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Organization received a competitive grant from the Boston Foundation in the past five years Yes

Summary

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Rosie's Place is to provide a safe and nurturing environment to help poor and homeless women maintain their dignity, seek opportunity and find security in their lives.
 
We seek to fulfill this mission through the expression of our core values: Welcoming; Unconditional love; Fair and non-judgmental treatment; Encouragement; Holistic approach; Alleviation of suffering; Truth; Pursuit of social justice; and Independence.

Mission Statement

The mission of Rosie's Place is to provide a safe and nurturing environment to help poor and homeless women maintain their dignity, seek opportunity and find security in their lives.
 
We seek to fulfill this mission through the expression of our core values: Welcoming; Unconditional love; Fair and non-judgmental treatment; Encouragement; Holistic approach; Alleviation of suffering; Truth; Pursuit of social justice; and Independence.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $8,846,414.00
Projected Expense $8,846,414.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Advocacy
  • Food Programs
  • Housing
  • Outreach and Stabilization
  • Women’s Education

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview

Mission Statement

The mission of Rosie's Place is to provide a safe and nurturing environment to help poor and homeless women maintain their dignity, seek opportunity and find security in their lives.
 
We seek to fulfill this mission through the expression of our core values: Welcoming; Unconditional love; Fair and non-judgmental treatment; Encouragement; Holistic approach; Alleviation of suffering; Truth; Pursuit of social justice; and Independence.

Background Statement

As the first shelter for poor and homeless women in the United States, Rosie’s Place strives to meet the needs of every woman who walks through our doors. All of our guests are welcomed without judgment, treated fairly and loved unconditionally. We provide a wide range of services in a sanctuary of support and opportunity—including meals, shelter, clothing, groceries, advocacy, education, legal assistance and help seeking employment. Rosie’s Place’s ability to provide services in its own unique way relies on the fact that we depend solely on private donations. We do not accept any support from the city, state, or federal governments, nor from the United Way. This independence allows us to evolve and adapt to the changing needs of our guests—supporting and encouraging them to overcome obstacles and to reach their dreams. 

Impact Statement

Since 1974, thousands of poor and homeless women have found an oasis of hope and nourishment at Rosie’s Place. The following are some of our most notable achievements in FY2016.
  • Our Advocacy department logged 13,683 appointments helping guests with clothing, housing, medical services, educational and employment opportunities, legal advice, transportation, and emergency funds for prescriptions and eviction prevention.
  • Our Emergency Overnight Shelter gave 291 women safety and support while advocates worked with them to find permanent homes and secure the services they need.
  • Our Women’s Education Center (adjoining Rosie’s Place main facility) provides an average of 300 women, each semester, with an opportunity to improve their skills and increase their self-sufficiency through free ESOL, Literacy and Technology courses and one-on-one tutoring. 
  • 98% of the 120 guests receiving our Stabilization and Community Health Outreach services remained housed and stable this year.
  • Rosie’s Place Dining Room served lunch and dinner 365 days of the year, with breakfast now served every weekday. In FY2016, the Dining Room served 103,684 nutritionally balanced meals to women and children.

Needs Statement

From the very beginning, Rosie’s Place has been a steadfast and vital presence in the Boston community. Our work has made a significant difference in the lives of poor and homeless women. In these challenging times, we are experiencing a dramatic increase in the number of women who are unable to afford rent, nutritious food, clothing and even basic medical care. Our five most pressing needs include:
  • Our Groceries Program allows 1,900 women per month to take home 20 to 30 pounds of foods that their families prefer and enjoy.
  • Our Advocates meet with 1,100 women each month to help with a wide-variety of needs.
  • This year, hundreds of women will find safety and support in our emergency housing while advocates work with them to find permanent homes and secure the services they need.
  • In FY 2017, our Health and Wellness Center will provide more than 6,000 visits and important services such as blood pressure checks, blood sugar measurements, weight monitoring, dispensing bandages and aspirin, and immunizations against hepatitis A and B as well as HIV testing and counseling.
  • This year, we plan to distribute hundreds of winter coats, hats, scarves and mittens along with our emergency clothing services.

CEO Statement

Dear Friends:

Sometimes I think that if I didn’t have a clock or a calendar, I could still tell the time of day and time of year, just by walking through Rosie’s Place. 

The Dining Room’s quiet, with enough leftovers to offer seconds—it must be the beginning of the month, before anyone’s check has run out. There’s a dozen women, excitedly pulling on coats and chattering to one another—it’s right after lunch, the traditional time we plan treks to museum exhibits and performances. The last load of laundry finishes, and the lights in the common room go out—it’s 11:00, and our Overnight guests settle in for a safe and comfortable night in our shelter.

