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Junior Achievement of Northern New England

 Junior Achievement of Northern New England, Inc., 400 Fifth Avenue, Suite 300
 Waltham, MA 02451
[P] (781) 373-1170
[F] (781) 373-1171
www.janewengland.org
[email protected]
Radhames Nova
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INCORPORATED: 1945
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2127020

LAST UPDATED: 05/02/2018
Organization DBA Junior Achievement of Northern New England
Former Names Junior Achievement of Eastern Massachusetts (2010)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Junior Achievement (JA) is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy.  JA programs provide relevant, experiential opportunities for students to apply their knowledge to real-world situations and understand how to own their economic success.  Through sequential curriculum focused on financial literacy, workforce readiness, and entrepreneurship, JA provides students with the 21st century life skills necessary to become economically confident, career-ready adults.  By partnering with educators and local business volunteers who deliver JA programs to add relevance and inspiration to the student experience, JA works toward the day when every young person feels confident in their ability to navigate their finances and the world of work.  

 

Mission Statement

The mission of Junior Achievement (JA) is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy.  JA programs provide relevant, experiential opportunities for students to apply their knowledge to real-world situations and understand how to own their economic success.  Through sequential curriculum focused on financial literacy, workforce readiness, and entrepreneurship, JA provides students with the 21st century life skills necessary to become economically confident, career-ready adults.  By partnering with educators and local business volunteers who deliver JA programs to add relevance and inspiration to the student experience, JA works toward the day when every young person feels confident in their ability to navigate their finances and the world of work.  

 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Projected Income $1,668,500.00
Projected Expense $1,652,357.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • JA Company Program (After-School)
  • JA K-12 Programs
  • JA Skills to Achieve

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of Junior Achievement (JA) is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy.  JA programs provide relevant, experiential opportunities for students to apply their knowledge to real-world situations and understand how to own their economic success.  Through sequential curriculum focused on financial literacy, workforce readiness, and entrepreneurship, JA provides students with the 21st century life skills necessary to become economically confident, career-ready adults.  By partnering with educators and local business volunteers who deliver JA programs to add relevance and inspiration to the student experience, JA works toward the day when every young person feels confident in their ability to navigate their finances and the world of work.  

 


Background Statement

Junior Achievement (JA) was founded in 1919 by Theodore Vail of American Telephone & Telegraph; Horace Moses of Strathmore Paper Company; and Senator Murray Crane of Massachusetts. JA’s first program allowed high school to experience the inner workings of entrepreneurship by starting and operating their very own company - and this value of free enterprise and innovation has not left the core of JA’s mission, even after almost 100 years of the organization's existence.

JA has since grown rapidly, building a sequential curriculum for grades K-8 since the 1970s. Today, JA remains relevant through its broadened scope and expanded activities, providing diverse programs for K-12th grade that allow each student to experience JA consistently as they develop in school. Offering these economic education programs to schools and students at no cost, JA provides access to real-world “life learning” that is often otherwise unavailable to our youth.

JA now has a national network of 109 offices, serving more than 4.8 million students annually. 119 countries worldwide offer JA programs, and since its founding JA has had a positive impact on the lives of more than 80 million young people globally.

Incorporated in New England in 1945 as a regional JA organization, Junior Achievement of Northern New England serves students in Central/Eastern Massachusetts, the Merrimack Valley and the state of New Hampshire. In the 2016-2017 school year we reached 23,416 students through the efforts of 1,532 JA volunteers.

 By equipping students with the tools to be successful at work and in life, JA plays a key role in creating informed members of the workforce who value fiscal responsibility. Volunteer-driven, measurable, and experiential, all JA programs align with the state's Common Core Standards to enhance the concepts students are already learning each year in school, and are conducted at no cost to the schools or youth we serve.

In our targeted strategy to reach our students consistently and consecutively with our sequential K-12 curriculum, JAofNNE is focused on deeply impacting the students within 10 identified “key” communities. We aim to build strong collaborations and partnerships within each community that will allow these students to receive all of the "life skills" benefits that JA has to offer.

 
 
 

Impact Statement

Accomplishments in 2017-2018:

 

Evolution of Program Strategy: With a continued emphasis on high-quality, long-term partnerships, we have honed our focus to develop lasting partnerships within 10 key communities. We have experienced strong advancements in several of these communities - for example, within Boston we have expanded our relationships to include seven new schools, and within Lawrence we have grown our partnerships from serving 49 students in 2016-2017 to serving nearly 350 students in 2017-2018.

