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Junior Achievement of Northern New England

 Junior Achievement of Northern New England, Inc., 400 Fifth Avenue, Suite 300
 Waltham, MA 02451
[P] (781) 373-1170
[F] (781) 373-1171
www.janewengland.org
bday@janewengland.org
Bonnie Day
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INCORPORATED: 1945
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2127020

LAST UPDATED: 05/16/2016
Organization DBA Junior Achievment of Eastern Massachusetts
Former Names Junior Achievement of Eastern Massachusetts (2010)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years No

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Junior Achievement (JA) is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. We do this by partnering with educators and business and community volunteers who deliver JA curricula and add relevancy and inspiration to the student experience in the classroom.

With grade-appropriate curricula on financial literacy, workforce readiness and entrepreneurship, JA helps to build students’ 21st century life skills. JA is working toward the day when every young person graduates from high school empowered to own their economic success.


Mission Statement

The mission of Junior Achievement (JA) is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. We do this by partnering with educators and business and community volunteers who deliver JA curricula and add relevancy and inspiration to the student experience in the classroom.

With grade-appropriate curricula on financial literacy, workforce readiness and entrepreneurship, JA helps to build students’ 21st century life skills. JA is working toward the day when every young person graduates from high school empowered to own their economic success.



FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $1,673,500.00
Projected Expense $1,662,581.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • JA Academy
  • JA Job Shadow
  • JA Skills to Achieve
  • K-12 Junior Achievement Programs

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of Junior Achievement (JA) is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. We do this by partnering with educators and business and community volunteers who deliver JA curricula and add relevancy and inspiration to the student experience in the classroom.

With grade-appropriate curricula on financial literacy, workforce readiness and entrepreneurship, JA helps to build students’ 21st century life skills. JA is working toward the day when every young person graduates from high school empowered to own their economic success.



Background Statement

Founded nationally by Horace A. Moses in 1919, the local JA operation, Junior Achievement of Northern New England (JANNE), began in 1945 and focuses on serving k-12 students within its territory that includes nine Massachusetts counties and the entire state of New Hampshire. The majority of students are classified as economically disadvantaged by the New Hampshire and Massachusetts Departments of Elementary & Secondary Education.

Horace A. Moses, a prominent industrialist and profound social engineer, donated time and finances towards the betterment of youth to ensure that children would have access to economic education and financial literacy lessons. From his vision nearly 100 years ago, the Junior Achievement organization has grown to over 120 chapters in the US, and JA Worldwide efforts grow each day. 
 
Today, JA of Northern New England is an award-winning that brings grade-appropriate work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy programming to students in Grades K-12. JA multiplies the impact of every dollar raised by training and deploying corporate and community volunteers to deliver our proven curricula to youth. 

Impact Statement

During the 2014-2015 school year, JANNE delivered over 1,500 programs in 254 schools and after-school sites, reaching over 38,000 students through the efforts of over 2,200 trained volunteers.

Through this past year’s strategic planning process, JANNE has made good progress on the goals we established for FY 2016. As previously stated, JA’s new, blended learning curriculum is actively being adopted, and our goal to service a predominantly low-to-moderate income (or, “high-needs”) population has been addressed through comprehensive plans to select targeted school districts where we will concentrate efforts. Specific accomplishments are described below:

Setting Strategic Vision for the Organization – Met

At the JANNE Board of Directors Meeting in February 2016, President Kerry Locke Bedard presented her vision, strategic focus, and five year goals for JANNE. In October 2016, the board will hold a one-day retreat to conduct a self-assessment and recommend changes to align with this vision.

Making Greater Impact – In Progress

This fiscal year, we explored how to make an even bigger impact for our students and in the community. For 2016-2017, we are implementing exciting program changes, ways we work with schools and conduct teacher outreach, and our volunteer management process.

Balancing the Budget – In Progress

This is a primary goal, and JANNE works closely with our board of directors to track and secure resources needed for our JA students.

Building a High Performing Team and Professional Development Operations – In Progress

The organization has a new Director of Development and Marketing, Amanda Doyle-Bouvier. For programs, we have a passionate and experienced Interim Program Director, Rachel Burack, who supervises three program managers.

Growing the Board of Directors to Include Educators and Community Partners – In Progress

Since June 2015, we have inducted 12 board members representing various industries and community partnerships. We continue to seek passionate, committed individuals to join our board.

