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Health Resources in Action, Inc.

 95 Berkeley Street, Suite 202
 Boston, MA 02116
[P] (617) 451-0049
[F] (617) 451-0062
http://www.hria.org
sridini@hria.org
Steve Ridini
Twitter
INCORPORATED: 1957
 Printable Profile (Summary / Full)
EIN 04-2229839

LAST UPDATED: 06/10/2016
Organization DBA --
Former Names The Medical Foundation, Inc. (1957)
Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

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Mission StatementMORE »

Our mission is to help people live healthier lives and build healthy communities through policy, research, prevention, and health promotion.

Mission Statement

Our mission is to help people live healthier lives and build healthy communities through policy, research, prevention, and health promotion.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016
Projected Income $11,138,906.00
Projected Expense $11,138,906.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Boston Alliance for Community Health (BACH)
  • Building Exemplary Systems of Training for Youth Workers (BEST)
  • The LEAH Project
  • Youth Leadership/Peer Leadership

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

Our mission is to help people live healthier lives and build healthy communities through policy, research, prevention, and health promotion.

Background Statement

Health Resources in Action, Inc. (HRiA) is a national nonprofit consultancy located in Boston, MA with a mission to help people live healthier lives and build healthy communities. Since our inception, HRiA has been a leader in developing innovative strategies and approaches to build the capacity and strengthen organizational structure and outcomes of government agencies, nonprofit organizations, communities, coalitions, and the public health workforce. HRiA is skilled at working with and across multiple sectors and engaging non-traditional partners in our government consultancy practice including youth, regional planners, business leaders, environmental health and safety, public safety, and economic/community development agencies. HRiA focuses on evidence-based/evidence-informed strategies and approaches that address inequities and lead to improved outcomes for agencies, organizations, and communities. HRiA is a Public Health Institute and a member of the National Network of Public Health Institutes, further demonstration of our national leadership and reach.

HRiA’s statewide capacity building and consultancy services, performed by nearly 90 staff throughout the state (and country) are reflected in our breadth of competencies, including:

· Strategic Planning and Organizational Effectiveness, supplying organizational planning and development expertise; assessment and recommendations for internal operations and systems; program planning, coordination, and management; needs assessments; and coaching;

· Training and Capacity Building, providing a range of technical assistance, training, program management, team building, curriculum and course development, and communication skills in-person, on line and through instructional design;

· Policy and Practice, offering policy development and advocacy, consultation, training and technical assistance, health impact and risk assessment, and regulatory and non-regulatory health systems integration expertise;

· Research and Evaluation, providing needs assessment and health improvement planning expertise; quantitative and qualitative (including mixed-methods) research and analysis; preparing and using large data sets, including electronic data; and subject matter expertise in health services, quality improvement, and data and policy analysis.


Impact Statement

1) New England Asthma Innovation Collaboration (NEAIC). In July 2012, the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation awarded HRiA’s Asthma Regional Council of New England (ARC) a $4.2 million three-year Health Care Innovation Challenge Award. The overarching goal of HRiA’s award, titled NEAIC, is to improve asthma outcomes, quality of care, and health care costs of primarily Medicaid and CHIP-enrolled children by advancing innovative service delivery and sustainable payment systems across New England; 2) In May 2015, HRiA’s Research and Evaluation team kicked off a multi-year, multi-pronged SÍ Texas evaluation. This complex multi-year initiative takes a Collective Impact approach to regional systems change in 12 counties in South Texas. The project will address integrated behavioral health and aim to improve behavioral health and physical co-morbidities, including diabetes and hypertension; 3) Launched in June 2015, Working on Wellness (WoW), is a statewide initiative funded by the MA Prevention Wellness Trust Fund and helps up to 350 Massachusetts employers develop, implement and sustain comprehensive, evidence-based worksite policies and programs that create a supportive work environment and enable employees to engage in healthy behaviors. HRiA manages the program for the state, including recruiting businesses to participate in webinars, providing technical assistance calls, self-paced online modules, mentoring, and case studies to develop effective and sustainable worksite wellness policies and programs. The online learning curriculum supports 350 small/medium businesses in creating healthy worksite initiatives through a cycle that includes Buy-in, Assessment, Planning, Community Partnerships, Implementation and Evaluation. For the current year, HRiA would like to build on its success in the aformentioned areas, working with federal, state and local agencies as well as hospitals, multi-sector coalitions and other nonprofits.



