged and believe that they have supportive relationships with staff members. The survey indicates that students at the Art Center are more likely to feel that going to their afterschool program helps them get along better with their friends and make new friends and that the program helps them to find out what they are good at doing and what they enjoy doing.

Examples of Program Success 

In the past few years, we have built new key partnerships, grown our community programs, as well as the leadership and presentation opportunities for youth, and doubled our audience and event attendance.

· 2014: Enhanced programs sustained and grow

o Creative Approaches to Therapeutic Support initiative is funded by C.F. Adams Trust and implements teacher training in Art Therapy techniques and builds an arts therapy based behavioral response plan.

o SACC youth create a mural installed in Tech Square and perform an interdisciplinary original play, REBEL, about the Haitian Revolution, at the Cambridge YMCA.

· 2013: Partnerships strengthened and awarded

o Executive Director, Eryn Johnson works with a group of ten social justice focused Cambridge-based non-profit leaders to form the new Cambridge Non-profit Coalition.

o The Community Art Center and Novartis are awarded the “Central in Motion Award” from the Central Square Business Association.


Teen Media Program

Youth ages 13-19 enter the Teen Media Program (TMP) and become creative technology users by participating in media arts and literacy activities. TMP offers a sequenced, multi-year curriculum that uses artistic expression to develop new technology and creativity. Artistic Growth is fostered through facilitating the creation, presentation and critique of media arts work. Personal Development is rooted in celebrating the inherent strengths of teens while filling gaps in their experience and knowledge. Community Engagement is encouraged through exposure to community resources, the invitation to work towards social change, and leadership opportunities. Media Foundations classes introduce youth to the digital arts and media literacy. They hone their creative voice in Video, Photo or Digital Arts Studio. Concrete professional skills are built in advanced Leadership Groups including Youth Council and DIYDS!! Crew - which curates, coordinates and leads our national film festival.

Budget  $135,000.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

1. TMP creates art that addresses community issues and promotes social justice

a. Our TMP Summer Media Institute incorporated weekly sessions starting last summer that examined key social issues affecting the lives of our youth such as stereotypes, types of oppression and gender equality.

b. Teens explored local and global issues through their curation of our DIYDS!! film festival, their creation of a mural based on community stories.

2. Meaningful youth leadership roles have been built into programming and organizational leadership.

a. Youth have genuine decision making roles within TMP through the establishment of the Youth Council and attended community meetings around development in Cambridge and issues that have come up in the Area Four neighborhood.

b. DIYDS!! Crew, members take on additional leadership of our national film festival through participating in our Festival Advisory Committee. -made up of adult leaders this committee is a key networking opportunity for TMP youth.

Program Long-Term Success 

1. Youth are powerful expressive artists and media users.
% of youth who identify as artists in end of year evaluations
% of youth who create art/media projects with an intended community impact
% of youth who have access to advancement in their art form

2. Youth are part of a creative network and value the arts and media as a viable profession.
% of youth who feel connected to arts/technology resources in end of year evaluation
% of youth interested in pursuing art or media as adults

3. Youth are leaders who make safe and healthy choices.
# of youth who participate in leadership opportunities (ongoing & one-time)
% of youth who identify as successful and healthy

4. Youth have an expansive world-view and help to transform their communities across classes, cultures and professional sectors.
% of youth who can identify with at least 3 communities
% of youth who participate in actions with an intended community impact
% of youth who feel connected across class, culture, sector

Program Success Monitored By 

Last year, using the Boston Youth Arts Evaluation Project Workbook as a guide, we adapted our Teen Media Program evaluation forms so that they directly correlate to our strategic goals and measures of success. An online survey has been created in Survey Monkey to administer this evaluation. In our School Age Child Care program we work with the City of Cambridge’s Agenda for Children to implement their Integrated Self Assessment and Support (ISAS) evaluation system. Based on the National In School and Out of School Time APT evaluation tool, ISAS helps staff and youth to observe program and make key changes to our program culture. SACC teachers also do progress reports on all SACC youth and evaluate them based on our three program elements: Artistic Growth, Personal Development and Community Engagement.

Examples of Program Success 

· 2014: Enhanced programs sustained and grow

o TMP teens present art exhibits in Kendall Square, MIT Museum, Cambridge City Hall and VMWare.

· 2013: Partnerships strengthened and awarded

o Alexandria Real Estate commissions a 160 foot mural on their East Cambridge construction site, which will be created by Teen Media Program Digital Arts Studio

o Boston Properties invites Teen Media Program students to curate a 130-foot digital screen mounted on the ceiling of the lobby space between Google’s new office spaces in Kendall Square.


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Eryn Johnson
CEO Term Start Oct 2007
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience The Community Art Center’s Executive Director, Eryn Johnson has a BA in Theater, a Masters in Performance Studies and close to fifteen years management experience at non-profit, youth-serving arts organizations. Before coming to the Community Art Center, Eryn served as the Director of Education at the Citi Performing Arts Center.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Marsha Stewart Jan 2004 Jan 2006

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mr. Marlon Orozco Media Program Director

Marlon has worked in youth programs focusing on multimedia design and technology for nearly 20 years. He was previously the Media Program Manager at the United Teen Equity Center in Lowell, MA, and before that, the Program Director at the Computer Clubhouse at the Museum of Science, Boston, MA. 