 

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Needs Statement

Teaching youth financial literacy, workforce readiness and entrepreneurship is part of a proactive Junior Achievement strategy to improve the long-term health of local and global economies. Such pragmatic training is the best offense to ensure a higher standard of living, a sense of security, and a better quality of life for future generations. In order to fulfill the Junior Achievement mission and impact even greater numbers of students, the following on-going needs must be met:

  • Active, engaging fundraising that is consistent and progressive must be conducted to keep current with increasing demands for JA programs and the costs associated with their delivery;
  • Growing a diverse, quality volunteer base of greater numbers to serve as the means for the delivery of JA programs;
  • Increasing our dynamic partnerships to create unique learning experiences and other valued outcomes for allied corporations, foundations and community organizations whose missions align with that of Junior Achievement.

 


CEO Statement

Junior Achievement (JA) programming is a complement to current classroom efforts with its relevant financial literacy, workforce readiness and entrepreneurship curriculum presented by trained volunteers.

By reaching students in the classroom with professionally-designed, sequential, relevant lessons, JA helps educate and inspire young people to value education, business and economics in order to improve the quality of their lives. 
 
A key strength of any JA program is the business mentors who volunteer in students' classrooms; they add personal, real-life experiences to the lessons. Students find such volunteers to be role models who inspire and motivate them to set, pursue and achieve their goals.

In consultation with school districts, JA makes a concentrated effort to provide its programs where “high impact” is needed most – in schools with students who are identified as “at risk” and “underserved.” We know through experience that these students benefit from JA‘s curriculum and the volunteers who teach the JA programs.

JA builds a partnership approach to education by working with schools, securing program funding and recruiting the volunteers. Businesses, foundations and individuals contribute financial and volunteer resources for program delivery which enhances the overall quality of local education
  • Elementary School programs teach the basics of business and economics, banking and money management, the relevance of school to the workplace and the importance of staying in school.
  • Middle School programs build on concepts students learn through the Common Core Standards. They are geared to helping teens make important decisions regarding their educational and professional futures, and encourage students to start thinking early about their career goals. These programs supplement standard social studies curricula and help to develop communication skills essential to success in the business world.
  • High School programs help students learn personal finance, business and workforce readiness through programs that develop interpersonal skills, instruct on building a business plan to start their own entrepreneurial venture, use interactive web-based simulation to develop decision-making skills, provide job shadow experiences, teach business ethics, and hone personal financial literacy skills.

JA seeks to introduce students to new opportunities and provide a sense of hope for the future by:

  • Delivering lessons focusing on building character, self-esteem and citizenship;
  • Building students' understanding of and attitudes about their roles in society;
  • Helping youth to connect education with future success;
  • Providing the basic skills of financial literacy, workforce readiness and entrepreneurship.

Board Chair Statement

“Schools can’t do it alone. I’m proud of my affiliation with Junior Achievement. Serving on the local board for this organization, I know I’m helping provide kids in my community with the skills they need to succeed in work and life.”– Bill Driscoll, Board Chair, President, New England District, Robert Half International Inc.


Geographic Area Served

GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- West Roxbury
CENTRAL REGION, MA
METROWEST REGION, MA
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
Junior Achievement of Northern New England serves students in grades K-12 in nine Massachusetts counties, including Barnstable, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex, Plymouth, Norfolk, Nantucket, Suffolk and Worcester, and the entire state of New Hampshire.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Educational Services
  2. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Economic Development

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

Yes

Programs

JA Academy

Developed by Junior Achievement of Northern New England, JA Academy is an after-school mentoring program for high school students hosted by area colleges, universities and/or business firms.  Enhancing the experience are the business professionals who serve as program mentors.  Following a 12-week curriculum, each JA Academy consists of a group of 15-20 students who learn how to run a business from the ground up -- setting strategy, market research, selling company shares, producing a product and conducting board meetings prior to liquidation of their company. Students learn important lessons through the management of the company -- leadership roles, and communication and public speaking skills, and gain critical thinking and decision-making strengths.

 

Budget  $10,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Afterschool Enrichment
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Key findings from past JA surveys indicate program impact is quantified by the following data, and expected as realistic outcomes for participating students:

  • Elementary school students who participated in JA possess more basic economic, personal finance, and business knowledge than non-JA students;
  • The majority of middle school students (71%) participating in JA programs reported that JA helped recognize the importance of education and provided motivation to work harder to achieve personal goals;
  • JA students are 7% more likely to matriculate to college immediately after high school;
  • 80% of participating high school students stated that they felt better prepared to join the workforce; and
  • More than 90% high school students agreed that JA’s programs prepared them to make ethical business decisions once they join the workforce.