If there’s a freezer full of turkeys ready to be cooked and served to more than 350 women, it’s November. December is marked by holiday meals, a larger than usual number of whole families volunteering, donations of toys and holiday gifts for our guests. If our clothing room volunteers are diligently searching for bathing suits in the piles of donated clothes, it must be July and almost time for our annual beach trip. Friday afternoons always feature a movie in our Sitting Room, while our legal clinic is always open on Monday evenings.

The regularity of our services is something our guests quickly come to depend upon. They know that if they are in need, they can count on vital services at Rosie’s Place that are offered without fail.  In the uncertainty and privation created by government budget cuts, recession and unemployment, astronomical housing prices and frayed family ties, Rosie’s Place works hard to create a refuge upon which our guests can rely.

Our ability to create this refuge completely depends upon the generosity of our donors, the diligence of our volunteers, the creativity of our staff and Board of Directors, and the legacy of our founder, Kip Tiernan. Together, we continue to create a unique community for women who have no place else to turn. 

With hope,

Sue Marsh


Board Chair Statement

Dear Friends,

Most Rosie’s Place guests have lost so much. Some of their losses are so large– housing, jobs, health–guests take years to recover. Some of their losses cannot be made up, like childhood photos gone in a fire or frayed relationships with friends and family. Many times, though, with help and support, our guests can begin to reconstruct the pieces of their lives to create a new beginning. And at Rosie’s Place, we’ve found that through that reconstruction, our guests rediscover their voice.
 
At Rosie’s Place, we celebrate the ability of our guests to speak up and take control of everyday life decisions in a responsible and informed way. We know that access to information is empowering, knowing how to use that information is critical and acting with courage develops over time when decisions are supported without judgment or criticism. And we know that when a guest finds her voice, her road to a safer and more dignified life becomes immeasurably closer.
 
And so at Rosie’s Place, we strive to honor our guests’ voices–just as we are sure to include the voices of our volunteers, supporters and staff–as we create new programs and reconfigure long time ones. We know that our guests’ voices authenticate and enrich what we do.
 
In the best of times, our guests work hard to make ends meet–in the meaner times, they count on Rosie’s Place even more. From food programs like our Dining Room and Food Pantry, to material assistance and advice provided through our Overnight, Advocacy and Outreach Programs, we aim to help women meet their biggest needs, right now. Our Women’s Education Center, Self Advocacy and Legal Service programs work with women around longer-term needs, to escape the constant deprivation many of our guests face.
 
Because of our community of friends, we can fulfill our commitment to meeting the needs of more women with unconditional love and caring. Each day, we walk side by side with our guests–wherever their journey leads. We thank you for traveling this road with us.
 
Sincerely,
Deb Pasculano
Board Chair

 


Geographic Area Served

Greater Boston Region-All Neighborhoods
GREATER BOSTON REGION, MA
City of Boston- Citywide (Indiv. neighborhoods also listed)
City of Boston- Allston/ Brighton
City of Boston- Back Bay
City of Boston- Beacon Hill/ West End
City of Boston- Charlestown
City of Boston- Chinatown/ Leather District
City of Boston- North Dorchester
City of Boston- South Dorchester
City of Boston- Downtown
City of Boston- East Boston
City of Boston- Fenway/ Kenmore
City of Boston- Hyde Park
City of Boston- Jamaica Plain
City of Boston- Mattapan
City of Boston- Mission Hill
City of Boston- North End
City of Boston- Roslindale
City of Boston- Roxbury
City of Boston- South Boston
City of Boston- South End/Bay Village
City of Boston- Harbor Islands
City of Boston- West Roxbury
STATEWIDE
Rosie’s Place is dedicated to helping poor and homeless women in the Greater Boston area. We serve women as young as 18 and as old as 80, from as close as across the street and as far away as the North and South Shores of Massachusetts.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Homeless Services/Centers
  2. Human Services - Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash)
  3. Education - Adult Education

Independent research has been conducted on this organization's theory of change or on the effectiveness of this organization's program(s)

No

Programs

Advocacy

Rosie’s Place Advocacy program’s assistance may include housing, health and wellness care, educational and employment opportunities, clothing, legal advice, transportation, and emergency funds for eviction prevention and prescriptions. Rosie’s Place employs seven full-time advocates and two part-time advocates, five of whom are fluent in Spanish, Haitian Creole, Portuguese, or French.

Whether a guest needs urgent assistance or long-term help with a complicated issue—our Advocates will be there for her. Unlike the advocacy services of state-run agencies—at Rosie’s Place, our guests don’t need to worry about eligibility or the expiration of benefits. Our Advocates never put any limits or conditions on their time or assistance. And accordingly, they do not dictate solutions, but rather work collaboratively to identify possible solutions to the tough challenges faced.  

