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Elizabeth Peabody House Association

 275-277 Broadway
 Somerville, MA 02145
[P] (617) 623-5510
[F] (617) 623 5515
www.teph.org
cking@elizabethpeabodyhouse.org
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Facebook
INCORPORATED: 1939
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2104827

LAST UPDATED: 08/03/2014
Organization DBA The Elizabeth Peabody House
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Our Mission
The Elizabeth Peabody House has been impacting the lives of children and their families in Greater Boston’s immigrant community for more than 117 years. Our mission is to support those families reaching their full potential by providing early childhood education, youth enrichment opportunities and family support services.
 
Our Vision
The vision of The Elizabeth Peabody House is to become a neighborhood center that fosters lifelong learning, helps break the cycle of poverty and transforms the community in its quality of life.

Mission Statement

Our Mission
The Elizabeth Peabody House has been impacting the lives of children and their families in Greater Boston’s immigrant community for more than 117 years. Our mission is to support those families reaching their full potential by providing early childhood education, youth enrichment opportunities and family support services.
 
Our Vision
The vision of The Elizabeth Peabody House is to become a neighborhood center that fosters lifelong learning, helps break the cycle of poverty and transforms the community in its quality of life.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $989,773.00
Projected Expense $1,440,521.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Elizabeth Peabody House Community Support Programs
  • Emergency Food Pantry

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2008 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Our Mission
The Elizabeth Peabody House has been impacting the lives of children and their families in Greater Boston’s immigrant community for more than 117 years. Our mission is to support those families reaching their full potential by providing early childhood education, youth enrichment opportunities and family support services.
 
Our Vision
The vision of The Elizabeth Peabody House is to become a neighborhood center that fosters lifelong learning, helps break the cycle of poverty and transforms the community in its quality of life.

Background Statement

 

Our Namesake: Elizabeth Palmer Peabody (1804-1894) was a writer, intellectual and activist who rallied against slavery, championed women’s rights and was a leading educational reformer. Best known for formally institutionalizing the education of children under age six, Peabody was the founder of the first English-speaking kindergarten in the United States. Her legacy was that her work helped establish the kindergarten as an accepted institution in American education.
   
Our Beginnings: When Peabody died near age 90, her friends, colleagues and teachers she both mentored and inspired, established a settlement house that would serve as an oasis-of-sorts in an underprivileged area. True to 
what Peabody stood for, children would be its focus. Its location was 
where the impact would be greatest: Boston’s immigrant-filled West End 
neighborhood, adjacent to Massachusetts General Hospital near what is 
now Storrow Drive. From 1896 to 1958, the settlement house benefitted the community, especially among the Irish, Italians and Eastern European Jews who called Boston's West End “home”. 
   For the first 15 years, The Elizabeth Peabody House had several West 
End addresses. Then, in 1912, it moved to a newly-constructed, seven-story building that housed a kindergarten, a community theater and a 
gym. It offered English and citizenship classes to parents, sports leagues 
to youth, and children’s enrichment programming, including singing, 
dancing and acting. Among its early alumni were actor Leonard Nimoy 
 who trained in the theater.  Nimoy was among a generation of children who also took advantage of a 21-acre summer camp located on the south shore 
of Lake Massapoag in Sharon, Massachusetts. Camp Gannett was the 
1915 gift of Boston hotelier Sarah Boyce. This summer getaway offered a much-needed escape to children and families in the overcrowded West End.
Our Move:  In the late 1950s, city fathers began planning for a “new Boston”, which called for razing the city’s West End neighborhood. Many 
chose to resettle in nearby Somerville, less than three miles 
away.  The Elizabeth Peabody House also moved to Somerville to continue its work, especially with children.
Our Legacy
These days, the families of our children are less likely to be Irish, 
Italian or Jewish from Eastern Europe. Instead, they hail from places 
like Haiti, El Salvador and Brazil. And while the nationalities of 
our families may have changed, our commitment to serve them 
remains the same. 

 


Impact Statement

Emergency Food Pantry: The largest food pantry in the city of Somerville, the Elizabeth Peabody House has served over 600 families annually (An increase of 125 families over the previous year) and provided 375 Turkeys and groceries during the Thanksgiving holiday.

After School Enrichment Program:   This past year, we were one of two agencies in the City of Somerville to be awarded a grant of $25,000 to support a behavioral specialist in our After School. This grant optimizes our ability to support children with greater needs and resources by interfacing with schools, other nonprofits and childcare professionals.

Preschool Program: Our Preschool became NAEYC accredited this past year providing varied learning opportunities through explorative, hands-on activities, guided by the Creative Curriculum. This accreditation represents a new standard of preschool excellence, helping potential constituents to distinguish our preschool as one driven towards success and preparation for kindergarten.