 

Diversification of our Volunteer Base: Because we are a volunteer-led organization, last year we set a goal to more robustly reflect the many backgrounds of the students we serve, enabling them to identify with volunteer role models with similar experiences and contexts. In 2017-2018 we made great strides in diversifying our volunteer base, starting with the engagement of members of the Association of Latino Professionals for America, who volunteered in Boston classrooms where nearly 70% of the students are Latino/a. We have plans to continue this focus in the coming years, through partnerships with the Black MBA Association and with diverse employee resource groups in our partnering corporations.

 

Collaborations with Other Community Organizations: Over the past year we have continued to focus on developing strong partnerships with other youth-serving organizations, including the Lawrence Boys & Girls Club, multiple sites of Girls Inc., Steps to Success, and the Boston Saves Children’s Savings Account program. We have hosted annual conversations with these partners to ensure our collaborations are thoughtful and strategic, and look forward to continuing to layer our services into programs that already serve youth in a meaningful way.

 

Growth of our Highest-Impact Program: This year JAofNNE significantly grew our delivery of the JA Company Program, an intensive, hands-on entrepreneurship program for high school students. Having increased delivery from 10 JA Company programs in school year 2016-2017 to 17 programs in school year 2017-2018 (some of which are taking place in our target communities) we are confident in our ability to grow the impact of this program moving forward. We are especially poised for this growth having just received funding to help support a staff person solely focused on developing the JA Company Program in our region.

 

Strategies Yielding Funding Success: New funders are now able to invest in JAofNNE, because our program strategy demonstrates proactive and thoughtful engagement with communities in which these funders also invest. For example, because we have grown our program presence in Lawrence, foundations specifically focused on impacting Lawrence are now able to support JA programs in the city. We have also honed our engagement strategies with corporate donors, aligning our mission and delivery model more deeply with the various philanthropic strategies of each partner.

 

Goals for 2018-2019:

Continued focus on our targeted program strategy, evaluating the growth and viability of partnerships within each community to achieve the greatest impact on the students we serve.

 

Continued growth of our highest-impact program, the JA Company Program, with a goal to deliver 20-22 programs (in-school and after-school) in school year 2018-2019. Growth of this program will bring with it several challenges due to its time commitment and competition within our market, but we are engaging in proactive strategies to address these challenges. For example, this year we worked with a consulting team from Babson College to assess entrepreneurship programs in our market, and identify opportunities, challenges, and recommendations for our organization’s growth within this space.

 

Growth of middle and high school program delivery in our target communities, due to the longer-term, more intensive nature of these programs. Challenges we may face in pursuing this goal are the inability to cut into teachers’ instructional time at the middle and high school level, and volunteer recruitment to deliver the weekly model that most middle and high school programs call for. However, we are working on meeting these challenges by more effectively communicating the benefits of weekly engagement for middle and high school students to our corporate partners, and by aligning mutual sponsors of JA and our partnering high schools to garner volunteer support.

 

Diversification of our funding sources, to include foundation and individual giving as larger portions of our annual budget. These areas of giving have been a consistent challenge for us, but as mentioned above, we are taking proactive steps to set strategy around increasing these revenue streams in the future.


Needs Statement

 Sustainable Funds: Our organization has made significant progress in raising new and increased funds for our mission, and are on track to meet or exceed our budget for FY2018.  This stemmed from stronger program partnerships, deeper alignment of our current supporters with our program partners, new corporate relationships, and a heightened focus on relationship-building with private and family foundations. Continuing this fundraising momentum will be critical to our operation moving forward, as we look to grow our programs and staff capacity in the coming years. Now, our focus will be on the need to develop sustainable funding partnerships with our corporate, foundation, and individual donors, while continually seeking new partners.

 
Volunteer Recruitment: With a delivery model based solely on corporate and community volunteers, much staff time is spent recruiting these individuals, and we recognize that volunteer retention is a struggle for almost all nonprofits. However, we are strategizing ways to improve our volunteer life cycle, focusing on upfront planning and relationship-building with volunteers and the schools they work with rather than operating in a reactionary mode of volunteer recruitment. Our Adopt-a-School model is also assisting this effort, as in this mode of delivery a corporate partner would "adopt" a JA school by providing the funds for the JA programs and also by providing volunteers. This creates a more seamless volunteer partnership with JA and deepens the connection between the volunteer company and the students in their partnering school.
 
Staff Training: The ability to further develop our staff through professional development opportunities would allow us to retain and continually provide new opportunities to our team.  We are a fairly young team, and providing our staff the capacity to take advantage of professional development opportunities would allow them to take their careers and the organization's work to the next level.