Budget  $1,846,613.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for the Homeless
Population Served Females Homeless Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success  All of Rosie’s Place guests have extremely limited incomes and have to face impossible decisions, such as: if they spend what little they have on food or child care, they might find themselves without money for medication, rent, utilities or health care. Every day at Rosie’s Place, we meet women throughout our community who are employed, but are still desperately trying to make ends meet—teetering on the verge of homelessness and/or self-neglect to provide for their families. While most of our guests continue to visit us during our daytime hours—many are involved with work, school, training, the medical community and other commitments. Rosie’s Place has responded to this need by expanding the availability of our Advocacy program. We have added two half-time Advocates who are available between the hours of 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. in the Dining Room to assist our guests with a wide variety of issues—connecting them to services offered here at Rosie’s Place and other programs in the community.
Program Long-Term Success  Some of the most important services we offer our guests are through our Advocacy program. Each year, Rosie’s Place’s advocates help thousands of women access services at Rosie’s Place and other public and private programs to address a wide variety of issues in their lives. To assist guests with more specific needs, we have collaborated with specialists in a range of fields. These specialists work on-site along side our Advocates, creating solutions for our guests. We have partnered with: HomeStart, which assists guests in overcoming barriers to housing; Irish International Immigrant Center, which offers legal advice and representation; Department of Mental Health, which offers support and counseling; and Community Works Services, which provides a career specialist. Bringing these services in-house allows us to tailor services to the specific needs of our guests, and further our guests feel safe and comfortable confronting their issues within Rosie’s Place’s supportive environment.
Program Success Monitored By  Because we recognize that program evaluation is critical to meeting the varied needs of our guests—all of the programs at Rosie’s Place are tracked quarterly and evaluated annually. The program goals and metrics are approved by the Executive Director and the Rosie’s Place Board of Directors. All program managers produce reports on their progress on a quarterly basis. The use of metrics allows program managers to report as specifically as possible on their progress. Each program manager also develops a logic model to describe the program’s long-term goals. The logic model provides an opportunity to assess the program within the larger context of the surrounding community, government policies, and needs of the people being served. A committee of the Board of Directors reviews each logic model and makes suggestions for improvements or changes accordingly.
Examples of Program Success  Rosie’s Place provides a wide-range of emergency services for our guests. In fiscal year 2016, we served thousands of women with our most basic services: 1,322 women made appointments to use our laundry facilities, 5,762 women took showers at Rosie’s Place, 8,220 women used the telephone and 9,555 women used our computer. These services are especially important for women who are living on the edge—desperately trying to tend to the daily needs of their lives while striving to attain or maintain stable housing and/or employment in this difficult economic landscape.

Food Programs

Serving a nutritious breakfast, lunch and dinner every day, and offering assistance with groceries—the Food Programs at Rosie’s Place are longstanding and vital nutritional and financial supplements for our guests. Our Dining Room serves a tasty and nourishing meal—365 days a year—to up to 300 women and their children each day.

This year, Rosie’s Place’s Dining Room anticipates serving approximately 100,000 nutritionally balanced meals. 
 
We don’t require our guests to line up and wait to receive their meals. Instead, volunteers and dining room staff act as waiters and waitresses to serve them restaurant-style—as our guests. 

Because many of our guests work during our Dining Room’s meal times and/or have families who are hungry, too, we offer Rosie’s Place Groceries. Through this program, we will welcome 1,800 women each month into our pantry to “shop” among our shelves. 

Budget  $1,513,755.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food
Population Served Females Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Families
Program Short-Term Success  Since the economic downturn, Rosie’s Place has seen a dramatic increase in the number of women visiting us—and our Groceries programs is no exception. In the past two years, our Groceries program has seen a tremendous increase in the number of women needing food assistance. Currently, Rosie’s Place Groceries is running at capacity, providing 1,800 women with groceries each month. This represents a 27% increase in visits from two years ago. To help overcome this challenge, our Groceries program hired an additional Food Pantry Coordinator to help distribute food between the hours of 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. Expanding our hours in the evening will allow us to serve thousands more women this year alone. 
Program Long-Term Success  In April 1974, founder Kip Tiernan mobilized a handful of volunteers to provide sandwiches and coffee to our first guests. Since then, Rosie’s Place has been committed to providing nutritious meals and groceries to women who have no where else to turn. Our long-term success is rooted in our ability to continuously provide our guests with the sustenance they need. We estimate that 300 women and their children visit our dining room for lunch and dinner daily, and we provide 1,800 women each month with non-perishable food. Rosie’s Place is proud to be a steadfast presence in the lives of so many women looking to feed themselves and their families.
Program Success Monitored By  In order to ensure that our Food Programs have a lasting and positive impact on the lives the women we serve—we track the program quarterly and evaluate it annually. The program goals and metrics are approved by the Executive Director and the Rosie’s Place Board of Directors. All program managers produce reports on their progress on a quarterly basis. The use of metrics allows program managers to report as specifically as possible on their progress. Each program manager also develops a logic model to describe the program’s long-term goals. The logic model provides an opportunity to assess the program within the larger context of the surrounding community, government policies, and needs of the people being served. A committee of the Board of Directors reviews each logic model and makes suggestions for improvements or changes accordingly.
Examples of Program Success  Rosie's Place's Dining Room meals are nutritionally balanced and include soup, an appetizer, a main course, and dessert. When poor women are able to afford food—nutritional value is usually overridden by cost. Healthy choices are often more expensive. We’re proud to report that almost every single one of the meals we serve in our Dining Room includes: 1 serving of fruit, 2 servings of vegetables, is high in fiber and low in both sodium and fat.