 

Program Long-Term Success 

It’s been said that if you want to see the future of our country all you have to do is look at our children today. So consider this: 7,000 students drop out of high school every day, 1.3 million failed to graduate last year, and 15 million more will join them by 2020. What does the future hold for our young people? Given our current economy and education circumstances, one can only guess. A recent study shows that a major reason young people drop out of school is because they do not see the correlation between what they are learning in the classroom to what is needed to succeed in the real world. Junior Achievement helps bridge this critical gap through its programs that teach financial literacy for life.

College and career preparation are vital to the success of today’s students. However, the issues are too great for educators to address alone. Educators need the support of community partnerships with businesses to help students become better prepared to meet the complex and troubling challenges of economic issues. In helping to create and sustain the partnerships between educators and commerce, JA is able to provide this vital link of bringing the real world to students, and creating the connections that open minds to the realization of personal potential.

Students must learn to connect academic success with future success. With this understanding, students are more likely to continue education through graduation and become contributing members of society. To be effective, this preparation must begin early in the academic career, be frequent and reinforced, and be sequentially organized and expanded at every grade level. This ideal model of JA’s curricula provides students with a variety of experiences and activities that include relevant, hands-on, out-of-the-desk, practical learning projects. Theconcepts and skills learned are reinforced and integrated with required subjects such as social studies, language arts, mathematics, and science. 

 

Program Success Monitored By 

Junior Achievement's volunteer-delivery model and program evaluation protocol sets the organization apart from non-profits since JA is one of only two major not-for-profits that has independent proof of program effectiveness. After more than 60 studies, JA programs have been found to have a significant impact on the knowledge, skill development and attitudes of students. These on-going studies indicate that JA students demonstrate a significant understanding of economics and business knowledge, particularly those involved in our programs through consecutive grade levels.

Across a wide variety of evaluations, JA has consistently demonstrated its capacity to effectively equip youth with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for future success. Simply put, students in JA financial literacy, workforce readiness and entrepreneurship programs are better prepared to enter the workforce. They are also better prepared for expanded STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) vocations, as well as a myriad of other careers. Ultimately, successful students have a positive impact on, and contribute to, our local, national and global economies.

Participating students will receive pre-program and post-program tests in order to determine the retention of course content. Locally, surveys are distributed to educators and volunteers to assess student learning from JA programs. Recent outcomes reveal that 100% of educators agree or strongly agree that the JA program was an effective learning experience for the class. 95% of educators also agree that JA programs helped students better understand business and economics.

National and local program evaluations are crucial to maintaining quality programs for our students. Teachers (95%) and volunteers (92%) report that students who participate in JA have a better understanding of how the real world operates. They also agree that JA students are comparatively better at working as a team. 

 

Examples of Program Success 
“My experience at this program has greatly increased my knowledge of how to form a company and all the difficulty and team work it takes to make it happen. I have learned from many of the speakers how they have become successful; and most of the skills they have discussed are being taught to us through the JA success skills workshops.”
                             Milton HS Student                            

JA Job Shadow

JA Job Shadow is designed for middle and high school students, and introduces careers options through one-day, on-site workplace orientations, where students “shadow” business professionals.  The program also consists of optional in-school, teacher-led activities prior to the worksite experience. Program themes and critical topics include the reinforcement of the relevance of schoolwork, necessary workplace skills, teamwork, the connection between learning and earning, and an introduction to careers.

Budget  $500.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Key findings from past JA surveys indicate program impact is quantified by the following data, and expected as realistic outcomes for participating students:

  • Elementary school students who participated in JA possess more basic economic, personal finance, and business knowledge than non-JA students;
  • The majority of middle school students (71%) participating in JA programs reported that JA helped recognize the importance of education and provided motivation to work harder to achieve personal goals;
  • JA students are 7% more likely to matriculate to college immediately after high school;
  • 80% of participating high school students stated that they felt better prepared to join the workforce; and
  • More than 90% high school students agreed that JA’s programs prepared them to make ethical business decisions once they join the workforce.