CEO Statement

When I moved to the U.S. from the Dominican Republic in 1989, I landed in Lawrence, Massachusetts – the poorest city in the Commonwealth.  I did not speak a word of English and, like all immigrants, had to learn a new language and a new culture.

Statistics show that, as a teenage boy from a single-family household with no father figure at home, I had a 50% chance of dropping out of high school and becoming a burden to society. But I was one of the lucky ones. I found a purpose through a youth organization in Lawrence; where I could engage in positive activities, take on leadership roles at a young age and, most importantly, interact with caring adults invested in my success.

Because of the guidance I received through this organization, four years after arriving in the United States not speaking a word of English, I spent 30 minutes in the Oval Office with President Bill Clinton. I also enrolled at Middlebury College, one of the country’s most prestigious schools. I went on to earn my MBA at Boston University and have dedicated most of my professional career to serving others – especially inner-city youth who have potential, but who need caring adults to change their attitudes from “I can’t” to “I can.”

Instead of becoming a burden to society, today I am a homeowner, tax payer and, I like to think, a net-positive contributor to my community, region, and adopted country. It is my honor to pay forward the advantages I received to other youth in our region by leading Junior Achievement of Northern New England.

I hope you can see why I absolutely believe the JA mission is critical to the future success of our region and our country. Only 57% of American adults are financially literate. This means almost half of our population – and an even higher percentage of those from disadvantaged communities – do not fully participate in, contribute to, or benefit from our economy. Many of our youth, like me, do not have parents who attended college, worked in a corporate setting, or became entrepreneurs. It is our duty to prepare these young people to succeed, not only for their benefit and that of their families, but for the sake of our country’s future.

- Radhames Nova, President & CEO of Junior Achievement of Northern New England


Board Chair Statement



Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- West Roxbury
CENTRAL REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
Junior Achievement of Northern New England serves students in grades K-12 in 9 Massachusetts counties, inclluding Barnstable, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex, Plymouth, Norfolk, Nantucket, Suffolk and Worcester, and the state of New Hampshire. However, with a shift focused on student impact rather than student number, our staff has identified 10 targeted communities in Eastern Massachusetts and New Hampshire upon which to focus in order to provide increased access to JA programming throughout these students' K-12 experience.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Educational Services
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Economic Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

JA Company Program (After-School)

Developed by Junior Achievement of Northern New England, JA Company Program (After-School) is an after-school mentoring program for high school students hosted by business firms and corporate locations.  Enhancing the experience are the business professionals who serve as program mentors.  Following a 13-week curriculum, each JA Company consists of a group of 12-15 high school students who learn how to run a business from the ground up -- setting strategy, market research, selling company shares, producing a product and conducting board meetings prior to liquidation of their company. Students learn important lessons through the management of the company -- leadership roles, and communication and public speaking skills, and gain critical thinking and decision-making strengths.

 

Budget  $25,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Afterschool Enrichment
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

First, we seek measurable knowledge gain amongst these students - to adopt any future positive behavior, youth must believe that they are capable of that behavior, and knowledge is critical in establishing that belief. Second, we seek a measurable change in students’ positive attitudes/behaviors.  A personal sense of "I can" is one of the crucial variables that contribute to a student's ability to succeed, and JA's experiences are designed to foster an "I can" attitude as a direct result of the activities in which JA students engage.

We use pre-tests and post-tests to measure these changes, as they reliably measure change while excluding other factors. Anticipated results from JA Company Program (After-School) that we assess (and use to inform our work moving forward) include:

1) 20% knowledge gain around key business concepts like company structure, Pivot vs. Persevere, navigating business obstacles, components of a business plan, effective communication with customers, and more.

2) 20% increase in students’ perceived skill in problem-solving, creativity, collaboration, teamwork, and communication.

3) 15% increase in students’ belief that they have large or complete control over their futures.

4) 20% increase in number of students who could see themselves as part of an entrepreneurial venture.

5) 70% of students will say they are more interested in owning their own business.

Program Long-Term Success 

Often qualitative data shows us the long-term impact of the JA Company Program, like the stories from local JA alumni: "I can confidently tell you that I would not be the person I am today without everything I learned from my JA mentors. Everything was always changing - new things we needed to get done, new problems we needed to solve. Through JA Company I learned the importance of teamwork. I couldn’t physically do everything alone, nor was I supposed to. I quickly realized that collaboration and communication is what makes a company successful. JA helped me see each side of business, and the company was all ours… we created it together." - Allyson Kummins, JA Alum, attending Babson College

"Being from a low-income family and living in a little area in Dorchester, I have often felt in the past that I could not obtain the same resources as my peers, and that I could not afford to be a part of the same opportunities. Stumbling upon that ad for JA Company was the best thing that could have ever happened to me because I discovered that my initial presumptions were wrong." - Sarah Ly, current JA student

Program Success Monitored By 

Program quality is of the utmost importance to our operation, and we engage in specific activities to ensure that we are delivering JA Academy at optimal levels:

Prior to beginning JA Company, all volunteer-mentors participate in a mandatory in-depth training, on topics including the curriculum content and classroom management techniques.