Additionally, the Rosie’s Place Groceries program offers fresh fruit and vegetables by partnering with local farms. This past growing season, we received approximately $30,000 worth of produce donations. Through these partnerships we have been able to place even more fruits and vegetables on the shelves of our food pantry.


Housing

In an effort to help our guests find security and stability in their living situations, Rosie’s Place offers emergency housing. Our Overnight program provides emergency shelter on-site for 20 women. While many of the guests in this program come directly from sleeping on the streets, other guests are escaping an abusive relationship or are newly evicted. Guests staying in this program are able to work with our Housing Search Specialist who partners with them to overcome hurdles such as past evictions or criminal records.

Unlike most shelters that require their guests to leave each morning—our program allows women to stay for three weeks, or more if needed. This precious constancy allows our guests to stop trying to figure out stop-gap measures of where they will spend each night and focus on long-term solutions. Our Overnight shelter is consistently at capacity and last year, more than 300 women used this service. 

Budget  $728,377.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Emergency Shelter
Population Served Females Homeless Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success  Rosie’s Place’s Overnight program houses 20 women at a time and is unique from other shelters in terms of the physical space as well as the variety of programs and services that are offered during a guest’s stay. The rooms are “dormitory” style and each sleep two to four women. The accommodations include nice linens and blankets, cheerfully painted walls, a side table for women to store their belongings in and a private locker. On each of the two floors, there is a shared a bathroom and a common area and there is a full kitchen on one floor for all guests to use. To ensure a comfortable stay, each woman is given basic necessities including a bathrobe, pajamas, undergarments, socks and hygiene products. We also offer a variety of workshops for our Overnight guests—such as how to prepare for a job interview, guidance on navigating the complex housing system, how to obtain and understand a credit report and health and wellness workshops on diabetes, hypertension and asthma.
Program Long-Term Success  Housing is a primary and persistent need for many of the women who visit Rosie’s Place. The Overnight program offers stability and support for our guests. Most emergency shelters require their guests to leave each morning and re-apply for shelter daily. Our program allows women to stay for three weeks, or more if needed. This approach provides the stability that our guests require to resolve their housing crises. Additionally, finding safe and affordable housing is a complex process. Guests staying in our Overnight program find support in weekly meetings with their advocate and are often referred to our Housing Search Specialist, who is contracted through HomeStart and offers services on-site at Rosie’s Place. The Housing Search Specialist works one-on-one with each guest to help locate and acquire available and affordable housing. 
Program Success Monitored By  Because we recognize that program evaluation is critical to meeting the varied needs of our guests—all of the programs at Rosie’s Place are tracked quarterly and evaluated annually. The program goals and metrics are approved by the Executive Director and the Rosie’s Place Board of Directors. All program managers produce reports on their progress on a quarterly basis. The use of metrics allows program managers to report as specifically as possible on their progress. Each program manager also develops a logic model to describe the program’s long-term goals. The logic model provides an opportunity to assess the program within the larger context of the surrounding community, government policies, and needs of the people being served. A committee of the Board of Directors reviews each logic model and makes suggestions for improvements or changes accordingly.
Examples of Program Success  Rosie's Place’s Overnight program is designed to help our guests find respite and support so that they might overcome homelessness. During their stay at Rosie’s Place, our HomeStart Housing Search advocate is available to help our guests to help overcome their housing crisis. The specialist works with each guest and locates available housing, assists in filling out extensive applications, determines what documents are necessary to meet all housing requirements, maintains records as to where each guest has applied and notifies her when an application is being considered. In addition, the HomeStart Housing Search Advocate provides housing clinics in conjunction with the Overnight program. In each clinic, the HomeStart Housing Search Advocate helps the guests understand and complete housing applications, provided necessary materials, and explained what each guest would need to do to obtain housing. This past year, 115 guests attended the housing clinics.

Outreach and Stabilization

Through our Outreach program, we focus on building long-term support and solutions for our guests who struggle with maintaining housing. Our stabilization workers visit each woman in her home and develop a support system that might include referrals for mental health treatment, substance abuse treatment, job placement, housing supports and primary health care.

Through home visits, accompanying women to doctor visits and helping them navigate medical, insurance and housing systems—our Community Health Outreach Worker helps women stay in their homes and out of the hospital.