Program Long-Term Success 

It’s been said that if you want to see the future of our country all you have to do is look at our children today. So consider this: 7,000 students drop out of high school every day, 1.3 million failed to graduate last year, and 15 million more will join them by 2020. What does the future hold for our young people? Given our current economy and education circumstances, one can only guess. A recent study shows that a major reason young people drop out of school is because they do not see the correlation between what they are learning in the classroom to what is needed to succeed in the real world. Junior Achievement helps bridge this critical gap through its programs that teach financial literacy for life.

College and career preparation are vital to the success of today’s students. However, the issues are too great for educators to address alone. Educators need the support of community partnerships with businesses to help students become better prepared to meet the complex and troubling challenges of economic issues. In helping to create and sustain the partnerships between educators and commerce, JA is able to provide this vital link of bringing the real world to students, and creating the connections that open minds to the realization of personal potential.

Students must learn to connect academic success with future success. With this understanding, students are more likely to continue education through graduation and become contributing members of society. To be effective, this preparation must begin early in the academic career, be frequent and reinforced, and be sequentially organized and expanded at every grade level. This ideal model of JA’s curricula provides students with a variety of experiences and activities that include relevant, hands-on, out-of-the-desk, practical learning projects. Theconcepts and skills learned are reinforced and integrated with required subjects such as social studies, language arts, mathematics, and science. 

 

Program Success Monitored By 
Junior Achievement's volunteer-delivery model and program evaluation protocol sets the organization apart from non-profits since JA is one of only two major not-for-profits that has independent proof of program effectiveness. After more than 60 studies, JA programs have been found to have a significant impact on the knowledge, skill development and attitudes of students. These on-going studies indicate that JA students demonstrate a significant understanding of economics and business knowledge, particularly those involved in our programs through consecutive grade levels.

Across a wide variety of evaluations, JA has consistently demonstrated its capacity to effectively equip youth with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for future success. Simply put, students in JA financial literacy, workforce readiness and entrepreneurship programs are better prepared to enter the workforce. They are also better prepared for expanded STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) vocations, as well as a myriad of other careers. Ultimately, successful students have a positive impact on, and contribute to, our local, national and global economies.

Participating students will receive pre-program and post-program tests in order to determine the retention of course content. Locally, surveys are distributed to educators and volunteers to assess student learning from JA programs. Recent outcomes reveal that 100% of educators agree or strongly agree that the JA program was an effective learning experience for the class. 95% of educators also agree that JA programs helped students better understand business and economics.

National and local program evaluations are crucial to maintaining quality programs for our students. Teachers (95%) and volunteers (92%) report that students who participate in JA have a better understanding of how the real world operates. They also agree that JA students are comparatively better at working as a team. 

 

Examples of Program Success 
  "This helped me learn a great deal about how to deal with other people and myself. I learned a lot about people/business management."

- Student, Acton-Boxborough Regional High School, Fidelity Job Shadow Day

 

 


JA Skills to Achieve

Developed by the Junior Achievement of Northern New England education staff, JA Skills to Achieve is a program for high school students that takes place in a corporate location. This collaborative program combines elements of two of the JA mission pillars that focus on financial literacy and workforce readiness. The one-school-day experience enables students to experience the workplace, while being guided through interactive lessons taught by business professionals.  The experience results in a mutually beneficial program for all involved, as students gain exposure to real-world work experience, volunteers benefit from team-building aspects, and businesses have the platform to share its company and industry with tomorrow’s workforce.

 

Budget  $1,000.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Key findings from past JA surveys indicate program impact is quantified by the following data, and expected as realistic outcomes for all participating students:

  • Elementary school students who participated in JA possess more basic economic, personal finance, and business knowledge than non-JA students;
  • The majority of middle school students (71%) participating in JA programs reported that JA helped recognize the importance of education and provided motivation to work harder to achieve personal goals;
  • JA students are 7% more likely to matriculate to college immediately after high school;
  • 80% of participating high school students stated that they felt better prepared to join the workforce; and
  • More than 90% high school students agreed that JA’s programs prepared them to make ethical business decisions once they join the workforce.

Program Long-Term Success 

It’s been said that if you want to see the future of our country all you have to do is look at our children today. So consider this: 7,000 students drop out of high school every day, 1.3 million failed to graduate last year, and 15 million more will join them by 2020. What does the future hold for our young people? Given our current economy and education circumstances, one can only guess. A recent study shows that a major reason young people drop out of school is because they do not see the correlation between what they are learning in the classroom to what is needed to succeed in the real world. Junior Achievement helps bridge this critical gap through its programs that teach financial literacy for life.