Participating students will receive pre-program and post-program tests in order to determine the retention of course content, and determine students' knowledge gain and attitudinal/behavioral changes after having participated in JA. All participating mentors will also receive surveys to provide feedback and their perspective on students’ gains as a result of the experience.

Examples of Program Success 
"Such a truly INCREDIBLE opportunity for young people! So very grateful that my daughter was able to participate in JA Academy as a high school student. A fabulous program that expanded her exposure to the concept of Entrepreneurship! Now she is off to college and plans to study Entrepreneurship at the undergraduate level. A special "Thank You!" to all involved in JA of Northern New England! The experiences/opportunities for those who participate are unbelievable! For those who are lucky enough to have the chance to participate, do not hesitate!" - Parent of a Malden High School JA Company participant
 

The experiential learning used in the JA Company Program not only cultivated my entrepreneurial spirit but inspired me to dream big and reach my own goals of economic success. It has given me a newfound confidence and allowed me to dream. I dream of going to business school. I dream of creating products that solve your burning needs. I dream of investing in startups as a venture capitalist. I dream of giving back to JA in any way possible, because our youth will always be our future. I am so grateful for everything Junior Achievement has done for me.” - Matteo Greenberg, former JA Company student

 

JA K-12 Programs

Junior Achievement (JA) programs teach important life skills lessons to students in Kindergarten through 12th grade – financial literacy skills like budgeting, saving, and investing; workforce readiness skills like collaboration and communication; and entrepreneurship skills like creativity and innovation. Delivered by corporate and community volunteers, each program is age-appropriate, dynamic, interactive, and aligns with Common Core standards. Programs are generally taught over a 5-8 week period, with flexibility to condense lessons into a one-day format, JA In A Day.  All Junior Achievement programs are provided at no cost to school and after-school organizations.

 

Budget  $850.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

To show any impact of our programs, we must first demonstrate that we have increased students' fund of knowledge - knowledge is critical in changing students' attitudes or behaviors. Secondly, we measure the change in students' attitudes relative to the knowledge that has been acquired in the JA program, and their self-report on their intent to change their current behaviors and adopt new, beneficial behaviors. Behavior intentionality has been shown to be a reliable predictor of future behavior.

Pre-tests and post-tests are the instruments of choice of program evaluators because they can reliably and validly measure change as a function of program participation while ruling out other potential explanations of student change in knowledge or attitude.

Some data points from recent work with schools in our target communities include:

Fourth graders demonstrated 33% knowledge gain in a JA program about entrepreneurship – topics surveyed included business challenges, problem-solving strategies, revenues/expenses and profit/loss, and resources needed to start a business.

Fifth graders demonstrated 30% knowledge gain in a JA program about work readiness and the need for entrepreneurial thinking to meet the requirements of high-growth careers – topics surveyed included interviewing, the free market economy, career clusters, resumes, and soft skills. Fifth graders also demonstrated a 13% increase in their willingness to study hard for a good job, and an 8% increase in their belief that they can create their own futures.

Eighth graders demonstrated 22% knowledge gain in a JA program about personal finance – topics surveyed included budgeting, credit vs. debit, career goal planning, and the relationship between academic and income level. They also demonstrated a 33% increase in the willingness to create financial goals for themselves, and a 27% increase in their willingness to save money for their future wants and needs.

Program Long-Term Success 
While we work with our communities and our school partners to develop long-term evaluations of their JA students, we are fortunate to have a national organization, Junior Achievement USA, who develops long-term studies of program effectiveness. The most recent study revealed:
 
-  JA alumni are 2.5 times more likely to start their own business than the general public 
 
-  1 in 5 JA alumni reported they entered the same career/industry as their JA volunteer
 
90% of JA alumni are confident in managing their finances
 
Program Success Monitored By 

Program quality is of the utmost importance to our operation, and we engage in specific activities to ensure that we are delivering at optimal levels.  A dedicated JA Program Manager is involved in the planning of every JA program, working with educators and with volunteers to set up the experience for programmatic excellence. The JA Program Manager is onsite at JA program delivery, to ensure the interactions between students, teachers, and volunteers are positive. Prior to beginning a JA program, all volunteers participate in a mandatory training, on topics including the curriculum content and classroom management techniques. 