Our Community Collaborative program aims to bring the resources of Rosie’s Place to underserved communities of women in the Boston area. We’ve established a satellite location at the Franklin Field public housing development, where we offer advocacy, legal counsel and job search assistance to the many single mothers living there—the majority of whom are living well below the poverty line. Our second collaboration brings staff to the Bridge Boston, Dever, Holmes, Lee Academy and Shaw elementary schools in Dorchester, the Community Academy of Science and Health High School in Dorchester and the Blackstone Innovation School in the South End. There, we give out groceries and offer advocacy, legal counsel and job search assistance to the mothers of children attending these schools. This year, we began partnering with city trial courts—to help poor women who are dealing with evictions and other urgent crises, to understand the court process while also helping them with critical needs. 
 
Our Friendly Visitor program connects volunteers with women who are isolated and alone, living in nursing homes, hospitals or home-bound, unable to come to Rosie's Place.

Every weekday evening our Outreach Van covers Dudley Square through Blue Hill Avenue, an area that has largely gone un-addressed by social service agencies. We bring the resources of Rosie’s Place to women who are on the street as a result of addiction, severe mental illness, partner abuse or involvement in the sex industry.

Budget  $1,706,633.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other In-Home Assistance
Population Served Females Elderly and/or Disabled Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
Every evening our Outreach Van brings the resources of Rosie’s Place to women who are on the street as a result of addiction, severe mental illness, partner abuse or involvement in the sex industry. The van offers sandwiches and water, as well as clean, underwear and socks, blankets, first-aid and toiletry supplies.
 
A woman who had not heard of Rosie’s Place was told about the Outreach Van by another woman who utilizes our services. After weeks of hesitation, wondering if we truly offered information without judgment, she approached the Van. We provided her with a warm blanket and a change clothes and pamphlet about our services. This friendly interaction and helpful information motivated her to then come to our building and speak with an Advocate. She has since moved out of state and has left behind nearly a decade of living and working on the streets.
Program Long-Term Success 
In response to the tremendous need for and success of our Homeless Prevention Initiative—last year we hired an additional Stabilization Worker. So that we are now be able to double the number of women we can help, assisting 150 women to maintain their housing and stability. 
 
On average, 438 women approach our Outreach Van for help each month. 
Program Success Monitored By  Because we recognize that program evaluation is critical to meeting the varied needs of our guests—all of the programs at Rosie’s Place are tracked quarterly and evaluated annually. The program goals and metrics are approved by the Executive Director and the Rosie’s Place Board of Directors. All program managers produce reports on their progress on a quarterly basis. The use of metrics allows program managers to report as specifically as possible on their progress. Each program manager also develops a logic model to describe the program’s long-term goals. The logic model provides an opportunity to assess the program within the larger context of the surrounding community, government policies, and needs of the people being served. A committee of the Board of Directors reviews each logic model and makes suggestions for improvements or changes accordingly.
Examples of Program Success 
On average, 438 women approach our Outreach Van for help each month – 29% more than we were seeing a year ago.
 
One evening the Outreach Van staff encountered a woman and her two little girls who needed services. They were headed out to a shelter and were running late but stopped to ask for assistance from the staff. The three were given transportation passes in order to get in the shelter on time (in order to get beds for the night), and hot chocolate and blankets to stay warm. The mother started to cry because her little girls were happy about receiving the blankets and for the help that staff provided. This woman came back to the Van a month later to thank our staff again and stated that her two girls still had their blankets.

Women’s Education

Now in its 13th year—our Women’s Education program continues to thrive. Rosie’s Place’s Women’s Education program truly meets our guests where they are—and gives them the opportunity to learn, achieve and go anywhere they choose. Our classes are not only financially accessible, but they are academically accessible, too. Students are not required to pass any tests to enroll and they are able to create their own timeline for progressing through our language levels.

Last year, our staff of 80 volunteer teachers provided 350 students each semester with free ESOL, Literacy and Technology classes—conveniently offering morning, afternoon and evening schedules. 