College and career preparation are vital to the success of today’s students. However, the issues are too great for educators to address alone. Educators need the support of community partnerships with businesses to help students become better prepared to meet the complex and troubling challenges of economic issues. In helping to create and sustain the partnerships between educators and commerce, JA is able to provide this vital link of bringing the real world to students, and creating the connections that open minds to the realization of personal potential.

Students must learn to connect academic success with future success. With this understanding, students are more likely to continue education through graduation and become contributing members of society. To be effective, this preparation must begin early in the academic career, be frequent and reinforced, and be sequentially organized and expanded at every grade level. This ideal model of JA’s curricula provides students with a variety of experiences and activities that include relevant, hands-on, out-of-the-desk, practical learning projects. Theconcepts and skills learned are reinforced and integrated with required subjects such as social studies, language arts, mathematics, and science. 

 

Program Success Monitored By 

JA’s volunteer-delivery model and program evaluation protocol sets the organization apart from non-profits since JA is one of only two major not-for-profits that has independent proof of program effectiveness. After more than 60 studies, JA programs have been found to have a significant impact on the knowledge, skill development and attitudes of students. These on-going studies indicate that JA students demonstrate a significant understanding of economics and business knowledge, particularly those involved in our programs through consecutive grade levels.

Across a wide variety of evaluations, JA has consistently demonstrated its capacity to effectively equip youth with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for future success. Simply put, students in JA financial literacy, workforce readiness and entrepreneurship programs are better prepared to enter the workforce. They are also better prepared for expanded STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) vocations, as well as a myriad of other careers. Ultimately, successful students have a positive impact on, and contribute to, our local, national and global economies.

Participating students will receive pre-program and post-program tests in order to determine the retention of course content. Locally, surveys are distributed to educators and volunteers to assess student learning from JA programs. Recent outcomes reveal that 100% of educators agree or strongly agree that the JA program was an effective learning experience for the class. 95% of educators also agree that JA programs helped students better understand business and economics.

National and local program evaluations are crucial to maintaining quality programs for our students. Teachers (95%) and volunteers (92%) report that students who participate in JA have a better understanding of how the real world operates. They also agree that JA students are comparatively better at working as a team. 

Examples of Program Success 

 "I felt like I could see my future opening up before me."

- Student, Acton-Boxborough Regional High School


K-12 Junior Achievement Programs

Junior Achievement (JA) programs, 22 in all, teach important lessons to students in Kindergarten through 12thgrade with regard to financial literacy for life – budgeting, saving, credit, investing and entrepreneurship. Delivered by community volunteers, each program is age-appropriate, dynamic, interactive, and aligns with the social studies curricula. Programs are generally taught over a 5-8 week period, with flexibility to condense lessons into a one-day format, JA In A Day.  As time is a critical concern for student and volunteer schedules, many educators and company coordinators are opting for this learning model for program delivery. Most importantly to school systems, at a time when public funding is being slashed, all Junior Achievement programs are provided at no cost to school and after-school organizations.

 

Budget  $714.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 
Key findings from past JA surveys indicate program impact is quantified by the following data, and expected as realistic outcomes for all participating students:
  • Elementary school students who participated in JA possess more basic economic, personal finance, and business knowledge than non-JA students;
  • The majority of middle school students (71%) participating in JA programs reported that JA helped recognize the importance of education and provided motivation to work harder to achieve personal goals;
  • JA students are 7% more likely to matriculate to college immediately after high school;
  • 80% of participating high school students stated that they felt better prepared to join the workforce; and
  • More than 90% high school students agreed that JA’s programs prepared them to make ethical business decisions once they join the workforce.

Program Long-Term Success 
It’s been said that if you want to see the future of our country all you have to do is look at our children today. So consider this: 7,000 students drop out of high school every day, 1.3 million failed to graduate last year, and 15 million more will join them by 2020. What does the future hold for our young people? Given our current economy and education circumstances, one can only guess. A recent study shows that a major reason young people drop out of school is because they do not see the correlation between what they are learning in the classroom to what is needed to succeed in the real world. Junior Achievement helps bridge this critical gap through its programs that teach financial literacy for life.