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Central in Motion Award (With Novartis) Central Square Business Association 2013
Creative Activist Award - Eryn Johnson, Executive Director ArtCorps 2012
Finalist Social Innovation Forum Root Cause 2011
Finalist Social Innovation Forum Root Cause 2008
Coming Up Taller Award National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards 2006

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

The Community Art Center collaborates with many local arts organizations, technology institutions, youth agencies and schools, especially those that can bring additional resources to our youth.  The following is an abbreviated list:

 

·         The Port Stories Public Art Project features new partnerships with the City of Cambridge Department of Human Services, Cambridge Historical Commission, Cambridge Housing Authority and a MIT.

·         Community Art Center staff participate in the Cambridge OST STEAM Committee and continues as active members of the Middle School Network, Reaching All Youth and the Cambridge Nonprofit Coalition.

·         In the past two years, we have built ongoing partnerships with: area real estate companies Alexandria Real Estate and Boston Properties, bio tech company Novartis, robotics company Vecna and non-profit organizations Margaret Fuller House, Tutoring Plus and Boys and Girls Clubs of Middlesex County.

·         The 2014 Do It Your Damn Self!! Youth Film Festival Premiere Screening was held for the third year at the Microsoft NERD Center. M.I.T’s Bartos Theater and for the first time, at the Institute of Contemporary Art.  Fletcher Maynard Academy hosted our DIYDS!! Jr. screening and this year’s DIYDS!! teen reel featured work by youth from Cambridge Community Television, Madison Park High School and Raw Artworks.

·         The Agenda for Children is a city-wide effort that supports our program evaluation and provides professional development to our staff.

In 2009, the Community Art Center started the Youth Development in the Arts Youth Worker Training curriculum development process in collaboration with Massachusetts Cultural Council YouthReach Program, Lesley University Division of Creative Arts and Learning and Health Resources in Action.  The collaborative has created a four module curriculum that teaches best practices in the field of youth development in the arts. In 2010, modules 1 and 2 were piloted at Lesley University Artist and Activist Conference and at the Great Barrington Stage Company. In 2012 the training was run at Lesley University and in 2013, 12 youth workers from around the Greater Boston area took the training held at the Microsoft NERD Center.

 

 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 11
Number of Volunteers 40
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % 80%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 3
Hispanic/Latino: 4
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 8
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 4
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Sejal Patel
Board Chair Company Affiliation Beaver Day Country School
Board Chair Term July 2014 -
Board Co-Chair Ms. Ana Mojica-Boyd
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Cambridge Trust Company
Board Co-Chair Term July 2013 -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dan Anderson Anderson Porter Design Voting
Nancy Angoff Community Volunteer Voting
Selvin Chambers The Food Project NonVoting
Elaine Donohue Novartis Pharmaceuticals NonVoting
Marcia Kaplan TECedge Voting
Saquora Lowe-McLaurin R3Logic, Inc. Voting
Ana Mojica-Boyd Cambridge Trust Company Voting
Omo Moses Young Peoples Project NonVoting
Sejal Patel The Photographic Resource Center Voting
Ashlyn Ridlehoover Wayfair NonVoting
Priscilla Sanville Lesley University Voting
Alan Schwartz No Affiliation Voting
Stephen Sillari Sillari Enterprise Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 8
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 0
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 70%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 70%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 70%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • Board Governance
  • Board Governance
  • Building
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Marketing
  • Personnel
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
  • Technology

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015
Projected Income $709,929.00
Projected Expense $704,102.00
Form 990s

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audit

2012 Audit

2011 Audit

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $668,160 $564,985 $814,879
Total Expenses $664,329 $615,316 $605,839

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $311,793 $349,228
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- $311,793 $349,228
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $252,342 $196,701 $390,814
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $364,601 $39,027 $55,409
Investment Income, Net of Losses $117 $184 $228
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $51,100 $17,280 $19,200
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $309,820 $422,228 $412,265
Administration Expense $102,463 $111,691 $107,550
Fundraising Expense $42,036 $81,397 $86,024
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.01 0.92 1.35
Program Expense/Total Expenses 47% 69% 68%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 17% 16% 12%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $461,443 $479,636 $530,747
Current Assets $150,747 $177,932 $226,589
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $219,722 $241,746 $242,526
Total Net Assets $241,721 $237,890 $288,221

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 0.69 0.74 0.93

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Community Art Center received a capital improvements grant in 2007 through the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. We used this funding to update our media lab and leveraged the remaining funds to launch a Capital Campaign to complete a full renovation of our facility. With grants from the Children's Investment Fund, the Cambridge Housing Authority and the City of Cambridge, among others, The Community Art Center Facility Renovation was completed in April 2011,

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in charts and graphs are per the organization's audited financials.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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