Budget  $618,387.00
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served Females Homeless Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success  Mindful of all these challenges which our students face, we work to provide a welcoming and supportive classroom environment. If a student has special needs or a limited schedule, Rosie’s Place can provide one-on-one tutoring. We also take care to provide additional services that any student would need to achieve success such as breakfast, school supplies, bus passes and winter coats. Our classes provide access to other support. By coming to class each week at our Women’s Education Center, students are able to easily access the myriad other programs and services at Rosie’s Place.
Program Long-Term Success  In January 2010, we opened our new Women’s Education Center at 887 Harrison Avenue, adjoining Rosie’s Place’s main facility. This beautiful building has enabled us to expand the program so we can in time triple the number of free ESOL, computer, and literacy classes available to our guests, maintain a teacher workforce that is primarily volunteers, expand class availability to evenings and weekends and enhance the training and coaching available to volunteer teachers. 
Program Success Monitored By  Because we recognize that program evaluation is critical to meeting the varied needs of our guests—all of the programs at Rosie’s Place are tracked quarterly and evaluated annually. The program goals and metrics are approved by the Executive Director and the Rosie’s Place Board of Directors. All program managers produce reports on their progress on a quarterly basis. The use of metrics allows program managers to report as specifically as possible on their progress. Each program manager also develops a logic model to describe the program’s long-term goals. The logic model provides an opportunity to assess the program within the larger context of the surrounding community, government policies, and needs of the people being served. A committee of the Board of Directors reviews each logic model and makes suggestions for improvements or changes accordingly.
Examples of Program Success  All of our classes offered through our Women’s Education program are academically accessible. Not satisfied with the standard ESOL curriculum, we designed and implemented our own one-of-a-kind curriculum which focuses on the practical needs of our guests, such as the ability to speak with a doctor, navigate a grocery store or a city bus system or fill out a job application. Further, students are not required to pass any tests to take classes and they are not forced to progress through levels to keep to a certain timetable. At Rosie’s Place, most of our students are at the very lowest skill levels and many are immigrants who speak little or no English, illiterate even in their first language. Many of our students are also affected by learning disabilities and mental health issues. We have seen tremendous success implementing our unique approach, with 83% of our student’s improving their scores from their pre-semester to their post-semester tests this past fiscal year.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

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Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Sue Marsh
CEO Term Start Oct 1998
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Sue Marsh has been executive director of Rosie’s Place since 1998, and was previously the executive director of the Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless for eleven years. She has done policy-changing work in the areas of food stamps, housing and welfare assistance. At Rosie’s Place, she has overseen the establishment of its adult education, homelessness prevention and public policy work, Rosie’s Place provides food, shelter, educational and advocacy services to more than 1000 poor and homeless women each month. Sue received her bachelor’s degree from Bowdoin College, and was enrolled in the doctoral program in Political Science at Boston University. She was named Public Citizen of the Year by the National Association of Social Workers, an Outstanding Advocate by the Massachusetts Human Services Committee, and an Unsung Heroine by Rosie’s Place, and was awarded the Common Good medal by Bowdoin College. She is a member of the Access to Justice Commission of the Supreme Judicial Court.
Co-CEO --
Co-CEO Term Start --
Co-CEO Email --
Co-CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ms. Julie Bandlen Oct 1989 Oct 1998

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Liz Chaves Director of Finance and Administration Elizabeth Chaves joined Rosie’s Place as Director of Finance and Administration in 2014. In her senior management role, she oversees the facilities and operations department as well as the Fiscal, IT and HR functions. Ms. Chaves has nearly 15 years of experience working in similar capacities for non-profit organizations such as the Massachusetts Immigrant Refugee Advocacy Coalition, the Massachusetts Alliance of Portuguese Speakers and Health Economics Research, Inc. Ms. Chaves earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Accountancy from Bentley University and is fluent in written and conversational Portuguese and Spanish.
Ms. Sandy Mariano VP of Internal Programs and Planning In July 2011, Sandy Mariano was promoted to Rosie’s Place’s Director of Advocacy and Residential Services.  In her new role, Ms. Mariano oversees direct service programming as well as supervises managers in the advocacy department, outreach program, self-advocacy and our residential services.  Prior to her promotion, Ms. Mariano worked as Director of Advocacy for seven years.  During that time, she managed six full time advocates and five outreach workers.  Overall, Ms. Mariano has 19 years of experience in the social work field.  She holds a Masters of Science with a concentration in mental health and marriage and family counseling.  Her experience includes individual and family work at a school for adolescent boys with behavior problems and at Tri-City Mental Health as a Shelter Specialist.  Prior to joining Rosie’s Place, she was contracted by the Department of Mental Health Homeless Outreach Team to work with mentally ill homeless women.
Ms. Erin Miller VP of External Programs and Training

Erin Miller has been at Rosie’s Place since 2011. Her responsibilities include overseeing and providing leadership to department directors in the External Programs division, including Outreach/Stabilization, the BPS Collaborative; the BHA Collaborative and the Trial Courts Collaborative. She also works with Rosie’s Place’s division directors to launch direct service initiatives authorized by the strategic plan. She also approves all contracted services and direct service partnerships that deliver services to Rosie’s Place guests through our external programs.

Prior to joining Rosie’s Place, Ms. Miller was the Director of Residential and Community Services at the Elizabeth Stone House. Ms. Miller has over a decade of experience working in the field of domestic violence support services. She holds a BA in Sociology from Arizona State University, an MPA from the University of Colorado at Denver’s Program on Domestic Violence and a Certificate from Boston University’s Institute for Nonprofit Management and Leadership.