College and career preparation are vital to the success of today’s students. However, the issues are too great for educators to address alone. Educators need the support of community partnerships with businesses to help students become better prepared to meet the complex and troubling challenges of economic issues. In helping to create and sustain the partnerships between educators and commerce, JA is able to provide this vital link of bringing the real world to students, and creating the connections that open minds to the realization of personal potential.

Students must learn to connect academic success with future success. With this understanding, students are more likely to continue education through graduation and become contributing members of society. To be effective, this preparation must begin early in the academic career, be frequent and reinforced, and be sequentially organized and expanded at every grade level. This ideal model of JA’s curricula provides students with a variety of experiences and activities that include relevant, hands-on, out-of-the-desk, practical learning projects. Theconcepts and skills learned are reinforced and integrated with required subjects such as social studies, language arts, mathematics, and science. 

Program Success Monitored By 
Junior Achievement's volunteer-delivery model and program evaluation protocol sets the organization apart from non-profits since JA is one of only two major not-for-profits that has independent proof of program effectiveness. After more than 60 studies, JA programs have been found to have a significant impact on the knowledge, skill development and attitudes of students. These on-going studies indicate that JA students demonstrate a significant understanding of economics and business knowledge, particularly those involved in our programs through consecutive grade levels.

Across a wide variety of evaluations, JA has consistently demonstrated its capacity to effectively equip youth with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for future success. Simply put, students in JA financial literacy, workforce readiness and entrepreneurship programs are better prepared to enter the workforce. They are also better prepared for expanded STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) vocations, as well as a myriad of other careers. Ultimately, successful students have a positive impact on, and contribute to, our local, national and global economies.

Participating students will receive pre-program and post-program tests in order to determine the retention of course content. Locally, surveys are distributed to educators and volunteers to assess student learning from JA programs. Recent outcomes reveal that 100% of educators agree or strongly agree that the JA program was an effective learning experience for the class. 95% of educators also agree that JA programs helped students better understand business and economics.

National and local program evaluations are crucial to maintaining quality programs for our students. Teachers (95%) and volunteers (92%) report that students who participate in JA have a better understanding of how the real world operates. They also agree that JA students are comparatively better at working as a team. 

Examples of Program Success 
Testimonial from Student, in a handwritten note sent to volunteer:
"Thank you for teaching us about money around the world.  I did not know other countries had different money.  That was cool to learn."

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Since Junior Achievement (JA) provides financial literacy and life-skills programs at no cost to schools and after-school sites, all students are eligible to participate in JA programming. Considering the Junior Achievement of Northern New England (JANNE) territory has a potential service constituency of over 1,000,000 students, the ability to deliver programs to meet demand remains a top priority for the JANNE operation.  Regardless of current economic conditions, such demand for JA programs consistently exceeds the capacity of both the organization’s staff and its finances.  Fundraising to stay current with demand for programming remains a prime challenge for the JANNE operation. To ensure the stability of finances into the future, and in order to broaden impact to more students,  a JANNE strategic sustainability plan was established and includes the on-going outreach, cultivation and stewardship of existing foundation, corporation and individual donors.  Challenge meets opportunity at an axis:  fundraising outreach not only provides support for programs but, especially in the corporate donor case, leads to essential volunteer forces that help JANNE’s efforts to provide program delivery. 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Kerry Locke Bedard
CEO Term Start Jan 2015
CEO Email kbedard@janewengland.org
CEO Experience

Kerry Locke Bedard became president of Junior Achievement of Northern New England, Inc., effective January 7, 2015.

Kerry has over twenty years of experience in nonprofits, business and politics. Most recently, she was the Marketing Director of Standard & Poor’s Financial Communications, a leading business-to-business resource for investor education and part of The McGraw-Hill Companies.

Prior to McGraw-Hill, Kerry spent eight years with Citigroup in New York City. She was the associate marketing director for Women & Co. where she conceived the idea and led development of Shape Your Future, an online program to help women take charge of their retirement, and Women and Affluence, a generational study of women and money.

She also led the strategic development of Citi Credit-ED, a credit education program for college students, which received numerous industry awards including the prestigious Telly Award. Kerry served as spokesperson for the business at financial literacy conferences on over fifteen college campuses, and at internal meetings reaching over 1,500 employees. She joined Citi Cards in 2000 as a management associate.

Earlier in her career, Kerry spent nearly a decade in politics, serving as the executive director of the Monroe County Republican Committee in Rochester, NY and working in Washington D.C. for the Republican National Committee, the National Republican Congressional Committee and U.S. Representative Bill Paxon (R-NY).