Needs Statement

As HRiA strengthens its capacity to serve more communities; federal, state and local agencies; nonprofits; and multi-sector partnerships, we identify the following 5 most pressing needs: 1)remaining deeply connected to community while also serving as a thought leader; 2)weaving equity and social justice throughout all of our work; 3)sustain our current strengths and expertise while exploring and leveraging emerging critical public health needs;  4)being a leader in public health all policies and convening multi-sector collaborations; 5)providing continued growth and professional development opportunities for our talented, committed staff.

CEO Statement

HRiA is an experienced nonprofit consultancy with a focus on public health. HRiA employs evidence-based/evidence-informed strategies, tools, and trainings that address health inequities and lead to improved population health outcomes for all residents of the Commonwealth. With a commitment to underserved and high-risk populations and sponsorship of cutting edge research on critical health issues, HRiA has earned a reputation as a leader in the public health field. As part of this robust portfolio, and reflecting our belief that health is all encompassing, HRiA works across multiple sectors including housing, community development, education, and environment, to name a few. HRiA’s statewide capacity building and consulting services span a range of competencies, including:
  • Training and Capacity Building, providing a range of technical assistance, training, program management, and coalition building expertise to over 1000 individuals representing more than 500 agencies and coalitions;
  • Policy and Practice, providing policy development and advocacy, consultation, training and technical assistance, program management, health impact assessment, and public health systems integration expertise to approximately 100 agencies and municipalities annually;
  • Research and Evaluation, conducting needs assessment and providing health improvement planning expertise to over 20 health departments, nonprofit hospitals, health centers, and community-based agencies annually;
  • Communications and Marketing, providing website and database management and program management expertise to more than a dozen agencies annually as well as developing and implementing communications materials, trainings, and campaigns for state agencies;
  • Strategic Planning and Organizational Effectiveness, conducting trainings and providing technical assistance, coaching and planning expertise to over 20 health departments, nonprofit hospitals, health centers, academic institutions, and agencies annually; and,
  • Coalition Sustainability, providing training and technical assistance, coalition building and grants management to over 500 stakeholders and more than 150 coalitions annually.

Board Chair Statement

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Geographic Area Served

Throughout the United States
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- Mattapan
STATEWIDE
NORTHEAST REGION, MA
Boston, MA; New England; United States

Organization Categories

  1. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C.
  2. Public & Societal Benefit - Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis
  3. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Boston Alliance for Community Health (BACH)

HISTORY: The Boston Alliance for Community Health (BACH) is a partnership of Boston neighborhood coalitions, hospitals, nonprofits and community-based organizations, health centers, government agencies and residents. Founded in the 1990s, BACH brings together over 50 groups working to address health disparities, improve a broad spectrum of health outcomes and achieve health equity.

 

MISSION: To unite public, private and non-profit partners in neighborhood-based, data-driven health planning and improvement. We work toward a Boston that is vibrant, just and equitable, where all people who live, work, play, pray and learn have optimal health and well-being. BACH brings together an extraordinary range of community organizations and assets. We play an outsized influence due to our unique role as the only citywide cross-sector community health coalition focused on health equity and a broad range of health issues.

Budget  --
Category  Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Adults At-Risk Populations Families
Program Short-Term Success 

Through a community-driven strategic planning process , BACH completed a citywide and neighborhood-level strategic planning process that engaged more than 2,000 residents and organization representatives. This produced what has become Boston’s Community Health Improvement Plan, identifying five key strategies to improve overall health outcomes: working with the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC), we helped bring millions of dollars of CDC grant funding to Boston to fight tobacco and chronic disease. Both the previous CPPW tobacco grant and the current Partners in Community Health (PICH) grant required a highly engaged cross-sector community alliance that had completed a health assessment plan in the past three years. Since the summer of 2015, 78 individuals from 9 different Boston neighborhoods and 12 neighborhood organizations have been recruited, trained and supported to be “Healthy Community Champions” at the neighborhood level.