Summer Enrichment Camp 
Every summer The Elizabeth Peabody House transports more than 100 children from Greater Boston to its 21-acre lakefront campus 30 miles south of Boston. Camp Gannett, as it is known, is situated on the south shore of Lake Massapoag in Sharon. The spring-fed lake, adjoining swamp, open fields and shaded pine forests all offer campers a host of activities, from swimming, fishing and boating, to field trips, nature walks and more. The theme-based curriculum provides campers a chance to explore, engage and enjoy the great outdoors in a way that also safeguards against summer learning loss.
Seniors Program
We also have a bi-weekly seniors program for are retirees.  
Volunteer Opportunities
We have as well a host of volunteer opportunities at our camp, in preschool and after school and at our pantry.  


FY 13 Goals

1.Food Pantry: Provide more than 89,000 pounds of food to 650 families who participate in our community food pantry program, with a focus on providing larger quantities of fresh fruits and vegetables to families year-round.

2. Theme-Based Summer Enrichment: Provide 360 hours of educational and enrichment  to 100 children between the ages of 5 and 14.


Needs Statement

Five Most Pressing Needs: 

1. A part-time grants manager whose full function is to apply and manage grant applications.Seed money for family & community support program. $15,000

2. Funding to hire a part-time development assistant to support development, fundraising and stewardship efforts. estimated $20,000

3. Funding needed for a  part-time physical plant and volunteer manager to manage our two campuses that are separated by 30 miles. estimated $25,000

4. Administrative support  for programming for data collection and other evaluation activities, and quality improvement initiatives. estimated $20,000

5. Purchase of new classroom supplies for the children we serve in both our After School program and our Preschool. estimated $10,000


CEO Statement

 

“When the founder of the first English-speaking kindergarten died in 1894, 
her friends, colleagues and protégés honored her by creating a special place 
to nurture and educate children. They belonged mostly to immigrant families 
struggling to make a new life for themselves. Now, more than a century 
later, The Elizabeth Peabody House continues this important work.”
- Mr. Thomas M. Colligan, Interim Executive Director 

 


Board Chair Statement

 "All of our programs are designed to deliver relevant and needed programming to the local community. In catering to Somerville and surrounding neighborhoods, we serve a population that is diverse racially, ethnically, and socio-economically. Many families who utilize our programs are first-generation immigrants, and over 90% attend our programs on state subsidies. We understand that a large portion of those we serve are low-income, female-headed households who are English-as-second-language speakers. Through this, we recognize how important is it that these children and families receive high-quality, culturally-sensitive programming that addresses the educational and social challenges that these populations often face. "

Mr. John H. Sanders, Jr., Board President  



Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA

We focus primarily on Somerville, although we also cater to children and immigrant families in Cambridge, Medford, Malden, Everett, Arlington and other Greater Boston Communities. 

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Child Day Care
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Human Services - Ethnic/Immigrant Services

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Elizabeth Peabody House Community Support Programs

At Elizabeth Peabody House, we remain committed to providing quality early education and out of school enrichment and support to our children and their families. Our programs are developed to support families and build community, primarily focusing on healthy child development and the development of opportunities for youth.


The Elizabeth Peabody House programs operate out of two sites in Somerville and Camp Gannet in Sharon, MA and include early education, out of school programs including programs for seniors and families as well as advocacy work with other organizations. We also operate a community Food Pantry.  
 
 
 
Budget  TO BE ADDED
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served Families At-Risk Populations Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  --
Program Long-Term Success  --
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

Emergency Food Pantry

Our food pantry caters to an area of Somerville marked by high rates of poverty, comprised of the Winter Hill, East Somerville, and Ten Hills neighborhoods. Our ability to offer an expansive selection of fresh produce, frozen items, dairy and meat products, and locally baked items has made us a destination for individuals experiencing food insecurity.  Our client base is currently growing at a rate of 7 clients per week and since our inception in December 2009, we have served 744 Somerville families, representing a total of 1177 children, 1160 adults and 133 seniors.  Our demographic breakdown is 40.4% Latino, 24.2% Haitian, 23.2% White/Caucasian, 4.3% African American, 2.9% Southeast Asian.  To accommodate the growing demand, we have enhanced the magnitude of the pantry’s operations by increasing shelving units, opening extended hours, solidifying outside partnerships with food providers and companies, and equipping the pantry with a larger volunteer base.  