Participating students will receive pre-program and post-program tests in order to determine the retention of course content, and determine students' knowledge gain and attitudinal/behavioral changes after having participated in JA. Locally, surveys are distributed to educators and volunteers to assess student learning from JA programs. Recent outcomes reveal that 100% of educators agree or strongly agree that the JA program was an effective learning experience for the class. 95% of educators also agree that JA programs helped students better understand business and economics.

National and local program evaluations are crucial to maintaining quality programs for our students. Teachers (95%) and volunteers (92%) report that students who participate in JA have a better understanding of how the real world operates. They also agree that JA students are comparatively better at working as a team. 

Examples of Program Success 
The perspectives of our partnering educators, and their perceptions of their students' JA experiences, are extremely important to us in demonstrating the value and success of each program. Testimonials from Boston middle school teachers from the 2016-2017 school year include:

“It is important that teens learn about money. They will have a whole lifetime to earn, save, invest, and spend it. Yet, in order to avoid costly mistakes and wasted time, they definitely do not want to wait a lifetime before learning how to do any of these things well. The JA Program provides ample opportunities for students to learn how to make the most of every penny so they can achieve the financial independence they want – when they need it. This program covers important financial topics, including Money Management, Checking and Savings Accounts, Credit Cards, Investing & Budgeting.”

“Thankfully there are programs like JA that are able to come to schools and provide a little of it for them, and expose them to material that they wouldn't otherwise learn about until they are much older. I know this program will have a lasting impression on them and they will be truly looking forward to the next JA visit!”

 

JA Skills to Achieve

Developed locally by Junior Achievement of Northern New England, JA Skills to Achieve is a program for high school students that takes place in a corporate location. This collaborative program combines elements of two essential JA content areas: financial literacy and workforce readiness. This one-school-day experience enables students to experience the workplace, while being guided through interactive lessons taught by the business professionals who work at that very company.  The experience results in a mutually beneficial program for all involved, as students gain exposure to real-world work experience, volunteers benefit from team-building aspects, and businesses have the platform to share its company and industry with tomorrow’s workforce.

 

Budget  $5,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

As a result of this one-day workplace experience, we anticipate that 80% of participating high school students will demonstrate:

An increased understanding of credit and building a positive credit score.

An increased understanding of interviewing skills

An increased understanding of the soft skills needed in the workplace, and different strategies for building these skills

Program Long-Term Success 
While the long-term success of JA Skills to Achieve is often not within the full purview of this program, anecdotal, qualitative data demonstrates that JA Skills to Achieve can change students' perspectives on their own futures. For example, one student who participated in JA Skills to Achieve in the 2016-2017 school year subsequently secured a job at their JA volunteer's company.
 
Additionally, JA Skills to Achieve is an awareness tool that opens students' eyes to possibilities, and opens the door to an environment they may never have been able to experience otherwise. They come away from this program with a greater understanding of the corporate setting, and how personal brand directly connects to success in this setting. 
Program Success Monitored By 

Program quality is of the utmost importance to our operation, and we engage in specific activities to ensure that we are delivering JA Skills to Achieve at optimal levels:

Prior to beginning a JA program, all volunteers participate in a mandatory training, on topics including the curriculum content and classroom management techniques.

Participating students will receive pre-program and post-program tests in order to determine the retention of the day's content, and determine students' knowledge gain and attitudinal/behavioral changes after having participated in JA. All participating teachers will also receive surveys to provide feedback and their perspective on students’ gains as a result of the experience.

Examples of Program Success 

“Today I learned how to act during an interview, how to have good credit,and about Wilmington Trust. Thank you for making learning fun!”

- Student from Somerville High School, participated in JA Skills to Achieve in 2016-2017 school year

 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Radhames Nova
CEO Term Start Oct 2016
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Radhames Nova joined Junior Achievement of Northern New England in October 2016 as President & CEO, overseeing a staff of 11 and responsible for the organization’s overall operations and strategy to move the mission forward.

Prior to joining Junior Achievement, Rad served as Senior Vice President of Strategic Partnerships for the Association of Latino Professionals for America (ALPFA), the largest Latino professional organization in the United States with over 72,000 members, where he was responsible for overseeing some of the organization’s largest national corporate partnerships and a pilot partnership between JA and ALPFA. He was the Executive Director of the ALPFA Boston Chapter from 2011 to 2015.