Kerry is a troop leader with the Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts and is president of the Wellesley Hills Juniors Women’s Club, an all-volunteer nonprofit founded in 1944. She has served on the Boards of the Young Entrepreneurs Alliance (YEA) and the Massachusetts Council on Economic Education.

Kerry holds an M.B.A. from Boston University and a B.A. in History from Hamilton College. Kerry and her husband, David, live in Wellesley, Massachusetts, and Hancock, New Hampshire, and have two daughters, Kady (11), and Ellie (10).

Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Amanda Doyle Bouvier Director of Development & Marketing --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Junior Achievement Worldwide 1945
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Mass Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Recruitment of new positions, longevity of staff vital to constituency relations; all staff are trained to serve as program volunteers

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 10
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 2,200
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 90%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 10
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration --

Risk Management Provisions

--

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Governance


Board Chair Mr. Dan L Kabat
Board Chair Company Affiliation PwC
Board Chair Term July 2015 - June 2017
Board Co-Chair Mr. Rick Tyson Jr.
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation US Trust
Board Co-Chair Term July 2015 - June 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Tom Allen AIG Property & Casualty Voting
Ms. Heide Anthony Accenture Voting
Mr. Chip Barnes formerly, UPS Voting
Ms. Christine Barry Windham Professionals Voting
Ms. Kerry Locke Bedard Junior Achievement of Northern New England Voting
Ms. Diana Bitzas Reebok Voting
Mr. Bob Boudreau WinterWyman Voting
Mr. James Boyer KPMG, LLP Voting
Ms Cheryl M. Burke DiCicco, Gulman & Company LLP Voting
Mr. Brendan Callahan Jones Lang LaSalle Voting
Mr. Edward Casale formerly, Verizon Voting
Ms. Migdalia Diaz ALPFA, Inc. Voting
Mr. Bill Driscoll Robert Half Voting
Ms. Amy Fracassini Davis, Malm & D'Agostine, P.C. Voting
Ms. Marisa Gianino State Street Global Advisors Voting
Mr. Robert Hazard People's United Bank Voting
Mr. William Herp Linear Air Voting
Mr. Raymond C. Hoefling Webster Bank, N.A. Voting
Mr. Luke Howarth Syrinx Consulting Voting
Mr. Steve Jones CTM Consulting, LLC Voting
Mr. Michael C. Jorgensen The Westin Copley Place Hotel Voting
Mr. Bruce Journey DataXu, Inc. Voting
Mr. Daniel L. Kabat PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Voting
Mr. Haydon Keitner Nixon Peabody Voting
Mr. Brendan Kennedy Cambridge Savings Bank Voting
Mr. Mike Killilea UPS - East Region Voting
Mr. Bill Kracunas RSM Voting
Mr. Paul Kraft Deloitte Voting
Ms. Janet Lehman KPMG LLP Voting
Mr. Damien Leigh Staples, Inc. Voting
Mr. Chris Lemone Enterprise Fleet Management, Inc. Voting
Mr. Keith Linhart State Street Finance Global Markets Voting
Mr. Jamie Luce Liberty Mutual Group Voting
Mr. Ed McCabe Cafco Construction Voting
Mr. Dan McCarthy Columbia Threadneedle Investments Voting
Mr. George Moore Cengage Learning Voting
Ms. Gale Murray The Business Journals Voting
Mr. Russell D. Norris Slalom Consulting Voting
Ms. Michelle Ouellette Accenture Voting
Mr. Jeremy F. Parker Boston Private Bank & Trust Company Voting
Mr. Raj Pathak Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Voting
Mr. Ed Perkin Eaton Vance Voting
Mr. Mark E. Reilly Comcast Voting
Mr. Glenn Riciardelli MDD Forensic Accountants Voting
Ms. Andreana Santangelo Blue Cross Blue Shield Voting
Ms. Gloria Spence Retired Voting
Ms. Betsy Stewart Bank of America Merrill Lynch Voting
Mr. Craig Stockmal Standard Register Voting
Mr. Jimmy Suppelsa FactSet Voting
Mr. Kevin Thurston UBS Voting
Mr. Rick Tyson Boston Private Bank & Trust Company Voting
Mr. David A. Weber MIT Sloan School of Management Voting
Mr. Mike Winn Boston College IMG Sports Marketing Voting
Ms. Amy Zidow Ernst & Young LLP Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 46
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 11
Male: 36
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 65%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No

Standing Committees

  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Marketing
  • Nominating
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Board of Directors of Junior Achievement (JA) is comprised of 47 active leaders from the Massachusetts and New Hampshire business communities who share the JA mission, “To inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy.”  Board members are expected to serve a three-year term, and fulfill service as an effective advocate of JA by assisting in the advancement of the JA mission through providing and supporting volunteer, development and financial resources.