Program Long-Term Success 

Help Boston Children’s Hospital to prioritize the use of $53 million that will be available for community health improvement through their community benefits. Convening neighborhood-based discussion and focus groups; Secure commitment from funders to continue the Health Community Champions initiative when federal CDC funding ends in 2017; Continued advocacy for implementation of certification for Community Health Workers and their inclusion in MassHealth’s Accountable Care Organization contracts and advocacy for more health care systems investing in addressing social determinants of health.

Program Success Monitored By 

BACH completed a Strategic Planning process in 2010 which fundamentally changed our mission as well as what and how we do our work. In 2014, we engaged consultants for a “process evaluation” of the new structure and how it has affected our outcomes. We have implemented many of the recommendations. Most importantly, we created a Racial Justice Committee and implemented a series of trainings and discussions for BACH leadership and key volunteers on racism as we identified the need to improve our ability to understand and discuss racism as key to effectively achieving our goals.

We are currently reassessing our Steering Committee’s structure and process to improve its effectiveness
Examples of Program Success 

Health Community Champions initiative trained and deploying over 75 residents to advocate for policy, systems, and environment changes addressing causes of chronic disease; increased number of smoke-free housing units, better access to affordable, healthy food and beverages, increased use of bicycling and walking in low-income communities of color. Additionally, BACH pasting

participated in priority setting for B&W Hospital community health funding, the result of engaging over 2000 people and 85 organizations in focus groups, surveys and many community meetings convened by our affiliated coalitions in neighborhoods throughout Boston.


Building Exemplary Systems of Training for Youth Workers (BEST)

BEST is a training institute for adults who work with youth in professional settings (i.e. youth workers) focused on youth development. This includes intensive training in youth development, gender sensitivity, violence prevention, mental health, and supervision. BEST Initiative’s aim is to develop an  infrastructure for youth worker training and to support a community, state-wide and national network of  youth workers and youth programs. BEST is northern New England’s only professional development and credentialing system for youth workers and their supervisors. BEST provides beginning, advanced, and specialized training and  follow-up support services to youth agencies to help them incorporate a strategic youth development approach into their programming. To date, BEST has trained more than 5,000 youth workers and provided technical assistance to their agencies, which serve more than 50,000 youth in Greater Boston, throughout Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Ontario, Canada.
Budget  --
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Other Named Groups Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
-90% of BEST trained youth workers understand the youth development approach and incorporate it into their programs
-80% of BEST trained youth workers incorporate violence prevention strategies into their programs
Program Long-Term Success 
-80% of the youth served by BEST trained youth workers have better outcomes, including finishing high school and attending college
-80% of BEST trained youth workers become more effective youth workers and stay in their careers at least 5 years
Program Success Monitored By 
-pre- post- tests to measure skill and knowledge gained for youth workers
-tracking youth served by youth workers through social media channels and survey monkey
Examples of Program Success 

In 2009 Brandeis University and HRiA conducted a comprehensive evaluation of this initiative. Youth workers who had BEST training and were members of networks and youth workers who were neither members of the network nor had received BEST Training were surveyed and interviewed. The results were startling:. BEST trained and networked respondents were more likely to use positive youth development approaches regularly in their work than were the control group. More importantly, the youth served by BEST trained and networked youth workers had better outcomes in self esteem, problem solving abilities, and learning skills. The evaluation proved TMF’s hypothesis: training, technical assistance, and strong professional networks for youth workers will enhance their ability to support young people. Unfortunately, few professional development opportunities in Massachusetts exist for youth workers to enhance their knowledge, skills, and abilities for working with youth, besides BEST.

 


The LEAH Project

The mission of the Leaders through Education, Action, and Hope (LEAH) Project is to cultivate the power of youth to transform their lives and communities through science, education, and service. The LEAH Project is a science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), college readiness, and youth development initiative. Each year, the LEAH Project recruits, trains, and supports Boston Public School high school students of color, LEAH Mentors, to teach science, assist with homework, and serve as role models for elementary school students. Through participation in LEAH, Mentors gain valuable leadership and professional skills and a network of peers & adults that support and inspire them to succeed academically. By focusing on STEM , students are supported in learning about topics and exploring career fields where people of color are drastically underrepresented. Mentors gain employment experience, receive one-on-one coaching, build peer & adult networks, and earn a stipend for their work.