From 2002 to 2006 Rad served as Director of Development for the Boys & Girls Club of Lawrence, Massachusetts, raising $1.8M annually for operations and leading the organization to a record breaking $8.5M capital campaign to build a new facility. Prior to that, he served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in South Africa. Beyond the nonprofit sector, Rad has held positions in the financial services industry – notably the Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund and SCS Financial. After five years working in the investments industry, Rad returned to his mission-driven career when he joined ALPFA in 2011.

Rad obtained his B.A. from Middlebury College and his MBA from Boston University. Born in the Dominican Republic, he immigrated to the United States 27 years ago and currently lives in Salem New Hampshire with his wife Alexandra and their three children.


“My life’s purpose is to provide as many young people as possible, especially inner-city youth, the same opportunities to succeed I was offered as a young man. I am humbled and privileged to pay it forward to thousands of young people though JA’s programs.”

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Amanda Doyle Bouvier Director of Development & Marketing --
Mr. Paulo Frade Director of Finance and Operations --
Ms. Deirdre O'Connor Mitchell Director of Programs --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Junior Achievement Worldwide 1945
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Mass Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

JA of Northern New England is proud to partner with schools, community organizations, and businesses to bring our programs to our youth. By bringing the education and business worlds together, we provide multifaceted benefits to our future workforce.  We are proud to collaborate with organizations like Boys & Girls Club, Girls Inc, Action for Boston Community Development, and others to layer our programs onto their existing youth programs, to provide optimal services to our students.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 9
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 1,532
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 90%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Rick Tyson Jr.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Wilmington Trust
Board Chair Term Apr 2016 - June 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Tom Allen AIG Voting
Ms. Christine Barry Endurance International Voting
Ms. Christine Berberich TBD Voting
Mr. Bob Boudreau WinterWyman Voting
Mr. James Boyer D'Amore-McKim School of Business, Northeastern University Voting
Mr. Mike Bruno Santander Voting
Mr. Brendan Callahan Jones Lang LaSalle Voting
Mr. Edward Casale Retired Voting
Mr. Chip Cook MullenLowe Voting
Ms. Migdalia Diaz ALPFA, Inc. Voting
Mr. Bill Driscoll Robert Half Voting
Ms. Amy Fracassini Davis, Malm & D'Agostine, P.C. Voting
Ms. Marisa Gianino State Street Global Advisors Voting
Mr. Tom Halloran Voya Voting
Mr. Robert Hazard People's United Bank Voting
Mr. Raymond C. Hoefling Webster Bank, N.A. Voting
Mr. Luke Howarth Syrinx Consulting Voting
Ms. Cynthia Izzo KPMG Voting
Mr. Michael C. Jorgensen The Westin Boston Waterfront Voting
Mr. Daniel L. Kabat PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Voting
Mr. Brian Kalberer Accenture Voting
Mr. Bill Kracunas RSM Voting
Ms. Melinda Kuleszka Fidelity Investments Voting
Mr. Damien Leigh Staples, Inc. Voting
Mr. Chris Lemone Enterprise Fleet Management, Inc. Voting
Mr. Keith Linhart CrossCountry Consulting Voting
Mr. Dan McCarthy Aon Hewitt Investments Voting
Mr. Mark Melito Deloitte Voting
Mr. George Moore Cengage Learning Voting
Ms. Gale Murray The Business Journals Voting
Ms. Emily Neill Robert Half Executive Search Voting
Ms. Suzanne Norman Milliman Voting
Mr. Russell D. Norris Slalom Consulting Voting
Mr. Raj Pathak Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Voting
Mr. Ed Perkin Eaton Vance Voting
Mr. Calvin Place Diversified Financial Management Voting
Mr. Mark E. Reilly Comcast Voting
Mr. Glenn Ricciardelli MDD Forensic Accountants Voting
Ms. Andreana Santangelo Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Voting
Ms. Gloria Spence Retired Voting
Ms. Betsy Stewart Bank of America Merrill Lynch Voting
Mr. Craig Stockmal Focused Impressions Voting
Mr. Jimmy Suppelsa Best Credit Data Voting
Mr. Rick Tyson Wilmington Trust Voting
Mr. David A. Weber MIT Sloan School of Management Voting
Ms. Amy Zidow Ernst & Young LLP Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 42
Hispanic/Latino: 4
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 14
Male: 32
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 42%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 97%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Marketing
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $1,237,522 $1,150,458 $1,621,507
Total Expenses $1,375,926 $1,425,590 $1,618,673

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$606,705 $522,038 $709,599
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $147,156 $186,296 $250,276
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $27,972 $-25,828 $-25,040
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $441,200 $427,554 $666,940
Revenue In-Kind $1,050 $23,199 $450
Other $13,439 $17,199 $19,282