The Junior Achievement of Northern New England (JANNE) Board of Directors is currently undergoing an overall reorganization of its membership, governance policies, and management operation.  Efforts are underway to recruit board members representing diversity in gender, nationality, and industry sectors.  Leadership members for key JANNE territory areas, New Hampshire and Worcester, are also being sought for service. These efforts to bolster the JANNE Board are expected to better engage board members, stream-line processes and open new arenas of networking and fundraising opportunities.  The JANNE FY13 class of Board of Directors will have a comprehensive schedule of orientation measures, training and evaluation processes, as well as a dedicated website portal designed specifically for Board member functions.   

In the spirit of recognizing distinguished service to Junior Achievement of Northern New England (JANNE), and seeking to maintain meaningful engagement between JANNE and former Board members, a newly created governance constituency was created: Board Emeritus. Effective FY13, and set to be instituted at the June 2012 Board of Directors’ Annual Meeting,  this group will be open to all former Board and Advisory Council members who have served at least one three-year term, and are considered to be in good standing, as determined by the President and Executive Committee.   Board Emeritus members are expected to serve as effective JA advocates by assisting in the advancement of the JA mission.  

 

Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2012 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2011 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $1,673,500.00
Projected Expense $1,662,581.00
Form 990s

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2013 Audited Financials

2012 Audited Financials

2011 Audited Financials

2010 Audited Financials

2009 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Revenue $1,651,120 $1,238,702 $1,031,788
Total Expenses $1,375,740 $1,112,684 $1,159,925

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$567,506 $415,675 $405,460
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $331,616 $242,187 $113,578
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses $42,348 $-1,689 $81,940
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $583,649 $474,214 $405,663
Revenue In-Kind $119,422 $98,995 $16,562
Other $6,579 $9,320 $8,585

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Program Expense $825,830 $697,531 $851,802
Administration Expense $247,914 $191,371 $134,665
Fundraising Expense $301,996 $223,782 $173,458
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.20 1.11 0.89
Program Expense/Total Expenses 60% 63% 73%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 20% 20% 19%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Total Assets $1,004,423 $731,507 $669,493
Current Assets $458,901 $280,799 $211,816
Long-Term Liabilities $20,221 $22,784 $22,192
Current Liabilities $121,514 $121,415 $186,011
Total Net Assets $862,688 $587,308 $461,290

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
Liberty Mutual $80,235.21
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
State Street $109,573.16
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
Accenture $126,500.00

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $260,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 3.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 3.78 2.31 1.14

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2013 2012 2011
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 2% 3% 3%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above are per the organization's audited financials.  Fiscal year 2011 and fiscal year 2012 financials are per the 2012 audit document.  Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Documents


Other Documents

JA Fact Sheet (2014)

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

JA's ultimate goal is to prepare students in Grades K-12 to live self-sustaining lives, owning their economic success. Grade-appropriate educational programs address financial literacy, workforce readiness, and entrepreneurship. JA USA is constantly updating curricula and rolling out new, blended-learning formats that help students clearly understand how to make sound career and financial decisions.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

JA of Northern New England (JANNE) conducts meetings with state policy-makers and education administrators to help bridge gaps in students' education on financial literacy and work readiness.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

In addition to JANNE's seat at the table described above, over 2,000 corporate volunteers are involved in delivering all local JA programs annually. Our extensive network of corporate and influential community agencies has earned us numerous awards.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

A key objective is to have more penetration at the middle school level in the Boston and Worcester Public Schools. Middle school is a pivotal age when many students decide to drop out of school, or may become disheartened about their ability to achieve success. The specific program we hope to bring to more of these students is JA Finance Park Virtual, a classroom curriculum that presents basic personal economic principles followed by a computer-simulation of an adult-life scenario that requires making financial and career decisions.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Recently, officials with the Worcester Public School system requested meetings with JANNE leadership; teachers want JA programs for their students! The president of JANNE also recently met with Massachusetts DESE representatives which are leading to productive new partnerships.