Budget  --
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Children Only (5 - 14 years) Blacks, African Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

Data from site visits indicate that 73% of elementary school participants learned something new from that day’s science lesson and 69% enjoyed the reading and experiments performed that day. 100% of site supervisors reported that Mentors had a positive or very positive impact on elementary school participants in academic outcomes, acceptance by peers, interest in science and reading, and self-esteem.

 
From 2014 to 2015, the LEAH Project grew from 12 afterschool sites to 15 sites. By opening more partner sites, LEAH was able to reach 55% more high-school youth with more college and job readiness training, and 33% more elementary-school children with afterschool and summer STEM instruction and enrichment. 
Program Long-Term Success 

LEAH has maintained an 85% retention rate between program terms, a 95% college acceptance rate, and a 100% high school graduation rate. Last year, LEAH Mentors reached 653 BPS elementary students with over 1,000 hours of additional STEM instruction and academic support. 

97% of Mentors said that LEAH helped them to: improve their grades; do better in science; feel better about themselves and their future; and achieve professional or personal goals. 100% of Mentors reported that at program completion, they stayed out of trouble and away from violence most of the time, a 25% increase from when starting the program. Mentors’ stories corroborate this data.
Program Success Monitored By 

To measure the LEAH Project’s success in meeting the stated outcomes, staff conduct a multi-stakeholder qualitative and quantitative assessment that includes input from LEAH Mentors, afterschool and summer camp site supervisors, LEAH staff, and elementary school participants. Via pre- and post-surveys using tested evaluation tools, LEAH Mentors rank themselves on self-esteem, connectedness, resiliency, personal responsibility, interpersonal skills, leadership skills, future goals, and job readiness skills. Survey results are aggregated and analyzed at the beginning and end of each term. LEAH staff also monitor success in these areas during weekly trainings and one-on-one qualitative interviews with LEAH Mentors. During site visits, LEAH staff use an observation tool to assess LEAH Mentors’ engagement of youth and implementation of the science curriculum. 

Examples of Program Success 

LEAH has maintained an 85% retention rate between program terms, a 95% college acceptance rate, and a 100% high school graduation rate. Last year, Mentors reached 653 BPS elementary students with over 1,000 hours of additional STEM instruction and academic support. Data from site visits indicate that 73% of elementary school participants learned something new from that day’s science lesson and 69% enjoyed the reading and experiments performed that day. 100% of site supervisors reported that Mentors had a positive or very positive impact on elementary school participants in academic outcomes, acceptance by peers, interest in science and reading, and self-esteem.

97% of Mentors said that LEAH helped them to: improve their grades; do better in science; feel better about themselves and their future; and achieve professional or personal goals. 100% of Mentors reported that at program completion, they stayed out of trouble and away from violence most of the time.

Youth Leadership/Peer Leadership

Peer leaders are high school-aged youth from all racial/ethnic backgrounds, who work with their peers and adults in programs focused on different public health topics (e.g., violence prevention, tobacco prevention and physical health and nutrition). HRiA trains these youth on the public health topics and in leadership skills, like presentation and organizational skills. A statewide peer leadership conference, The Peer Leadership Institute, will occur at the end of each school year to unite all Greater Boston area peer leaders so they can share their best practices and present workshops for each other. The youth will also create a statewide directory of peer leadership programs, By intentionally engaging young people in authentic youth leadership opportunities, HRiA ensures that the skills and knowledge they gain are transferable into their daily lives, which leads to healthier social and emotional youth outcomes and stronger and more resilient communities overall.
Budget  --
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  -90% of the peer leaders will learn new knowledge and transferable skills (specific topics and skills are dependent on the focus of their program)
Program Long-Term Success 
-80% of the peer leaders will graduate high school
-70% will go to college
Program Success Monitored By  -pre-post tests measuring skills and knowledge gained for the peer leaders
Examples of Program Success 
Testimony from Peer Leaders in the Healthy Girls Healthy Women (HGHW) group:
“I never thought I could stand in front of a group, but you made me feel like I can make a difference in these girls’ lives.” ~HGHW Peer Leader

“I like teaching the other girls because it helped me feel more confident and feel like I have the power to start with something small.” ~HGHW Peer Leader

 

“I have learned the facts and skills to make better choices. Some examples are that I choose different things to eat like fruits and yogurt and granola. I’ve never tried granola before, but now I like it! Now I am working out and tried to go to the gym with the other girls.” ~HGHW Participant