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $801,641 $884,713 $916,941
Administration Expense $277,192 $227,069 $289,050
Fundraising Expense $297,093 $313,808 $412,682
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.90 0.81 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 58% 62% 57%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 25% 28% 25%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $940,695 $1,027,301 $1,241,412
Current Assets $174,290 $275,650 $536,983
Long-Term Liabilities -- $0 $0
Current Liabilities $240,526 $188,728 $127,707
Total Net Assets $700,169 $838,573 $1,113,705

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $100,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 3.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 0.72 1.46 4.20

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Junior Achievement’s goal is to prepare students in Grades K-12 to live self-sustaining lives, participate in and contribute to the local and national economy, and ultimately affect the economic conditions of this country. Specific to Massachusetts, Junior Achievement of Northern New England’s aims to provide the youth in Eastern Massachusetts with the skills needed to succeed in the workplace, manage their finances, and become positive contributors to their communities and economy. This in turn will affect our region’s future economic fabric, in which unemployment/underemployment rates and poverty rates are decreased and our communities can economically flourish. We engage in this work because youth prepared with economic and workforce skills today can contribute to our social and economic wellbeing tomorrow.

While financial literacy is not a requirement to be taught in Massachusetts schools, a 2016 study released by the FINRA Foundation revealed that nearly two-thirds of Americans cannot pass a basic financial literacy test. Furthermore, a recent survey indicated that 42% of over 400 U.S. employers rated the overall preparation of our high school graduates for entry-level jobs as "deficient", 70% rated graduates "deficient" in both professional/work ethic and critical thinking, and 54% rated their creativity/innovation skills as "deficient". And while an introduction to entrepreneurship is left out of most classroom curriculum, young people need to continue to innovate and launch businesses in order for their communities to benefit from future economic opportunities.

JA of Northern New England seeks to remedy these significant gaps by providing access to sequential, age-appropriate programs that specifically address financial, economic, and entrepreneurial skills. We aim to provide this “life skills” education to our region’s youth through a strategic approach to create community partnerships with 10 key communities in Northern New England. Creating long-standing relationships in these communities will allow us to reach their students “early and often”, leading to deep impact on their economic and workforce capabilities and ultimately affecting the economic fabric of these communities over time. We recognize that this process will be slow and will require many layers of foundation, but our overall goal is to create a pathway of JA experiences for our youth, building the groundwork for them to become economically confident citizens.

In the long-term, with these 10 key communities we aim to establish partnerships in which a student, for example a student in Lowell, can experience sequential JA programs from elementary school to high school. This allows that student to annually build upon the economic and entrepreneurial skills learned in the previous school year, and continue to develop a strong foundation upon which to succeed as an adult. Over the next 3-5 years, we will know we are successful in this effort if our programs are more deeply integrated into the elementary, middle, and high school levels in each of our 10 communities, because this will demonstrate to us that students are on their way toward receiving consistent access to JA’s life skills education.

Please see Question #4 for additional information on evaluating our success in this strategy.


2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

The strength of JA's proven, time-tested K-12 curriculum is the first step toward achieving our aforementioned goals, as they are strategically developed to be age-appropriate, relevant, and interactive for students. By design, JA students are introduced to new concepts and tools, and then have the opportunity to practice their learnings and develop new skills, all while receiving positive feedback from volunteer-mentors. These volunteers from the local business community play an invaluable role in providing real-world relevance for students, as well as mentorship that shapes students’ positive outlooks toward work and their futures. JA’s constructive combination of new knowledge and skills, coupled with the development of positive attitudes about the topics learned, increase students' perceptions that they have the ability to control their futures. JA programs are:
 
- Age-appropriate, tied to each grade’s academic curriculum and aligned with common core standards
- Experiential and hands-on, providing independent and collaborative opportunities for students to gain knowledge and build skills
- Proven, but consistently redeveloped by trained educators to maintain relevance and address needs
- Designed in a sequential, "building-block" fashion from K-12, enabling students to annually build upon the skills learned previously
- Delivered by local business volunteers, providing encouragement and modeling that contribute to students’ development of positive outlooks/behaviors
 
Throughout the JA experience students learn everything from simple concepts like earning, saving and spending to more sophisticated concepts like taxes and insurance. They learn how money moves through a community and personal finance skills like budgeting, building credit, etc. They learn how our local and global economies work, discover opportunities within our free market system, and practice making critical business decisions. They learn about the soft skills needed for today's workplace, and develop those skills through hands-on simulations.
 