Budget  120,000
Category  Human Services, General/Other Emergency Assistance
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success  We hope that there will be an increase of 20% of our clientele that opt for healthier food items in the pantry which consist of
Program Long-Term Success  The emergency food pantry aims to reduce health problems that are directly related to obesity and the consumption of fatty, processed foods by offering fresh fruits and vegetables on a year-round basis.  A decade from now, the food pantry will still be the largest source of emergency food relief in the City of Somerville but provide healthy options that reinforce positive eating behaviors and lifestyles, in spite of their poverty. 
Program Success Monitored By  --
Examples of Program Success  --

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As an agency, the country’s current financial climate has had a direct impact on The Elizabeth Peabody House. It has affected what we do, how we do it and our direction in to ensure our survival in a tough economy.

For example, over the past several years, we have seen a decline in the
availability of government funding and subsidies that we have traditionally depended upon, so, we are currently seeking to diversify our fundraising base, look at our internal capacity to raise money and create a strong fundraising arm. To that end, last year we hired a seasoned development professional to not only go after individual donors, grant and foundation funding, but to begin re-cultivating the agency’s 115-year-old alumni body for support. Increasing our development capacity is just one way that we are evolving in order to stay relevant and sustainable in the new millenum. We have also taken a close look at the necessity for, as well as the sustainability of, our current programming in relation to new needs and opportunities. As result, we are in the process of closing our agency’s infant and toddler program that was few a few years in a row under-enrolled and non-revenue producing losing money for the agency. In its place, we plan to develop programming in two new areas of need: teen programming and family resource referral. Specifically, in the next 24 months, we hope to raise funding for, develop and implement family support services office and a teen media center. The former will serve effectively as a clearinghouse, directing families-in-need and assisting them in accessing resources that we don’t provide.

The latter is to help fill a void in Somerville of programming that serves
teens, a place they can go to be enriched and engaged in the face of virtually non-existent programs. This is but one example of how we as an agency have faced challenges and turned them into creative solutions.

 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Thomas M. Colligan
CEO Term Start July 2012
CEO Email tom@nonprofitprofessionalforhire.com
CEO Experience

The Elizabeth Peabody House Board of Directors has named Thomas M. Colligan as interim Executive Director of its 116-year-old non-profit. He assumes his position in July 2012.

Colligan has extensive leadership credentials, including roles with YMCAs in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Upstate New York, as well as with the entity’s Chicago-based national offices. His professional experience also includes being a senior vice president at the Arthritis Foundation in Atlanta, as well as serving as a consultant in financial development and motivational messaging. His non-profit experience also includes time with The House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association, Bridge Over Troubled Waters, and United South End Settlements of Boston.

Colligan is based in Torrington, Connecticut, and holds a bachelor’s degree from Goddard College and a master’s degree in education from Springfield College.

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience


Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Oksana Bondar Director of Finance & Operations --
Mr. Clennon L. King Director of Development & Marketing --
Ms. Alexandra Schuppert Director of Programming & Evaluation --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Current collaborations that support our ability to serve children with special needs, developmental delays ,emotional and behavioral challenges, include Guidance Center’s Early Intervention, Somerville Public Schools, ENABLE, and other private counseling clinics served by our children. We participate in a collaboration called SomerPromise, a citywide initiative aimed at streamlining and filling the gaps in the support systems for children and families with the goal of ensuring that every child in Somerville can be successful

Other collaborations we have engaged in to augment our services and offerings in the area of early childhood literacy initiatives, ESL and financial literacy classes, resource referrals, volunteer projects, include The Welcome Project, Boston Partners, ARAMARK, Boston Cares, Raising a Reader, Jumpstart, to name just a few.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 15
Number of Part Time Staff 6
Number of Volunteers 120
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 100%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 3
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 11
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. John H. Sanders Jr.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Gordon Associates
Board Chair Term Jan 2012 - Jan 2014
Board Co-Chair Ms. Janice Philpot
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Somerville Center for Adult Learning Experiences
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2011 - Jan 2014

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Kristin Burns Volunteer Voting
Ms. Louise Coughlan Volunteer Voting
Ms. Christine Egitto Silicon Valley Bank Voting
Ms. Janice Philpot Somerville Adult and Continuing Education Voting
Mr. Joseph Pignatiello Laurel Associates Voting
Mr. John Sanders Gordon Associates Voting
Ms. Lauretta Siggers American Red Cross Voting
Mr. Dan Thomas Kings Stubbins Voting
Ms. Vicki Wairi City of Somerville Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 6
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 89%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Building
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Program / Program Planning

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

As an agency, the country’s current financial climate has had a direct impact on The Elizabeth Peabody House. It has affected what we do, how we do it and our direction in to ensure our survival in a tough economy.

For example, over the past several years, we have seen a decline in the
availability of government funding and subsidies that we have traditionally depended upon, so, we are currently seeking to diversify our fundraising base, look at our internal capacity to raise money and create a strong fundraising arm. To that end, last year we hired a seasoned development professional to not only go after individual donors, grant and foundation funding, but to begin re-cultivating the agency’s 116-year-old alumni body for support.