Ms. Leemarie Mosca VP of External Relations Leemarie Mosca has been the Director of Development and Public Relations at Rosie’s Place since 2008. In her senior management role, she oversees the development,volunteer services, communications and Women’s Craft Cooperative departments. She is responsible for the organization’s $7M annual fundraising budget, and manages its external relations functions. Ms. Mosca has more than a decade of experience leading fundraising activities at non-profit organizations. Prior to joining Rosie’s Place she worked at Horizons for Homeless Children and Italian Home for Children. Ms. Mosca earned a Bachelor of Arts in Communications at Ithaca College.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --
Member of state association of nonprofits? No
Name of state association --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Rosie’s Place is constantly working to find the services and ultimately, solutions that our guests so desperately need. This means that rather than sending our guests across town with a referral, we bring specialists to Rosie’s Place so that our guests can connect with them immediately, in our trusted environment.
Our Advocacy program partners with:
• The Department of Mental Health
• Brookline Community Mental Health Center
• HomeStart
• Goodwill
to enhance our services by providing a Counselor, Trauma Counselor, Housing Search Specialist and Job Placement Specialist at Rosie's Place.
Our Legal Services program partners with:
• Greater Boston Legal Services
• The Irish International Immigration Center.
Our Wellness Center partners with:
• Health Care Without Walls
• Regis College
• Boston Health Care for the Homeless
• Boston University School of Dental Medicine
• New England Eye Institute.
Rosie’s Place is also proud to bring our help beyond our doors.
We partner with Woods Mullen Shelter to provide:
• A Housing Search Specialist to enhance the assistance offered to the homeless women who stay at this city-run shelter.
Our Community Collaborative program partners with:
• Franklin Field Public Housing Development
• Blackstone Innovation School, Bridge Boston, Dever, Holmes and Shaw Elementary Schools
• Community Academy of Science and Health High School
•Chelsea District Court’s Housing Court
•Brooke Courthouse
•Cambridge District Court’s Mental Health Court and its Homeless Court.

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 56
Number of Part Time Staff 17
Number of Volunteers 2,500
Number of Contract Staff 8
Staff Retention Rate % 86%

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 22
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 27
Hispanic/Latino: 12
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 4
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 66
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes
State Registration Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Blanket Personal Property
Boiler and Machinery
Crime Coverage
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
Fiduciary Liability
General Property Coverage
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Medical Health Insurance
Risk Management Provisions
Special Event Liability
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Governance


Board Chair Ms. Deborah Pasculano
Board Chair Company Affiliation Fundraiser
Board Chair Term Sept 2016 - Sept 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term - Sept

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. Jenaro Cardona-Fox Ironsides Partners Voting
Ms. Christina Gordon Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Lynn Kaplan Horizon Financial Group Voting
Ms. Nancy Leaming Retired Health Insurance Executive Voting
Ms. Michele May Retired CFO Bain Capital Voting
Ms. Deborah Pasculano Fundraiser Voting
Ms. Diana Pisciotta Denterlein Worldwide Voting
Ms. Kelly Race Human Resources Consultant Voting
Mr. Peter Rosenberg Ropes and Gray, LLP Voting
Ms. Isabelle Stillger Marketing Consultant Voting
Ms. Michele Wu City Councillor Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Advisory Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 9
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 87%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Human Resources / Personnel
  • Investment
  • Nominating
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Income $8,846,414.00
Projected Expense $8,846,414.00
Form 990s

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

2011 990

2010 990

2009 990

Audit Documents

2016 FY16 Audit

2015 FY15 Audit

2014 FY14 Audit

2013 FY13 Audit

2012 FY12 Audit

2011 FY11 Audit

2010 FY10 Audit

2009 FY09 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $9,491,369 $9,331,878 $9,619,869
Total Expenses $9,497,576 $8,523,261 $8,322,403

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $8,411,979 $7,751,299 $7,394,975
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $30,984 $643,262 $1,463,752
Investment Income, Net of Losses $91,614 $124,041 $151,969
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events $935,218 $805,384 $598,326
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $21,574 $7,892 $10,847

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $8,015,925 $7,195,198 $7,088,508
Administration Expense $290,737 $244,049 $270,108
Fundraising Expense $1,190,914 $1,084,014 $963,787
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.09 1.16
Program Expense/Total Expenses 84% 84% 85%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 13% 13% 12%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $19,537,675 $20,038,907 $18,903,581
Current Assets $9,721,690 $9,857,770 $9,521,228
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Current Liabilities $362,825 $708,685 $274,651
Total Net Assets $19,174,850 $19,330,222 $18,628,930

Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
1st (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
2nd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --
3rd (Source and Amount) -- --
-- --
-- --

Financial Planning

Endowment Value $25,000.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
How many months does reserve cover? --

Capital Campaign

Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 26.79 13.91 34.67

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Rosie’s Place generated surpluses in years 2009 through 2011. The decrease in revenue should not be viewed negatively as it is due to the completion of a successful capital campaign in 2009 in which Rosie’s Place raised 100% of the $3 million used to construct our Women's Education Center.