Beyond the power of the JA program, our staff has been laser-focused on working in our target communities to engage students at all age levels in our programs. We have spent much time meeting with these communities' school and civic leaders, asking how we can support their students and working to collaborate in providing JA moving forward. We have developed strategic partnerships with school and city initiatives in order to layer our programs into existing partnerships, and have set out long-term collaborations with partners to ensure maximum impact.  These activities, over time, will enable us to develop a JA "framework" as we continue to expand our reach within each target community. And we will be able to build upon this framework to, down the line, achieve sequential JA access for students in our target communities.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

 Junior Achievement of Northern New England (JAofNNE) is fortunate to position itself for future success in our work. Our staff is a mixture of tenured and new JA members, which allows for both institutional knowledge and "fresh eyes" to inform our work and processes moving forward. Our Programs team is a group of individuals who have deep knowledge of JA programs, their impact, and how to successfully implement them, with tenure of up to 5 years delivering JA programs to our partners. Our Development team is made up of experienced Fundraising professionals, in corporate, foundation, and individual giving, as well as newer individuals who bring with them direct JA program experience to inform our fundraising efforts. JAofNNE also benefits from a highly engaged, 46-member Board of Directors, who bring with them expertise across various industries and geographic regions, and fully execute in establishing connections and introductions for JA staff. With clear Board expectations and a strong belief in the JA mission, our Board is more engaged than ever, and we are currently undergoing an analysis of our Board to ensure our members represent the various communities and backgrounds of the students we serve. Finally, JAofNNE benefits from the strong partnerships and collaborations it commits to with other community partners. Collaborations with city government offices, business partners, and other youth organizations allow JAofNNE to steadily weave JA programming into the fabric of established entities within our communities, which ultimately benefits the youth we aim to serve and moves our strategy forward.


4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

We will utilize data to assess our program impact on our students, with a goal to steadily increase students’ knowledge of financial and economic concepts, and improve their confidence in managing their finances and futures. First, we seek measurable knowledge gain amongst these students - to adopt any future positive behavior, youth must believe that they are capable of that behavior, and knowledge is critical in establishing that belief. Second, we seek a measurable change in students’ positive attitudes/behaviors. A personal sense of "I can" is one of the crucial variables that contribute to a student's ability to succeed, and JA's experiences are designed to foster an "I can" attitude as a direct result of the activities in which JA students engage.

To measure our success we will implement pre and post-program evaluations with our students, and assess students’ knowledge gain as well as their attitudes toward their futures and finances after having participated in JA. A sampling of data points we will measure include increased knowledge around saving and budgeting; increased understanding of how financial institutions and businesses contribute to a community; increased knowledge around entrepreneurs’ challenges, opportunities, and innovation skills; heightened understanding of credit scores and credit vs. debit; and an increased understanding of the skills needed to succeed in the workplace.
 
Additionally, because the implementation of these programs will continue into future years, over time we will be able to compare the data collected from new JA students with the data collected from students who have received JA for several years. This will allow us to show the effects of students’ long-term access to JA, and how years of foundation-building JA programs can impact students’ attitudes and knowledge as compared to students who will experience JA content for the first time. Comparing this data will allow another lens through which to measure our success.
 
Over the next 3-5 years, a major milestone we will work toward is a marked increase in program delivery across the elementary, middle, and high school levels within our target communities, and specifically at the middle and high school level, as these programs are most intensive and highly impactful. We will look for deep integration of programs within schools and partners in our target communities, with a strategic path for increased delivery over time. As mentioned, this will demonstrate to us that we are moving forward in providing our students with consistent access to JA’s life skills education.

 


5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Our continued emphasis on high-quality, long-term partnerships has yielded some strong success from the past year, in deepening and embarking on partnerships in our target communities. Within Boston our partnership with the Boston Saves Children’s Savings Account program continues to grow, and as this initiative spreads within Boston Public Schools JA is there to be a supportive curriculum partner in their efforts. Within Lawrence we have developed collaborations with several new school and community partners, and brought the JA Company Program (After-School) to the city for the first time in over ten years. And, within Lawrence we have progressed from serving 49 students in 2016-2017 to serving nearly 350 students in 2017-2018. These collaborations in our communities will continue to contribute to our long-term work to reach their students at every age level, from elementary to middle to high school.
 
While we have made strong progress in some of our target communities, we have also experienced challenges and roadblocks in others. We have found some communities to be “over-saturated” by community partners, and their needs may not align as closely with JA’s mission as others. Hence, we have needed to evaluate our work within each community and adjust our plans as necessary based on our learnings from the past year. One result of this evaluation is the focusing of our strategy to 10 target communities rather than 15, enabling our staff to maximize their capacity within a smaller set of communities, where the potential for JA to fulfill their needs is the highest