Increasing our development capacity is just one way that we are evolving in order to stay relevant and sustainable in the new millenum. 
We have also taken a close look at the necessity for, as well as the
sustainability of, our current programming in relation to new needs and opportunities. As result, we are in the process of closing our agency’s infant and toddler program that was few a few years in a row
under-enrolled and non-revenue producing losing money for the agency. In its place, we plan to develop programming in two new areas of need: teen programming and family resource referral. Specifically, in the next 24 months, we hope to raise funding for, develop and implement family support services office and a teen media center. The former will serve effectively as a clearinghouse, directing families-in-need and assisting them in accessing resources that we don’t provide.

The latter is to help fill a void in Somerville of programming that serves
teens, a place they can go to be enriched and engaged in the face of virtually non-existent programs. This is but one example of how we as an agency have faced challenges and turned them into creative solutions.

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2010 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2009 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2008 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Projected Income $989,773.00
Projected Expense $1,440,521.00
Form 990s

2010 990

2009 990

2008 990

Audit Documents

2010 Audit

2009 Audit

2008 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Total Revenue $1,344,334 $969,610 $1,051,911
Total Expenses $1,491,227 $1,413,126 $1,149,372

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$176,542 $222,637 $178,911
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $16,107 $10,808 $21,352
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $915,470 $980,665 $909,301
Investment Income, Net of Losses $155,047 $-315,123 $-95,533
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $27,681 $31,575 $840
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $53,487 $39,048 $37,040

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Program Expense $1,122,954 $1,061,580 $931,555
Administration Expense $247,399 $252,944 $168,641
Fundraising Expense $120,874 $98,602 $49,176
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.90 0.69 0.92
Program Expense/Total Expenses 75% 75% 81%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 55% 37% 24%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Total Assets $3,136,560 $3,241,495 $3,624,163
Current Assets $730,950 $769,597 $941,043
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $140,184 $98,226 $37,378
Total Net Assets $2,996,376 $3,143,269 $3,586,785

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
1st (Source and Amount) United Way of Massachusetts Bay $70,565.00
United Way of Massachusetts Bay $68,407.00
City of Somerville $41,661.00
2nd (Source and Amount) Smith Family Foundation $30,000.00
Garlund Memorial Fund $28,490.00
Garlund Memorial Fund $35,810.00
3rd (Source and Amount) Associated Grant Makers $25,890.00
Associated Grant Makers $26,190.00
United Way of Massachusetts Bay $32,487.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $6,024.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.21 7.83 25.18

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2010 2009 2008
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

We, at The Elizabeth Peabody House, are especially proud of our 115-year-old heritage that started in Boston’s West End and continues, 4 miles away, here in Somerville. Our past is as much a source of pride as our future holds promise.  Take our West End theater, which produced fifty years ago the child of Russian Jewish immigrants in a Leonard Nimoy, who went on to Star Trek fame in the ‘60s as Mr. Spock. And today, look at our out-of-school-time enrichment programming,
playing such a large role in the life and future success of Destiny Augustin, a child of Haitian and Puerto Rican heritage, whose future is as bright as her smile and intellect. 

Still, then as now, nurturing talent and potential like Leonard and Destiny comes only with support.

It is why The Elizabeth Peabody House has taken the current economic times very seriously. Our agency has been hit hard by government budget cuts and freezes that have traditionally subsidized the children we serve. Specifically, our enrollment numbers have been impacted by the freezing of childcare vouchers by the state that had allowed many of our students to attend our programs. As a result, we have had to regroup on what we fund and to take seriously the business of fundraising.
 
To ensure our sustainability in these lean times, our board made the very
deliberate decision for the agency to create a bonafide development department, and hire a seasoned development professional to increase and diversify our funding base.

In another belt-tightening effort, our board made the difficult decision to close our infant and toddler center, and to re-focus instead on program offerings aimed at family support and teens.

Specifically, we are looking to open a Community and Family Resource Center to connect those in need with agencies, which can help in ways we cannot. Plans also call for opening a Community Learning Lab outfitted with computers, to, among other things, give those out of work access to the online job market. In addition, we are preparing to open a teen media center that will help fill a programming void for Somerville area teens, and engage this at-risk demographic with an opportunity to learn visual storytelling and production skills.

Additionally, we have three other important needs. One has to do with funding a position to aid the development department in its efforts, and to assist in the grants application process. The second is to renovate our existing facility where the bulk of our programming takes place. Finally, there is our ongoing need for the funding of scholarships for children attending our preschool, afterschool or enrichment camp, and families using our emergency food pantry.

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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