 

Foundation Comments

Financial summary data in the charts and graphs above is per the organization's IRS Form 990s. Contributions from foundations and corporations are listed under individuals when the breakout was not available.

Impact

The Impact tab is a section on the Giving Common added in October 2013; as such the majority of nonprofits have not yet had the chance to complete this voluntary section. The purpose of the Impact section is to ask five deceptively simple questions that require reflection and promote communication about what really matters – results. The goal is to encourage strategic thinking about how a nonprofit will achieve its goals. The following Impact questions are being completed by nonprofits slowly, thoughtfully and at the right time for their respective organizations to ensure the most accurate information possible.


1. What is your organization aiming to accomplish?

Founded by Kip Tiernan in 1974, Rosie’s Place is the first emergency shelter for women in the United States. With myriad programs offering help and hope to thousands of guests each year, we have become much more than a shelter. Our mission is to provide a safe and secure environment for poor and homeless women to maintain their dignity, seek opportunity and find security in their lives. 
 
It’s not only what Rosie’s Place is that makes us extraordinary—it’s also what we’re not. We’re not an institution—but a sanctuary. Not an intake center—but a community center. And we’re not just a shelter. We’re bustling classrooms, an encouraging friend, a helpful resource, a welcoming Dining Room, a hot shower, a choice food pantry and so much more. When poor and homeless women come to Rosie’s Place—they’re not numbers or forms to fill out. They are familiar names and faces. They are our guests.
 
At Rosie’s Place, it’s not only what we do—but how we do it—that sets us apart. For more than forty years, Rosie’s Place has worked to recognize the overlooked and remedy the underserved women in our community. We strive to offer our guests support and opportunities that are thoughtful, respectful and ultimately, make a difference. Every day at Rosie’s Place we welcome hundreds of poor and homeless women and offer them unconditional love, sanctuary and opportunity.

2. What are your strategies for making this happen?

Over the decades—through economic busts, budget cuts and funding shortfalls—Rosie’s Place has endured and evolved. We have always known that there is not one face of poverty, and of course, there is not a one-size-fits-all solution. Consequently, we are constantly self-evaluating and expanding to better meet the changing needs of our guests.
 
As the significant issues facing our guests have changed, so have we—consistently assessing and improving our programs and services. Our ability to stay abreast of these issues is through the development and implementation of our multi-year strategic plans. In order to not be setback, or surprised by a need of our guests, we at Rosie’s Place strive to be proactive and progressive by remaining true to our mission and growing our programs and capacities to best meet our guest needs. We believe that in this way, we can be most effective in helping poor and homeless women find not only sanctuary—but stability and opportunity as well.

3. What are your organization’s capabilities for doing this?

As Rosie’s Place’s services have evolved and expanded, we continue to believe that Rosie’s Place’s physical space sets the stage to best serve our guests. Whether it is a relaxing chair to sit in while waiting for an advocate, a comfortable room to sleep in for the night or eating off real dishes in our dining room, each space at Rosie’s Place is set up to serve our guests in the most respectful and dignified way imaginable.
 
Rosie's Place's programs are successful because we are well-known in the community and located in an area of tremendous need. Our proximity to numerous subsidized housing projects, the neighborhoods of Roxbury and Dorchester, and Boston University Medical Center makes it accessible for our guests to take advantage of our many services.
 
Rosie’s Place’s ability to provide services in its own unique way relies on the fact that we only accept private donations. We do not receive any support from the city, state, or federal governments, nor from the United Way. Rosie’s Place will continue to endure and evolve because of our strong leadership, our committed and compassionate staff and our thousands of generous volunteers and supporters.

4. How will your organization know if you are making progress?

Because we recognize that program evaluation is critical to meeting the varied needs of our guests—all of the programs at Rosie’s Place are tracked quarterly and evaluated annually. The program goals and metrics are approved by the President and the Rosie’s Place Board of Directors. All program managers produce reports on their progress on a quarterly basis. The use of metrics allows program managers to report as specifically as possible on their progress. Each program manager also develops a logic model to describe the program’s long-term goals. The logic model provides an opportunity to assess the program within the larger context of the surrounding community, government policies, and needs of the people being served. A committee of the Board of Directors reviews each logic model and makes suggestions for improvements or changes accordingly.

5. What have and haven’t you accomplished so far?

Every day, 365 days-a-year, Rosie’s Place put the words of our mission into action, offering “a safe and secure environment for poor and homeless women to maintain their dignity, seek opportunity and find security in their lives.” While we have accomplished much and helped many since 1974, we know our work will continue as long as there are poor and homeless women needing the unconditional help and hope Rosie’s Place can give them.