 

“I’ve been sticking to my healthy eating habits and helping my friends and family be healthy and help people in my community.” ~HGHW Participant

 


CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Steven Ridini EdD
CEO Term Start Mar 1980
CEO Email sridini@hria.org
CEO Experience Steven Ridini, Ed.D., was appointed as its new President and Chief Executive Officer effective March 1, 2016. Dr. Ridini served as Vice President of Programs at HRiA for 18 years, and is recognized nationally for his leadership in the public health arena. He has 25 years of experience working to improve population health with federal and state agencies, various health-care systems, targeted philanthropy, and community organizations. He also has a proven track record in non-profit management and administration and extensive expertise in evaluation, organizational development, grant making, and coalition building.Prior to joining HRiA, Dr. Ridini was Director of Prevention Services at MetroWest Medical Center in Framingham, MA, and the Education Coordinator at PRIDE, Inc., which is headquartered in Atlanta, GA. He worked with USAID in Belize to develop a national alcohol and drug education curriculum for that country.After earning a Master’s degree in Public Health, Ridini also earned a Doctorate in Education from Harvard University.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Mitzi Fennel MBA COO --
Dr. Jeremy Holman PhD Vice President --
Dr. Robert Sege MD, PhD, FAAP Vice President

Dr. Lisa Wolff ScD Vice President --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
American Public Health Association (APHA) 2013
Massachusetts Nonprofit Network 2013
United Way Member Agency 2013
Member of state association of nonprofits? Yes
Name of state association Massachusetts Nonprofit Network

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

HRiA has extensive collaborations with non-profits, Departments of Public Health, Boards of Health, hospitals, universities, nonprofits, federal agencies and multi-sector collaboratives.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 66
Number of Part Time Staff 18
Number of Volunteers 135
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 93%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 12
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 6
Caucasian: 52
Hispanic/Latino: 10
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: 3
Other (if specified): two or more races
Gender Female: 67
Male: 17
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

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Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Dr. Harriet G. Tolpin PhD
Board Chair Company Affiliation Partners HealthCare
Board Chair Term Mar 2015 - Dec 2017
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dr. Carole Allen MD Harvard Vanguard Medical Voting
Mr. Harold Cox MSSW Boston University School of Public Health Voting
Ms. Lori Fresina M & R Strategies Voting
Dr. Eric Kramer PhD Community Volunteer Voting
Dr. Bruce E. Landon MD, MBA Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Voting
Dr. Richard Platt MD, MSc Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute Voting
Ms. Joan Quinlan MPA Massachusetts General Hospital Voting
Dr. Steven Ridini EdD President, Health Resources in Action --
Dr. Megan Sandel MD, MPH Boston University School of Public Health Voting
Ms. Thaleia Tsongas Schlesinger Schlesinger & Associates Voting
Dr. Harriet Tolpin PhD Partners HealthCare Voting
Mr. Nelson Valverde MBA Invalsa Coffee Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 10
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 6
Male: 6
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 63%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 75%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Nominating
  • Personnel

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $10,732,995 $12,984,216 $16,884,004
Total Expenses $12,282,594 $13,786,900 $17,697,566

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,892,831 $2,717,905 $6,647,338
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support $183,850 $119,997 $134,086
Earned Revenue $7,461,930 $8,829,466 $8,820,220
Investment Income, Net of Losses $114,322 $400,702 $335,110
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind $1,063,260 $915,300 $947,250
Other $16,802 $846 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $10,716,880 $12,112,039 $16,065,368
Administration Expense $1,410,636 $1,375,649 $1,460,846
Fundraising Expense $155,078 $299,212 $171,352
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.87 0.94 0.95
Program Expense/Total Expenses 87% 88% 91%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 7% 11% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $5,956,954 $7,451,318 $9,795,941
Current Assets $3,811,978 $4,490,505 $7,204,941
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $279,000
Current Liabilities $2,288,793 $2,233,558 $3,496,497
Total Net Assets $3,668,161 $5,217,760 $6,020,444

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $2,337,882.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5.0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? 1.30

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.67 2.01 2.06

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 3%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's audited financials. Contributions from individuals are listed under foundations and corporations as the breakdown was not available.
 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

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2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

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3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

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4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

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5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

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